Poetic Justice

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
19981126

By Joe Hollins, read by Nigel Anthony. John's wife loved ornamental fish, and he himself enjoyed gardening, so when the water board wanted to tunnel under their new fishpond, he was understandably angry and just a little worried.

01Treadmill20120827

It may be surprising to discover that writing poetry is a popular activity among prisoners.

Prison is a place where men and women are forced to look into themselves, where they have the time and the solitude to reflect on their lives and the consequences of their actions. Often this introspection finds an outlet through poetry.

Each day this week, performance poet Mr Gee visits former prisoners, young people who are considered to be at risk of offending, and those currently held in custody.

In each episode, Mr Gee facilitates a poetry-writing workshop. Through the deeply personal discussions that take place during the creative process, and through the poetry produced, we discover moving and powerful accounts of how the participants have been affected by the wounds they have both sustained and inflicted on others.

The goal is to help the participants avoid trouble in the future, helping them understand the roots of their offending behaviour and hopefully reducing the number of potential victims.

Episode 1, Treadmill is recorded inside HMP Brixton, a busy South London prison for adult males. Prisoners write poems to their younger selves and to those who may be at risk entering the vicious circle of crime and incarceration.

Produced by Andrew Wilkie and Adam Fowler

A Prison Radio Association production for BBC Radio 4.

01Treadmill20120827

At HMP Brixton, prisoners write poems to their younger selves and to those at risk.

02Hope20120828

Women prisoners tell of the despair of imprisonment and the importance of family bonds.

02Hope20120828

It may be surprising to discover that writing poetry is a popular activity among prisoners.

Prison is a place where men and women are forced to look into themselves, where they have the time and the solitude to reflect on their lives and the consequences of their actions. Often this introspection finds an outlet through poetry.

Each day this week, performance poet Mr Gee visits former prisoners, young people who are considered to be at risk of offending, and those currently held in custody.

In each episode, Mr Gee facilitates a poetry-writing workshop. Through the deeply personal discussions that take place during the creative process, and through the poetry produced, we discover moving and powerful accounts of how the participants have been affected by the wounds they have both sustained and inflicted on others.

The goal is to help the participants avoid trouble in the future, helping them understand the roots of their offending behaviour and hopefully reducing the number of potential victims.

Episode 2: Hope

Recorded inside HMP Styal, a women's prison near Manchester, where Mr Gee hears about the despair of imprisonment and the importance of family bonds from a group of women who find reason to be optimistic about their time in prison.

Produced by Andrew Wilkie and Adam Fowler

A Prison Radio Association production for BBC Radio 4.

03Crosswords20120829

It may be surprising to discover that writing poetry is a popular activity among prisoners.

Prison is a place where men and women are forced to look into themselves, where they have the time and the solitude to reflect on their lives and the consequences of their actions. Often this introspection finds an outlet through poetry.

Each day this week, performance poet Mr Gee visits former prisoners, young people who are considered to be at risk of offending, and those currently held in custody.

In each episode, Mr Gee facilitates a poetry-writing workshop. Through the deeply personal discussions that take place during the creative process, and through the poetry produced, we discover moving and powerful accounts of how the participants have been affected by the wounds they have both sustained and inflicted on others.

The goal is to help the participants avoid trouble in the future, helping them understand the roots of their offending behaviour and hopefully reducing the number of potential victims.

Episode 3: Crossroads

Recorded inside HMP YOI Brinsford, a Young Offenders' establishment in the West Midlands. Mr Gee encourages a group of young men to listen to the advice of older men serving long term prison sentences, talking about the disastrous decisions they made as youngsters. He encourages the teenagers to write to their families and loved ones in poetry.

Produced by Andrew Wilkie and Adam Fowler

A Prison Radio Association production for BBC Radio 4.

At HMP YOI Brinsford, Mr Gee encourages teenagers to write to their loved ones in poetry.

04Reflection20120830

It may be surprising to discover that writing poetry is a popular activity among prisoners.

Prison is a place where men and women are forced to look into themselves, where they have the time and the solitude to reflect on their lives and the consequences of their actions. Often this introspection finds an outlet through poetry.

Each day this week, performance poet Mr Gee visits former prisoners, young people who are considered to be at risk of offending, and those currently held in custody.

In each episode, Mr Gee facilitates a poetry-writing workshop. Through the deeply personal discussions that take place during the creative process, and through the poetry produced, we discover moving and powerful accounts of how the participants have been affected by the wounds they have both sustained and inflicted on others.

The goal is to help the participants avoid trouble in the future, helping them understand the roots of their offending behaviour and hopefully reducing the number of potential victims.

Episode 4: Reflection

Recorded in Surrey with former prisoners. A remarkable group of people come together to pass on - in poetry - the result of many years of contemplation on events and decisions which led them in to trouble and out of it again.

Produced by Andrew Wilkie and Adam Fowler

A Prison Radio Association production for BBC Radio 4.

04Reflection20120830

Former prisoners pass on, in poetry, the result of many years of contemplation.

05 LAST20120831

Young people in Edinburgh at risk of offending give Mr Gee a tour of the local areas.

05 LAST20120831

It may be surprising to discover that writing poetry is a popular activity among prisoners.

Prison is a place where men and women are forced to look into themselves, where they have the time and the solitude to reflect on their lives and the consequences of their actions. Often this introspection finds an outlet through poetry.

Each day this week, performance poet Mr Gee visits former prisoners, young people who are considered to be at risk of offending, and those currently held in custody.

In each episode, Mr Gee facilitates a poetry-writing workshop. Through the deeply personal discussions that take place during the creative process, and through the poetry produced, we discover moving and powerful accounts of how the participants have been affected by the wounds they have both sustained and inflicted on others.

The goal is to help the participants avoid trouble in the future, helping them understand the roots of their offending behaviour and hopefully reducing the number of potential victims.

Episode 5: Boundaries

Featuring young people in Edinburgh at risk of offending, who give Mr Gee a tour of the local areas where allegiances provide both a sense of community and a source of rivalry and conflict.

Produced by Andrew Wilkie and Adam Fowler

A Prison Radio Association production for BBC Radio 4.

LS19991129

By Joe Hollins, read by Nigel Anthony. John's wife loved ornamental fish while he enjoyed gardening. So when the water board wanted to tunnel under their new fish pond, he was understandably angry and just a little worried.