More Or Less

show more detailshow less detail

Episodes

TitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
2012011320120114
20120120

TBC

20120127

Tim Harford explains - and sometimes debunks - the numbers and statistics used in political debate, the news and everyday life.

Tim Harford explains - and sometimes debunks - the numbers and statistics used in polit.

2012020320120204

Tim Harford explains - and sometimes debunks - the numbers and statistics used in polit.

Tim Harford explains - and sometimes debunks - the numbers and statistics used in political debate, the news and everyday life.

2012032320120325

Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics in the news and in life.

2012032320120324
20120331
20120407

Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics in the news and in life.

2012041420120415 (WS)

Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics in the news and in life.

20120421

Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics in the news and in life.

20120428
2012051920120520
20120616
2012062320120624
2012063020120701
2012070720120708
20120922
2012092920120930 (WS)

Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics in the news and in life.

20121006
20121013
2012102020121021 (WS)

Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics in the news and in life.

20121201
02/03/201220120303
02/11/201220121103
07/04/201220120408
07/12/201220121208
09/03/201220120310
09/03/201220120311
09/11/201220121110
10/02/201220120211
10/02/201220120212

Tim Harford explains - and sometimes debunks - the numbers and statistics used in polit.

12/05/20122012051220120513
13/01/201220120115
14/12/201220121215
16/03/201220120317
16/11/201220121117
17/02/201220120218

Tim Harford investigates explains the numbers and statistics used in political debate,.

Tim Harford investigates explains the numbers and statistics used in political debate, the news and everyday life.

20/01/201220120121
21/04/201220120422

Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics in the news and in life.

21/12/201220121222
23/11/201220121124
27/01/201220120128
27/01/201220120129
28/04/201220120429
31/03/201220120401
A Grand Economic Experiment?2012050520120506

European austerity versus US stimulus.

Are we witnessing a grand economic experiment being played out between Europe, trying to cut its way out of trouble, and the United States, trying to spend its way to redemption?

Are African Leaders More Likely To Die In Office?2012082520120826 (WS)

The Prime Minister of Ethiopia is the fourth African premier to die this year alone.

Are African leaders more likely to die in office, than their counterparts elsewhere?

Also, does marriage make economic sense?

(Image: Ghanaian soldiers carry the coffin of late President John Atta Mills during the funeral service at Independence Square in Accra on 10 August 2012. Credit: AFP PHOTO/PIUS UTOMI EKPEIPIUS UTOMI EKPEI/AFP/Getty Images)

Are African leaders more likely than their counterparts elsewhere to die in office?

Counting Images Of Queen Elizabeth Ii20120602

How many images of the Queen have ever been created?

And is Facebook really worth more than twice as much as every company on the Nigerian Stock Exchange?

(Image: Composite image showing Queen Elizabeth II on her Diamond Jubilee visits and events around the UK in one month spanning 17 April to 17 May 2012 in various locations. Credit: Getty Images)

Do Big Football Clubs Win More Penalties?20120401

Tim Harford looks at referee bias, and he gazes into the future with Hans Rosling's data.

Do Manchester United and other leading clubs like Real Madrid and Barcelona benefit from biased refereeing decisions when they play in front of their home crowd? It’s a widely-held view, but Tim Harford challenges it with a look at the penalty statistics.

Plus, if you want to understand the world you’re living in, and how it will be different to the world your children and grandchildren will live in, listen to Tim’s interview with Hans Rosling of Gapminder.

Gun Laws And Gold Medals2012072820120729 (WS)

Would tighter gun laws lead to fewer gun deaths? Also: how Olympians have changed.

Last week's mass-shooting at a cinema in Colorado has - not surprisingly - intensified America's bitter and long-running argument with itself about gun control.

The argument is political and highly partisan. But it is also practical: would tighter gun laws actually lead to fewer gun deaths? You might think it's obvious that they would. But it seems the evidence isn't quite that clear.

Also: how have Olympians changed in the last century?

(Image: Shell casing for.40 caliber cartridges. Credit: Getty Images)

How Extraordinary Is Ye Shiwen?2012080420120805 (WS)

There was controversy this week after Ye Shiwen - a young Chinese swimmer - won the 400 metre individual medley in fine style.

A US swimming coach called the performance "disturbing", implying that she may have cheated.

More Or Less investigates the numbers and finds there's no statistical smoking gun.

(Image: China's Ye Shiwen competing in the women's 200m individual medley heats swimming event at the London 2012 Olympic Games. Credit: AFP PHOTO/LEON NEALLEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)

How extraordinary was Ye Shiwen's Olympic performance? More or Less looks at the numbers.

How To Explain Infinity To A Four-year-old2012090120120902 (WS)

Can Johnny Ball explain infinity to a 4-year-old? Plus, an interview with Count von Count.

"What's the number before infinity?" asks Claudia, aged four. We challenge Johnny Ball, legendary British TV presenter, to explain.

And in celebration of the voice of Sesame Street's Count von Count, Jerry Nelson - who has died aged 78 - there's another chance to hear our 2009 interview with the Count, in which he revealed his favourite number - 34,969.

Presenter and producer: Ruth Alexander.

