Lives In A Landscape

A documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today - stories that reveal people in a context.

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
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20050711

A new documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today, stories that reveal people in a context.

1/6. A Good Fondness for Rats

The Ancient and Honourable Society of Ratters leave London clubland behind and head for Yorkshire to experience the excitement of a real rat-hunt, masterminded by ex-miner Brian Oliver. But when he invites them back to his council semi, it's not quite what they're expecting.

20050718

A documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today, stories that reveal people in a context.

2/6. Wi' Ma Hands Full o' Nothin' - Poets from the Dundee Schemes

Gary works nights in a factory, Kevin used to box and Mark was a building labourer. They come from Dundee's 'hoosin' schemes', the large estates on the edge of the city. Each of their lives has been transformed - and in one case saved - by writing poetry.

They tell stories about the town of 'jute, jam and journalism' in its own language, and perform to its people in the pubs and clubs. Now a world beyond their own is beginning to prick up its ears.

20050725

A documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today, stories that reveal people in a context.

3/6. Clapham Mothers

Frances, Arlene and Melissa live at the heart of Abbevillage. It's what the locals call Abbeville Road, an ordinary south London street near Clapham Common. In between her pre-dawn power exercise, piano lessons, Italian classes, book groups and dog walking, Frances is up to her ears organising the local Abbeville fete. With the great day approaching, Frances, Arlene and Melissa seem to have it all - big houses, big cars, gardeners and au pairs - but is it enough?

20050801

A documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today, stories that reveal people in a context.

4/6. The Lyke Wake Walk

Fifty years ago a Yorkshire farmer called Bill Cowley wrote an article proposing a marathon walk that would cross the North York Moors for 40 miles, linking burial mounds and without passing through any villages: the Lyke Wake Walk was born. Now Bill is dead, the number of walkers is dwindling and, on the 50th anniversary of the first crossing, the club is to be disbanded. But one group of enthusiasts don't want the Walk to die and have formed a breakaway New Lyke Wake Club. As the walkers set out on their final trek, there's friction in the high heather.

20050808

A documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today, stories that reveal people in a context.

5/6. The Base

Tidworth is home to the 1st Battalion Staffordshire Regiment, currently serving a six month tour of Iraq. It's a hard life for the wives and children left at home, who carry on with their day to day routines and wait for their men to come back, whilst coping daily with news of injuries and death in a hostile country thousands of miles from home.

20050815

A documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today, stories that reveal people in a context.

6/6. Tied to the Takeaway

For 52 weeks a year, and seven days a week, the Golden Bowl Chinese Takeaway in Birmingham is open for business. For Ling Tsan's parents it is their only option - but for Ling, the very model of a modern London girl, it is a weekly return to a world she thought she'd left behind long ago.

20060809

1/6. A Good Fondness for Rats

A documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today - stories that reveal people in context.

In the first programme, the Ancient and Honourable Society of Ratters leave London clubland behind and head for Yorkshire to experience the excitement of a real rat-hunt, masterminded by ex-miner Brian Oliver. But when he invites them back to his council semi, it's not quite what they're expecting.

20060816

A documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today - stories that reveal people in a context.

2/6. Wi' Ma Hands Full o' Nothin: Poets From the Dundee Schemes

Gary works nights in a factory, Kevin used to box and Mark was a building labourer. They come from Dundee's 'hoosin' schemes', the large estates on the edge of the city. Each of their lives has been transformed - and in one case saved - by writing poetry. They tell stories about the town of jute, jam and journalism in its own language and perform to its people in the pubs and clubs. Now a world beyond their own is beginning to prick up its ears.

20060823

A documentary series about people in Britain. 3/6. Clapham Mothers: Frances, Arlene and Melissa seem to have it all - big houses, big cars, gardeners and au pairs, but is it enough?

20060830

A documentary series about people in Britain.

4/6. The Base

Dropping in on Tidworth, home to the 1st Battalion Staffordshire Regiment, which served a six-month tour in Iraq. It's a hard life for the wives and children left at home, who carry on with their day to day routines and wait for their men to come back, and have to cope with the daily news of injuries and death in a hostile country thousands of miles from home.

20060904

Documentary portraits of real lives in Britain today.

1/6. Under Throckmorton

James Maw visits the tiny village of Throckmorton, home to a giant old airfield and sandwiched between the Vale of Evesham and the Malvern Hills. What is a group of former soldiers doing speeding around the runway? Why is there no electricity in the church? What are dozens of brand new pianos doing in an old chicken shed? And what else will be revealed 'Under Throckmorton'?

20060911

Documentary portraits of real lives in Britain today.

2/6. Barbaraville

A Romany gypsy village in Hertfordshire is under threat. For over 40 years, a close-knit community has found a permanent home here - but proposals to build a huge composting plant next door could change their settled way of life forever. Will the ghost of the village's great original benefactor, Barbara Cartland, come to its rescue?

20060918

Documentary portraits of real lives in Britain today.

3/6. Cruising for a Bruising

Essex Boys and their motors - inseparable - especially when £35K has been lovingly invested in modifying them. Richard and Tony are two friends from Benfleet and this is the story of their families, their cars, and the Southend On Sea Cruise scene.

20060925

Documentary portraits of real lives in Britain today.

4/6. Tempers in Bloom

The villagers of Luddenden are turning detective to track down those who sabotaged their chances of victory in the Britain in Bloom competition and ensure there's no repeat of foul play this year. This isn't the first time that short-listed villages in this Royal Horticultural Society contest have suffered from foul play - but who would want this Yorkshire village to lose and why?

20061002

Documentary portraits of real lives in Britain today.

5/6. The Garden Square

Behind the ivy clad railings of Notting Hill lie secret gardens, accessible only to those residents with a key. You may glimpse a tennis court or a croquet lawn, hear distant laughter or a mower, but what really goes on inside the square? With acres of lawns this should be an urban utopia, but run by powerful and watchful committees, is this serene space really paradise after all?

20061009

Documentary portraits of real lives in Britain today.

6/6. Will Terrance get a degree

When Terrance first joined his Liverpool secondary school, he was bottom of the class. Four years later, he was head boy and had passed four A-levels with flying colours. Now he has won a place at Oxford University to study engineering.

The only problem is that Terrance is a Ugandan refugee and despite being resident here for four years, he only qualifies as a foreign student. The race is on to raise £20,000 for his first year's fees.

20061227

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

1/6. Under Throckmorton

James Maw visits a tiny village, home to an old airfield, sandwiched between the Vale of Evesham and the Malvern Hills. What is a group of former soldiers doing speeding around the runway? Why is there no electricity in the church and what are dozens of brand new pianos doing in an old chicken shed?

20070103

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

2/6. Barbaraville

A Romany gypsy village in Hertfordshire is under threat. For over forty years a close-knit community has found a permanent home here, but proposals to build a huge composting plant next door could change their settled way of life forever. Will the ghost of the village's great original benefactor, Barbara Cartland, come to its rescue?

20070110

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

3/6. Cruising for a Bruising

Essex Boys and their motors are inseparable, from the gold-flecked paint work to TV screens, huge speakers and tinted windows.

But what happens when girls get involved, rivalries occur and a lovingly souped up car ends up at the wrong end of a baseball bat? Two friends from Benfleet talk about their families, their cars, and the Southend On Sea cruise scene.

20070124

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

4/6. Tempers in Bloom

The villagers of Luddenden, Yorkshire, are turning detective to track down those who sabotaged their chances of victory in the Britain in Bloom competition last summer and ensure that there will be no repeat this year.

20070131

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

5/6. The Garden Square

Behind the ivy-clad railings of Notting Hill lie secret gardens, accessible only to residents with a key. What goes on within this apparent urban utopia?

20070207

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

6/6. Will Terrance Get a Degree?

Former Ugandan refugee Terrance has passed four A-levels with flying colours and won a place at Oxford University to study engineering. The problem is that despite being resident here for four years, he only qualifies as a foreign student. The race is on to raise the money for his first year's fees and term starts in three weeks time.

20070921

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

1/6: The Lines Are Open

Every weekday the Mike Parr Show on BBC Radio Newcastle attracts callers from all over Northumberland. What is it that brings these listeners together?

20070928

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

2/6. Show Girls

Glamour models Nikki-Lee, Lara-Lou and Vanessa make their living on a non-stop circuit of podium dancing and posing for punters. But life is about to change for Vanessa. Having travelled the world, performing to thousands and earning good money, she has met the love of her life. Now she is expecting her first baby and has decided to give up the breakdancing for a while.

20071005

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

3/6. The Regatta

For one week every year the peaceful village of Seaview on the Isle of Wight bursts into life to host its annual regatta. As locals prepare to join battle alongside the visitors who regularly come from London to sail, the dire weather forecast is the least of the committee's problems.

20071012

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

4/6. The Dawn Winder

Twice a week, as the city of London rumbles slowly into life, a solitary figure hurries from room to room at the Royal Courts of Justice. For 35 years, Jeffrey Rosson has wound the clocks that measure out the day in the country's famous law courts. The job is as old as the building itself, but Jeffrey's tenure as the dawn winder will soon be coming to an end.

20071019

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

5/6. Negotiating the half-pipes and bowls of the North's skateparks, Tim, Carl, Johnny, Woody and Daz look a little out of place. At least 25 years older than most of their fellow skateboarders, they are the Middle Aged Shredders.

20080724

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

2/6. Show Girls

Glamour models Nikki-Lee, Lara-Lou and Vanessa make their living on a non-stop circuit of podium dancing and posing for punters. But life is about to change for Vanessa. Having travelled the world, performing to thousands and earning good money, she has met the love of her life. Now she is expecting her first baby and has decided to give up the breakdancing for a while.

20080731

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

2/6. Clapham Mothers

Frances, Arlene and Melissa live in an ordinary south London street near Clapham Common. In between her pre-dawn power exercise, piano lessons, Italian classes, book groups and dog walking, Frances is up to her ears organising the local fete.

20080807

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

3/6. Negotiating the half-pipes and bowls of the North's skateparks, Tim, Carl, Johnny, Woody and Daz look a little out of place. At least 25 years older than most of their fellow skateboarders, they are the Middle Aged Shredders.

20080814

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

4/6. Tempers in Bloom

The villagers of Luddenden, Yorkshire, are turning detective to track down those who sabotaged their chances of victory in the Britain in Bloom competition and ensure that there will be no repeat.

20080821

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

5/6: The Lines Are Open

Every weekday the Mike Parr Show on BBC Radio Newcastle attracts callers from all over Northumberland. What is it that brings these listeners together?

20080828

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

6/6. The Dawn Winder

Twice a week, as the city of London rumbles slowly into life, a solitary figure hurries from room to room at the Royal Courts of Justice. For 35 years, Jeffrey Rosson has wound the clocks that measure out the day in the country's famous law courts. The job is as old as the building itself, but Jeffrey's tenure as the dawn winder will soon be coming to an end.

20081027

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

1/6. Going to the Dogs

Alan Dein reports on the closure of Walthamstow greyhound racing track and hears from some of the people whose livelihoods depend on the declining greyhound racing business. While bookmaker Joe Bennett is philosophical about the ups and downs of the business, trainer Paul Rich is more pessimistic, forced as he is to now race his dogs in Kent, a far cry from the glory of Walthamstow.

20081103

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Fellside Photographer

2/6. Alan Dein meets Wayne Hutchinson, a Cumbrian farmer who combines the hard graft of shepherding with a second job photographing some of Britain's most expensive livestock. Alan meets Wayne as he prepares for the Royal Show in Warwickshire and learns how he balances the pressures of modern farming with both family life and the 'on call' nature of his photography work.

20081110

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

3/6. Five Units on Fazeley Street

Alan Dein meets the diverse group of people that work in the units of Birmingham's Fazeley Street industrial estate, from a lone maker of precision steel components to a group of African evangelists.

20081117

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

4/6. Stars, Stripes and Chalfont St Giles

Alan meets members of the Chiltern American Women's Club. He discovers that the life of a well-heeled expat may look glamorous to those on the outside, but for new comers to the UK it can often be lonely. He learns about the activities organised by this 200-member club, from advice on how to get by in the UK to organised hikes and volunteering for the annual bazaar.

20081124

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

5/6. The Queens of Coal

Alan Dein meets former Coal Queens at a reunion of these former beauty queens who were elected by miners to represent their mines. He hears from two in particular, Helen Coleman and Maureen Griffiths, about how winning the competition changed their lives for ever and their thoughts about the decline of the coal industry and its pit communities.

Series 4, The Queens of Coal20081124

Alan Dein meets former Coal Queens at a reunion of these former beauty queens.

1Series 1020120502

In the first of a new series of documentary stories from contemporary Britain, Alan Dein captures the dramas of young families just moving into Cardea: a brand new housing estate on the outskirts of Peterborough. Just two years ago, Cardea was just open fields - now it's a burgeoning community.

Two families in particular attract Alan's attention. Sara Jane and Stacey are both expectant mums in their early twenties. Together with their partners, they're about to embark on a new life on a new-build estate.

Cardea represents a fresh start for both women after an often difficult past. Sara Jane was brought up on council estate and vowed that she wanted a different upbringing for her own children. At the same time, Stacey hopes that her ambitions to become a midwife - thwarted through ill-health - might yet bear fruit as she starts out in a new home.

Alan follows the young families up to and beyond moving day, talking to them about their hopes and fears for the future.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

. Alan Dein captures the dramas of families moving into a new Peterborough housing estate.

2Series 1020120509

Alan Dein delves into the deaths of two Labradors, Moz and Chloe and three Jack Russell Terriers, Monty, Poppy and Murphy, living in different families on the same street. Following the latest death, pork steak laced with pesticide was found in a garden and a local vet is in little doubt that this was a deliberate.

For Georgina and her husband Darren the attacks have unleashed mistrust and fear in their once close knit community. Their home on the sprawling council estate now hosts a shrine around the fireplace and the cremated remains of their loved pets are buried in the garden. Just weeks later Monty's mother, Poppy, was out in the garden when Emma spotted her eating something: "I rushed out and couldn't believe my eyes when I saw her with more meat. It was too late to stop her and she died later that afternoon."

For PC Charlie Banks, from the Pontefract and Knottingley neighbourhood policing team, the case is proving difficult to solve. There is no history of dispute between neighbours and he has found no evidence to suggest what might lie behind the attacks. Alan Dein meets those with theories of their own and looks at what these five dogs meant to their owners and who might have wanted them dead.

And just days into the recording the poisoner strikes again - with Alan Dein following the latest attack and also the reaction to it: Georgina and her husband, for instance, have decided to pack their bags and leave. But their son, Zac, has grown up on the estate and is reluctant to leave.

Meanwhile other neighbours speculate about what might be behind the latest attacks - could this be a personal vendetta....?

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

. Alan Dein delves into the mysterious deaths of five dogs in the same West Yorkshire street

0101A Good Fondness For Rats2005071120060809
20160809 (BBC7)
20160810 (BBC7)

A documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today - stories that reveal people in a context.

Members of The Ancient and Honorable Society of Ratters head to Yorkshire.

4 Extra Debut. Members of The Ancient and Honorable Society of Ratters leave London for Yorkshire to experience a real rat hunt. From July 2005.

The Ancient and Honourable Society of Ratters leave London clubland behind and head for Yorkshire to experience the excitement of a real rat-hunt, masterminded by ex-miner Brian Oliver.

But when he invites them back to his council semi, it's not quite what they're expecting.

0101A Good Fondness For Rats2005071120060809

A documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today - stories that reveal people in a context.

The Ancient and Honourable Society of Ratters leave London clubland behind and head for Yorkshire to experience the excitement of a real rat-hunt, masterminded by ex-miner Brian Oliver.

But when he invites them back to his council semi, it's not quite what they're expecting.

0102Wi' Ma Hands Full O' Nothin' - Poets From The Dundee Schemes2005071820060816

Gary works nights in a factory, Kevin used to box and Mark was a building labourer.

They come from Dundee's 'hoosin' schemes', the large estates on the edge of the city.

Each of their lives has been transformed - and in one case saved - by writing poetry.

They tell stories about the town of 'jute, jam and journalism' in its own language, and perform to its people in the pubs and clubs.

Now a world beyond their own is beginning to prick up its ears.

0102Wi' Ma Hands Full O' Nothin' - Poets From The Dundee Schemes2005071820060816

Gary works nights in a factory, Kevin used to box and Mark was a building labourer.

They come from Dundee's 'hoosin' schemes', the large estates on the edge of the city.

Each of their lives has been transformed - and in one case saved - by writing poetry.

They tell stories about the town of 'jute, jam and journalism' in its own language, and perform to its people in the pubs and clubs.

Now a world beyond their own is beginning to prick up its ears.

0103Clapham Mothers2005072520060823
20080731 (BBC7)
20160816 (BBC7)
20160817 (BBC7)
20080731 (R4)

Frances, Arlene and Melissa live at the heart of Abbevillage.

It's what the locals call Abbeville Road, an ordinary south London street near Clapham Common.

In between her pre-dawn power exercise, piano lessons, Italian classes, book groups and dog walking, Frances is up to her ears organising the local Abbeville fete.

With the great day approaching, Frances, Arlene and Melissa seem to have it all - big houses, big cars, gardeners and au pairs - but is it enough?

Frances, Arlene and Melissa seem to have it all - big houses, big cars, gardeners and au pairs, but is it enough?

Frances, Arlene and Melissa live in an ordinary south London street near Clapham Common.

In between her pre-dawn power exercise, piano lessons, Italian classes, book groups and dog walking, Frances is up to her ears organising the local fete.

'Busy busy' stay at home mum Frances's 'to do' list includes running a local fete.

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Frances, Arlene and Melissa live in an ordinary south London street near Clapham Common. In between her pre-dawn power exercise, piano lessons, Italian classes, book groups and dog walking, Frances is up to her ears organising the local fete.

0103Clapham Mothers2005072520060823
20080731 (R4)

Frances, Arlene and Melissa live at the heart of Abbevillage.

It's what the locals call Abbeville Road, an ordinary south London street near Clapham Common.

In between her pre-dawn power exercise, piano lessons, Italian classes, book groups and dog walking, Frances is up to her ears organising the local Abbeville fete.

With the great day approaching, Frances, Arlene and Melissa seem to have it all - big houses, big cars, gardeners and au pairs - but is it enough?

Frances, Arlene and Melissa seem to have it all - big houses, big cars, gardeners and au pairs, but is it enough?

Frances, Arlene and Melissa live in an ordinary south London street near Clapham Common.

In between her pre-dawn power exercise, piano lessons, Italian classes, book groups and dog walking, Frances is up to her ears organising the local fete.

0104The Lyke Wake Walk20050801

Fifty years ago a Yorkshire farmer called Bill Cowley wrote an article proposing a marathon walk that would cross the North York Moors for 40 miles, linking burial mounds and without passing through any villages: the Lyke Wake Walk was born.

Now Bill is dead, the number of walkers is dwindling and, on the 50th anniversary of the first crossing, the club is to be disbanded.

But one group of enthusiasts don't want the Walk to die and have formed a breakaway New Lyke Wake Club.

As the walkers set out on their final trek, there's friction in the high heather.

0104The Lyke Wake Walk20050801

Fifty years ago a Yorkshire farmer called Bill Cowley wrote an article proposing a marathon walk that would cross the North York Moors for 40 miles, linking burial mounds and without passing through any villages: the Lyke Wake Walk was born.

Now Bill is dead, the number of walkers is dwindling and, on the 50th anniversary of the first crossing, the club is to be disbanded.

But one group of enthusiasts don't want the Walk to die and have formed a breakaway New Lyke Wake Club.

As the walkers set out on their final trek, there's friction in the high heather.

0105The Base2005080820060830

Tidworth is home to the 1st Battalion Staffordshire Regiment, currently serving a six month tour of Iraq.

It's a hard life for the wives and children left at home, who carry on with their day to day routines and wait for their men to come back, whilst coping daily with news of injuries and death in a hostile country thousands of miles from home.

Dropping in on Tidworth, home to the 1st Battalion Staffordshire Regiment, which served a six-month tour in Iraq.

It's a hard life for the wives and children left at home, who carry on with their day to day routines and wait for their men to come back, and have to cope with the daily news of injuries and death in a hostile country thousands of miles from home.

0105The Base2005080820060830

Tidworth is home to the 1st Battalion Staffordshire Regiment, currently serving a six month tour of Iraq.

It's a hard life for the wives and children left at home, who carry on with their day to day routines and wait for their men to come back, whilst coping daily with news of injuries and death in a hostile country thousands of miles from home.

Dropping in on Tidworth, home to the 1st Battalion Staffordshire Regiment, which served a six-month tour in Iraq.

It's a hard life for the wives and children left at home, who carry on with their day to day routines and wait for their men to come back, and have to cope with the daily news of injuries and death in a hostile country thousands of miles from home.

