Who Sold The Soul?

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01Rhythm & Business20131008

Alvin Hall examines the struggle of African Americans in the music industry.

01Rhythm & Business20131008

Jazz, Blues, Rhythm and Blues, Rock 'n' Roll, Soul, Funk and Hip-Hop; there's no question African American musical creativity has fuelled the modern music industry. But faced with racism and cultural theft for decades, African-American musicians, DJs, businessmen and women have struggled to have any real control or ownership in the business. Even though millionaire music moguls like P Diddy and 50 Cent today give the impression blacks have real industry power, aren't they just a few very visible exceptions? Exceptions whose companies are actually distributed by white-owned conglomerates? In this three part series financial educator, broadcaster and music obsessive Alvin Hall examines the political economy of African American music, from jazz to Jay Z.

Our series begins with Alvin travelling back to the turn of the 20th century. Just 50 years after the American Civil War, the emerging jazz and blues music was gaining popularity but blacks were still very much second class citizens. America was segregated, Jim Crow laws were in full effect and lynching was prevalent. The nascent recording industry was simply a reflection of America at that time. Alvin examines the early history of blacks in the recording industry in blues, jazz, rhythm and blues and rock 'n' roll. From the first black-owned record label to white record companies re-recording black music it seems that blacks created new music while whites exploited it. But was there more than racism at work? Did middle class blacks ignore the music of working-class blacks, allowing whites to take control?

01Rhythm & Business2013100820131113

Jazz, Blues, Rhythm and Blues, Rock 'n' Roll, Soul, Funk and Hip-Hop; there's no question African American musical creativity has fuelled the modern music industry. But faced with racism and cultural theft for decades, African-American musicians, DJs, businessmen and women have struggled to have any real control or ownership in the business. Even though millionaire music moguls like P Diddy and 50 Cent today give the impression blacks have real industry power, aren't they just a few very visible exceptions? Exceptions whose companies are actually distributed by white-owned conglomerates? In this three part series financial educator, broadcaster and music obsessive Alvin Hall examines the political economy of African American music, from jazz to Jay Z.

Our series begins with Alvin travelling back to the turn of the 20th century. Just 50 years after the American Civil War, the emerging jazz and blues music was gaining popularity but blacks were still very much second class citizens. America was segregated, Jim Crow laws were in full effect and lynching was prevalent. The nascent recording industry was simply a reflection of America at that time. Alvin examines the early history of blacks in the recording industry in blues, jazz, rhythm and blues and rock 'n' roll. From the first black-owned record label to white record companies re-recording black music it seems that blacks created new music while whites exploited it. But was there more than racism at work? Did middle class blacks ignore the music of working-class blacks, allowing whites to take control?

01Rhythm & Business2013100820131113

Jazz, Blues, Rhythm and Blues, Rock 'n' Roll, Soul, Funk and Hip-Hop; there's no question African American musical creativity has fuelled the modern music industry. But faced with racism and cultural theft for decades, African-American musicians, DJs, businessmen and women have struggled to have any real control or ownership in the business. Even though millionaire music moguls like P Diddy and 50 Cent today give the impression blacks have real industry power, aren't they just a few very visible exceptions? Exceptions whose companies are actually distributed by white-owned conglomerates? In this three part series financial educator, broadcaster and music obsessive Alvin Hall examines the political economy of African American music, from jazz to Jay Z.

Our series begins with Alvin travelling back to the turn of the 20th century. Just 50 years after the American Civil War, the emerging jazz and blues music was gaining popularity but blacks were still very much second class citizens. America was segregated, Jim Crow laws were in full effect and lynching was prevalent. The nascent recording industry was simply a reflection of America at that time. Alvin examines the early history of blacks in the recording industry in blues, jazz, rhythm and blues and rock 'n' roll. From the first black-owned record label to white record companies re-recording black music it seems that blacks created new music while whites exploited it. But was there more than racism at work? Did middle class blacks ignore the music of working-class blacks, allowing whites to take control?

Alvin Hall examines the struggle of African Americans in the music industry.

