Wordaholics

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01012012022020150731 (BBC7)
20150801 (BBC7)
20150726 (R4)

Wordaholics is Radio 4's brand new comedy panel game all about words.

Gyles Brandreth presides as linguistic brainboxes and comedians including the legendary Stephen Fry, Fresh Meat star Jack Whitehall, Radio 4 regular Milton Jones and Countdown stalwart Susie Dent vie for supremacy in the ring.

Gyles is the longest-serving wordsmith in Countdown's Dictionary Corner and the author of numerous wordplay books. But now it's time for him to encourage other people to show off their knowledge of words and playfulness with language.

Wordaholics is clever, intelligent, witty and unexpected. There are toponyms, abbreviations, euphemisms, old words, new words, cockney rhyming slang, Greek gobbledegook, plus the panellists' picks of the ugliest and the most beautiful words: the whole world of words in twenty-eight minutes.

Find out the meaning of words like giff-gaff, knock-knobbler and buckfitches - the difference between French marbles, French velvet and the French ache - hear the glorious poetry of the English language, as practiced from writers varying from William Shakespeare to Vanilla Ice - and spend half an hour laughing and learning with some of the finest Wordaholics in the business.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle

Producer: Claire Jones

Comedy panel game hosted by Gyles Brandreth. With guests Stephen Fry and Milton Jones.

New comedy panel game hosted by Gyles Brandreth. With guests Stephen Fry and Milton Jones

01022012022720150807 (BBC7)
20150808 (BBC7)
20150802 (R4)

Wordaholics is Radio 4's brand new comedy panel game all about words.

Gyles Brandreth presides as linguistic brainboxes and comedians including the legendary Stephen Fry, Fresh Meat star Jack Whitehall, Radio 4 regular Milton Jones and Countdown stalwart Susie Dent vie for supremacy in the ring.

This week linguistic brainbox Natalie Haynes and poet Michael Rosen vie for wordy supremacy with comedians Arthur Smith and Paul Sinha.

Gyles is the longest-serving wordsmith in Countdown's Dictionary Corner and the author of numerous wordplay books. But now it's time for him to encourage other people to show off their knowledge of words and playfulness with language.

Wordaholics is clever, intelligent, witty and unexpected. There are toponyms, abbreviations, euphemisms, old words, new words, cockney rhyming slang, Greek gobbledegook, plus the panellists' picks of the ugliest and the most beautiful words: the whole world of words in twenty-eight minutes.

Find out the meaning of words like giff-gaff, knock-knobbler and buckfitches - the difference between French marbles, French velvet and the French ache - hear the glorious poetry of the English language, as practiced from writers varying from William Shakespeare to Vanilla Ice - and spend half an hour laughing and learning with some of the finest Wordaholics in the business.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle

Producer: Claire Jones.

Natalie Haynes, Michael Rosen, Arthur Smith and Paul Sinha vie for wordy supremacy.

01032012030520150814 (BBC7)
20150815 (BBC7)
20150809 (R4)

With panellists Susie Dent, Natalie Haynes, Milton Jones and Jack Whitehall.

Wordaholics is Radio 4's brand new comedy panel game all about words.

Gyles Brandreth presides as linguistic brainboxes and comedians vie for supremacy in the ring.

Today's show features Fresh Meat star Jack Whitehall, Radio 4 regular Milton Jones and Countdown stalwart Susie Dent as well as Greek scholar and all-round clever clogs Natalie Haynes.

Today they reveal their least favourite words, attempt to decipher Cockney rhyming slang and try to guess the meaning of some words no longer in our common parlance, taken from the 1736 Dictionary of Canting Slang.

Gyles is the longest-serving wordsmith in Countdown's Dictionary Corner and the author of numerous wordplay books. But now it's time for him to encourage other people to show off their knowledge of words and playfulness with language.

Wordaholics is clever, intelligent, witty and unexpected. There are toponyms, abbreviations, euphemisms, old words, new words, cockney rhyming slang, Greek gobbledegook, plus the panellists' picks of the ugliest and the most beautiful words: the whole world of words in twenty-eight minutes.

Find out the meaning of words like giff-gaff, knock-knobbler and buckfitches - the difference between French marbles, French velvet and the French ache - hear the glorious poetry of the English language, as practiced from writers varying from William Shakespeare to Vanilla Ice - and spend half an hour laughing and learning with some of the finest Wordaholics in the business.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle

Producer: Claire Jones.

