Seven More Days That Rocked The World

Stuart Maconie presents a series highlighting some of the most influential days in the history of rock.

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Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
Electric Dylan20120925

Stuart Maconie examines how Bob Dylan shocked and thrilled the audience at the 1965 Newport Festival when he appeared on stage with a full electric band. Things would never be the same again as Dylan brought to pop a lyrical intensity it had not seen before. Repeated as part of BBC Radio 6 Music Celebrates Live Music.

0101Gi Elvis20010329

This first programme goes back to 1958 when Elvis Presley was at his peak, just before he was drafted into the army.

0102The Day The Music Died2001040520090116

In this edition, how the death of Buddy Holly in a plane crash at the age of 22 secured him a place in rock 'n' roll history, and was marked by Don McLean in his song `American Pie'.

With contributions from Cliff Richard, Hank Marvin, Phil Everly, Johnny Black and Keith Richards

0103The Isle Of Wight Festival2001041220070917 (6M)
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Stuart Maconie assesses the impact of the 1970 festival headlined by The Who and Jimi Hendrix. What promised to be three days of peace, love and music turned sour with sporadic fighting and political violence. With contributions from Murray Lerner, Trevor Dan and Johnny Black and repeated as part of BBC Radio 6 Music Celebrates Live Music.

Stuart Maconie assesses the impact of the 1970 festival headlined by The Who and Jimi Hendrix.

This third edition focuses on the Isle of Wight Festival in 1970.

What promised to be three days of peace, love and music turned sour with sporadic fighting and political violence.

With contributions from Murray Lerner, Trevor Dan and Johnny Black.

Stuart Maconie assesses the impact of the festival headlined by The Who and Jimi Hendrix.

0104The End Of Pirate Radio2001041920070906 (6M)
20090915 (6M)

On August 14 1967, the Marine Offences Bill became law, spelling the end for ground-breaking pirate stations such as Radio Caroline and Radio London.

But within months, most of the star DJs were ensconced at the BBC's fledgling Radio 1.

0105Tubular Bells2001042620070918 (6M)
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In May 1973, Mike Oldfield's strange album `Tubular Bells' was released and went on to become a surprise hit, helped by its appearance in `The Exorcist'.

With contributions from Mike Oldfield, Richard Branson and Mark Kermode

Stuart Maconie assesses the impact of Mike Oldfield's 1973 album, which helped launch Richard Branson's business empire.

Stuart Maconie assesses the impact of Mike Oldfield's 1973 album.

0106The Start Of Motown2001050320090917

In June 1960, Berry Gordy formed a small label named Tamla Motown which, within five years, was churning out an enormous number of hits.

With contributions from Berry Gordy, Smokey Robinson, Lionel Richie, the Temptations, Charles Shaar Murray and Andy Peebles

0107 LASTThe End Of The Beatles2001051020090918
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Seven Days That Rocked the World - The Beatles Split.

Stuart Maconie relieves that fateful day in 1970.

First broadcast in 2001.

Stuart Maconie relieves the fateful day in 1970 when the band split up.

Stuart Maconie looks back at the day when the The Beatles split up.

On 10 April 1970, Paul Mccartney issued a press release stating that he intended to leave the Beatles, devastating fans worldwide.

It was an acrimonious parting for the foursome, yet within weeks of the split all the former Beatles had begun their respective solo careers.

Stuart Maconie focuses on The Beatles' appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show in America, watched by a record audience of 73 million people.

With contributions from Mike Nesmith, Gary Valentine, Bernie Leadon, Dennis Locorriere, Ed Sullivan and Mojo journalist Johnny Black.

0201The Release Of Joe Meek's Telstar2004011420121123 (6M)

Stuart Maconie looks back at another momentous event in pop music, the release of Joe Meek's Telstar. An incredibly futuristic sounding pop single, it marked the launch of the Russian satellite (which, in itself, had rocked the western world). It pre-empted Kraftwerk, the Human League, Pet Shop Boys et al by decades and pointed a new way forward for pop. This documentary was first broadcast on Radio 2 in 2004.".

0202The Release Of Good Vibrations20040121
0203The Murder Of John Lennon20040128

Today, the murder of John Lennon

0205Elvis's 68 Comeback Special20040211

This edition spotlights Elvis's 68 Comeback Special.

0206The Birth Of Mtv20040218

In this edition, the birth of MTV 20 years ago.

0207 LASTWalk This Way20040225

This edition examines the release of Walk This Way.

0301The Death Of Kurt Cobain2007082320080416

Former Nirvana band mate Dave Grohl, Joe Elliott of Def Leppard and Perry Farrell from Jane's Addiction discover how Kurt Cobain's death in 1994 rocked the music world, and the impact that it had on his fans and on those around him.

0302Charles Manson: The Tate Murders20070830

An examination of Charles Manson and the Tate murders, and his relationship with music and connection with the Beach Boys.

A frustrated rock star, Manson was convicted of conspiracy to commit the murder of actress Sharon Tate and four of her friends, and of Leno Labianca and his wife.

He was notorious for using music to manipulate his followers and identifying supposedly hidden codes within songs.