022013101520131114

Alvin Hall looks at the 1960s and 70s, a period of social development for black people.

022013101520131114

Jazz, Blues, Rhythm and Blues, Rock 'n' Roll, Soul, Funk and Hip-Hop; there's no question African American musical creativity has fuelled the modern music industry. But faced with racism and cultural theft for decades, African-American musicians, DJs, businessmen and women have struggled to have any real control or ownership in the business. In this three part series financial educator, broadcaster and music obsessive Alvin Hall examines the political economy of African American music, from jazz to Jay Z.

In this second episode, Alvin looks at the 1960s and 70s. Soul music wasn't just the soundtrack and fashion to a turbulent and eventful period in the civil rights movement. It defined a specific period of social development for black people. Motown became the sound of young America with the first, commercially successful black-owned record label. James Brown preached his black capitalist message through his self-titled Soul Power. And CBS Records commissioned the Harvard Business School to investigate the profitability of black music. A report that would change industry thinking forever.

022013101520131114

Jazz, Blues, Rhythm and Blues, Rock 'n' Roll, Soul, Funk and Hip-Hop; there's no question African American musical creativity has fuelled the modern music industry. But faced with racism and cultural theft for decades, African-American musicians, DJs, businessmen and women have struggled to have any real control or ownership in the business. In this three part series financial educator, broadcaster and music obsessive Alvin Hall examines the political economy of African American music, from jazz to Jay Z.

In this second episode, Alvin looks at the 1960s and 70s. Soul music wasn't just the soundtrack and fashion to a turbulent and eventful period in the civil rights movement. It defined a specific period of social development for black people. Motown became the sound of young America with the first, commercially successful black-owned record label. James Brown preached his black capitalist message through his self-titled Soul Power. And CBS Records commissioned the Harvard Business School to investigate the profitability of black music. A report that would change industry thinking forever.

02Soul Power20131015

Alvin Hall looks at the 1960s and 70s, a period of social development for black people.

02Soul Power20131015

Alvin Hall looks at the 1960s and 70s, a period of social development for black people.

02Soul Power20131015

Jazz, Blues, Rhythm and Blues, Rock 'n' Roll, Soul, Funk and Hip-Hop; there's no question African American musical creativity has fuelled the modern music industry. But faced with racism and cultural theft for decades, African-American musicians, DJs, businessmen and women have struggled to have any real control or ownership in the business. In this three part series financial educator, broadcaster and music obsessive Alvin Hall examines the political economy of African American music, from jazz to Jay Z.

In this second episode, Alvin looks at the 1960s and 70s. Soul music wasn't just the soundtrack and fashion to a turbulent and eventful period in the civil rights movement. It defined a specific period of social development for black people. Motown became the sound of young America with the first, commercially successful black-owned record label. James Brown preached his black capitalist message through his self-titled Soul Power. And CBS Records commissioned the Harvard Business School to investigate the profitability of black music. A report that would change industry thinking forever.

02Soul Power2013101520131114

Jazz, Blues, Rhythm and Blues, Rock 'n' Roll, Soul, Funk and Hip-Hop; there's no question African American musical creativity has fuelled the modern music industry. But faced with racism and cultural theft for decades, African-American musicians, DJs, businessmen and women have struggled to have any real control or ownership in the business. In this three part series financial educator, broadcaster and music obsessive Alvin Hall examines the political economy of African American music, from jazz to Jay Z.

In this second episode, Alvin looks at the 1960s and 70s. Soul music wasn't just the soundtrack and fashion to a turbulent and eventful period in the civil rights movement. It defined a specific period of social development for black people. Motown became the sound of young America with the first, commercially successful black-owned record label. James Brown preached his black capitalist message through his self-titled Soul Power. And CBS Records commissioned the Harvard Business School to investigate the profitability of black music. A report that would change industry thinking forever.

Alvin Hall looks at the 1960s and 70s, a period of social development for black people.

03 LASTEmpire State of Mind20131022

Alvin Hall looks at the 1980s and beyond, concluding with the rise of hip-hop.