0106 LASTTied To The Takeaway20050815

For 52 weeks a year, and seven days a week, the Golden Bowl Chinese Takeaway in Birmingham is open for business.

For Ling Tsan's parents it is their only option - but for Ling, the very model of a modern London girl, it is a weekly return to a world she thought she'd left behind long ago.

0106 LASTTied To The Takeaway20050815

For 52 weeks a year, and seven days a week, the Golden Bowl Chinese Takeaway in Birmingham is open for business.

For Ling Tsan's parents it is their only option - but for Ling, the very model of a modern London girl, it is a weekly return to a world she thought she'd left behind long ago.

0201Under Throckmorton *2006090420061227

James Maw visits the tiny village of Throckmorton, home to a giant old airfield and sandwiched between the Vale of Evesham and the Malvern Hills.

What is a group of former soldiers doing speeding around the runway? Why is there no electricity in the church? What are dozens of brand new pianos doing in an old chicken shed? And what else will be revealed 'Under Throckmorton'?

0201Under Throckmorton *2006090420061227

James Maw visits the tiny village of Throckmorton, home to a giant old airfield and sandwiched between the Vale of Evesham and the Malvern Hills.

What is a group of former soldiers doing speeding around the runway? Why is there no electricity in the church? What are dozens of brand new pianos doing in an old chicken shed? And what else will be revealed 'Under Throckmorton'?

0202Barbaraville2006091120070103

A Romany gypsy village in Hertfordshire is under threat.

For over 40 years, a close-knit community has found a permanent home here - but proposals to build a huge composting plant next door could change their settled way of life forever.

Will the ghost of the village's great original benefactor, Barbara Cartland, come to its rescue?

0202Barbaraville2006091120070103

A Romany gypsy village in Hertfordshire is under threat.

For over 40 years, a close-knit community has found a permanent home here - but proposals to build a huge composting plant next door could change their settled way of life forever.

Will the ghost of the village's great original benefactor, Barbara Cartland, come to its rescue?

0203Cruising For A Bruising2006091820070110

Essex Boys and their motors are inseparable, from the gold-flecked paint work to TV screens, huge speakers and tinted windows.

But what happens when girls get involved, rivalries occur and a lovingly souped up car ends up at the wrong end of a baseball bat? Two friends from Benfleet talk about their families, their cars, and the Southend On Sea cruise scene.

0203Cruising For A Bruising2006091820070110

Essex Boys and their motors are inseparable, from the gold-flecked paint work to TV screens, huge speakers and tinted windows.

But what happens when girls get involved, rivalries occur and a lovingly souped up car ends up at the wrong end of a baseball bat? Two friends from Benfleet talk about their families, their cars, and the Southend On Sea cruise scene.

0204Tempers In Bloom *2006092520070124
20080814 (R4)

The villagers of Luddenden are turning detective to track down those who sabotaged their chances of victory in the Britain in Bloom competition and ensure there's no repeat of foul play this year.

This isn't the first time that short-listed villages in this Royal Horticultural Society contest have suffered from foul play - but who would want this Yorkshire village to lose and why?

0204Tempers In Bloom *2006092520070124
20080814 (R4)

The villagers of Luddenden are turning detective to track down those who sabotaged their chances of victory in the Britain in Bloom competition and ensure there's no repeat of foul play this year.

This isn't the first time that short-listed villages in this Royal Horticultural Society contest have suffered from foul play - but who would want this Yorkshire village to lose and why?

0205The Garden Square2006100220070131

Behind the ivy clad railings of Notting Hill lie secret gardens, accessible only to those residents with a key.

You may glimpse a tennis court or a croquet lawn, hear distant laughter or a mower, but what really goes on inside the square? With acres of lawns this should be an urban utopia, but run by powerful and watchful committees, is this serene space really paradise after all?

0205The Garden Square2006100220070131

Behind the ivy clad railings of Notting Hill lie secret gardens, accessible only to those residents with a key.

You may glimpse a tennis court or a croquet lawn, hear distant laughter or a mower, but what really goes on inside the square? With acres of lawns this should be an urban utopia, but run by powerful and watchful committees, is this serene space really paradise after all?

0206 LASTWill Terrance Get A Degree2006100920070207

When Terrance first joined his Liverpool secondary school, he was bottom of the class.

Four years later, he was head boy and had passed four A-levels with flying colours.

Now he has won a place at Oxford University to study engineering.

The only problem is that Terrance is a Ugandan refugee and despite being resident here for four years, he only qualifies as a foreign student.

The race is on to raise £20,000 for his first year's fees.

0206 LASTWill Terrance Get A Degree2006100920070207

When Terrance first joined his Liverpool secondary school, he was bottom of the class.

Four years later, he was head boy and had passed four A-levels with flying colours.

Now he has won a place at Oxford University to study engineering.

The only problem is that Terrance is a Ugandan refugee and despite being resident here for four years, he only qualifies as a foreign student.

The race is on to raise £20,000 for his first year's fees.

0301The Lines Are Open2007092120080821

Every weekday the Mike Parr Show on BBC Radio Newcastle attracts callers from all over Northumberland.

What is it that brings these listeners together?

0301The Lines Are Open2007092120080821

Every weekday the Mike Parr Show on BBC Radio Newcastle attracts callers from all over Northumberland.

What is it that brings these listeners together?

0302Show Girls2007092820080724

Glamour models Nikki-Lee, Lara-Lou and Vanessa make their living on a non-stop circuit of podium dancing and posing for punters.

But life is about to change for Vanessa.

Having travelled the world, performing to thousands and earning good money, she has met the love of her life.

Now she is expecting her first baby and has decided to give up the breakdancing for a while.

0302Show Girls2007092820080724

Glamour models Nikki-Lee, Lara-Lou and Vanessa make their living on a non-stop circuit of podium dancing and posing for punters.

But life is about to change for Vanessa.

Having travelled the world, performing to thousands and earning good money, she has met the love of her life.

Now she is expecting her first baby and has decided to give up the breakdancing for a while.

0303The Regatta20071005

For one week every year the peaceful village of Seaview on the Isle of Wight bursts into life to host its annual regatta.

As locals prepare to join battle alongside the visitors who regularly come from London to sail, the dire weather forecast is the least of the committee's problems.

0303The Regatta20071005

For one week every year the peaceful village of Seaview on the Isle of Wight bursts into life to host its annual regatta.

As locals prepare to join battle alongside the visitors who regularly come from London to sail, the dire weather forecast is the least of the committee's problems.

0304The Dawn Winder *2007101220080828

Twice a week, as the city of London rumbles slowly into life, a solitary figure hurries from room to room at the Royal Courts of Justice.

For 35 years, Jeffrey Rosson has wound the clocks that measure out the day in the country's famous law courts.

The job is as old as the building itself, but Jeffrey's tenure as the dawn winder will soon be coming to an end.

0304The Dawn Winder *2007101220080828

Twice a week, as the city of London rumbles slowly into life, a solitary figure hurries from room to room at the Royal Courts of Justice.

For 35 years, Jeffrey Rosson has wound the clocks that measure out the day in the country's famous law courts.

The job is as old as the building itself, but Jeffrey's tenure as the dawn winder will soon be coming to an end.

0305Middle Aged Shredders2007101920080807

Negotiating the half-pipes and bowls of the North's skateparks, Tim, Carl, Johnny, Woody and Daz look a little out of place.

At least 25 years older than most of their fellow skateboarders, they are the Middle Aged Shredders.

0305Middle Aged Shredders2007101920080807

Negotiating the half-pipes and bowls of the North's skateparks, Tim, Carl, Johnny, Woody and Daz look a little out of place.

At least 25 years older than most of their fellow skateboarders, they are the Middle Aged Shredders.

0306 LASTWhiteway: A Rather Barren Utopia20071026

The Whiteway Colony in the Cotswolds was established in 1898 by anarchist followers of Count Tolstoy.

Its former residents included conscientious objectors, radicals and refugees.

But does the spirit of freedom still flourish in this idealistic communnity?

0306 LASTWhiteway: A Rather Barren Utopia20071026

The Whiteway Colony in the Cotswolds was established in 1898 by anarchist followers of Count Tolstoy.

Its former residents included conscientious objectors, radicals and refugees.

But does the spirit of freedom still flourish in this idealistic communnity?

0401Going To The Dogs

0401Going To The Dogs *2008102720090803

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

When Walthamstow dog track closed its doors for the last time in August 2008, it was the end of an era.

Alan Dein was the only reporter allowed to join the crowds as the hare led the dogs round the circuit for the last time; the loudspeakers played Thanks for the Memory and the tears flowed freely.

But what now for the future of British greyhound racing, without the iconic Stow? For bookie Joe Bennett and young trainer Paul Rich the dogs are a way of life and a family tradition, in spite of the fact that in England greyhound racing's glory days are long past.

Alan follows them as they face an uncertain future.

While Joe is philosophical and knows that the sport has always had its ups and downs, Paul, who has devoted to his dogs and has only just taken over the family business, is more pessimistic.

Now he is racing in Kent, at Sittingbourne's track on a dreary industrial estate in the wrong end of town - a far cry from the glories of the Stow.

Alan Dein meets some of the people whose livelihoods depend on greyhound racing.

Alan Dein reports on the closure of Walthamstow greyhound racing track and hears from some of the people whose livelihoods depend on the declining greyhound racing business.

While bookmaker Joe Bennett is philosophical about the ups and downs of the business, trainer Paul Rich is more pessimistic, forced as he is to now race his dogs in Kent, a far cry from the glory of Walthamstow.

0401Going To The Dogs *2008102720090803

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

When Walthamstow dog track closed its doors for the last time in August 2008, it was the end of an era.

Alan Dein was the only reporter allowed to join the crowds as the hare led the dogs round the circuit for the last time; the loudspeakers played Thanks for the Memory and the tears flowed freely.

But what now for the future of British greyhound racing, without the iconic Stow? For bookie Joe Bennett and young trainer Paul Rich the dogs are a way of life and a family tradition, in spite of the fact that in England greyhound racing's glory days are long past.

Alan follows them as they face an uncertain future.

While Joe is philosophical and knows that the sport has always had its ups and downs, Paul, who has devoted to his dogs and has only just taken over the family business, is more pessimistic.

Now he is racing in Kent, at Sittingbourne's track on a dreary industrial estate in the wrong end of town - a far cry from the glories of the Stow.

Alan Dein meets some of the people whose livelihoods depend on greyhound racing.

Alan Dein reports on the closure of Walthamstow greyhound racing track and hears from some of the people whose livelihoods depend on the declining greyhound racing business.

While bookmaker Joe Bennett is philosophical about the ups and downs of the business, trainer Paul Rich is more pessimistic, forced as he is to now race his dogs in Kent, a far cry from the glory of Walthamstow.

0402Fellside Photographer

0406 LASTGone East *2008120120090907

In the dead of night, presenter Alan Dein once listened to the troubles of young teenager Hannah, pouring out her woes from a phone box during a turbulent night in the centre of the Kent resort town of Margate.

Alan went on to make a Radio 4 feature programme about Hannah's story; now, he finally encounters Hannah and her family.

0406 LASTGone East *2008120120090907

In the dead of night, presenter Alan Dein once listened to the troubles of young teenager Hannah, pouring out her woes from a phone box during a turbulent night in the centre of the Kent resort town of Margate.

Alan went on to make a Radio 4 feature programme about Hannah's story; now, he finally encounters Hannah and her family.

41Going to the Dogs20090803
42Fellside Photographer20090810
0402Fellside Photographer *2008110320090810

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Alan Dein meets Wayne Hutchinson, a Cumbrian farmer who combines the hard graft of shepherding with a second job - photographing some of Britain's most expensive livestock.

Wayne farms Swaledale sheep with his father in the hills linking Cumbria to the Yorkshire dales.

It is rugged territory, but Wayne has allied his farming pedigree with an enthusiasm for photography.

He now mixes his farming duties with time spent travelling the length and breadth of Britain taking pictures of pedigree livestock.

It takes him to the farms of some of the wealthiest landowners in Britain as well as smallholders with a passion for livestock.

But these are tough times for farmers, with the aftermath of foot and mouth still being felt, alongside the twin menaces of Blue Tongue and the increasing pressure put on them to protect the environment while at the same time keeping cheap food on our plates.

Alongside those tensions are the pressures of mixing farming and family life with the increasingly 'on call' nature of the photography business.

Alan introduces us to Wayne as he prepares for what nobody realised at the time was to be the penultimate Royal Show.

Alan Dein meets a Cumbrian farmer who combines shepherding with a second job.

Alan meets Wayne as he prepares for the Royal Show in Warwickshire and learns how he balances the pressures of modern farming with both family life and the 'on call' nature of his photography work.

0402Fellside Photographer *2008110320090810

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Alan Dein meets Wayne Hutchinson, a Cumbrian farmer who combines the hard graft of shepherding with a second job - photographing some of Britain's most expensive livestock.

Wayne farms Swaledale sheep with his father in the hills linking Cumbria to the Yorkshire dales.

It is rugged territory, but Wayne has allied his farming pedigree with an enthusiasm for photography.

He now mixes his farming duties with time spent travelling the length and breadth of Britain taking pictures of pedigree livestock.

It takes him to the farms of some of the wealthiest landowners in Britain as well as smallholders with a passion for livestock.

But these are tough times for farmers, with the aftermath of foot and mouth still being felt, alongside the twin menaces of Blue Tongue and the increasing pressure put on them to protect the environment while at the same time keeping cheap food on our plates.

Alongside those tensions are the pressures of mixing farming and family life with the increasingly 'on call' nature of the photography business.

Alan introduces us to Wayne as he prepares for what nobody realised at the time was to be the penultimate Royal Show.

Alan Dein meets a Cumbrian farmer who combines shepherding with a second job.

Alan meets Wayne as he prepares for the Royal Show in Warwickshire and learns how he balances the pressures of modern farming with both family life and the 'on call' nature of his photography work.

43Five Units on Fazeley Street20090817
0403Five Units On Fazeley Street2008111020090817

Alan Dein meets the diverse group of people that work in the units of Birmingham's Fazeley Street industrial estate, from a lone maker of precision steel components to a group of African evangelists.

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Alan Dein meets the diverse group of people that work in the units of Birmingham's Fazeley Street industrial estate, where every unit tells a story.

As the sun rises over this ramshackle grouping of canalside workshops, warehouses and offices, an unexpected array of characters set about their diverse businesses.

Whatever their line, industry is very firmly the name of the game here.

At 7.30am sharp, workaholic Roger opens up Clifton Steel and starts his daily rounds checking stock.

Surveying his vast stockyard and reflecting on life in the steel business, he proudly proclaims, 'I'm an industrialist'.

Next door, young Adam is starting his first car window tinting job of the day, a blue VW.

Heatgun in hand, he talks of the skill required to do it properly, declaring, 'I'm an artist'.

Upstairs, solitary Derek - a real Mr Fixit - is slowly but assiduously drilling 300 precision steel components, alone in his workshop save for the accompaniment of classical music.

Their businesses are different but their hopes and fears strikingly similar.

They talk of the influence of their fathers - for good or ill - their fears for the future and their pride in a job well done.

But as night settles and the industry ceases, Fazeley Street shifts gear.

Adam finishes his last tint of the day, Derek drills his final hole and next door a group of 20 African evangelists don white gowns and prepare to praise God, while slick young rockers Copter rehearse at full volume for their next gig.

Alan Dein meets the people that work in Birmingham's Fazeley Street industrial estate.

0403Five Units On Fazeley Street2008111020090817

Alan Dein meets the diverse group of people that work in the units of Birmingham's Fazeley Street industrial estate, from a lone maker of precision steel components to a group of African evangelists.

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Alan Dein meets the diverse group of people that work in the units of Birmingham's Fazeley Street industrial estate, where every unit tells a story.

As the sun rises over this ramshackle grouping of canalside workshops, warehouses and offices, an unexpected array of characters set about their diverse businesses.

Whatever their line, industry is very firmly the name of the game here.

At 7.30am sharp, workaholic Roger opens up Clifton Steel and starts his daily rounds checking stock.

Surveying his vast stockyard and reflecting on life in the steel business, he proudly proclaims, 'I'm an industrialist'.

Next door, young Adam is starting his first car window tinting job of the day, a blue VW.

Heatgun in hand, he talks of the skill required to do it properly, declaring, 'I'm an artist'.

Upstairs, solitary Derek - a real Mr Fixit - is slowly but assiduously drilling 300 precision steel components, alone in his workshop save for the accompaniment of classical music.

Their businesses are different but their hopes and fears strikingly similar.

They talk of the influence of their fathers - for good or ill - their fears for the future and their pride in a job well done.

But as night settles and the industry ceases, Fazeley Street shifts gear.

Adam finishes his last tint of the day, Derek drills his final hole and next door a group of 20 African evangelists don white gowns and prepare to praise God, while slick young rockers Copter rehearse at full volume for their next gig.

Alan Dein meets the people that work in Birmingham's Fazeley Street industrial estate.

0404Stars, Stripes And Chalfont St Giles

44Stars, Stripes and Chalfont St Giles20090824
0404Stars, Stripes And Chalfont St Giles *2008111720090824

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Alan Dein meets members of the Chiltern American Women's Club, a 200-member club which caters for expat women whose husbands have been seconded to work in the UK.

The club ensures that there is something to do almost every day of the week, from newcomers' coffees with advice on how to drive around roundabouts and use UK washing machines, to organised hikes in the local countryside and volunteering for the annual charity bazaar.

Alan follows the lives of the club's president, Louise Fortier, and some of the newcomers who have yet to fully settle into their temporary life in the UK.

Alan Dein meets members of the Chiltern American Women's Club.

Alan meets members of the Chiltern American Women's Club.

He discovers that the life of a well-heeled expat may look glamorous to those on the outside, but for new comers to the UK it can often be lonely.

He learns about the activities organised by this 200-member club, from advice on how to get by in the UK to organised hikes and volunteering for the annual bazaar.

0404Stars, Stripes And Chalfont St Giles *2008111720090824

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Alan Dein meets members of the Chiltern American Women's Club, a 200-member club which caters for expat women whose husbands have been seconded to work in the UK.

The club ensures that there is something to do almost every day of the week, from newcomers' coffees with advice on how to drive around roundabouts and use UK washing machines, to organised hikes in the local countryside and volunteering for the annual charity bazaar.

Alan follows the lives of the club's president, Louise Fortier, and some of the newcomers who have yet to fully settle into their temporary life in the UK.

Alan Dein meets members of the Chiltern American Women's Club.

Alan meets members of the Chiltern American Women's Club.

He discovers that the life of a well-heeled expat may look glamorous to those on the outside, but for new comers to the UK it can often be lonely.

He learns about the activities organised by this 200-member club, from advice on how to get by in the UK to organised hikes and volunteering for the annual bazaar.

0405The Queens Of Coal

45The Queens of Coal20090831
0405The Queens Of Coal *2008112420090831

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Alan Dein meets former Coal Queens at a reunion of these former beauty queens who were elected by miners to represent their mines.

In the days of coal, each pit used to elect a Coal Queen to represent the mine.

The daughter or granddaughter of a miner would be put forward and if she claimed the crown, she went on to compete in county and even national championships.

A recent reunion of Coal Queens brought together former beauty queens from all over the coal mining regions of England, along with their memories and memorabilia.

Alan Dein meets them and explores the lives of two in particular to hear how that event, in their youth, changed the course of their lives.

Helen Coleman went on to open a beauty salon and married the drummer of Britain's leading Queen tribute band.

Maureen Griffiths ran a working men's club and is still remembered by locals for that golden day in 1951.

Both have watched the changing face of life after coal.

The Miners' Strike of 1984 brought an end to the Coal Queen tradition and changed pit community life forever, but what has happened since and why has a tradition like the Coal Queen beauty pageant endured in the memories of older generations while the teenagers barely know what coal is?

Alan Dein meets former Coal Queens at a reunion of these former beauty queens.

He hears from two in particular, Helen Coleman and Maureen Griffiths, about how winning the competition changed their lives for ever and their thoughts about the decline of the coal industry and its pit communities.

0405The Queens Of Coal *2008112420090831

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Alan Dein meets former Coal Queens at a reunion of these former beauty queens who were elected by miners to represent their mines.

In the days of coal, each pit used to elect a Coal Queen to represent the mine.

The daughter or granddaughter of a miner would be put forward and if she claimed the crown, she went on to compete in county and even national championships.

A recent reunion of Coal Queens brought together former beauty queens from all over the coal mining regions of England, along with their memories and memorabilia.

Alan Dein meets them and explores the lives of two in particular to hear how that event, in their youth, changed the course of their lives.

Helen Coleman went on to open a beauty salon and married the drummer of Britain's leading Queen tribute band.

Maureen Griffiths ran a working men's club and is still remembered by locals for that golden day in 1951.