01042012031220150821 (BBC7)
20150822 (BBC7)
20150816 (R4)

With panellists Michael Rosen, Arthur Smith, Paul Sinha and Natalie Haynes.

Wordaholics is Radio 4's brand new comedy panel game all about words.

Gyles Brandreth presides as linguistic brainboxes and comedians including the legendary Stephen Fry, Fresh Meat star Jack Whitehall, Radio 4 regular Milton Jones and Countdown stalwart Susie Dent vie for supremacy in the ring.

This week linguistic brainbox Natalie Haynes and poet Michael Rosen vie for wordy supremacy with comedians Arthur Smith and Paul Sinha.

Today the panel unravel the meanings of Cockney rhyming slang, attempt to reduce some long pieces of prose and poetry to the length of a tweet and try to guess the meanings of some words no longer in common parlance, taken from this week's guest dictionary compiled by Dr Samuel Johnson.

Gyles is the longest-serving wordsmith in Countdown's Dictionary Corner and the author of numerous wordplay books. But now it's time for him to encourage other people to show off their knowledge of words and playfulness with language.

Wordaholics is clever, intelligent, witty and unexpected. There are toponyms, abbreviations, euphemisms, old words, new words, cockney rhyming slang, Greek gobbledegook, plus the panellists' picks of the ugliest and the most beautiful words: the whole world of words in twenty-eight minutes.

Find out the meaning of words like giff-gaff, knock-knobbler and buckfitches - the difference between French marbles, French velvet and the French ache - hear the glorious poetry of the English language, as practiced from writers varying from William Shakespeare to Vanilla Ice - and spend half an hour laughing and learning with some of the finest Wordaholics in the business.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle

Producer: Claire Jones.

01052012031920150828 (BBC7)
20150829 (BBC7)
20150823 (R4)

With panellists Jack Whitehall, Milton Jones, Natalie Haynes and Susie Dent.

Gyles Brandreth hosts a comedy panel show in which guests are challenged to display their knowledge of words and language. In this edition he is joined by Jack Whitehall, Milton Jones, Natalie Haynes and Countdown's Susie Dent.

This week's letter of the week is P which really packs a punch.

We learn why Susie Dent's favourite word is 'blurb', we find out what a Chicago Piano was and we listen as Jack Whitehall struggles to reduce to a tweet a particularly fruity passage from his father's autobiography.

Writers: James Kettle and Jon Hunter.

Producer: Claire Jones.

0106 LAST2012032620150904 (BBC7)
20150905 (BBC7)
20150830 (R4)

Gyles Brandreth hosts a comedy panel show in which guests are challenged to display their knowledge of words and language. In this edition he is joined by Jack Whitehall, Milton Jones, Natalie Haynes and Countdown's Susie Dent.

This week's letter of the week is P which really packs a punch.

We learn why Susie Dent's favourite word is 'blurb', we find out what a Chicago Piano was and we listen as Jack Whitehall struggles to reduce to a tweet a particularly fruity passage from his father's autobiography.

Writers: James Kettle and Jon Hunter.

Producer: Claire Jones.

With Richard Herring, Alex Horne and Jenny Eclair. Plus special guest: the letter F.

02012013040320160226 (BBC7)
20160221 (R4)

Radio 4's word-obsessed comedy panel game returns for a new series - with stars from across the world of wordplay coming together to score points off each other, under the well-read eye of chairman Gyles Brandreth.

This week's panellists are comedians Milton Jones and Alun Cochrane, Dictionary Corner's Susie Dent and Front Row critic Natalie Haynes.

On today's show Milton Jones coins his own new fear - the fear of becoming a monk: 'cloisterphobia'; Alun Cochrane's Yorkshire roots help him guess the meaning of the Polish word 'prozvonit';Susie Dent explains the origin of the phrase 'gingering up' and Natalie Haynes tries to ban the word 'guesstimate'.

Other panellists appearing in the series include Lloyd Langford, Dave Gorman, Richard Herring, Katy Brand, Robin Ince and Alex Horne - plus there's a very special guest appearance from Ainsley Harriott.

They'll be asked to guess the meanings of now-obsolete words, invent their own cliches and cockney rhyming slang, discuss their own favourite words and phrases - and suggest words they would like to ban.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle.

Producer: Claire Jones.