(Image: Johnny Ball explaining infinity to a four-year-old Claudia)

How To Lose Money - Fast20120812

Last week Knight Capital lost a lot of money very quickly.

It was the latest chapter in the story of something called 'high frequency trading'.

Investors have always valued being the first with the news.

But high frequency trading is different - algorithms execute automatic trades, conducted by computers, at astonishing speeds.

We ask - is the rapid growth of high frequency trading progress, or – as some think – a threat to the stability of the entire financial system?

(Image: $100 bills. Credit: AFP PHOTO/Karen BLEIER)

Is the rapid growth of high frequency trading progress or a threat to the financial system

Interview With Daniel Kahneman20120609

Tim Harford interviews Daniel Kahneman, a psychologist who won the Nobel Prize in Economics.

The author of Thinking, Fast and Slow describes the common mistakes people make when confronted with statistics.

(Image: Daniel Kahneman. Credit: Getty Images)

Investigating Crime Statistics2012091520120916 (WS)

Investigating Sweden's high rape rate; and which surprising countries top kidnap league?

The Julian Assange extradition case has put Sweden's relatively high rate of rape under the spotlight. But can such statistics be reliably compared from one country to another?

Ruth Alexander investigates and finds out which countries are the surprise leaders of the world kidnap league, and why even murder rates are difficult to compare internationally.

Plus, who went home from the London 2012 Games with more medals – Olympians or Paralympians?

(Image: A woman sitting on bed with her head in her hands. Credit: JIM VARNEY/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY)

Levelling The Statistical Playing Field2012081820120819 (WS)

Which countries over and under achieved at London 2012?

If you adjust for the fact that some countries are richer than others and some have more people in them, can we work out what the Olympic medal tally should have looked like, based only on those factors? In other words, which countries over and under-achieved at London 2012?

Also, we think numbers help us to understand the world. But for Daniel Tammet, they're a lot more important than that. For him, numbers don't just help him to understand the real world. They're his ticket to being a part of it. We've been talking to Daniel - a mathematical savant - about his new book, Thinking In Numbers.

(Image: A combination of images taken during the Olympic Games in London. Credit: AFP

PHOTO/STAFFSTAFF/AFP/GettyImages)

Numbers Of 201220121229

Tim Harford and guests look back at the most surprising statistics of 2012.

Predicting L'aquila Earthquake: Is It Right To Blame The Scientists?20121027

On More or Less this week we look at how the probability of an earthquake is estimated.

This week six scientists and one ex-government official were sentenced to six years in prison for multiple manslaughter. Part of the case against them was the falsely reassuring comments they made before the earthquake struck. On More or Less this week we look at how the probability of an earthquake is estimated. And how will this case effect scientists giving advice in the future?

Plus, Rahul Gandhi, leader of the Congress party, has caused a political storm in India by claiming that 70% of the youth in Punjab are drug addicts. More or Less explains why the figure is wrong - it comes from a gross misreading of the research - but there certainly is a serious drug problem in Punjab.

(Image: An Italian military carabinieri walking on debris past destroyed buildings after an earthquake in L'Aquila. Credit: REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi/Files)

Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics in the news and in life.

The Maths Of Infidelity2012052620120527

It’s a very commonly-held belief that men are less faithful than women But it takes two to tango. So can this be mathematically possible? And we answer a cry for help from an Australian listener who wants to be “a bit more average”.

Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics in the news and in life.

The Tour De France And The Statistics Of Cheating2012072120120722
20120722 (WS)

The Tour de France, we are told, has finally cleaned up its act and clamped down on the use of performance-enhancing drugs.

But if it has, should we expect today's drug-free riders to be slower than their drug-fuelled forebears? Can statistics tell us whether the Tour de France really is cleaner than it was?

Also in the programme - does when you retire influence when you die?

(Image: The peloton climbs the Cote de Burs during stage seventeen of the 2012 Tour de France from Bagneres-de-Luchon to Peyragudes. Credit: Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)

Can maths prove whether the Tour de France has clamped down on the use of banned drugs?

Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics in the news and in life.

Where Are All The Us Paralympics Gold Medals?2012090820120909 (WS)

Why did the USA top the gold medals league in the Olympics, but not the Paralympics?

Ruth Alexander examines the performance numbers of the London 2012 Paralympic Games, and discovers which countries are punching above their weight, and which below.

Plus, how many songs could ever be written?

Mathematically-minded evolutionary biologist Yan Wong answers this listener's question: "I'm always amazed by the number of songs one can recognise on hearing the first second or two of music. Is it possible to calculate the total number of potential opening bars? Surely it must be finite?"

(Image: (L-R) Arnu Fourie of South Africa, Jonnie Peacock of Great Britain, Richard Browne of the United States, Oscar Pistorius of South Africa, and Alan Fonteles Cardoso Oliveira of Brazil, compete in the T44 100m at the London 2012 Paralympic Games. Photo by Jamie McDonald/Getty Images)

Who Are The Libor Losers?2012071420120715

How much damage did messing with Libor really do to the financial system?

After all, most financial trades are two way bets - and for every winner, there is a loser.

Did the banks really pick our pockets as they manipulated Libor?

Or were they just picking each others’?

Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics in the news and in life.