Both have watched the changing face of life after coal.

The Miners' Strike of 1984 brought an end to the Coal Queen tradition and changed pit community life forever, but what has happened since and why has a tradition like the Coal Queen beauty pageant endured in the memories of older generations while the teenagers barely know what coal is?

Alan Dein meets former Coal Queens at a reunion of these former beauty queens.

He hears from two in particular, Helen Coleman and Maureen Griffiths, about how winning the competition changed their lives for ever and their thoughts about the decline of the coal industry and its pit communities.

0406Gone East

46 LASTGone East2008120120090907

. Alan Dein finds himself on the east coast of England to hear an unlikely story of hope.

51Play for Tomorrow20091106
0501Play For Tomorrow20091106

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Three sixth formers have the summer to get their band back on track after the bass player and best mate walks out on them.

Nick, Christian and Lawrence are all 17 and have lived most of their lives in Grimsby.

The closest of friends, they had hoped to spend the summer gigging with their band, Socio Republic.

But bassist Reece has just decided he no longer wants to be part of the group.

The remaining trio are left shell-shocked by their friend's decision and the future of the band is cast into serious doubt.

Alan Dein presents an intimate story of friendship under pressure as the three 'in-betweeners' - not yet men, no longer boys - spend a long wet summer trying to fill Reece's shoes and get some gigs.

Yet the weeks pass and the lads - heartbroken and mystified by Reece's departure - are still without a new bass player.

But, as Lawrence says, 'good things have to end for better things to begin'.

The relentless rain brings on severe boredom and the lads seem paralysed.

The three are aware that the clock is ticking.

University beckons in a year - when, once again, their friendships will be put to the test.

Alan Dein presents a story of three sixth formers trying to get their band back on track.

0501Play For Tomorrow20091106

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Three sixth formers have the summer to get their band back on track after the bass player and best mate walks out on them.

Nick, Christian and Lawrence are all 17 and have lived most of their lives in Grimsby.

The closest of friends, they had hoped to spend the summer gigging with their band, Socio Republic.

But bassist Reece has just decided he no longer wants to be part of the group.

The remaining trio are left shell-shocked by their friend's decision and the future of the band is cast into serious doubt.

Alan Dein presents an intimate story of friendship under pressure as the three 'in-betweeners' - not yet men, no longer boys - spend a long wet summer trying to fill Reece's shoes and get some gigs.

Yet the weeks pass and the lads - heartbroken and mystified by Reece's departure - are still without a new bass player.

But, as Lawrence says, 'good things have to end for better things to begin'.

The relentless rain brings on severe boredom and the lads seem paralysed.

The three are aware that the clock is ticking.

University beckons in a year - when, once again, their friendships will be put to the test.

Alan Dein presents a story of three sixth formers trying to get their band back on track.

52Tilting at Windmills20091113
0502Tilting At Windmills20091113

Windfarms, Earth-destroying asteroids and raining fish - apocalyptic visions run surprisingly high in the sleepy beauty of the Welsh borders, as Alan Dein discovers when he visits the village of Knighton on the route of Offa's Dyke.

Situated with one foot in Wales and the other in England, Knighton is known for its picture-postcard tranquillity.

Yet today all is far from calm, as a new windfarm, with its giant slowly rotating turbines, is planned for the hill on the edge of town.

Some people look on this as their part in saving the Earth from the threat of climate change, others as the destruction of the ancient landscape.

Meanwhile, on the hill itself stands an observatory, the Spaceguard Centre, whose director sees its role as drawing attention to the dangers lurking in space, and the likelihood of the world's destruction by asteroid strike.

So did a strange shower of fish over the town hint at apocalypse? Alan Dein visits the town, reads the omens and tries to understand why the sky over Knighton is filled with portents.

Alan Dein discovers that passions run high in the quiet borderland village of Knighton.

0502Tilting At Windmills20091113

Windfarms, Earth-destroying asteroids and raining fish - apocalyptic visions run surprisingly high in the sleepy beauty of the Welsh borders, as Alan Dein discovers when he visits the village of Knighton on the route of Offa's Dyke.

Situated with one foot in Wales and the other in England, Knighton is known for its picture-postcard tranquillity.

Yet today all is far from calm, as a new windfarm, with its giant slowly rotating turbines, is planned for the hill on the edge of town.

Some people look on this as their part in saving the Earth from the threat of climate change, others as the destruction of the ancient landscape.

Meanwhile, on the hill itself stands an observatory, the Spaceguard Centre, whose director sees its role as drawing attention to the dangers lurking in space, and the likelihood of the world's destruction by asteroid strike.

So did a strange shower of fish over the town hint at apocalypse? Alan Dein visits the town, reads the omens and tries to understand why the sky over Knighton is filled with portents.

Alan Dein discovers that passions run high in the quiet borderland village of Knighton.

0503Balancing Act

53Balancing Act20091120
0503Balancing Act *20091120

When Joni met Howie: the story of a long-distance love affair that blossomed amid the torn ligaments and strained quadriceps of some of Britain's top circus performers.

Joni, a leading Mayfair physiotherapist, could only marvel when she met the men and women of No Fit State circus, at the musculature and the perfection equilibrium of their bodies.

But Howie, a former horticulturalist, advertising stiltwalker and all-round free spirit was special, and soon they were more than friends.

Now, as if keeping their two lives together - ministering to the muscular misfortunes of City financiers and performing high in the Big Top all over Europe - weren't enough, Howie faces a special, personal ordeal.

He must undergo much-postponed surgery on his damaged left knee.

Meanwhile Joni has her own enormous physical challenges to face.

Circus artiste Howie prepares for make-or-break knee surgery.

0503Balancing Act *20091120

When Joni met Howie: the story of a long-distance love affair that blossomed amid the torn ligaments and strained quadriceps of some of Britain's top circus performers.

Joni, a leading Mayfair physiotherapist, could only marvel when she met the men and women of No Fit State circus, at the musculature and the perfection equilibrium of their bodies.

But Howie, a former horticulturalist, advertising stiltwalker and all-round free spirit was special, and soon they were more than friends.

Now, as if keeping their two lives together - ministering to the muscular misfortunes of City financiers and performing high in the Big Top all over Europe - weren't enough, Howie faces a special, personal ordeal.

He must undergo much-postponed surgery on his damaged left knee.

Meanwhile Joni has her own enormous physical challenges to face.

Circus artiste Howie prepares for make-or-break knee surgery.

0504The Maryfield Writers

54The Maryfield Writers20091127
0504The Maryfield Writers *20091127

Alan Dein goes to Northern Ireland to talk to former Royal Ulster Constabulary officers who have formed a writing group.

The Maryfield Writers meet once a month to share and discuss their work.

Alan spends time with three of them to understand why they write about their chosen subjects and finds that each of them deals with the past in different ways.

Bob has made a clean break with his police past.

He served for 22 years, was shot at, had bombs placed under his car and was forced to move house a number of times.

He chooses to write children's stories about fantasy and escape and has had a number of books published.

Keith is working on screenplays which fall into the police-procedural genre but avoid autobiographical references.

Not entirely at ease with modern Northern Ireland, Keith spends a lot of time at home, writing.

Teresa spent 20 years in Juvenile Liaisons and, as a Catholic, was in a minority in the RUC.

Her poetry has allowed her some catharsis as years of difficult experiences during the Troubles have now found a creative outlet.

They each reflect on their motivations for joining the police and the importance of their new lives as writers in post-Troubles Northern Ireland.

Alan Dein talks to former RUC officers in Northern Ireland who have taken up writing.

0504The Maryfield Writers *20091127

Alan Dein goes to Northern Ireland to talk to former Royal Ulster Constabulary officers who have formed a writing group.

The Maryfield Writers meet once a month to share and discuss their work.

Alan spends time with three of them to understand why they write about their chosen subjects and finds that each of them deals with the past in different ways.

Bob has made a clean break with his police past.

He served for 22 years, was shot at, had bombs placed under his car and was forced to move house a number of times.

He chooses to write children's stories about fantasy and escape and has had a number of books published.

Keith is working on screenplays which fall into the police-procedural genre but avoid autobiographical references.

Not entirely at ease with modern Northern Ireland, Keith spends a lot of time at home, writing.

Teresa spent 20 years in Juvenile Liaisons and, as a Catholic, was in a minority in the RUC.

Her poetry has allowed her some catharsis as years of difficult experiences during the Troubles have now found a creative outlet.

They each reflect on their motivations for joining the police and the importance of their new lives as writers in post-Troubles Northern Ireland.

Alan Dein talks to former RUC officers in Northern Ireland who have taken up writing.

55BMX Brothers20091204
0505Bmx Brothers *20091204

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Trey and Daniel Whyte's talent on the BMX track has resulted in progress to an Olympic qualifying event in the south of France.

Within the space of six months they have seen their lives transformed, moving from a makeshift BMX track on their Peckham estate to preparations for the event in Nice.

The ruthlessness learnt on their run-down estate undoubtedly helps them on the race track, but will it also make it harder for them to adjust to their new lives?

In preparation for the event, Daniel has moved to the UK's cycling academy in Manchester and 15-year-old Trey has been combining time there with his studies back in London at the Peckham Academy.

Their cycle coach believes the edge needed to live in places like Peckham has given the boys a real advantage on the track.

Daniel in particular is considered fearless by his rivals, and he gives an insight into his life before he took up cycling, and exactly how much trouble he was in.

It was a chance encounter with CK Flash, a part-time DJ and local BMX enthusiast, which led to the brothers taking up BMX riding and later resulted in parents forming a Peckham club which is now one of the best in the country.

The Whyte brothers have their sights set on the London Olympics, but how much will they be able to adapt to the changes they face as 2012 approaches?

Two teenage brothers swap life on a London estate for the elite British cycling academy.

0505Bmx Brothers *20091204

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Trey and Daniel Whyte's talent on the BMX track has resulted in progress to an Olympic qualifying event in the south of France.

Within the space of six months they have seen their lives transformed, moving from a makeshift BMX track on their Peckham estate to preparations for the event in Nice.

The ruthlessness learnt on their run-down estate undoubtedly helps them on the race track, but will it also make it harder for them to adjust to their new lives?

In preparation for the event, Daniel has moved to the UK's cycling academy in Manchester and 15-year-old Trey has been combining time there with his studies back in London at the Peckham Academy.

Their cycle coach believes the edge needed to live in places like Peckham has given the boys a real advantage on the track.

Daniel in particular is considered fearless by his rivals, and he gives an insight into his life before he took up cycling, and exactly how much trouble he was in.

It was a chance encounter with CK Flash, a part-time DJ and local BMX enthusiast, which led to the brothers taking up BMX riding and later resulted in parents forming a Peckham club which is now one of the best in the country.

The Whyte brothers have their sights set on the London Olympics, but how much will they be able to adapt to the changes they face as 2012 approaches?

Two teenage brothers swap life on a London estate for the elite British cycling academy.

0506Fragile Isle

0506 LASTFragile Isle20091211

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Alan Dein travels to Canna, one of the Small Isles in North West Scotland.

With a population of 18, six of whom are children, Canna is at a critical point.

There are just enough people to keep the island community going.

If any leave it will put huge pressures on the others.

If new people come, it will inevitably change the fragile balance that exists in such a small, tightly-knit populace.

Alan explores the connections between the different families and how they relate to the island as well as managing to feel connected to the wider world.

Neil has come from Wales with his family and is the island gardener; Magda is Basque and is the archivist of an enormous collection of Gaelic songs and stories; Murdo and Gerry are the farmers; John and Sheila run the guest house; Ellidh is the teacher in the school where two of the four pupils are her own children; Geoff, her husband, looks after their two year old twins at home.

What they all have in common is that they work for the Scottish National Trust, which owns the island and controls its population size.

It also controls the destiny of a young community trying to put down roots.

Alan Dein visits the tiny community on the Hebridean island of Canna.

0506 LASTFragile Isle20091211

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Alan Dein travels to Canna, one of the Small Isles in North West Scotland.

With a population of 18, six of whom are children, Canna is at a critical point.

There are just enough people to keep the island community going.

If any leave it will put huge pressures on the others.

If new people come, it will inevitably change the fragile balance that exists in such a small, tightly-knit populace.

Alan explores the connections between the different families and how they relate to the island as well as managing to feel connected to the wider world.

Neil has come from Wales with his family and is the island gardener; Magda is Basque and is the archivist of an enormous collection of Gaelic songs and stories; Murdo and Gerry are the farmers; John and Sheila run the guest house; Ellidh is the teacher in the school where two of the four pupils are her own children; Geoff, her husband, looks after their two year old twins at home.

What they all have in common is that they work for the Scottish National Trust, which owns the island and controls its population size.

It also controls the destiny of a young community trying to put down roots.

Alan Dein visits the tiny community on the Hebridean island of Canna.

56 LASTFragile Isle20091211
6120101117

Alan Dein returns with the series which captures stories from modern Britain.

1 Market Day. The sleepy market town of Bicester is home to a smattering of small scale high street stores and a plethora of charity shops. Yet less than ten minutes' walk from the market square lies one of the UK's most successful designer outlet centres - Bicester Village - hosting some of the biggest global brands. Visitors flock from the Middle- and Far East to snap up a bargain. Alan Dein joins them on board the Shopping Express coach and follows them on their shopping odyssey - in order to explore the worldwide appeal of designer bargain hunting in rural Oxfordshire.

Lives in a Landscape is Radio 4's award-winning documentary series, presented by Alan Dein, that tracks down people with stories to tell that reflect - in sometimes offbeat ways - the pleasure, the pain and the particularity of life in contemporary Britain. Also in this series - the villagers of a remote Cornish community take on a threat to their timeless idyllic home; the story of the men for whom recession means good times - the boarders up of empty buildings and... fighting it out in the City - inside the world of white-collar boxing.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

. Market Day. Alan Dein explores the allure of designer bargain hunting in Bicester Village.

0601Market Day20101117

Alan Dein returns with the series which captures stories from modern Britain.

1 Market Day.

The sleepy market town of Bicester is home to a smattering of small scale high street stores and a plethora of charity shops.

Yet less than ten minutes' walk from the market square lies one of the UK's most successful designer outlet centres - Bicester Village - hosting some of the biggest global brands.

Visitors flock from the Middle- and Far East to snap up a bargain.

Alan Dein joins them on board the Shopping Express coach and follows them on their shopping odyssey - in order to explore the worldwide appeal of designer bargain hunting in rural Oxfordshire.

Lives in a Landscape is Radio 4's award-winning documentary series, presented by Alan Dein, that tracks down people with stories to tell that reflect - in sometimes offbeat ways - the pleasure, the pain and the particularity of life in contemporary Britain.

Also in this series - the villagers of a remote Cornish community take on a threat to their timeless idyllic home; the story of the men for whom recession means good times - the boarders up of empty buildings and...

fighting it out in the City - inside the world of white-collar boxing.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

Market Day.

Alan Dein explores the allure of designer bargain hunting in Bicester Village.

0601Market Day20101117

Alan Dein returns with the series which captures stories from modern Britain.

1 Market Day.

The sleepy market town of Bicester is home to a smattering of small scale high street stores and a plethora of charity shops.

Yet less than ten minutes' walk from the market square lies one of the UK's most successful designer outlet centres - Bicester Village - hosting some of the biggest global brands.

Visitors flock from the Middle- and Far East to snap up a bargain.

Alan Dein joins them on board the Shopping Express coach and follows them on their shopping odyssey - in order to explore the worldwide appeal of designer bargain hunting in rural Oxfordshire.

Lives in a Landscape is Radio 4's award-winning documentary series, presented by Alan Dein, that tracks down people with stories to tell that reflect - in sometimes offbeat ways - the pleasure, the pain and the particularity of life in contemporary Britain.

Also in this series - the villagers of a remote Cornish community take on a threat to their timeless idyllic home; the story of the men for whom recession means good times - the boarders up of empty buildings and...

fighting it out in the City - inside the world of white-collar boxing.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

Market Day.

Alan Dein explores the allure of designer bargain hunting in Bicester Village.

6220101124

2 - City Fighters. In the second of Alan Dein's features reflecting the lives of widely differing groups of people across the country today, he catches up with two busy young men, Matt and Simon. Both have well-paid jobs in the City of London, but in recent months each has been training hard at a specialist boxing gym within sight of both the glass and steel towers of Broadgate and the cosier terraces of the old East End. Their goal is three hard-fought rounds of amateur so called 'white-collar' boxing in front of an enthusiastic and partisan audience in the very public arena of Kensington Town Hall.

Neither fighter knows the other, and indeed all Matt has heard about Simon is that he's a southpaw. City lawyer Simon's trainer Darren reckons his boy will be a hard nut to crack, especially with his vicious left hand. But Matt's no pushover either. Because, unbeknownst to his opponent, before he joined a select firm of employment consultants, tall and hefty Matt was a top-flight professional rugby player. And bears the scars to prove it.

With so-called 'white collar' amateur boxing enjoying something of a boom, on the big night there's a fair contingent of supporters from the office as well as family and best buddies cheering Matt and Simon on across the three 2-minute rounds... May the best man win.

Producer: Paula McGinley.

. Alan Dein joins white-collar boxers on the way to a big City night out.

0602City Fighters20101124

In the second of Alan Dein's features reflecting the lives of widely differing groups of people across the country today, he catches up with two busy young men, Matt and Simon.

Both have well-paid jobs in the City of London, but in recent months each has been training hard at a specialist boxing gym within sight of both the glass and steel towers of Broadgate and the cosier terraces of the old East End.

Their goal is three hard-fought rounds of amateur so called 'white-collar' boxing in front of an enthusiastic and partisan audience in the very public arena of Kensington Town Hall.

Neither fighter knows the other, and indeed all Matt has heard about Simon is that he's a southpaw.

City lawyer Simon's trainer Darren reckons his boy will be a hard nut to crack, especially with his vicious left hand.

But Matt's no pushover either.

Because, unbeknownst to his opponent, before he joined a select firm of employment consultants, tall and hefty Matt was a top-flight professional rugby player.

And bears the scars to prove it.

With so-called 'white collar' amateur boxing enjoying something of a boom, on the big night there's a fair contingent of supporters from the office as well as family and best buddies cheering Matt and Simon on across the three 2-minute rounds...

May the best man win.

Producer: Paula McGinley.

Alan Dein joins white-collar boxers on the way to a big City night out.

0602City Fighters20101124

In the second of Alan Dein's features reflecting the lives of widely differing groups of people across the country today, he catches up with two busy young men, Matt and Simon.

Both have well-paid jobs in the City of London, but in recent months each has been training hard at a specialist boxing gym within sight of both the glass and steel towers of Broadgate and the cosier terraces of the old East End.

Their goal is three hard-fought rounds of amateur so called 'white-collar' boxing in front of an enthusiastic and partisan audience in the very public arena of Kensington Town Hall.

Neither fighter knows the other, and indeed all Matt has heard about Simon is that he's a southpaw.

City lawyer Simon's trainer Darren reckons his boy will be a hard nut to crack, especially with his vicious left hand.

But Matt's no pushover either.

Because, unbeknownst to his opponent, before he joined a select firm of employment consultants, tall and hefty Matt was a top-flight professional rugby player.

And bears the scars to prove it.

With so-called 'white collar' amateur boxing enjoying something of a boom, on the big night there's a fair contingent of supporters from the office as well as family and best buddies cheering Matt and Simon on across the three 2-minute rounds...

May the best man win.

Producer: Paula McGinley.

Alan Dein joins white-collar boxers on the way to a big City night out.

6320101201

Alan Dein explores the lives of those making and buying chapattis as Bradford families mark Eid al-Adha, the Muslim Festival of Sacrifice.

The emergence of businesses based solely on providing warm fresh chapattis to accompany meals cooked at home meets a yearning for something provided in Pakistan where such sellers are commonplace. In addition, as Alan discovers, there's a social aspect to the queues forming as all sorts of people wait to take this final part of the meal back home. From Parveen's son, Aman, sent to buy 25 chapattis for a get together involving brothers, sisters, cousins and aunts, to eleven year old Alina, who already has her sights set on following her parents into a legal career and can't wait to get her warm food back home where it will sit alongside a feast prepared for family friends.

Thousands of chapattis and nan breads are made at Chach Valley every day by four men, one recently arrived from Pakistan. At Eid, in mid-November, Muslims share food and remind themselves of their own sacrifices. These are hard times in this part of Bradford and cultural and economic pressures leave the older generations worrying about what will happen to the young

But the relentless turnover as the chapatti orders flow - each batch carried off to tables across the city - is a reminder of what can bring people together. The ties between families but also the links between communities as those in the snaking queue wait their turn. The popularity of businesses providing chapattis and little else besides has taken many by surprise but whether it's a taste of the past, a sign of the times or just a convenient by product of both it's certainly something exciting and new

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

. A Taste of Home - Alan Dein explores the lives of Bradford chapatti buyers and sellers.