Return of the word-obsessed panel game. Milton Jones and Susie Dent join Gyles Brandreth.

02022013041020160304 (BBC7)
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20160228 (R4)

Katy Brand and Alex Horne compete against Richard Herring and Natalie Haynes.

Gyles Brandreth presides over the comedy panel game where Katy Brand and Alex Horne compete against Richard Herring and Natalie Haynes to find out who knows more about words.

This week Katy Brand reveals an unexpected love of Proverbs in the Old Testament and takes a guess at what 'cougar juice' meant at the turn of the 20th century; Richard Herring explains why his favourite West County word from his schooldays is 'wasp'; Natalie Haynes guesses the meaning of the German word 'zechpreller' which has no direct translation in English, and Alex Horne coins his very own onomatopoeia to describe a snowflake landing on a bubble.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle

Producer: Claire Jones.

02032013042420160311 (BBC7)
20160312 (BBC7)
20160306 (R4)

Lloyd Langford, Susie Dent, Dave Gorman and Natalie Haynes compete in the wordy comedy game.

Gyles Brandreth chairs the word-obsessed comedy panel. Lloyd Langford and Susie Dent, compete against Dave Gorman and Natalie Haynes to find out who has the most word know-how.

This week Dave Gorman guesses the meaning of the phrase 'living on Queen Street' from the late 1800s; Natalie Haynes unravels the word 'autodysomophobia'; Lloyd Langford guesses the meaning of the Yiddish word 'farpotshket'; and Susie Dent shares her love of the current Liverpool word 'twirlies' and explains the meaning of the word 'quockerwodger'.

Both teams also have a go at coming up with modern phrases to replace the old cliches 'When life give you lemons, make lemonade' and 'Beauty is only skin deep'.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle.

Producer: Claire Jones.

Gyles Brandreth chairs the word-obsessed comedy panel game where this week Katy Brand and Alex Horne compete with Richard Herring and Natalie Haynes for wordy supremacy.

This week Richard Herring decides to reclaim the word 'middle class' and tries to decipher the 16th century phrase 'a mare's nest'; Natalie Haynes tries to get rid of the word 'decimate' and despite being a vegetarian works out what the very meaty cookery term 'barding' means; Alex Horne comes up with the correct definition for the Victorian phrase 'a scraping castle' and asks to take the word 'a' out of the dictionary. Meanwhile Katy Brand takes a guess at what the unit of measurement 'the Warhol' is and reveals that her favourite word is 'plop'.

020420130501

02042013050120160313 (R4)

Gyles Brandreth chairs the word-obsessed comedy panel game where this week Katy Brand & Alex Horne compete with Richard Herring & Natalie Haynes for wordy supremacy.

This week Richard Herring decides to reclaim the word 'middle class' and tries to decipher the 16th century phrase 'a mare's nest'; Natalie Haynes tries to get rid of the word 'decimate' and despite being a vegetarian works out what the very meaty cookery term 'barding' means; Alex Horne comes up with the correct definition for the Victorian phrase 'a scraping castle' and asks to take the word 'a' out of the dictionary. Meanwhile Katy Brand takes a guess at what the unit of measurement 'the Warhol' is and reveals that her favourite word is 'plop'.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle.

Producer: Claire Jones.

02042013050120160318 (BBC7)
20160319 (BBC7)
20160313 (R4)

Katy Brand, Alex Horne, Richard Herring and Natalie Haynes compete in the wordy panel game

Gyles Brandreth chairs the word-obsessed comedy panel game where this week Katy Brand and Alex Horne compete with Richard Herring and Natalie Haynes for wordy supremacy.

This week Richard Herring decides to reclaim the word 'middle class' and tries to decipher the 16th century phrase 'a mare's nest'; Natalie Haynes tries to get rid of the word 'decimate' and despite being a vegetarian works out what the very meaty cookery term 'barding' means; Alex Horne comes up with the correct definition for the Victorian phrase 'a scraping castle' and asks to take the word 'a' out of the dictionary. Meanwhile Katy Brand takes a guess at what the unit of measurement 'the Warhol' is and reveals that her favourite word is 'plop'.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle.

Producer: Claire Jones.

02052013050820160320 (R4)

Gyles Brandreth chairs the comedy panel game where this week Milton Jones and Robin Ince compete against Natalie Haynes and Lloyd Langford to find out who is the most passionate and knowledgeable about words.