03 LASTEmpire State Of Mind20131022

Alvin Hall looks at the 1980s and beyond, concluding with the rise of hip-hop.

03 LASTEmpire State of Mind20131022

Jazz, Blues, Rhythm and Blues, Rock 'n' Roll, Soul, Funk and Hip-Hop; there's no question African American musical creativity has fuelled the modern music industry. But faced with racism and cultural theft for decades, African-American musicians, DJs, businessmen and women have struggled to have any real control or ownership in the business. In this three part series financial educator, broadcaster and music obsessive Alvin Hall examines the political economy of African American music, from jazz to Jay Z.

In this final part, Alvin looks at the 1980s and beyond. Beginning with the black pop of Michael Jackson, Prince and Whitney Houston the series concludes with the rise of hip-hop, today American's most dominant form of popular music. Many people suggest that rap's rise to the top demonstrates African Americans now exert real power in the music industry. But is that really the case?

Contributors include writer Kevin Powell, Jay Z's former business partner Damon Dash and rapper and activist KRS-One.

03 LASTEmpire State of Mind2013102220131115

Alvin Hall looks at the 1980s and beyond, concluding with the rise of hip-hop.

03 LASTEmpire State of Mind2013102220131115

Jazz, Blues, Rhythm and Blues, Rock 'n' Roll, Soul, Funk and Hip-Hop; there's no question African American musical creativity has fuelled the modern music industry. But faced with racism and cultural theft for decades, African-American musicians, DJs, businessmen and women have struggled to have any real control or ownership in the business. In this three part series financial educator, broadcaster and music obsessive Alvin Hall examines the political economy of African American music, from jazz to Jay Z.

In this final part, Alvin looks at the 1980s and beyond. Beginning with the black pop of Michael Jackson, Prince and Whitney Houston the series concludes with the rise of hip-hop, today American's most dominant form of popular music. Many people suggest that rap's rise to the top demonstrates African Americans now exert real power in the music industry. But is that really the case?

Contributors include writer Kevin Powell, Jay Z's former business partner Damon Dash and rapper and activist KRS-One.

03 LASTEmpire State Of Mind2013102220131115

Jazz, Blues, Rhythm and Blues, Rock 'n' Roll, Soul, Funk and Hip-Hop; there's no question African American musical creativity has fuelled the modern music industry. But faced with racism and cultural theft for decades, African-American musicians, DJs, businessmen and women have struggled to have any real control or ownership in the business. In this three part series financial educator, broadcaster and music obsessive Alvin Hall examines the political economy of African American music, from jazz to Jay Z.

In this final part, Alvin looks at the 1980s and beyond. Beginning with the black pop of Michael Jackson, Prince and Whitney Houston the series concludes with the rise of hip-hop, today American's most dominant form of popular music. Many people suggest that rap's rise to the top demonstrates African Americans now exert real power in the music industry. But is that really the case?

Contributors include writer Kevin Powell, Jay Z's former business partner Damon Dash and rapper and activist KRS-One.

03 LASTEmpire State Of Mind2013102220131115

Jazz, Blues, Rhythm and Blues, Rock 'n' Roll, Soul, Funk and Hip-Hop; there's no question African American musical creativity has fuelled the modern music industry. But faced with racism and cultural theft for decades, African-American musicians, DJs, businessmen and women have struggled to have any real control or ownership in the business. In this three part series financial educator, broadcaster and music obsessive Alvin Hall examines the political economy of African American music, from jazz to Jay Z.

In this final part, Alvin looks at the 1980s and beyond. Beginning with the black pop of Michael Jackson, Prince and Whitney Houston the series concludes with the rise of hip-hop, today American's most dominant form of popular music. Many people suggest that rap's rise to the top demonstrates African Americans now exert real power in the music industry. But is that really the case?

Contributors include writer Kevin Powell, Jay Z's former business partner Damon Dash and rapper and activist KRS-One.

Alvin Hall looks at the 1980s and beyond, concluding with the rise of hip-hop.