0603A Taste Of Home20101201

Alan Dein explores the lives of those making and buying chapattis as Bradford families mark Eid al-Adha, the Muslim Festival of Sacrifice.

The emergence of businesses based solely on providing warm fresh chapattis to accompany meals cooked at home meets a yearning for something provided in Pakistan where such sellers are commonplace.

In addition, as Alan discovers, there's a social aspect to the queues forming as all sorts of people wait to take this final part of the meal back home.

From Parveen's son, Aman, sent to buy 25 chapattis for a get together involving brothers, sisters, cousins and aunts, to eleven year old Alina, who already has her sights set on following her parents into a legal career and can't wait to get her warm food back home where it will sit alongside a feast prepared for family friends.

Thousands of chapattis and nan breads are made at Chach Valley every day by four men, one recently arrived from Pakistan.

At Eid, in mid-November, Muslims share food and remind themselves of their own sacrifices.

These are hard times in this part of Bradford and cultural and economic pressures leave the older generations worrying about what will happen to the young

But the relentless turnover as the chapatti orders flow - each batch carried off to tables across the city - is a reminder of what can bring people together.

The ties between families but also the links between communities as those in the snaking queue wait their turn.

The popularity of businesses providing chapattis and little else besides has taken many by surprise but whether it's a taste of the past, a sign of the times or just a convenient by product of both it's certainly something exciting and new

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

A Taste of Home - Alan Dein explores the lives of Bradford chapatti buyers and sellers.

0603A Taste Of Home20101201

Alan Dein explores the lives of those making and buying chapattis as Bradford families mark Eid al-Adha, the Muslim Festival of Sacrifice.

The emergence of businesses based solely on providing warm fresh chapattis to accompany meals cooked at home meets a yearning for something provided in Pakistan where such sellers are commonplace.

In addition, as Alan discovers, there's a social aspect to the queues forming as all sorts of people wait to take this final part of the meal back home.

From Parveen's son, Aman, sent to buy 25 chapattis for a get together involving brothers, sisters, cousins and aunts, to eleven year old Alina, who already has her sights set on following her parents into a legal career and can't wait to get her warm food back home where it will sit alongside a feast prepared for family friends.

Thousands of chapattis and nan breads are made at Chach Valley every day by four men, one recently arrived from Pakistan.

At Eid, in mid-November, Muslims share food and remind themselves of their own sacrifices.

These are hard times in this part of Bradford and cultural and economic pressures leave the older generations worrying about what will happen to the young

But the relentless turnover as the chapatti orders flow - each batch carried off to tables across the city - is a reminder of what can bring people together.

The ties between families but also the links between communities as those in the snaking queue wait their turn.

The popularity of businesses providing chapattis and little else besides has taken many by surprise but whether it's a taste of the past, a sign of the times or just a convenient by product of both it's certainly something exciting and new

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

A Taste of Home - Alan Dein explores the lives of Bradford chapatti buyers and sellers.

64The Battle of Trevalga20101208

Alan Dein visits the tiny Cornish village of Trevalga, recently put up for sale by Marlborough College.

The village of Trevalga sits on the north Cornish coast between the tourist magnets of Boscastle and Tintagel. It has no pub, no shops and no second homes. Virtually every villager pays rent, and homes are permanently occupied.

For the last fifty years, the villagers of Trevalga have paid rents to their landlord; a trust set up by the former owner of the village, Gerald Curgenven. In his will, Curgenven stipulated that the village be preserved and maintained by a trust, with any monies from rents left over to go to his former school, Marlborough College in Wiltshire.

Earlier this year, the college took legal advice which convinced them that the trust was invalid, and that they were actually the outright owners of the village and wider estate of Trevalga. They decided to sell and, as properties were measured and glossy brochures produced, Trevalgans reeled as their cosy existence was threatened for the first time in living memory.

The villagers organised, and sought their own legal advice, which flatly contradicted that given to the College. They were told that the trust was indeed valid, and that the village was not Marlborough's to sell.

Until the question of ownership is resolved, the future of this tiny, fragile community remains unclear. Alan meets the tenant farmers, artists, childminders and gravediggers of Trevalga, trying to plan for an uncertain future.

Producer : John Byrne.

. Alan Dein visits a Cornish community fighting for survival.

0604The Battle Of Trevalga20101208

Alan Dein visits the tiny Cornish village of Trevalga, recently put up for sale by Marlborough College.

The village of Trevalga sits on the north Cornish coast between the tourist magnets of Boscastle and Tintagel.

It has no pub, no shops and no second homes.

Virtually every villager pays rent, and homes are permanently occupied.

For the last fifty years, the villagers of Trevalga have paid rents to their landlord; a trust set up by the former owner of the village, Gerald Curgenven.

In his will, Curgenven stipulated that the village be preserved and maintained by a trust, with any monies from rents left over to go to his former school, Marlborough College in Wiltshire.

Earlier this year, the college took legal advice which convinced them that the trust was invalid, and that they were actually the outright owners of the village and wider estate of Trevalga.

They decided to sell and, as properties were measured and glossy brochures produced, Trevalgans reeled as their cosy existence was threatened for the first time in living memory.

The villagers organised, and sought their own legal advice, which flatly contradicted that given to the College.

They were told that the trust was indeed valid, and that the village was not Marlborough's to sell.

Until the question of ownership is resolved, the future of this tiny, fragile community remains unclear.

Alan meets the tenant farmers, artists, childminders and gravediggers of Trevalga, trying to plan for an uncertain future.

Producer : John Byrne.

Alan Dein visits a Cornish community fighting for survival.

0604The Battle Of Trevalga20101208

Alan Dein visits the tiny Cornish village of Trevalga, recently put up for sale by Marlborough College.

The village of Trevalga sits on the north Cornish coast between the tourist magnets of Boscastle and Tintagel.

It has no pub, no shops and no second homes.

Virtually every villager pays rent, and homes are permanently occupied.

For the last fifty years, the villagers of Trevalga have paid rents to their landlord; a trust set up by the former owner of the village, Gerald Curgenven.

In his will, Curgenven stipulated that the village be preserved and maintained by a trust, with any monies from rents left over to go to his former school, Marlborough College in Wiltshire.

Earlier this year, the college took legal advice which convinced them that the trust was invalid, and that they were actually the outright owners of the village and wider estate of Trevalga.

They decided to sell and, as properties were measured and glossy brochures produced, Trevalgans reeled as their cosy existence was threatened for the first time in living memory.

The villagers organised, and sought their own legal advice, which flatly contradicted that given to the College.

They were told that the trust was indeed valid, and that the village was not Marlborough's to sell.

Until the question of ownership is resolved, the future of this tiny, fragile community remains unclear.

Alan meets the tenant farmers, artists, childminders and gravediggers of Trevalga, trying to plan for an uncertain future.

Producer : John Byrne.

Alan Dein visits a Cornish community fighting for survival.

65The Hall20101215

In the heart of London's former docklands on the Isle of Dogs, surrounded by the steel and glass of Canary Wharf stands an outpost of an old London that's all but disappeared. St John's Community Centre is a little hall that's used seven days a week by a staggering variety of people, from the devout evangelical Christians who hold services there to the Moslem worshippers for whom the same space is their mosque. But for tango dancers it's the East End's equivalent of Buenos Aires, while for the bingo brigade, it's Full House - and for those who fancy a pint of an evening, St John's is simply the Local: at St John's, when one group have finished, another one is poised to move in.

At the hub of these extraordinarily diverse groups and juggling the space's complex timetable is George, now in his 70s but still working as piermaster just down the road at Canary Wharf. As a fifth generation stevedore, George Pye has seen the ships disappear from the river and the old wharves nearby transformed into gentrified pads for wealthy loft-dwellers. With Christmas approaching George has his time cut out to meet the many demands on the the little space that's been home to so many people for more than three decades.

Producer: Neil McCarthy.

. Alan Dein meets the many people for whom St John's Centre is a home from home.

0605The Hall20101215

In the heart of London's former docklands on the Isle of Dogs, surrounded by the steel and glass of Canary Wharf stands an outpost of an old London that's all but disappeared.

St John's Community Centre is a little hall that's used seven days a week by a staggering variety of people, from the devout evangelical Christians who hold services there to the Moslem worshippers for whom the same space is their mosque.

But for tango dancers it's the East End's equivalent of Buenos Aires, while for the bingo brigade, it's Full House - and for those who fancy a pint of an evening, St John's is simply the Local: at St John's, when one group have finished, another one is poised to move in.

At the hub of these extraordinarily diverse groups and juggling the space's complex timetable is George, now in his 70s but still working as piermaster just down the road at Canary Wharf.

As a fifth generation stevedore, George Pye has seen the ships disappear from the river and the old wharves nearby transformed into gentrified pads for wealthy loft-dwellers.

With Christmas approaching George has his time cut out to meet the many demands on the the little space that's been home to so many people for more than three decades.

Producer: Neil Mccarthy.

Alan Dein meets the many people for whom St John's Centre is a home from home.

0605The Hall20101215

In the heart of London's former docklands on the Isle of Dogs, surrounded by the steel and glass of Canary Wharf stands an outpost of an old London that's all but disappeared.

St John's Community Centre is a little hall that's used seven days a week by a staggering variety of people, from the devout evangelical Christians who hold services there to the Moslem worshippers for whom the same space is their mosque.

But for tango dancers it's the East End's equivalent of Buenos Aires, while for the bingo brigade, it's Full House - and for those who fancy a pint of an evening, St John's is simply the Local: at St John's, when one group have finished, another one is poised to move in.

At the hub of these extraordinarily diverse groups and juggling the space's complex timetable is George, now in his 70s but still working as piermaster just down the road at Canary Wharf.

As a fifth generation stevedore, George Pye has seen the ships disappear from the river and the old wharves nearby transformed into gentrified pads for wealthy loft-dwellers.

With Christmas approaching George has his time cut out to meet the many demands on the the little space that's been home to so many people for more than three decades.

Producer: Neil Mccarthy.

Alan Dein meets the many people for whom St John's Centre is a home from home.

71Passion at Glasgow Cross2011031820120402

On the wall above the Val D'Oro, one of the oldest fish and chip shops in Glasgow hangs a painting of the Crucifixion, painted to commemorate the residents of one of the poorest areas of the city.

Completed in 2010 David Adam's stark image of a crucified Christ in a street scene at Glasgow Cross places Christ in the midst of the city. At the foot of the cross where Christ's grieving mother Mary traditionally stands, is another Mary, Mary Paterson, a valued customer and local character, now in her nineties, huddled over the basket in which she carried her dog Sheba.

To the left of the cross, Luigi Corvi, owner of the shop, stands poised to sing, bearing a plate of fish and chips. In his innocence, a small boy offers up the remains of his Irn Bru to Jesus while a woman to his right attempts to pick the pocket of a passer-by and a man nearby injects heroin into his thigh.

But as Alan Dein discovers in the first of the new series of Lives in a Landscape, exploring offbeat aspects of contemporary Britain, the Passion at Glasgow Cross also describes Luigi's long suppressed dream: he serves fish and chips by day but dreams of life singing opera at La Scala...

Producer David Stenhouse

Coming up in this series: Alan is in deepest Northamptonshire at midnight on a Sunday in December to hear the mind-bending racket of the village of Broughton's "Tin Can Band". Unshackled from the dense silence that pervades this corner of rural England, the villagers, armed with pots, pans and anything that rattles, unleash as much noise as they process through the freezing lanes...

In Liverpool, Alan finds himself exploring violence and relationships and... theatre; while there's a nod to the royal celebrations at the end of April as he joins a couple of Iraq veterans in Gloucestershire who've turned from military imaging to wedding snaps... And will north London teenage hopeful JJ make it through his troubled family past to win a part in a big stage show?

. Alan Dein unearths a Crucifixion in a historic Glasgow chippie.

On the wall above the Val D'Oro, one of the oldest fish and chip shops in Glasgow hangs a painting of the Crucifixion, painted to commemorate the residents of one of the poorest areas of the city.

Completed in 2010 David Adam's stark image of a crucified Christ in a street scene at Glasgow Cross places Christ in the midst of the city. At the foot of the cross where Christ's grieving mother Mary traditionally stands, is another Mary, Mary Paterson, a valued customer and local character, now in her nineties, huddled over the basket in which she carried her dog Sheba.

To the left of the cross, Luigi Corvi, owner of the shop, stands poised to sing, bearing a plate of fish and chips. In his innocence, a small boy offers up the remains of his Irn Bru to Jesus while a woman to his right attempts to pick the pocket of a passer-by and a man nearby injects heroin into his thigh.

But as Alan Dein discovers in the first of the new series of Lives in a Landscape, exploring offbeat aspects of contemporary Britain, the Passion at Glasgow Cross also describes Luigi's long suppressed dream: he serves fish and chips by day but dreams of life singing opera at La Scala...

Producer David Stenhouse

Coming up in this series: Alan is in deepest Northamptonshire at midnight on a Sunday in December to hear the mind-bending racket of the village of Broughton's "Tin Can Band". Unshackled from the dense silence that pervades this corner of rural England, the villagers, armed with pots, pans and anything that rattles, unleash as much noise as they process through the freezing lanes...

In Liverpool, Alan finds himself exploring violence and relationships and... theatre; while there's a nod to the royal celebrations at the end of April as he joins a couple of Iraq veterans in Gloucestershire who've turned from military imaging to wedding snaps... And will north London teenage hopeful JJ make it through his troubled family past to win a part in a big stage show?

. Alan Dein unearths a Crucifixion in a historic Glasgow chippie.

0701Passion At Glasgow Cross2011031820120402

On the wall above the Val D'Oro, one of the oldest fish and chip shops in Glasgow hangs a painting of the Crucifixion, painted to commemorate the residents of one of the poorest areas of the city.

Completed in 2010 David Adam's stark image of a crucified Christ in a street scene at Glasgow Cross places Christ in the midst of the city. At the foot of the cross where Christ's grieving mother Mary traditionally stands, is another Mary, Mary Paterson, a valued customer and local character, now in her nineties, huddled over the basket in which she carried her dog Sheba.

To the left of the cross, Luigi Corvi, owner of the shop, stands poised to sing, bearing a plate of fish and chips. In his innocence, a small boy offers up the remains of his Irn Bru to Jesus while a woman to his right attempts to pick the pocket of a passer-by and a man nearby injects heroin into his thigh.

But as Alan Dein discovers in the first of the new series of Lives in a Landscape, exploring offbeat aspects of contemporary Britain, the Passion at Glasgow Cross also describes Luigi's long suppressed dream: he serves fish and chips by day but dreams of life singing opera at La Scala...

Producer David Stenhouse

Coming up in this series: Alan is in deepest Northamptonshire at midnight on a Sunday in December to hear the mind-bending racket of the village of Broughton's "Tin Can Band". Unshackled from the dense silence that pervades this corner of rural England, the villagers, armed with pots, pans and anything that rattles, unleash as much noise as they process through the freezing lanes...

In Liverpool, Alan finds himself exploring violence and relationships and... theatre; while there's a nod to the royal celebrations at the end of April as he joins a couple of Iraq veterans in Gloucestershire who've turned from military imaging to wedding snaps... And will north London teenage hopeful JJ make it through his troubled family past to win a part in a big stage show?

Alan Dein unearths a Crucifixion in a historic Glasgow chippie.

Completed in 2010 David Adam's stark image of a crucified Christ in a street scene at Glasgow Cross places Christ in the midst of the city.

At the foot of the cross where Christ's grieving mother Mary traditionally stands, is another Mary, Mary Paterson, a valued customer and local character, now in her nineties, huddled over the basket in which she carried her dog Sheba.

To the left of the cross, Luigi Corvi, owner of the shop, stands poised to sing, bearing a plate of fish and chips.

In his innocence, a small boy offers up the remains of his Irn Bru to Jesus while a woman to his right attempts to pick the pocket of a passer-by and a man nearby injects heroin into his thigh.

Coming up in this series: Alan is in deepest Northamptonshire at midnight on a Sunday in December to hear the mind-bending racket of the village of Broughton's "Tin Can Band".

Unshackled from the dense silence that pervades this corner of rural England, the villagers, armed with pots, pans and anything that rattles, unleash as much noise as they process through the freezing lanes...

In Liverpool, Alan finds himself exploring violence and relationships and...

theatre; while there's a nod to the royal celebrations at the end of April as he joins a couple of Iraq veterans in Gloucestershire who've turned from military imaging to wedding snaps...

And will north London teenage hopeful JJ make it through his troubled family past to win a part in a big stage show?

0701Passion At Glasgow Cross2011031820120402

On the wall above the Val D'Oro, one of the oldest fish and chip shops in Glasgow hangs a painting of the Crucifixion, painted to commemorate the residents of one of the poorest areas of the city.

Completed in 2010 David Adam's stark image of a crucified Christ in a street scene at Glasgow Cross places Christ in the midst of the city. At the foot of the cross where Christ's grieving mother Mary traditionally stands, is another Mary, Mary Paterson, a valued customer and local character, now in her nineties, huddled over the basket in which she carried her dog Sheba.

To the left of the cross, Luigi Corvi, owner of the shop, stands poised to sing, bearing a plate of fish and chips. In his innocence, a small boy offers up the remains of his Irn Bru to Jesus while a woman to his right attempts to pick the pocket of a passer-by and a man nearby injects heroin into his thigh.

But as Alan Dein discovers in the first of the new series of Lives in a Landscape, exploring offbeat aspects of contemporary Britain, the Passion at Glasgow Cross also describes Luigi's long suppressed dream: he serves fish and chips by day but dreams of life singing opera at La Scala...

Producer David Stenhouse

Coming up in this series: Alan is in deepest Northamptonshire at midnight on a Sunday in December to hear the mind-bending racket of the village of Broughton's "Tin Can Band". Unshackled from the dense silence that pervades this corner of rural England, the villagers, armed with pots, pans and anything that rattles, unleash as much noise as they process through the freezing lanes...

In Liverpool, Alan finds himself exploring violence and relationships and... theatre; while there's a nod to the royal celebrations at the end of April as he joins a couple of Iraq veterans in Gloucestershire who've turned from military imaging to wedding snaps... And will north London teenage hopeful JJ make it through his troubled family past to win a part in a big stage show?

Alan Dein unearths a Crucifixion in a historic Glasgow chippie.

Completed in 2010 David Adam's stark image of a crucified Christ in a street scene at Glasgow Cross places Christ in the midst of the city.

At the foot of the cross where Christ's grieving mother Mary traditionally stands, is another Mary, Mary Paterson, a valued customer and local character, now in her nineties, huddled over the basket in which she carried her dog Sheba.

To the left of the cross, Luigi Corvi, owner of the shop, stands poised to sing, bearing a plate of fish and chips.

In his innocence, a small boy offers up the remains of his Irn Bru to Jesus while a woman to his right attempts to pick the pocket of a passer-by and a man nearby injects heroin into his thigh.

Coming up in this series: Alan is in deepest Northamptonshire at midnight on a Sunday in December to hear the mind-bending racket of the village of Broughton's "Tin Can Band".

Unshackled from the dense silence that pervades this corner of rural England, the villagers, armed with pots, pans and anything that rattles, unleash as much noise as they process through the freezing lanes...

In Liverpool, Alan finds himself exploring violence and relationships and...

theatre; while there's a nod to the royal celebrations at the end of April as he joins a couple of Iraq veterans in Gloucestershire who've turned from military imaging to wedding snaps...

And will north London teenage hopeful JJ make it through his troubled family past to win a part in a big stage show?

07022011032520120403

St Peter's church, a 13th century jewel, is empty.

Inside, the workings of the clock tick ominously, moving the hands towards midnight. On the street outside a group of people, maybe a hundred, huddle against the cold, waiting for the clock to strike.

This is the scene on the second Sunday in December, every year, in the village of Broughton, near Kettering in Northamptonshire. This is a quiet village, the bypass takes traffic away, the few commuters leaving town early in the morning. The few pubs are jolly, but not rowdy, and the Co-op acts as an unofficial meeting point for the locals.

Not much to distinguish it from the other villages nearby; flat, farmland stretching from one village to the next, with the odd superstore or garden centre between them. But come midnight something different happens; something unique, ancient, mysterious; something rather noisy. For every year for as long as anyone can remember, and even further back, the devil is beaten out of Broughton, by the tin can band - a collection of villagers who patrol the streets after midnight, banging, pots and pans, milk churns and hip baths, drums and hammers, colanders and frying pans - anything that makes a noise in fact, and for one night a year, Broughton becomes the noisiest place in Northamptonshire. And no one quite knows why... Alan Dein joins them with a microphone.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

Alan Dein on how Northants villagers shatter the midnight peace in a din of pots and pans.