Today the Letter of the Week is 'W'. Lloyd Langford hazards a guess as to what 'Welsh cricket' is while Natalie Haynes has to work out what 'Whistling breeches' are.

In a round about Australian slang Robin Ince tries to guess the meaning of 'guttergripper' while Milton Jones takes a stab at 'shypoo'.

All the panellists come up with some brilliant new toponyms and also reveal their pet-hate words.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle

Producer: Claire Jones.

02062013051520160327 (R4)

Gyles Brandreth presides over the comedy panel game where, this week, Susie Dent and Lloyd Langford compete against Dave Gorman and Natalie Haynes to find out which team is the most passionate and knowledgeable about words.

This week Susie Dent reveals two of her favourite now-defunct words from Samuel Johnson's Dictionary are 'pandiculation' (to stretch while yawning) and 'snirtle' (to laugh in a quiet and restrained manner); Dave Gorman comes up with a new cliche to replace 'Curiosity Killed the Cat'; Natalie Haynes tells us what the Cockney rhyming slang 'a Basil' refers to and Lloyd Langford is asked the meaning of 'dumpoke' from the 1903 dictionary, 'Hobson Jobson - A Glossary of Anglo Indian Colloquial Words and Phrases' (a book which Susie Dent claims is 'a very good read').

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle

Producer: Claire Jones.

020620130515

0206 LAST20130515

Gyles Brandreth presides over the comedy panel game where, this week, Susie Dent and Lloyd Langford compete against Dave Gorman and Natalie Haynes to find out which team is the most passionate and knowledgeable about words.

This week Susie Dent reveals two of her favourite now-defunct words from Samuel Johnson's Dictionary are 'pandiculation' (to stretch while yawning) and 'snirtle' (to laugh in a quiet and restrained manner); Dave Gorman comes up with a new cliche to replace 'Curiosity Killed the Cat'; Natalie Haynes tells us what the Cockney rhyming slang 'a Basil' refers to and Lloyd Langford is asked the meaning of 'dumpoke' from the 1903 dictionary, 'Hobson Jobson - A Glossary of Anglo Indian Colloquial Words and Phrases' (a book which Susie Dent claims is 'a very good read').

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle

Producer: Claire Jones

030120140903

The return of the work-obsessed panel game.

Comedians Lloyd Langford, Holly Walsh, Paul Sinha and Natalie Haynes join Gyles Brandreth for the panel game about words that will make you laugh your socks off.

On this week's show Lloyd Langford delicately tells us whey avocados are called avocados; Natalie Haynes explains what the modern term astroturfing is; Paul Sinha unlocks the meaning of the German word handschuhsanbalwerfer and Holly Walsh shares her favourite example of prison slang.

The panel also suggest words that don't yet exist, but should. What could they mean by 'a Clarkson', 'messcalation', 'trage' and 'appointmentia'?

Writers: Jon Holmes and James Kettle.

Producer: Claire Jones

030220140910

Comedians Josh Widdecombe and Helen Keen, Dictionary Corner's Susie Dent and classics scholar Natalie Haynes vie for wordy supremacy under the watchful eye of chair Gyles Brandreth.

Lexicographer Susie Dent admits to the words she finds most difficult to spell; science lover Helen Keen grumpily dismantles the portmanteau word 'murse'; Natalie Haynes works out what 'kyacting' is, and does some to boot; while Josh Widdecombe tries to ban the word 'chillax'.

The panel also guess what some foreign words which have no direct equivalent in English: the Caribbean Spanish word 'cotisuelto; the Welsh phrase 'glas wen'; the German word 'Kummerspeck' and the Central American Spanish word 'achaplinarse'.

Finally they unearth some archaic phrases from the 1870s: 'gigglemug', 'Jeremiah-mongering', 'back row hopper' and 'robbing the barber'.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle.

Producer: Claire Jones

030320140917

Radio 4's word-obsessed comedy panel game - with stars from across the world of wordplay coming together to score points off each other, under the well-read eye of chairman Gyles Brandreth

Today's panellists are Irish comedian Ed Byrne, Tasmanian stand up and art expert Hannah Gadsby, punmaster general Milton Jones and classics boffin Natalie Haynes.

Today's Letter of the week is 'N'. Ed Byrne explains what the phrase 'nuking the fridge' means and Hannah Gadsby deduces what the Sicilian phrase 'go to Naples' means.