0303The Dixie Chicks And That Bush Comment...20070906

Ten days before the 2003 invasion of Iraq, Natalie Maines, lead vocalist of the hugely successful country music trio the Dixie Chicks, was reported to have criticised US president George Bush while performing on stage at London's Shepherds Bush Empire.

No one could have predicted the response and backlash that followed.

We investigate how the music industry and political world responded to those events four years ago and discover how the highest selling female band in the world coped with such massive public attention.

0304The Release Of Rapper's Delight2007091320091127
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Stuart Maconie remembers the 1979 multi-platinum seller, Rapper's Delight.

The song Rapper's Delight by the Sugarhill Gang was a multi-platinum seller and massive radio hit in 1979 and is regarded to have kick-started the phenomenon of recorded hip-hop.

Despite having received considerable chart success, selling over 8 million copies worldwide and inspiring hits by the likes of Blondie and Queen, the music industry as a whole reacted contemptuously; insisting that rap was a short-lived trend, simply a whim or fad.

Stuart looks the ways the track inspired a generation; how three local New York rappers plucked from the relative obscurity of underground bloc parties contributed towards rap becoming the biggest selling and most popular genres in music today.

Stuart Maconie remembers the record that kick-started the hip-hop phenomenon.

Repeated following the recent death of Sylvia Robinson, founder of Sugar Hill Records.

Stuart Maconie looks back at the release of the classic hip hop record Rapper's Delight.

7 More Days That Rocked The World - The release of Rapper's Delight.

Presented by Stuart Maconie.

The track Rapper's Delight by the Sugarhill Gang was a multi-platinum seller and massive radio hit in 1979, and is regarded by many to have kick-started the phenomenon of recorded hip-hop.

0305Alan Freed: Payola Scandal2007092020080520
20091016 (6M)

Widely credited with coining the phrase 'rock and roll', American DJ Alan Freed became infamous in the 1950s for emceeing what is believed to be the first ever rock concert.

At his Moondog Coronation Ball, upwards of 20,000 fans crashed the gates, causing rock's first riot and the dance to be cancelled.

With his career blossoming, claims that he accepted payments from records companies in exchange for airplay (in what came to be known as the Payola scandal) meant he was blackballed within the business.

Despite claiming that the money was simply a token of gratitude which had not affected airplay, Freed pleaded guilty to two counts of commercial bribery and was fined $300.

Eventually fired from his job and with the realisation that his dream of returning to New York radio was just that, a dream, he turned to drink.

His career and personal life left in tatters Freed died a broken, penniless man in 1965 aged just 43.

0306The Sex Pistols Bring Anarchy To Manchester2007092720080320 (6M)
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Stuart Maconie looks back at the influential Sex Pistols gig in Manchester in June 1976.

Another chance to hear Stuart Maconie's assessment of the impact of the Sex Pistols' gig in Manchester in June 1976. Repeated as part of BBC Radio 6 Music Celebrates Live Music.

When the Sex Pistols took to the stage in Manchester's tiny Lesser Free Trade Hall on 4 June 1976, their performance arguably changed the world of music. Along with Woodstock and Live Aid, the gig has been acknowledged as one of the most influential live sets of all time, due to the power of the music and the effect that the show had on the handful of people who witnessed it.

For years the gig was shrouded in myth and legend, with literally thousands claiming that they were in attendance. It has since been found that just 35-40 people could have been present - but they included some who would go on to form some of the most iconic bands of the time, such as The Smiths, Buzzcocks, New Order, Joy Division and The Fall.

Another chance to hear Stuart Maconie's assessment of the impact of the Sex Pistols' gig in Manchester in June 1976. Repeated as part of BBC Radio 6 Music and BBC Four's Punk Britannia season.

The gig has been shrouded in myth and legend, with many claiming that they were in attendance. It has since been found that just 35-40 people could have been present - but they included some who would go on to form bands such as The Smiths, Buzzcocks, New Order, Joy Division and The Fall.

Another chance to hear Stuart Maconie's assessment of the impact of the Sex Pistols' gig in Manchester in June 1976.

When the Sex Pistols took to the stage in Manchester's tiny Lesser Free Trade Hall on 4 June 1976, their performance arguably changed the world of music.

Along with Woodstock and Live Aid, the gig has been acknowledged as one of the most influential live sets of all time, due to the power of the music and the effect that the show had on the handful of people who witnessed it.

For the last 30 years the gig has been shrouded in myth and legend, with literally thousands claiming that they were in attendance.

It has since been found that just 35-40 people could have been present - but they included some who would go on to form some of the most iconic bands of the time, such as The Smiths, Buzzcocks, New Order, Joy Division and The Fall.

Stuart Maconie assesses the impact of the Sex Pistols' gig in Manchester in June 1976.

For the last thirty years, the gig has been shrouded in myth and legend, with literally thousands claiming that they were in attendance.

Of the few who actually were, many went on to form some of the most iconic bands of the time, such as The Smiths, Buzzcocks, New Order, Joy Division and The Fall.

0307 LAST2007100420080417

The impact of the momentous day in rock when Ozzy Osbourne was reported to have bitten the head off a dove.

We examine what actually happened on that day and how this ghastly prank sealed Ozzy's madman persona from then onwards.