Inside, the workings of the clock tick ominously, moving the hands towards midnight.

On the street outside a group of people, maybe a hundred, huddle against the cold, waiting for the clock to strike.

This is the scene on the second Sunday in December, every year, in the village of Broughton, near Kettering in Northamptonshire.

This is a quiet village, the bypass takes traffic away, the few commuters leaving town early in the morning.

The few pubs are jolly, but not rowdy, and the Co-op acts as an unofficial meeting point for the locals.

Not much to distinguish it from the other villages nearby; flat, farmland stretching from one village to the next, with the odd superstore or garden centre between them.

But come midnight something different happens; something unique, ancient, mysterious; something rather noisy.

For every year for as long as anyone can remember, and even further back, the devil is beaten out of Broughton, by the tin can band - a collection of villagers who patrol the streets after midnight, banging, pots and pans, milk churns and hip baths, drums and hammers, colanders and frying pans - anything that makes a noise in fact, and for one night a year, Broughton becomes the noisiest place in Northamptonshire.

And no one quite knows why...

Alan Dein joins them with a microphone.

07022011032520120403

St Peter's church, a 13th century jewel, is empty.

Inside, the workings of the clock tick ominously, moving the hands towards midnight. On the street outside a group of people, maybe a hundred, huddle against the cold, waiting for the clock to strike.

This is the scene on the second Sunday in December, every year, in the village of Broughton, near Kettering in Northamptonshire. This is a quiet village, the bypass takes traffic away, the few commuters leaving town early in the morning. The few pubs are jolly, but not rowdy, and the Co-op acts as an unofficial meeting point for the locals.

Not much to distinguish it from the other villages nearby; flat, farmland stretching from one village to the next, with the odd superstore or garden centre between them. But come midnight something different happens; something unique, ancient, mysterious; something rather noisy. For every year for as long as anyone can remember, and even further back, the devil is beaten out of Broughton, by the tin can band - a collection of villagers who patrol the streets after midnight, banging, pots and pans, milk churns and hip baths, drums and hammers, colanders and frying pans - anything that makes a noise in fact, and for one night a year, Broughton becomes the noisiest place in Northamptonshire. And no one quite knows why... Alan Dein joins them with a microphone.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

Alan Dein on how Northants villagers shatter the midnight peace in a din of pots and pans.

Inside, the workings of the clock tick ominously, moving the hands towards midnight.

On the street outside a group of people, maybe a hundred, huddle against the cold, waiting for the clock to strike.

This is the scene on the second Sunday in December, every year, in the village of Broughton, near Kettering in Northamptonshire.

This is a quiet village, the bypass takes traffic away, the few commuters leaving town early in the morning.

The few pubs are jolly, but not rowdy, and the Co-op acts as an unofficial meeting point for the locals.

Not much to distinguish it from the other villages nearby; flat, farmland stretching from one village to the next, with the odd superstore or garden centre between them.

But come midnight something different happens; something unique, ancient, mysterious; something rather noisy.

For every year for as long as anyone can remember, and even further back, the devil is beaten out of Broughton, by the tin can band - a collection of villagers who patrol the streets after midnight, banging, pots and pans, milk churns and hip baths, drums and hammers, colanders and frying pans - anything that makes a noise in fact, and for one night a year, Broughton becomes the noisiest place in Northamptonshire.

And no one quite knows why...

Alan Dein joins them with a microphone.

0703Between Brothers2011040120120404

Alan Dein follows the lives of two brothers - Alex, searching for a fresh start away from London gangs and his adopted brother JJ, who is poised for success on the London stage.

Alan charts the lives of Alex, JJ and parents Liz and Andreas as they cope with changes which will fundamentally shift the balance of their family life.

As JJ approaches 16 he must make decisions about his life and is preparing for auditions which could see him relaunch his acting career. This was put on hold five years earlier when the woman he knew as his 'mum' died and he was taken in by best friend Alex and adopted by Alex's parents, Andreas and Liz. Before this he had toured with productions like the King and I and his teachers believe he has the talent, drive and determination to succeed.

These are characteristics in short supply for Alex who is preparing to move to the Philippines to live with his maternal grandmother. He has been selling Cannabis and now owes money to a local gang. Excluded from school he sees little prospect of his life improving and welcomes the opportunity to start afresh somewhere new - even though that means leaving best friend JJ.

The recordings track events from the initial intervention of family therapists offering intensive support in London to the equally enticing offer from relatives abroad. As Alex prepares to leave England JJ prepares for the auditions which could seal his future and both brothers get use to the idea of living their separate lives.

Alan Dein with a story of two brothers with very different destinies.

As JJ approaches 16 he must make decisions about his life and is preparing for auditions which could see him relaunch his acting career.

This was put on hold five years earlier when the woman he knew as his 'mum' died and he was taken in by best friend Alex and adopted by Alex's parents, Andreas and Liz.

Before this he had toured with productions like the King and I and his teachers believe he has the talent, drive and determination to succeed.

These are characteristics in short supply for Alex who is preparing to move to the Philippines to live with his maternal grandmother.

He has been selling Cannabis and now owes money to a local gang.

Excluded from school he sees little prospect of his life improving and welcomes the opportunity to start afresh somewhere new - even though that means leaving best friend JJ.

The recordings track events from the initial intervention of family therapists offering intensive support in London to the equally enticing offer from relatives abroad.

As Alex prepares to leave England JJ prepares for the auditions which could seal his future and both brothers get use to the idea of living their separate lives.

0703Between Brothers2011040120120404

Alan Dein follows the lives of two brothers - Alex, searching for a fresh start away from London gangs and his adopted brother JJ, who is poised for success on the London stage.

Alan charts the lives of Alex, JJ and parents Liz and Andreas as they cope with changes which will fundamentally shift the balance of their family life.

As JJ approaches 16 he must make decisions about his life and is preparing for auditions which could see him relaunch his acting career. This was put on hold five years earlier when the woman he knew as his 'mum' died and he was taken in by best friend Alex and adopted by Alex's parents, Andreas and Liz. Before this he had toured with productions like the King and I and his teachers believe he has the talent, drive and determination to succeed.

These are characteristics in short supply for Alex who is preparing to move to the Philippines to live with his maternal grandmother. He has been selling Cannabis and now owes money to a local gang. Excluded from school he sees little prospect of his life improving and welcomes the opportunity to start afresh somewhere new - even though that means leaving best friend JJ.

The recordings track events from the initial intervention of family therapists offering intensive support in London to the equally enticing offer from relatives abroad. As Alex prepares to leave England JJ prepares for the auditions which could seal his future and both brothers get use to the idea of living their separate lives.

Alan Dein with a story of two brothers with very different destinies.

As JJ approaches 16 he must make decisions about his life and is preparing for auditions which could see him relaunch his acting career.

This was put on hold five years earlier when the woman he knew as his 'mum' died and he was taken in by best friend Alex and adopted by Alex's parents, Andreas and Liz.

Before this he had toured with productions like the King and I and his teachers believe he has the talent, drive and determination to succeed.

These are characteristics in short supply for Alex who is preparing to move to the Philippines to live with his maternal grandmother.

He has been selling Cannabis and now owes money to a local gang.

Excluded from school he sees little prospect of his life improving and welcomes the opportunity to start afresh somewhere new - even though that means leaving best friend JJ.

The recordings track events from the initial intervention of family therapists offering intensive support in London to the equally enticing offer from relatives abroad.

As Alex prepares to leave England JJ prepares for the auditions which could seal his future and both brothers get use to the idea of living their separate lives.

07042011040820120405

Alan Dein follows the fortunes of Iraq veteran turned wedding photographer Stefan Edwards as he contends with the difficulties of life on civvy street and tries to cut himself a slice of the increasingly competitive wedding market.

It's a March wedding for Lorraine and Richard from Newport and photographer Stefan Edwards exudes an air of military authority as he helps to chronicle the pair's big day. On the inside, though, Stefan's every bit as nervous as the couple anxiously awaiting the exchanging of vows. For Stefan's a newcomer to the wedding photography business - six months previously, he'd been out in Iraq using his camera to chronicle the war ravaged country, first for the British army and then for a private security contractor.

Having visited virtually every corner of Iraq, Stefan eventually decided to return to the UK to be with his Newport-based family who'd grown increasingly concerned at his absence. With steady work hard to find, Stefan has decided to go into the photography business, swapping one risk for another. Alan Dein joins him at the start of the wedding season as he attempts to drum up trade for his new venture and put the trauma of Iraq behind him.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

Alan Dein follows the fortunes of Iraq veteran turned wedding photographer Stefan Edwards.

It's a March wedding for Lorraine and Richard from Newport and official photographer Stefan Edwards exudes an air of military authority as he chronicles the pair's big day.

On the inside, though, Stefan's every bit as nervous as the couple anxiously awaiting the exchanging of vows.

For Stefan's a newcomer to the wedding photography business - six months previously, he'd been out in Iraq using his camera to chronicle the war ravaged country, first for the British army and then for a private security contractor.

Having visited virtually every corner of Iraq, Stefan eventually decided to return to the UK to be with his Newport-based family who'd grown increasingly concerned at his absence.

With steady work hard to find, Stefan has decided to go into the photography business, swapping one risk for another.

Alan Dein joins him at the start of the wedding season as he attempts to drum up trade for his new venture and put the trauma of Iraq behind him.

07042011040820120405

Alan Dein follows the fortunes of Iraq veteran turned wedding photographer Stefan Edwards as he contends with the difficulties of life on civvy street and tries to cut himself a slice of the increasingly competitive wedding market.

It's a March wedding for Lorraine and Richard from Newport and photographer Stefan Edwards exudes an air of military authority as he helps to chronicle the pair's big day. On the inside, though, Stefan's every bit as nervous as the couple anxiously awaiting the exchanging of vows. For Stefan's a newcomer to the wedding photography business - six months previously, he'd been out in Iraq using his camera to chronicle the war ravaged country, first for the British army and then for a private security contractor.

Having visited virtually every corner of Iraq, Stefan eventually decided to return to the UK to be with his Newport-based family who'd grown increasingly concerned at his absence. With steady work hard to find, Stefan has decided to go into the photography business, swapping one risk for another. Alan Dein joins him at the start of the wedding season as he attempts to drum up trade for his new venture and put the trauma of Iraq behind him.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

Alan Dein follows the fortunes of Iraq veteran turned wedding photographer Stefan Edwards.

It's a March wedding for Lorraine and Richard from Newport and official photographer Stefan Edwards exudes an air of military authority as he chronicles the pair's big day.

On the inside, though, Stefan's every bit as nervous as the couple anxiously awaiting the exchanging of vows.

For Stefan's a newcomer to the wedding photography business - six months previously, he'd been out in Iraq using his camera to chronicle the war ravaged country, first for the British army and then for a private security contractor.

Having visited virtually every corner of Iraq, Stefan eventually decided to return to the UK to be with his Newport-based family who'd grown increasingly concerned at his absence.

With steady work hard to find, Stefan has decided to go into the photography business, swapping one risk for another.

Alan Dein joins him at the start of the wedding season as he attempts to drum up trade for his new venture and put the trauma of Iraq behind him.

0705 LASTReaders' Lives2011041520120406

Every six weeks a group of women in affluent Putney by the Thames in south-west London meets to discuss a book they've all been reading. This is no casual club open to the public but a close knit circle of friends and bibliophiles whose group is exclusive. As Boat Race Saturday - spring highpoint of the social calendar - approaches, Alan Dein joins the women as they go about their daily lives to hear about their relationship with Putney, with each other and the meaning the book club has for them.

Producer: Neil McCarthy.

Alan Dein joins a group of female friends in an exclusive south-west London reading circle

5.

Readers' Lives.

Every six weeks a group of women in affluent Putney by the Thames in south-west London meets to discuss a book they've all been reading.

This is no casual club open to the public but a close knit circle of friends and bibliophiles whose group is exclusive.

As Boat Race Saturday - spring highpoint of the social calendar - approaches, Alan Dein joins the women as they go about their daily lives to hear about their relationship with Putney, with each other and the meaning the book club has for them.

0705 LASTReaders' Lives2011041520120406

Every six weeks a group of women in affluent Putney by the Thames in south-west London meets to discuss a book they've all been reading. This is no casual club open to the public but a close knit circle of friends and bibliophiles whose group is exclusive. As Boat Race Saturday - spring highpoint of the social calendar - approaches, Alan Dein joins the women as they go about their daily lives to hear about their relationship with Putney, with each other and the meaning the book club has for them.

Producer: Neil McCarthy.

Alan Dein joins a group of female friends in an exclusive south-west London reading circle

5.

Readers' Lives.

Every six weeks a group of women in affluent Putney by the Thames in south-west London meets to discuss a book they've all been reading.

This is no casual club open to the public but a close knit circle of friends and bibliophiles whose group is exclusive.

As Boat Race Saturday - spring highpoint of the social calendar - approaches, Alan Dein joins the women as they go about their daily lives to hear about their relationship with Putney, with each other and the meaning the book club has for them.

722011032520120403

St Peter's church, a 13th century jewel, is empty.

Inside, the workings of the clock tick ominously, moving the hands towards midnight. On the street outside a group of people, maybe a hundred, huddle against the cold, waiting for the clock to strike.

This is the scene on the second Sunday in December, every year, in the village of Broughton, near Kettering in Northamptonshire. This is a quiet village, the bypass takes traffic away, the few commuters leaving town early in the morning. The few pubs are jolly, but not rowdy, and the Co-op acts as an unofficial meeting point for the locals.

Not much to distinguish it from the other villages nearby; flat, farmland stretching from one village to the next, with the odd superstore or garden centre between them. But come midnight something different happens; something unique, ancient, mysterious; something rather noisy. For every year for as long as anyone can remember, and even further back, the devil is beaten out of Broughton, by the tin can band - a collection of villagers who patrol the streets after midnight, banging, pots and pans, milk churns and hip baths, drums and hammers, colanders and frying pans - anything that makes a noise in fact, and for one night a year, Broughton becomes the noisiest place in Northamptonshire. And no one quite knows why... Alan Dein joins them with a microphone.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

. Alan Dein on how Northants villagers shatter the midnight peace in a din of pots and pans.

St Peter's church, a 13th century jewel, is empty.

Inside, the workings of the clock tick ominously, moving the hands towards midnight. On the street outside a group of people, maybe a hundred, huddle against the cold, waiting for the clock to strike.

This is the scene on the second Sunday in December, every year, in the village of Broughton, near Kettering in Northamptonshire. This is a quiet village, the bypass takes traffic away, the few commuters leaving town early in the morning. The few pubs are jolly, but not rowdy, and the Co-op acts as an unofficial meeting point for the locals.

Not much to distinguish it from the other villages nearby; flat, farmland stretching from one village to the next, with the odd superstore or garden centre between them. But come midnight something different happens; something unique, ancient, mysterious; something rather noisy. For every year for as long as anyone can remember, and even further back, the devil is beaten out of Broughton, by the tin can band - a collection of villagers who patrol the streets after midnight, banging, pots and pans, milk churns and hip baths, drums and hammers, colanders and frying pans - anything that makes a noise in fact, and for one night a year, Broughton becomes the noisiest place in Northamptonshire. And no one quite knows why... Alan Dein joins them with a microphone.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

. Alan Dein on how Northants villagers shatter the midnight peace in a din of pots and pans.

73Between Brothers20120404

Alan Dein follows the lives of two brothers - Alex, searching for a fresh start away from London gangs and his adopted brother JJ, who is poised for success on the London stage.

Alan charts the lives of Alex, JJ and parents Liz and Andreas as they cope with changes which will fundamentally shift the balance of their family life.

As JJ approaches 16 he must make decisions about his life and is preparing for auditions which could see him relaunch his acting career. This was put on hold five years earlier when the woman he knew as his 'mum' died and he was taken in by best friend Alex and adopted by Alex's parents, Andreas and Liz. Before this he had toured with productions like the King and I and his teachers believe he has the talent, drive and determination to succeed.

These are characteristics in short supply for Alex who is preparing to move to the Philippines to live with his maternal grandmother. He has been selling Cannabis and now owes money to a local gang. Excluded from school he sees little prospect of his life improving and welcomes the opportunity to start afresh somewhere new - even though that means leaving best friend JJ.

The recordings track events from the initial intervention of family therapists offering intensive support in London to the equally enticing offer from relatives abroad. As Alex prepares to leave England JJ prepares for the auditions which could seal his future and both brothers get use to the idea of living their separate lives.

. Alan Dein with a story of two brothers with very different destinies.

742011040820120405

Alan Dein follows the fortunes of Iraq veteran turned wedding photographer Stefan Edwards as he contends with the difficulties of life on civvy street and tries to cut himself a slice of the increasingly competitive wedding market.

It's a March wedding for Lorraine and Richard from Newport and official photographer Stefan Edwards exudes an air of military authority as he chronicles the pair's big day. On the inside, though, Stefan's every bit as nervous as the couple anxiously awaiting the exchanging of vows. For Stefan's a newcomer to the wedding photography business - six months previously, he'd been out in Iraq using his camera to chronicle the war ravaged country, first for the British army and then for a private security contractor.

Having visited virtually every corner of Iraq, Stefan eventually decided to return to the UK to be with his Newport-based family who'd grown increasingly concerned at his absence. With steady work hard to find, Stefan has decided to go into the photography business, swapping one risk for another. Alan Dein joins him at the start of the wedding season as he attempts to drum up trade for his new venture and put the trauma of Iraq behind him.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

. Alan Dein follows the fortunes of Iraq veteran turned wedding photographer Stefan Edwards.

Alan Dein follows the fortunes of Iraq veteran turned wedding photographer Stefan Edwards as he contends with the difficulties of life on civvy street and tries to cut himself a slice of the increasingly competitive wedding market.

It's a March wedding for Lorraine and Richard from Newport and photographer Stefan Edwards exudes an air of military authority as he helps to chronicle the pair's big day. On the inside, though, Stefan's every bit as nervous as the couple anxiously awaiting the exchanging of vows. For Stefan's a newcomer to the wedding photography business - six months previously, he'd been out in Iraq using his camera to chronicle the war ravaged country, first for the British army and then for a private security contractor.

Having visited virtually every corner of Iraq, Stefan eventually decided to return to the UK to be with his Newport-based family who'd grown increasingly concerned at his absence. With steady work hard to find, Stefan has decided to go into the photography business, swapping one risk for another. Alan Dein joins him at the start of the wedding season as he attempts to drum up trade for his new venture and put the trauma of Iraq behind him.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

. Alan Dein follows the fortunes of Iraq veteran turned wedding photographer Stefan Edwards.

75 LASTReaders' Lives20120406

5. Readers' Lives. Every six weeks a group of women in affluent Putney by the Thames in south-west London meets to discuss a book they've all been reading. This is no casual club open to the public but a close knit circle of friends and bibliophiles whose group is exclusive. As Boat Race Saturday - spring highpoint of the social calendar - approaches, Alan Dein joins the women as they go about their daily lives to hear about their relationship with Putney, with each other and the meaning the book club has for them.

Producer: Neil McCarthy.

. Alan Dein joins a group of female friends in an exclusive south-west London reading circle

0805 LAST20110629

In May, major forest fires swept through a corner of Berkshire.

12 fire services were engaged in tackling the blaze which lasted a week and is estimated to have caused £100,000 of damage to woodland.

On the edge of a section of the forest known as Crowthorne Wood a small row of wooden houses narrowly avoided being destroyed by the fire which reached the end of the road.

The residents of these one-time foresters' houses were evacuated whilst firefighters tried to regain control.

Alan Dein meets this small neighbourhood whose existence was suddenly thrown into peril as the fire moved quickly towards it.

He also returns to the much loved forest with some of the residents, now a charred remnant of what it used to be.

Producer: Neil McCarthy.

In May, Berkshire suffered its biggest ever forest fire.

Alan Dein meets the evacuees.

0805 LAST20110629

In May, major forest fires swept through a corner of Berkshire.

12 fire services were engaged in tackling the blaze which lasted a week and is estimated to have caused £100,000 of damage to woodland.

On the edge of a section of the forest known as Crowthorne Wood a small row of wooden houses narrowly avoided being destroyed by the fire which reached the end of the road.

The residents of these one-time foresters' houses were evacuated whilst firefighters tried to regain control.

Alan Dein meets this small neighbourhood whose existence was suddenly thrown into peril as the fire moved quickly towards it.

He also returns to the much loved forest with some of the residents, now a charred remnant of what it used to be.

Producer: Neil McCarthy.

In May, Berkshire suffered its biggest ever forest fire.

Alan Dein meets the evacuees.

8120110601

With the trauma surrounding the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan and the increasing urgency of the debate about Britain's future use of nuclear power, Alan Dein joins a group for whom the nuclear industry has been an uninterrupted staple of their daily lives. But the golfing members of SASRA, the Sellafield Area Sports and Recreation Association, have a life away from the pressure of working at one of the most recognisable nuclear establishments in the world.