In a round about derogatory terms Natalie Haynes is asked what a 'fishbagger' was in the late nineteenth century and Milton Jones is asked what the American term 'ballclankers' from the 1960s might have meant.

The panellists also attempt to ban their least favourite words including 'blog', 'Christmas', 'fablet' and 'simples'.

And finally they try to unearth the meaning of some words found in a dictionary of thieves' slang from 1673.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle.

Producer: Claire Jones

030420140924

Radio 4's word-obsessed comedy panel game - with stars from across the world of wordplay coming together to score points off each other, under the well-read eye of chairman Gyles Brandreth.

Former linguistics student Josh Widdicombe tells us about his favourite West Country words, lexicographer Susie Dent predicts some of the new words that might enter the dictionary this year and astronomy enthusiast Helen Keen reveals her favourite words from the language of outer space.

The letter of the week is 'L'. Josh has to guess what the World War 2 slang term 'latrinogram' meant; Natalie Haynes explains the American expression 'log-rolling'; Susie Dent gets full marks for explaining where the phrase 'limbo dancing' comes from and in a Germanic twist Helen Keen is asked under what circumstances you would act like a 'liver sausage'.

The panellists are asked to invent new words or phrases. Their new offerings include 'Antandecophobia'; 'smellationship'; the 'Josh number' and 'agony hooves'.

In a round about derogatory terms for different occupations Natalie has to guess what a 'nutbuster' is; Susie a 'needle-dodger'; Helen a 'knob thatcher' and Josh a 'honey-dipper'.

They then coin their own terms of abuse including bikopaths, fobslotch, nerds of prey and chattypedia.

Finally the panellists are asked what four Victorian slang terms meant: widdling, muffin-worry, lully-prigger and hock-dockies.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle.

Producer: Claire Jones

030520141001

Stand up comedians Lloyd Langford, Holly Walsh and Paul Sinha and novelist and classicist Natalie Haynes join chair Gyles Brandreth for the panel game for word fans.

Today's Letter of the week is the sinuous letter 'S'. Lloyd Langford has to work out what the Victorian term 'Smothering a parrot' meant. Natalie Haynes works out what a 'Saint Giles Carpet' was. Holly Walsh works out what she'd be doing in the 1700s if she were to ride on 'Shank's mare'. And Paul Sinha works out what a 'spermologer' is.

In a round about portmanteau words Natalie is asked what a 'chork' is; Holly a 'geep'; Paul 'smirting' and Lloyd a 'flexitarian'.

Next the panellists are asked to guess the meaning of some foreign words which have no direct equivalent in English. Lloyd tries to guess the meaning of the Central American word 'chaquetero' and Holly works out what the Chilean phrase 'pagar el piso' means.

The panel then try and ban the words which drive them most mad including 'foodie' and 'chillax'.

Finally they try and decipher what the long-forgotten words from the early 1600s are: 'mulct','matrixe', 'pistated' and 'obnubilate'.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle.

Producer: Claire Jones

0306 LAST20141008

Radio 4's word-obsessed comedy panel game - with stars from across the world of wordplay coming together to score points off each other, under the well-read eye of chairman Gyles Brandreth.

Today's panellists are Irish comedian Ed Byrne, Tasmanian stand up and art expert Hannah Gadsby, punmaster general Milton Jones and classics boffin Natalie Haynes.

Today's Letter of the week is 'Z'. Ed Byrne is asked what a 'Zigger-Zagger' is; Natalie 'a Zombie Title'; Hannah is asked about the German expression 'zugzwang', and Milton is as what he thinks a 'zafty' might be.

Also on the show the panellists are asked to coin their own topynyms. Tune in to find out what Natalie meant by Hackney and Alaska. And what did Milton imagine you'd find in Antandectwerp?

In a round called 'Eat It Or Not' the panel have to guess whether the foreign words hurled at them by Gyles are edible or not.

They then get a chance to add their own new word to the dictionary. Milton's is 'parashambles'; Hannah's is 'shelve'; Natalie's is 'fraudience' and Ed's is 'cheerbleeders'. But what are their definitions?

Finally the panellists are asked to delve into 'A Dictionary of Americanisms' from 1848. The phrases they are asked to muse on are: 'a hurra's nest'; a 'talking iron'; 'wamble-cropped' and 'shooting your grandmother'.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle.

Producer: Claire Jones