Alan Dein joins Don Gash, the treasurer, fixtures secretary and - in his own words - general dogsbody for the SASRA golf society and a small group as they play their weekly competition round on the old golf that hugged the Cumbrian coast between Seascale and Calder Hall long before the nuclear industry arrived to dominate the landscape. The talk is of dry fairways, short rough and the business of working for an industry that was once seen as heroic and pioneering before entering a period of intense critical scrutiny.

And Alan also wonders how these British nuclear workers view events at Fukushima where their Japanese colleagues face the worst nightmare of people involved in this business.

As they make their way to the far end of the course, the holes which neighbour the Sellafield landscape of their working lives, Alan learns how they balance a very particular kind of work and leisure.

Producer: Tom Alban.

. Alan Dein shares a memory-rich round of golf with a group of nuclear workers at Sellafield

080120110601

With the trauma surrounding the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan and the increasing urgency of the debate about Britain's future use of nuclear power, Alan Dein joins a group for whom the nuclear industry has been an uninterrupted staple of their daily lives.

But the golfing members of SASRA, the Sellafield Area Sports and Recreation Association, have a life away from the pressure of working at one of the most recognisable nuclear establishments in the world.

Alan Dein joins Don Gash, the treasurer, fixtures secretary and - in his own words - general dogsbody for the SASRA golf society and a small group as they play their weekly competition round on the old golf that hugged the Cumbrian coast between Seascale and Calder Hall long before the nuclear industry arrived to dominate the landscape.

The talk is of dry fairways, short rough and the business of working for an industry that was once seen as heroic and pioneering before entering a period of intense critical scrutiny.

And Alan also wonders how these British nuclear workers view events at Fukushima where their Japanese colleagues face the worst nightmare of people involved in this business.

As they make their way to the far end of the course, the holes which neighbour the Sellafield landscape of their working lives, Alan learns how they balance a very particular kind of work and leisure.

Producer: Tom Alban.

Alan Dein shares a memory-rich round of golf with a group of nuclear workers at Sellafield

080120110601

With the trauma surrounding the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan and the increasing urgency of the debate about Britain's future use of nuclear power, Alan Dein joins a group for whom the nuclear industry has been an uninterrupted staple of their daily lives.

But the golfing members of SASRA, the Sellafield Area Sports and Recreation Association, have a life away from the pressure of working at one of the most recognisable nuclear establishments in the world.

Alan Dein joins Don Gash, the treasurer, fixtures secretary and - in his own words - general dogsbody for the SASRA golf society and a small group as they play their weekly competition round on the old golf that hugged the Cumbrian coast between Seascale and Calder Hall long before the nuclear industry arrived to dominate the landscape.

The talk is of dry fairways, short rough and the business of working for an industry that was once seen as heroic and pioneering before entering a period of intense critical scrutiny.

And Alan also wonders how these British nuclear workers view events at Fukushima where their Japanese colleagues face the worst nightmare of people involved in this business.

As they make their way to the far end of the course, the holes which neighbour the Sellafield landscape of their working lives, Alan learns how they balance a very particular kind of work and leisure.

Producer: Tom Alban.

Alan Dein shares a memory-rich round of golf with a group of nuclear workers at Sellafield

8220110608

Alan Dein meets Arthur Lowe, a 75-year-old life model and former financial adviser, from Shipston-On-Stour who poses for art students as a contribution to society. Arthur puts his trim physique down to the lengths he regularly swims in his local pool - training which helped him win a gold medal at last year's world master's swimming competition in Sweden.

Alan visits an art class and observes the students at work as they capture the essence of the man at the front of the class. Although, he is physically naked before them, many know little of the life within and the issues that concern Arthur. Away from the studio, Alan explores exposure, vanity and the ageing process with Arthur who is acutely aware that his days as a model may be numbered.

. Alan Dein meets a 75-year-old life model in Shipston-On-Stour.

080220110608

Alan Dein meets Arthur Lowe, a 75-year-old life model and former financial adviser, from Shipston-On-Stour who poses for art students as a contribution to society.

Arthur puts his trim physique down to the lengths he regularly swims in his local pool - training which helped him win a gold medal at last year's world master's swimming competition in Sweden.

Alan visits an art class and observes the students at work as they capture the essence of the man at the front of the class.

Although, he is physically naked before them, many know little of the life within and the issues that concern Arthur.

Away from the studio, Alan explores exposure, vanity and the ageing process with Arthur who is acutely aware that his days as a model may be numbered.

Alan Dein meets a 75-year-old life model in Shipston-On-Stour.

080220110608

Alan Dein meets Arthur Lowe, a 75-year-old life model and former financial adviser, from Shipston-On-Stour who poses for art students as a contribution to society.

Arthur puts his trim physique down to the lengths he regularly swims in his local pool - training which helped him win a gold medal at last year's world master's swimming competition in Sweden.

Alan visits an art class and observes the students at work as they capture the essence of the man at the front of the class.

Although, he is physically naked before them, many know little of the life within and the issues that concern Arthur.

Away from the studio, Alan explores exposure, vanity and the ageing process with Arthur who is acutely aware that his days as a model may be numbered.

Alan Dein meets a 75-year-old life model in Shipston-On-Stour.

8320110615

It was a chance encounter with the President himself which saw Zimbabwean musician, Wilson Magwere, become a well rewarded propagandist for Robert Mugabe's regime. While he and his fellow musicians from the band Storm were asked to perform at pro-government rallies and events, all around them they witnessed their friends, neighbours and family members suffer at the hands of the same repressive regime. It was soon too much for Wilson to bear. Leaving his wife and baby daughter behind in Harare, he ran away from the band, from Mugabe and from Zimbabwe. Eight years later, he has found himself living alone in Belfast, a city synonymous with its own set of political complexities. There he continues to wait for his political refugee status to be reviewed and prays that one day his wife and child will be able to join him. But for now Wilson has been trying to make a success of 'Magwere,' the new band he's formed with a disparate group of Belfast based musicians hailing from a hotchpotch of different countries around the world. Alan Dein meets Wilson as he attempts to carve out a life for himself in Belfast and Magwere prepare for their next big gig.

Producer: Conor Garrett.

. Alan Dein meets Zimbabwean refugee Wilson Magwere in his adopted home of Belfast.

08032011061520120731

It was a chance encounter with the President himself which saw Zimbabwean musician, Wilson Magwere, become a well rewarded propagandist for Robert Mugabe's regime. While he and his fellow musicians from the band Storm were asked to perform at pro-government rallies and events, all around them they witnessed their friends, neighbours and family members suffer at the hands of the same repressive regime. It was soon too much for Wilson to bear. Leaving his wife and baby daughter behind in Harare, he ran away from the band, from Mugabe and from Zimbabwe. Eight years later, he has found himself living alone in Belfast, a city synonymous with its own set of political complexities. There he continues to wait for his political refugee status to be reviewed and prays that one day his wife and child will be able to join him. But for now Wilson has been trying to make a success of 'Magwere,' the new band he's formed with a disparate group of Belfast based musicians hailing from a hotchpotch of different countries around the world. Alan Dein meets Wilson as he attempts to carve out a life for himself in Belfast and Magwere prepare for their next big gig.

Producer: Conor Garrett.

It was a chance encounter with the President himself which saw Zimbabwean musician, Wilson Magwere, become a well rewarded propagandist for Robert Mugabe's regime. While he and his fellow musicians from the band Storm were asked to perform at pro-government rallies and events, all around them they witnessed their friends, neighbours and family members suffer at the hands of the same repressive regime. It was soon too much for Wilson to bear. Leaving his wife and baby daughter behind in Harare, he ran away from the band, from Mugabe and from Zimbabwe. Eight years later, he has found himself living alone in Belfast, a city synonymous with its own set of political complexities. There he continues to wait for his political refugee status to be reviewed and prays that one day his wife and child will be able to join him. But for now Wilson has been trying to make a success of 'Magwere,' the new band he's formed with a disparate group of Belfast based musicians hailing from a hotchpotch of different countries around the world. Alan Dein meets Wilson as he attempts to carve out a life for himself in Belfast and Magwere prepare for their next big gig.

Producer: Conor Garrett.

Alan Dein meets Zimbabwean refugee Wilson Magwere in his adopted home of Belfast.

08032011061520120731

It was a chance encounter with the President himself which saw Zimbabwean musician, Wilson Magwere, become a well rewarded propagandist for Robert Mugabe's regime. While he and his fellow musicians from the band Storm were asked to perform at pro-government rallies and events, all around them they witnessed their friends, neighbours and family members suffer at the hands of the same repressive regime. It was soon too much for Wilson to bear. Leaving his wife and baby daughter behind in Harare, he ran away from the band, from Mugabe and from Zimbabwe. Eight years later, he has found himself living alone in Belfast, a city synonymous with its own set of political complexities. There he continues to wait for his political refugee status to be reviewed and prays that one day his wife and child will be able to join him. But for now Wilson has been trying to make a success of 'Magwere,' the new band he's formed with a disparate group of Belfast based musicians hailing from a hotchpotch of different countries around the world. Alan Dein meets Wilson as he attempts to carve out a life for himself in Belfast and Magwere prepare for their next big gig.

Producer: Conor Garrett.

Alan Dein meets Zimbabwean refugee Wilson Magwere in his adopted home of Belfast.

8420110622

Millie is about to reach the astonishing age of 104; at 94, Lily is a mere youngster, while 95-year-old Hetty is still as voluble and lively as she was when she worked in a football factory or ran her own business... Alan Dein visits Vi and John Rubens House in Ilford, Essex, where elderly residents of the old East End Jewish community in London now spend their days. Talking to them about how they spend their time now he discovers a rich landscape of experience in the lives of these entertainingly lively and thoughtful old people.

Producer: Simon Elmes.

. Alan Dein explores the feisty and the frail sides of ageing in an elderly people's home.

080420110622

Millie is about to reach the astonishing age of 104; at 94, Lily is a mere youngster, while 95-year-old Hetty is still as voluble and lively as she was when she worked in a football factory or ran her own business...

Alan Dein visits Vi and John Rubens House in Ilford, Essex, where elderly residents of the old East End Jewish community in London now spend their days.

Talking to them about how they spend their time now he discovers a rich landscape of experience in the lives of these entertainingly lively and thoughtful old people.

Producer: Simon Elmes.

Alan Dein explores the feisty and the frail sides of ageing in an elderly people's home.

080420110622

Millie is about to reach the astonishing age of 104; at 94, Lily is a mere youngster, while 95-year-old Hetty is still as voluble and lively as she was when she worked in a football factory or ran her own business...

Alan Dein visits Vi and John Rubens House in Ilford, Essex, where elderly residents of the old East End Jewish community in London now spend their days.

Talking to them about how they spend their time now he discovers a rich landscape of experience in the lives of these entertainingly lively and thoughtful old people.

Producer: Simon Elmes.

Alan Dein explores the feisty and the frail sides of ageing in an elderly people's home.

85 LAST20110629

In May, major forest fires swept through a corner of Berkshire. 12 fire services were engaged in tackling the blaze which lasted a week and is estimated to have caused £100,000 of damage to woodland. On the edge of a section of the forest known as Crowthorne Wood a small row of wooden houses narrowly avoided being destroyed by the fire which reached the end of the road. The residents of these one-time foresters' houses were evacuated whilst firefighters tried to regain control. Alan Dein meets this small neighbourhood whose existence was suddenly thrown into peril as the fire moved quickly towards it. He also returns to the much loved forest with some of the residents, now a charred remnant of what it used to be.

Producer: Neil McCarthy.

. In May, Berkshire suffered its biggest ever forest fire. Alan Dein meets the evacuees.

9120111010

"Ten years work gone in one night".

On Monday, 8th August, 2011, Siva's shop, "the Clarence Convenience Store" in the heart of Hackney, London, fell prey to looters during the riots that swept UK city centres two months ago. A Tamil refugee, Siva had spent a decade building up the small shop in Clarence Road, which was destined, one hot summer night, to become the 'front-line' in a battle between police and rioters.

Over the days and weeks that followed, presenter Alan Dein talked to Siva and others affected by the turmoil in this area of north London, for this first programme in the new series of Lives in a Landscape.

Immediately after the attack, pictures of Siva's shop, a whirlwind of wreckage created by a dark carnival of looters, were circulated across the globe by social media. Siva was left devastated - his was no chain store selling trainers or electrical goods. This was a small business, with no contents insurance. Bewildered by the attack, he was left wondering how he'd ever get his life and business back together.

But locals, determined that this would not be the end of the road for a popular local trader, got together to raise money and get help to rebuild his shop, and the Save Siva fund was born.

In the new series of "Lives in A Landscape" Alan Dein follows the immediate aftermath of the disturbances, meeting the people whose lives, for one night, were turned upside down and shaken violently.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall

Also in this series: Up for the Cup - Alan Dein follows the lives of the sportsmen and their families in a village near Manchester as they bid to win the National Village Cricket Cup... and the story of the evangelical traveller people who are trying to convert the inhabitants of a tough Edinburgh estate.

. Alan Dein explores the impact of last summer's riots on one London man and his friends.

09012011101020120730

Alan Dein explores the impact of last summer's riots on one London man and his friends.

"Ten years work gone in one night".

On Monday, 8th August, 2011, Siva's shop, "The Clarence Convenience Store" in the heart of Hackney, London, fell prey to looters during the riots that swept UK city centres. A Tamil refugee, Siva had spent a decade building up the small shop in Clarence Road, which was destined, one hot summer night, to become the 'front-line' in a battle between police and rioters.

Over the days and weeks that followed, presenter Alan Dein talked to Siva and others affected by the turmoil in this area of north London, for this Sony nominated "Lives in a Landscape".

Immediately after the attack, pictures of Siva's shop, a whirlwind of wreckage created by a dark carnival of looters, were circulated across the globe by social media. Siva was left devastated - his was no chain store selling trainers or electrical goods. This was a small business, with no contents insurance. Bewildered by the attack, he was left wondering how he'd ever get his life and business back together.

But locals, determined that this would not be the end of the road for a popular local trader, got together to raise money and get help to rebuild his shop, and the Help Siva fund was born.

In the new series of "Lives in A Landscape" Alan Dein follows the immediate aftermath of the disturbances, meeting the people whose lives, for one night, were turned upside down and shaken violently.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall

Also in this series: Up for the Cup - Alan Dein follows the lives of the sportsmen and their families in a village near Manchester as they bid to win the National Village Cricket Cup... and the story of the evangelical traveller people who are trying to convert the inhabitants of a tough Edinburgh estate.

"Ten years work gone in one night".

On Monday, 8th August, 2011, Siva's shop, "The Clarence Convenience Store" in the heart of Hackney, London, fell prey to looters during the riots that swept UK city centres. A Tamil refugee, Siva had spent a decade building up the small shop in Clarence Road, which was destined, one hot summer night, to become the 'front-line' in a battle between police and rioters.

Over the days and weeks that followed, presenter Alan Dein talked to Siva and others affected by the turmoil in this area of north London, for this Sony nominated "Lives in a Landscape".

Immediately after the attack, pictures of Siva's shop, a whirlwind of wreckage created by a dark carnival of looters, were circulated across the globe by social media. Siva was left devastated - his was no chain store selling trainers or electrical goods. This was a small business, with no contents insurance. Bewildered by the attack, he was left wondering how he'd ever get his life and business back together.

But locals, determined that this would not be the end of the road for a popular local trader, got together to raise money and get help to rebuild his shop, and the Help Siva fund was born.

In the new series of "Lives in A Landscape" Alan Dein follows the immediate aftermath of the disturbances, meeting the people whose lives, for one night, were turned upside down and shaken violently.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall

Also in this series: Up for the Cup - Alan Dein follows the lives of the sportsmen and their families in a village near Manchester as they bid to win the National Village Cricket Cup... and the story of the evangelical traveller people who are trying to convert the inhabitants of a tough Edinburgh estate.

09012011101020120730

Alan Dein explores the impact of last summer's riots on one London man and his friends.

"Ten years work gone in one night".

On Monday, 8th August, 2011, Siva's shop, "The Clarence Convenience Store" in the heart of Hackney, London, fell prey to looters during the riots that swept UK city centres. A Tamil refugee, Siva had spent a decade building up the small shop in Clarence Road, which was destined, one hot summer night, to become the 'front-line' in a battle between police and rioters.

Over the days and weeks that followed, presenter Alan Dein talked to Siva and others affected by the turmoil in this area of north London, for this Sony nominated "Lives in a Landscape".

Immediately after the attack, pictures of Siva's shop, a whirlwind of wreckage created by a dark carnival of looters, were circulated across the globe by social media. Siva was left devastated - his was no chain store selling trainers or electrical goods. This was a small business, with no contents insurance. Bewildered by the attack, he was left wondering how he'd ever get his life and business back together.

But locals, determined that this would not be the end of the road for a popular local trader, got together to raise money and get help to rebuild his shop, and the Help Siva fund was born.

In the new series of "Lives in A Landscape" Alan Dein follows the immediate aftermath of the disturbances, meeting the people whose lives, for one night, were turned upside down and shaken violently.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall

Also in this series: Up for the Cup - Alan Dein follows the lives of the sportsmen and their families in a village near Manchester as they bid to win the National Village Cricket Cup... and the story of the evangelical traveller people who are trying to convert the inhabitants of a tough Edinburgh estate.

9220111017

The village of Woodhouses is half-rural, half-suburban idyll. It has two pubs, a bowling green, a working men's club, a golf course and a thriving cricket club. Just ten minutes from the heart of Manchester, the village is full of excitement and anticipation because, as Alan Dein discovers, it's just won the semi-final of the 2011 Village Cricket Cup; the final - at Lords - is only a few weeks away.

However this proud Lancashire cricketing village, once home to quarter of a million pigs, suddenly finds itself part of a broader national debate about Britain's threatened countryside, because Woodhouses is today in real danger of being consumed by bricks and concrete. Although the very, very smelly pigs have all but gone, a handful of horses remain, keeping the builders at bay. But how long will Woodhouses remain a village? Will the bowling green become a car park as the rumour has it? If the building does not stop will Woodhouses be eligible to enter the National Village cup? The future could be up to a few horses, six small pigs and the final result at Lords.

Producer: Neil George.

. Alan Dein visits Woodhouses, Lancashire where more than national cricket fame is at stake.

09022011101720120803

The village of Woodhouses is half-rural, half-suburban idyll. It has two pubs, a bowling green, a working men's club, a golf course and a thriving cricket club. Just ten minutes from the heart of Manchester, the village is full of excitement and anticipation because, as Alan Dein discovers, it's just won the semi-final of the 2011 Village Cricket Cup; the final - at Lords - is only a few weeks away.

However this proud Lancashire cricketing village, once home to quarter of a million pigs, suddenly finds itself part of a broader national debate about Britain's threatened countryside, because Woodhouses is today in real danger of being consumed by bricks and concrete. Although the very, very smelly pigs have all but gone, a handful of horses remain, keeping the builders at bay. But how long will Woodhouses remain a village? Will the bowling green become a car park as the rumour has it? If the building does not stop will Woodhouses be eligible to enter the National Village cup? The future could be up to a few horses, six small pigs and the final result at Lords.

Producer: Neil George.

The village of Woodhouses is half-rural, half-suburban idyll. It has two pubs, a bowling green, a working men's club, a golf course and a thriving cricket club. Just ten minutes from the heart of Manchester, the village is full of excitement and anticipation because, as Alan Dein discovers, it's just won the semi-final of the 2011 Village Cricket Cup; the final - at Lords - is only a few weeks away.

However this proud Lancashire cricketing village, once home to quarter of a million pigs, suddenly finds itself part of a broader national debate about Britain's threatened countryside, because Woodhouses is today in real danger of being consumed by bricks and concrete. Although the very, very smelly pigs have all but gone, a handful of horses remain, keeping the builders at bay. But how long will Woodhouses remain a village? Will the bowling green become a car park as the rumour has it? If the building does not stop will Woodhouses be eligible to enter the National Village cup? The future could be up to a few horses, six small pigs and the final result at Lords.

Producer: Neil George.

Alan Dein visits Woodhouses, Lancashire where more than national cricket fame is at stake.

09022011101720120803

The village of Woodhouses is half-rural, half-suburban idyll. It has two pubs, a bowling green, a working men's club, a golf course and a thriving cricket club. Just ten minutes from the heart of Manchester, the village is full of excitement and anticipation because, as Alan Dein discovers, it's just won the semi-final of the 2011 Village Cricket Cup; the final - at Lords - is only a few weeks away.

However this proud Lancashire cricketing village, once home to quarter of a million pigs, suddenly finds itself part of a broader national debate about Britain's threatened countryside, because Woodhouses is today in real danger of being consumed by bricks and concrete. Although the very, very smelly pigs have all but gone, a handful of horses remain, keeping the builders at bay. But how long will Woodhouses remain a village? Will the bowling green become a car park as the rumour has it? If the building does not stop will Woodhouses be eligible to enter the National Village cup? The future could be up to a few horses, six small pigs and the final result at Lords.

Producer: Neil George.

Alan Dein visits Woodhouses, Lancashire where more than national cricket fame is at stake.

9320111024

In a 1930s art deco building on an industrial site in Edinburgh's Craigmillar estate, a group of evangelical travellers meets every Sunday and Thursday in the Life and Light church. Alan Dein meets Violet and other members of the church as they mingle with former heroin addicts, and joins them and Pastor Alister as they go 'witnessing' on Craigmillar.

Once a thriving community, today Craigmillar lies two thirds empty, with promised re-development on hold. For the last twenty years Craigmillar has been in a constant state of flux as one housing project after another has been flattened and entire neighbourhoods moved from one end of the estate to the other.

In contrast, the travellers' site has been isolated from Craigmillar's ever changing landscape. Through their church they have created a bubble in which to live. It's a small pocket of life, pretty much self contained and contrasts greatly with the fragmented estate next door.

Venturing into the heart of a housing scheme rife, so say the travellers, with drug dealers, Alan is not sure what kind of reception they will receive. On the estate he meets Heather, Craigmillar born and bred, who takes him to a wasteland. Once her home, it's now an eerie landscape with the roads and street lights still there but the houses gone.

Violet and Heather: a story of a small patch of inner-city life with two very different perspectives...

Producer: Kate Bissell.

. Alan Dein is in Edinburgh to meet evangelical travellers surviving amid decaying estates.

09032011102420111212 (R3)
20111217 (RS)
20111219 (RS)

Alan Dein is in Edinburgh to meet evangelical travellers surviving amid decaying estates.

In a 1930s art deco building on an industrial site in Edinburgh's Craigmillar estate, a group of evangelical travellers meets every Sunday and Thursday in the Life and Light church.

Alan Dein meets Violet and other members of the church as they mingle with former heroin addicts, and joins them and Pastor Alister as they go 'witnessing' on Craigmillar.

Once a thriving community, today Craigmillar lies two thirds empty, with promised re-development on hold.

For the last twenty years Craigmillar has been in a constant state of flux as one housing project after another has been flattened and entire neighbourhoods moved from one end of the estate to the other.

In contrast, the travellers' site has been isolated from Craigmillar's ever changing landscape.

Through their church they have created a bubble in which to live.

It's a small pocket of life, pretty much self contained and contrasts greatly with the fragmented estate next door.

Venturing into the heart of a housing scheme rife, so say the travellers, with drug dealers, Alan is not sure what kind of reception they will receive.

On the estate he meets Heather, Craigmillar born and bred, who takes him to a wasteland.

Once her home, it's now an eerie landscape with the roads and street lights still there but the houses gone.

Violet and Heather: a story of a small patch of inner-city life with two very different perspectives...

Producer: Kate Bissell.

09032011102420111212 (R3)
20111217 (RS)
20111219 (RS)

Alan Dein is in Edinburgh to meet evangelical travellers surviving amid decaying estates.

In a 1930s art deco building on an industrial site in Edinburgh's Craigmillar estate, a group of evangelical travellers meets every Sunday and Thursday in the Life and Light church.

Alan Dein meets Violet and other members of the church as they mingle with former heroin addicts, and joins them and Pastor Alister as they go 'witnessing' on Craigmillar.

Once a thriving community, today Craigmillar lies two thirds empty, with promised re-development on hold.

For the last twenty years Craigmillar has been in a constant state of flux as one housing project after another has been flattened and entire neighbourhoods moved from one end of the estate to the other.

In contrast, the travellers' site has been isolated from Craigmillar's ever changing landscape.

Through their church they have created a bubble in which to live.

It's a small pocket of life, pretty much self contained and contrasts greatly with the fragmented estate next door.

Venturing into the heart of a housing scheme rife, so say the travellers, with drug dealers, Alan is not sure what kind of reception they will receive.

On the estate he meets Heather, Craigmillar born and bred, who takes him to a wasteland.

Once her home, it's now an eerie landscape with the roads and street lights still there but the houses gone.

Violet and Heather: a story of a small patch of inner-city life with two very different perspectives...

Producer: Kate Bissell.

0905 LAST2011110720120801

Elsecar Park, Barnsley has been both paradise and hell for one man. Alan Dein investigates

Alan Dein travels to Elsecar Park, Barnsley.For the past 4 years it has been home to Francis McDonald who both runs the cafe and acts as unofficial park keeper. This was once called 'Elsecar by the sea'. Day trippers from Sheffield and hordes of local children from the pit village would play and swim in its reservoir. There's a wrought iron bandstand, a modern playground and the water still laps against the shore. In the last of the golden autumn sun, with eddies of brown leaves skittering around, it is a place of quiet beauty.

It seemed like a paradise when McDonald opened the doors on a world he had known since his childhood. But gradually it became a kind of lonely hell. Now this will be his last autumn and the house on the hill will fall silent and shuttered.

Producer: Mark Burman.

Alan Dein travels to Elsecar Park, Barnsley.For the past 4 years it has been home to Francis McDonald who both runs the cafe and acts as unofficial park keeper. This was once called 'Elsecar by the sea'. Day trippers from Sheffield and hordes of local children from the pit village would play and swim in its reservoir. There's a wrought iron bandstand, a modern playground and the water still laps against the shore. In the last of the golden autumn sun, with eddies of brown leaves skittering around, it is a place of quiet beauty.

It seemed like a paradise when McDonald opened the doors on a world he had known since his childhood. But gradually it became a kind of lonely hell. Now this will be his last autumn and the house on the hill will fall silent and shuttered.

Producer: Mark Burman.

0905 LAST2011110720120801

Elsecar Park, Barnsley has been both paradise and hell for one man. Alan Dein investigates

Alan Dein travels to Elsecar Park, Barnsley.For the past 4 years it has been home to Francis McDonald who both runs the cafe and acts as unofficial park keeper. This was once called 'Elsecar by the sea'. Day trippers from Sheffield and hordes of local children from the pit village would play and swim in its reservoir. There's a wrought iron bandstand, a modern playground and the water still laps against the shore. In the last of the golden autumn sun, with eddies of brown leaves skittering around, it is a place of quiet beauty.

It seemed like a paradise when McDonald opened the doors on a world he had known since his childhood. But gradually it became a kind of lonely hell. Now this will be his last autumn and the house on the hill will fall silent and shuttered.

Producer: Mark Burman.

9420111031

Alan Dein goes to Boston, Lincolnshire to explore the simmering tensions caused by a large influx of migrant workers from Eastern Europe.

On arriving in this traditional market town dominated by its vast church known locally as the Stump, Alan hears rumours of escalating crime, homelessness and enforced repatriations. Migration is without doubt the number one issue here - the population of this market town has swollen dramatically since the expansion of the EU, with workers drawn by the ready supply of agricultural work.

Alan talks to Bostonians and migrant workers alike. He witnesses for himself the troubles in the town on a Saturday night, attempting to build up a balanced picture of the truth behind the rumours.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

. Alan Dein goes to Boston, Lincs to explore tensions caused by an influx of migrant workers

09042011103120120802

Alan Dein goes to Boston, Lincs to explore tensions caused by an influx of migrant workers

Alan Dein goes to Boston, Lincolnshire to explore the simmering tensions caused by a large influx of migrant workers from Eastern Europe.

On arriving in this traditional market town dominated by its vast church known locally as the Stump, Alan hears rumours of escalating crime, homelessness and enforced repatriations. Migration is without doubt the number one issue here - the population of this market town has swollen dramatically since the expansion of the EU, with workers drawn by the ready supply of agricultural work.

Alan talks to Bostonians and migrant workers alike. He witnesses for himself the troubles in the town on a Saturday night, attempting to build up a balanced picture of the truth behind the rumours.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

09042011103120120802

Alan Dein goes to Boston, Lincs to explore tensions caused by an influx of migrant workers

Alan Dein goes to Boston, Lincolnshire to explore the simmering tensions caused by a large influx of migrant workers from Eastern Europe.

On arriving in this traditional market town dominated by its vast church known locally as the Stump, Alan hears rumours of escalating crime, homelessness and enforced repatriations. Migration is without doubt the number one issue here - the population of this market town has swollen dramatically since the expansion of the EU, with workers drawn by the ready supply of agricultural work.

Alan talks to Bostonians and migrant workers alike. He witnesses for himself the troubles in the town on a Saturday night, attempting to build up a balanced picture of the truth behind the rumours.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

Alan Dein goes to Boston, Lincolnshire to explore the simmering tensions caused by a large influx of migrant workers from Eastern Europe.

On arriving in this traditional market town dominated by its vast church known locally as the Stump, Alan hears rumours of escalating crime, homelessness and enforced repatriations. Migration is without doubt the number one issue here - the population of this market town has swollen dramatically since the expansion of the EU, with workers drawn by the ready supply of agricultural work.

Alan talks to Bostonians and migrant workers alike. He witnesses for himself the troubles in the town on a Saturday night, attempting to build up a balanced picture of the truth behind the rumours.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

95 LAST20111107

Alan Dein travels to Elsecar Park, Barnsley.For the past 4 years it has been home to Francis McDonald who both runs the cafe and acts as unofficial park keeper. This was once called 'Elsecar by the sea'. Day trippers from Sheffield and hordes of local children from the pit village would play and swim in its reservoir. There's a wrought iron bandstand, a modern playground and the water still laps against the shore. In the last of the golden autumn sun, with eddies of brown leaves skittering around, it is a place of quiet beauty.

It seemed like a paradise when McDonald opened the doors on a world he had known since his childhood. But gradually it became a kind of lonely hell. Now this will be his last autumn and the house on the hill will fall silent and shuttered.

Producer: Mark Burman.

. Elsecar Park, Barnsley has been both paradise and hell for one man. Alan Dein investigates

100120120502

In the first of a new series of documentary stories from contemporary Britain, Alan Dein captures the dramas of young families just moving into Cardea: a brand new housing estate on the outskirts of Peterborough. Just two years ago, Cardea was just open fields - now it's a burgeoning community.

Two families in particular attract Alan's attention. Sara Jane and Stacey are both expectant mums in their early twenties. Together with their partners, they're about to embark on a new life on a new-build estate.

Cardea represents a fresh start for both women after an often difficult past. Sara Jane was brought up on council estate and vowed that she wanted a different upbringing for her own children. At the same time, Stacey hopes that her ambitions to become a midwife - thwarted through ill-health - might yet bear fruit as she starts out in a new home.

Alan follows the young families up to and beyond moving day, talking to them about their hopes and fears for the future.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

Alan Dein captures the dramas of families moving into a new Peterborough housing estate.

100120120502

In the first of a new series of documentary stories from contemporary Britain, Alan Dein captures the dramas of young families just moving into Cardea: a brand new housing estate on the outskirts of Peterborough. Just two years ago, Cardea was just open fields - now it's a burgeoning community.

Two families in particular attract Alan's attention. Sara Jane and Stacey are both expectant mums in their early twenties. Together with their partners, they're about to embark on a new life on a new-build estate.

Cardea represents a fresh start for both women after an often difficult past. Sara Jane was brought up on council estate and vowed that she wanted a different upbringing for her own children. At the same time, Stacey hopes that her ambitions to become a midwife - thwarted through ill-health - might yet bear fruit as she starts out in a new home.

Alan follows the young families up to and beyond moving day, talking to them about their hopes and fears for the future.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

Alan Dein captures the dramas of families moving into a new Peterborough housing estate.

100220120509

(02/04)

Alan Dein delves into the deaths of two Labradors, Moz and Chloe and three Jack Russell Terriers, Monty, Poppy and Murphy, living in different families on the same street. Following the latest death, pork steak laced with pesticide was found in a garden and a local vet is in little doubt that this was a deliberate.

For Georgina and her husband Darren the attacks have unleashed mistrust and fear in their once close knit community. Their home on the sprawling council estate now hosts a shrine around the fireplace and the cremated remains of their loved pets are buried in the garden. Just weeks later Monty's mother, Poppy, was out in the garden when Emma spotted her eating something: "I rushed out and couldn't believe my eyes when I saw her with more meat. It was too late to stop her and she died later that afternoon."

For PC Charlie Banks, from the Pontefract and Knottingley neighbourhood policing team, the case is proving difficult to solve. There is no history of dispute between neighbours and he has found no evidence to suggest what might lie behind the attacks. Alan Dein meets those with theories of their own and looks at what these five dogs meant to their owners and who might have wanted them dead.

And just days into the recording the poisoner strikes again - with Alan Dein following the latest attack and also the reaction to it: Georgina and her husband, for instance, have decided to pack their bags and leave. But their son, Zac, has grown up on the estate and is reluctant to leave.

Meanwhile other neighbours speculate about what might be behind the latest attacks - could this be a personal vendetta....?

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

100220120509

(02/04)

Alan Dein delves into the deaths of two Labradors, Moz and Chloe and three Jack Russell Terriers, Monty, Poppy and Murphy, living in different families on the same street. Following the latest death, pork steak laced with pesticide was found in a garden and a local vet is in little doubt that this was a deliberate.

For Georgina and her husband Darren the attacks have unleashed mistrust and fear in their once close knit community. Their home on the sprawling council estate now hosts a shrine around the fireplace and the cremated remains of their loved pets are buried in the garden. Just weeks later Monty's mother, Poppy, was out in the garden when Emma spotted her eating something: "I rushed out and couldn't believe my eyes when I saw her with more meat. It was too late to stop her and she died later that afternoon."

For PC Charlie Banks, from the Pontefract and Knottingley neighbourhood policing team, the case is proving difficult to solve. There is no history of dispute between neighbours and he has found no evidence to suggest what might lie behind the attacks. Alan Dein meets those with theories of their own and looks at what these five dogs meant to their owners and who might have wanted them dead.

And just days into the recording the poisoner strikes again - with Alan Dein following the latest attack and also the reaction to it: Georgina and her husband, for instance, have decided to pack their bags and leave. But their son, Zac, has grown up on the estate and is reluctant to leave.

Meanwhile other neighbours speculate about what might be behind the latest attacks - could this be a personal vendetta....?

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

For Georgina and her husband Darren the attacks have unleashed mistrust and fear in their once close knit community. Their home on the sprawling council estate now hosts a shrine around the fireplace and the cremated remains of their loved pets are buried in the garden. Just weeks later Monty's mother, Poppy, was out in the garden when Emma spotted her eating something: "I rushed out and couldn't believe my eyes when I saw her with more meat. It was too late to stop her and she died later that afternoon."

Alan Dein delves into the mysterious deaths of five dogs in the same West Yorkshire street

10022012050920130115

Alan Dein delves into the deaths of two Labradors, Moz and Chloe and three Jack Russell Terriers, Monty, Poppy and Murphy, living in different families on the same street. Following the latest death, pork steak laced with pesticide was found in a garden and a local vet is in little doubt that this was a deliberate.

For Georgina and her husband Darren the attacks have unleashed mistrust and fear in their once close knit community. Their home on the sprawling council estate now hosts a shrine around the fireplace and the cremated remains of their loved pets are buried in the garden. Just weeks later Monty's mother, Poppy, was out in the garden when Emma spotted her eating something: "I rushed out and couldn't believe my eyes when I saw her with more meat. It was too late to stop her and she died later that afternoon."

For PC Charlie Banks, from the Pontefract and Knottingley neighbourhood policing team, the case is proving difficult to solve. There is no history of dispute between neighbours and he has found no evidence to suggest what might lie behind the attacks. Alan Dein meets those with theories of their own and looks at what these five dogs meant to their owners and who might have wanted them dead.

And just days into the recording the poisoner strikes again - with Alan Dein following the latest attack and also the reaction to it: Georgina and her husband, for instance, have decided to pack their bags and leave. But their son, Zac, has grown up on the estate and is reluctant to leave.

Meanwhile other neighbours speculate about what might be behind the latest attacks - could this be a personal vendetta....?

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

(02/04)

For Georgina and her husband Darren the attacks have unleashed mistrust and fear in their once close knit community. Their home on the sprawling council estate now hosts a shrine around the fireplace and the cremated remains of their loved pets are buried in the garden. Just weeks later Monty's mother, Poppy, was out in the garden when Emma spotted her eating something: "I rushed out and couldn't believe my eyes when I saw her with more meat. It was too late to stop her and she died later that afternoon."

Alan Dein delves into the mysterious deaths of five dogs in the same West Yorkshire street

10022012050920130115

Alan Dein delves into the deaths of two Labradors, Moz and Chloe and three Jack Russell Terriers, Monty, Poppy and Murphy, living in different families on the same street. Following the latest death, pork steak laced with pesticide was found in a garden and a local vet is in little doubt that this was a deliberate.

For Georgina and her husband Darren the attacks have unleashed mistrust and fear in their once close knit community. Their home on the sprawling council estate now hosts a shrine around the fireplace and the cremated remains of their loved pets are buried in the garden. Just weeks later Monty's mother, Poppy, was out in the garden when Emma spotted her eating something: "I rushed out and couldn't believe my eyes when I saw her with more meat. It was too late to stop her and she died later that afternoon."

For PC Charlie Banks, from the Pontefract and Knottingley neighbourhood policing team, the case is proving difficult to solve. There is no history of dispute between neighbours and he has found no evidence to suggest what might lie behind the attacks. Alan Dein meets those with theories of their own and looks at what these five dogs meant to their owners and who might have wanted them dead.

And just days into the recording the poisoner strikes again - with Alan Dein following the latest attack and also the reaction to it: Georgina and her husband, for instance, have decided to pack their bags and leave. But their son, Zac, has grown up on the estate and is reluctant to leave.

Meanwhile other neighbours speculate about what might be behind the latest attacks - could this be a personal vendetta....?

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

100320120516

Episode 03 of 04

Golf has put Portrush on the map once again. The seaside town in Northern Ireland is home to two stars of the sport, Graeme McDowell and Darren Clarke. Their names are proudly displayed on the 'Welcome to Portrush' road signs.

Along with fellow Northern Ireland player, Rory McIlroy, the two men have reinvigorated the local sports scene, so much so that the Irish Open golf tournament is coming to the Royal Portrush Golf Club at the end of June 2012. For four days the town will turn into a golf lover's paradise. Most of the hotels are booked out and people are renting out their houses.

The Irish Open was last held at Royal Portrush in 1947 when the town was a popular holiday resort. But the advent of package holidays and affordable foreign travel eventually lead to a slow-down in the local tourism trade. For this Lives in a Landscape Alan Dein is in Portrush as it carries out a major spring-clean. Derelict buildings, described as 'eyesores', are one legacy of the recent property boom and bust. Now an injection of cash from the government is paying for their demolition and many of the town's buildings are being repainted. Some in Portrush fear this will be a temporary patch-up job and that once the big sporting event ends, and the world's TV cameras depart, things will return to normal. Others are hoping the Irish Open will breathe new life into Portrush.

Alan meets residents as they prepare for the eyes of the world to fall on their town.

Producer: Claire Burgoyne.

100320120516

Episode 03 of 04

Golf has put Portrush on the map once again. The seaside town in Northern Ireland is home to two stars of the sport, Graeme McDowell and Darren Clarke. Their names are proudly displayed on the 'Welcome to Portrush' road signs.

Along with fellow Northern Ireland player, Rory McIlroy, the two men have reinvigorated the local sports scene, so much so that the Irish Open golf tournament is coming to the Royal Portrush Golf Club at the end of June 2012. For four days the town will turn into a golf lover's paradise. Most of the hotels are booked out and people are renting out their houses.

The Irish Open was last held at Royal Portrush in 1947 when the town was a popular holiday resort. But the advent of package holidays and affordable foreign travel eventually lead to a slow-down in the local tourism trade. For this Lives in a Landscape Alan Dein is in Portrush as it carries out a major spring-clean. Derelict buildings, described as 'eyesores', are one legacy of the recent property boom and bust. Now an injection of cash from the government is paying for their demolition and many of the town's buildings are being repainted. Some in Portrush fear this will be a temporary patch-up job and that once the big sporting event ends, and the world's TV cameras depart, things will return to normal. Others are hoping the Irish Open will breathe new life into Portrush.

Alan meets residents as they prepare for the eyes of the world to fall on their town.

Producer: Claire Burgoyne.

1004 LASTSteel Spring20120523

In 1990 Alan Dein travelled the length and breadth of Britain to document lives in steel- already an industry in decline. His then employer British Steel is, itself, now history. Decline, closure and layoffs have been the depressingly familiar litany of modern British industry. When they mothballed the blast furnace at Redcar, on the iron coast of Teesside, in 2010 it felt like just another death. "Like killing a creature" one worker says but this Easter Redcar witnessed a remarkable and fiery resurrection. A billion and a half dollars from Thailand brought back steel making and now the new blast furnace belches smoke and fire as the grey waves crash against the sands of Redcar. Alan Dein returns to a landscape he hasn't visited for a quarter of a century to journey from the iron shore where dark grey waves complement the coils of pale smoke beyond before trailing the black path to the steelworks and its fiery heart, the blast furnace. Dein picks his way through the vast metal realm of 'Queen Bess' vomiting sparks, smoke and flame to hear from new and old lives in steel, from those who forever left behind a world of generational toil and from those reborn in the shadow of the fire.

Producer Mark Burman.

1004 LASTSteel Spring2012052320130122

In 1990 Alan Dein travelled the length and breadth of Britain to document lives in steel- already an industry in decline. His then employer British Steel is, itself, now history. Decline, closure and layoffs have been the depressingly familiar litany of modern British industry. When they mothballed the blast furnace at Redcar, on the iron coast of Teesside, in 2010 it felt like just another death. "Like killing a creature" one worker says but this Easter Redcar witnessed a remarkable and fiery resurrection. A billion and a half dollars from Thailand brought back steel making and now the new blast furnace belches smoke and fire as the grey waves crash against the sands of Redcar. Alan Dein returns to a landscape he hasn't visited for a quarter of a century to journey from the iron shore where dark grey waves complement the coils of pale smoke beyond before trailing the black path to the steelworks and its fiery heart, the blast furnace. Dein picks his way through the vast metal realm of 'Queen Bess' vomiting sparks, smoke and flame to hear from new and old lives in steel, from those who forever left behind a world of generational toil and from those reborn in the shadow of the fire.

Producer Mark Burman.

1004 LASTSteel Spring2012052320130122

Steel Spring. In 1990 Alan Dein travelled the length and breadth of Britain to document lives in steel- already an industry in decline. His then employer British Steel is, itself, now history. Decline, closure and layoffs have been the depressingly familiar litany of modern British industry. When they mothballed the blast furnace at Redcar, on the iron coast of Teesside, in 2010 it felt like just another death. "Like killing a creature" one worker says but this Easter Redcar witnessed a remarkable and fiery resurrection. A billion and a half dollars from Thailand brought back steel making and now the new blast furnace belches smoke and fire as the grey waves crash against the sands of Redcar. Alan Dein returns to a landscape he hasn't visited for a quarter of a century to journey from the iron shore where dark grey waves complement the coils of pale smoke beyond before trailing the black path to the steelworks and its fiery heart, the blast furnace. Dein picks his way through the vast metal realm of 'Queen Bess' vomiting sparks, smoke and flame to hear from new and old lives in steel, from those who forever left behind a world of generational toil and from those reborn in the shadow of the fire.

Producer Mark Burman.

Steel Spring. In 1990 Alan Dein travelled the length and breadth of Britain to document lives in steel- already an industry in decline. His then employer British Steel is, itself, now history. Decline, closure and layoffs have been the depressingly familiar litany of modern British industry. When they mothballed the blast furnace at Redcar, on the iron coast of Teesside, in 2010 it felt like just another death. "Like killing a creature" one worker says but this Easter Redcar witnessed a remarkable and fiery resurrection. A billion and a half dollars from Thailand brought back steel making and now the new blast furnace belches smoke and fire as the grey waves crash against the sands of Redcar. Alan Dein returns to a landscape he hasn't visited for a quarter of a century to journey from the iron shore where dark grey waves complement the coils of pale smoke beyond before trailing the black path to the steelworks and its fiery heart, the blast furnace. Dein picks his way through the vast metal realm of 'Queen Bess' vomiting sparks, smoke and flame to hear from new and old lives in steel, from those who forever left behind a world of generational toil and from those reborn in the shadow of the fire.

Producer Mark Burman.

1101Gone Astray20121003

Alan Dein returns with a new series of stories from Britain today.

1. Gone Astray. Maureen's black and white cat Rosie has gone missing and the pensioner is scouring the neighbourhood to find her. Little does she know that further down the same Portsmouth street, the Fletcher family have had a visitor. Last Sunday night a black and white cat wandered into their house, sprawled herself out and showed every indication she wanted to stay. The cat has brought the family back together after a nightmare summer holiday with their teenage children. But does their feline peacemaker actually belong to Maureen?

Alan Dein finds out in a tale of lost and found cats, aided by Joy Wilson of Portsmouth and District Cat Rescue, who has devoted her life to the welfare of cats.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

1101Gone Astray2012100320130101

Alan Dein goes in search of stories from Britain today.

1. Gone Astray. Maureen's black and white cat Rosie has gone missing and the pensioner is scouring the neighbourhood to find her. Little does she know that further down the same Portsmouth street, the Fletcher family have had a visitor. Last Sunday night a black and white cat wandered into their house, sprawled herself out and showed every indication she wanted to stay. The cat has brought the family back together after a nightmare summer holiday with their teenage children. But does their feline peacemaker actually belong to Maureen?

Alan Dein finds out in a tale of lost and found cats, aided by Joy Wilson of Portsmouth and District Cat Rescue, who has devoted her life to the welfare of cats.

Producer: Laurence Grissell

Maureen's black and white cat Rosie has gone missing and the pensioner is scouring the neighbourhood to find her. Little does she know that further down the same Portsmouth street, the Fletcher family have had a visitor. Last Sunday night a black and white cat wandered into their house, sprawled herself out and showed every indication she wanted to stay. The cat has brought the family back together after a nightmare summer holiday with their teenage children. But does their feline peacemaker actually belong to Maureen?

Alan Dein finds out in a tale of lost and found cats, aided by Joy Wilson of Portsmouth and District Cat Rescue, who has devoted her life to the welfare of cats.

Producer: Laurence Grissell

1101Gone Astray2012100320130101

Alan Dein goes in search of stories from Britain today.

1. Gone Astray. Maureen's black and white cat Rosie has gone missing and the pensioner is scouring the neighbourhood to find her. Little does she know that further down the same Portsmouth street, the Fletcher family have had a visitor. Last Sunday night a black and white cat wandered into their house, sprawled herself out and showed every indication she wanted to stay. The cat has brought the family back together after a nightmare summer holiday with their teenage children. But does their feline peacemaker actually belong to Maureen?

Alan Dein finds out in a tale of lost and found cats, aided by Joy Wilson of Portsmouth and District Cat Rescue, who has devoted her life to the welfare of cats.

Producer: Laurence Grissell

Maureen's black and white cat Rosie has gone missing and the pensioner is scouring the neighbourhood to find her. Little does she know that further down the same Portsmouth street, the Fletcher family have had a visitor. Last Sunday night a black and white cat wandered into their house, sprawled herself out and showed every indication she wanted to stay. The cat has brought the family back together after a nightmare summer holiday with their teenage children. But does their feline peacemaker actually belong to Maureen?

1101Gone Astray2012100320130101

Alan Dein goes in search of stories from Britain today.

1. Gone Astray. Maureen's black and white cat Rosie has gone missing and the pensioner is scouring the neighbourhood to find her. Little does she know that further down the same Portsmouth street, the Fletcher family have had a visitor. Last Sunday night a black and white cat wandered into their house, sprawled herself out and showed every indication she wanted to stay. The cat has brought the family back together after a nightmare summer holiday with their teenage children. But does their feline peacemaker actually belong to Maureen?

Alan Dein finds out in a tale of lost and found cats, aided by Joy Wilson of Portsmouth and District Cat Rescue, who has devoted her life to the welfare of cats.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

1102The Longest Commute In Britain20121010

Geoff picks up a copy of "Horse and Hound" for his wife and strides toward Euston Station; Angus heads for the lounge car, where a whisky is ready and waiting; Mary leaves the offices of 'Country Life', and joins the London rush hour crowds wearing sturdy walking boots; meanwhile Ann Marie has taken up her position at the end of the platform 15, to await the longest train in the UK - it will be her job to unlock the doors, and ready the train for departure.

This is arguable the longest commute in the UK - the Caledonian Sleeper - which at a quarter of a mile long, is also the longest train.

Walkers, climbers, shooting-parties and Americans tourists are regular fare, but week in week out, the same faces return, the band of commuters who live in the Scottish Highlands, but work in London.

Would you, given the choice, choose to spent two nights a week on a train? Two nights of camaraderie in the lounge car; two nights of friendly exchanges, unwinding with late night whiskies; but two nights also of jolting rails, beds just a mite too short for the tallest folk, and the notorious uncoupling at Edinburgh.

Alan Dein rides the rails with the experts, through the long night of the long distance commuter, to find out where home really lies.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

1102The Longest Commute In Britain2012101020130108

Geoff picks up a copy of "Horse and Hound" for his wife and strides toward Euston Station; Angus heads for the lounge car, where a whisky is ready and waiting; Mary leaves the offices of 'Country Life', and joins the London rush hour crowds wearing sturdy walking boots; meanwhile Ann Marie has taken up her position at the end of the platform 15, to await the longest train in the UK - it will be her job to unlock the doors, and ready the train for departure.

This is arguable the longest commute in the UK - the Caledonian Sleeper - which at a quarter of a mile long, is also the longest train.

Walkers, climbers, shooting-parties and Americans tourists are regular fare, but week in week out, the same faces return, the band of commuters who live in the Scottish Highlands, but work in London.

Would you, given the choice, choose to spent two nights a week on a train? Two nights of camaraderie in the lounge car; two nights of friendly exchanges, unwinding with late night whiskies; but two nights also of jolting rails, beds just a mite too short for the tallest folk, and the notorious uncoupling at Edinburgh.

Alan Dein rides the rails with the experts, through the long night of the long distance commuter, to find out where home really lies.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

1102The Longest Commute in Britain2012101020130108

The Longest Commute in Britain

Geoff picks up a copy of "Horse and Hound" for his wife and strides toward Euston Station; Angus heads for the lounge car, where a whisky is ready and waiting; Mary leaves the offices of 'Country Life', and joins the London rush hour crowds wearing sturdy walking boots; meanwhile Ann Marie has taken up her position at the end of the platform 15, to await the longest train in the UK - it will be her job to unlock the doors, and ready the train for departure.

This is arguable the longest commute in the UK - the Caledonian Sleeper - which at a quarter of a mile long, is also the longest train.

Walkers, climbers, shooting-parties and Americans tourists are regular fare, but week in week out, the same faces return, the band of commuters who live in the Scottish Highlands, but work in London.

Would you, given the choice, choose to spent two nights a week on a train? Two nights of camaraderie in the lounge car; two nights of friendly exchanges, unwinding with late night whiskies; but two nights also of jolting rails, beds just a mite too short for the tallest folk, and the notorious uncoupling at Edinburgh.

Alan Dein rides the rails with the experts, through the long night of the long distance commuter, to find out where home really lies.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

1102The Longest Commute In Britain2012101020130108

Geoff picks up a copy of "Horse and Hound" for his wife and strides toward Euston Station; Angus heads for the lounge car, where a whisky is ready and waiting; Mary leaves the offices of 'Country Life', and joins the London rush hour crowds wearing sturdy walking boots; meanwhile Ann Marie has taken up her position at the end of the platform 15, to await the longest train in the UK - it will be her job to unlock the doors, and ready the train for departure.

This is arguable the longest commute in the UK - the Caledonian Sleeper - which at a quarter of a mile long, is also the longest train.

Walkers, climbers, shooting-parties and Americans tourists are regular fare, but week in week out, the same faces return, the band of commuters who live in the Scottish Highlands, but work in London.

Would you, given the choice, choose to spent two nights a week on a train? Two nights of camaraderie in the lounge car; two nights of friendly exchanges, unwinding with late night whiskies; but two nights also of jolting rails, beds just a mite too short for the tallest folk, and the notorious uncoupling at Edinburgh.

Alan Dein rides the rails with the experts, through the long night of the long distance commuter, to find out where home really lies.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

1102The Longest Commute in Britain2012101020130108

The Longest Commute in Britain

Geoff picks up a copy of "Horse and Hound" for his wife and strides toward Euston Station; Angus heads for the lounge car, where a whisky is ready and waiting; Mary leaves the offices of 'Country Life', and joins the London rush hour crowds wearing sturdy walking boots; meanwhile Ann Marie has taken up her position at the end of the platform 15, to await the longest train in the UK - it will be her job to unlock the doors, and ready the train for departure.

This is arguable the longest commute in the UK - the Caledonian Sleeper - which at a quarter of a mile long, is also the longest train.

Walkers, climbers, shooting-parties and Americans tourists are regular fare, but week in week out, the same faces return, the band of commuters who live in the Scottish Highlands, but work in London.

Would you, given the choice, choose to spent two nights a week on a train? Two nights of camaraderie in the lounge car; two nights of friendly exchanges, unwinding with late night whiskies; but two nights also of jolting rails, beds just a mite too short for the tallest folk, and the notorious uncoupling at Edinburgh.

Alan Dein rides the rails with the experts, through the long night of the long distance commuter, to find out where home really lies.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

1103The Pigeon Men of Burdiehouse20121017

3. The Pigeon Men of Burdiehouse

Burdiehouse is a council scheme on the outermost tip of Edinburgh and it's here, hidden away from the world outside, that Alan encounters the pigeon, or doo men, locked in a constant battle to capture each other's birds. These men are neighbours but when it comes to pigeons the battle lines are drawn.

This is an old game: 'doo flying' has been practised in Scotland since Victorian times. Hundreds of doo men fly 'horseman thief' pigeons from lofts, bedrooms and sheds. The aim being to lure and capture the pigeons of their rivals.The doomen's pigeons mean a lot to them - they are groomed, their feathers dyed and combed to make them look their best. Some families have kept doos for generations. It's a passion passed on from father to son.

In Burdiehouse Alan talks to Paul who comes from a long line of doo men. Paul gave up the birds and moved away from the scheme when he got married, but since separating from his wife has moved in with his mother Anne and built a doo hut in the garden. Central to his new life as a doo man is the swap shop, a bird auction held every week in the local pub. This is where the flyers go to trade birds and gossip over a pint. Paul runs the night with Iain, a long-time doo man and self-proclaimed sheriff of the scheme, who often has to step in to prevent the fierce rivalry over pigeons becoming violent. Despite suffering chronic health problems as a result of keeping birds since he was a boy, Iain says he will never give up his pigeons.

This is a story of escapism, gamesmanship and family set against the backdrop of the elusive sport of doo flying.

Producer: Caitlin Smith.

1103The Pigeon Men Of Burdiehouse20121017

3. The Pigeon Men of Burdiehouse

Burdiehouse is a council scheme on the outermost tip of Edinburgh and it's here, hidden away from the world outside, that Alan encounters the pigeon, or doo men, locked in a constant battle to capture each other's birds. These men are neighbours but when it comes to pigeons the battle lines are drawn.

This is an old game: 'doo flying' has been practised in Scotland since Victorian times. Hundreds of doo men fly 'horseman thief' pigeons from lofts, bedrooms and sheds. The aim being to lure and capture the pigeons of their rivals.The doomen's pigeons mean a lot to them - they are groomed, their feathers dyed and combed to make them look their best. Some families have kept doos for generations. It's a passion passed on from father to son.

In Burdiehouse Alan talks to Paul who comes from a long line of doo men. Paul gave up the birds and moved away from the scheme when he got married, but since separating from his wife has moved in with his mother Anne and built a doo hut in the garden. Central to his new life as a doo man is the swap shop, a bird auction held every week in the local pub. This is where the flyers go to trade birds and gossip over a pint. Paul runs the night with Iain, a long-time doo man and self-proclaimed sheriff of the scheme, who often has to step in to prevent the fierce rivalry over pigeons becoming violent. Despite suffering chronic health problems as a result of keeping birds since he was a boy, Iain says he will never give up his pigeons.

This is a story of escapism, gamesmanship and family set against the backdrop of the elusive sport of doo flying.

Producer: Caitlin Smith.

1103The Pigeon Men of Burdiehouse2012101720130531

Burdiehouse is a council scheme on the outermost tip of Edinburgh and it's here, hidden away from the world outside, that Alan encounters the pigeon, or doo men, locked in a constant battle to capture each other's birds. These men are neighbours but when it comes to pigeons the battle lines are drawn.

This is an old game: 'doo flying' has been practised in Scotland since Victorian times. Hundreds of doo men fly 'horseman thief' pigeons from lofts, bedrooms and sheds. The aim being to lure and capture the pigeons of their rivals.The doomen's pigeons mean a lot to them - they are groomed, their feathers dyed and combed to make them look their best. Some families have kept doos for generations. It's a passion passed on from father to son.

In Burdiehouse Alan talks to Paul who comes from a long line of doo men. Paul gave up the birds and moved away from the scheme when he got married, but since separating from his wife has moved in with his mother Anne and built a doo hut in the garden. Central to his new life as a doo man is the swap shop, a bird auction held every week in the local pub. This is where the flyers go to trade birds and gossip over a pint. Paul runs the night with Iain, a long-time doo man and self-proclaimed sheriff of the scheme, who often has to step in to prevent the fierce rivalry over pigeons becoming violent. Despite suffering chronic health problems as a result of keeping birds since he was a boy, Iain says he will never give up his pigeons.

This is a story of escapism, gamesmanship and family set against the backdrop of the elusive sport of doo flying.

Producer: Caitlin Smith.

1103The Pigeon Men Of Burdiehouse2012101720130531

Burdiehouse is a council scheme on the outermost tip of Edinburgh and it's here, hidden away from the world outside, that Alan encounters the pigeon, or doo men, locked in a constant battle to capture each other's birds. These men are neighbours but when it comes to pigeons the battle lines are drawn.

This is an old game: 'doo flying' has been practised in Scotland since Victorian times. Hundreds of doo men fly 'horseman thief' pigeons from lofts, bedrooms and sheds. The aim being to lure and capture the pigeons of their rivals.The doomen's pigeons mean a lot to them - they are groomed, their feathers dyed and combed to make them look their best. Some families have kept doos for generations. It's a passion passed on from father to son.

In Burdiehouse Alan talks to Paul who comes from a long line of doo men. Paul gave up the birds and moved away from the scheme when he got married, but since separating from his wife has moved in with his mother Anne and built a doo hut in the garden. Central to his new life as a doo man is the swap shop, a bird auction held every week in the local pub. This is where the flyers go to trade birds and gossip over a pint. Paul runs the night with Iain, a long-time doo man and self-proclaimed sheriff of the scheme, who often has to step in to prevent the fierce rivalry over pigeons becoming violent. Despite suffering chronic health problems as a result of keeping birds since he was a boy, Iain says he will never give up his pigeons.

This is a story of escapism, gamesmanship and family set against the backdrop of the elusive sport of doo flying.

Producer: Caitlin Smith.

3. The Pigeon Men of Burdiehouse

1104 LAST20121024

Alan Dein visits a Hastings allotment and finds that a plot of land means a lot more to people than a place to grow vegetables. He joins various allotmenteers as they tend their plot and, in turn, hears how differently they use it. A young family have created a haven where the children learn about nature; a teacher uses the allotment to help him deal with depression; two friends meet up under a full moon and await the wild original inhabitants of the allotment whilst reflecting on life and their place in it.

Produced by Sarah Bowen and Neil McCarthy.

1104 LAST20121024

Alan Dein visits a Hastings allotment and finds that a plot of land means a lot more to people than a place to grow vegetables. He joins various allotmenteers as they tend their plot and, in turn, hears how differently they use it. A young family have created a haven where the children learn about nature; a teacher uses the allotment to help him deal with depression; two friends meet up under a full moon and await the wild original inhabitants of the allotment whilst reflecting on life and their place in it.

Produced by Sarah Bowen and Neil McCarthy.

1104 LAST20121024

Alan Dein visits a Hastings allotment and finds that a plot of land means a lot more to people than a place to grow vegetables. He joins various allotmenteers as they tend their plot and, in turn, hears how differently they use it. A young family have created a haven where the children learn about nature; a teacher uses the allotment to help him deal with depression; two friends meet up under a full moon and await the wild original inhabitants of the allotment whilst reflecting on life and their place in it.

Produced by Sarah Bowen and Neil McCarthy.

1201Zoo for Sale2013022020130527

In a rain sodden valley, close to the fresh winds of the Irish Sea, a leopard marches back and forth through the mud. Close by, capuchin monkeys chuckle as they cling to the bars, and in the warmth of a dark glass tank, a 14 foot python is being moved for feeding.

These are unwanted animals - some born in captivity, some abandoned and some just too big for their owners to keep. They've all found a home with Jean and Alan Mumbray, at The Animalarium, a small private zoo close to the fishing village of Borth, west Wales.

When Jean and Alan bought the property, they were given the keys by the previous owner, who left without a backward glance - throwing them into the world of zoo keeping without training or experience. 12 years later, full of enthusiasm for the place they have created and made their own, they are putting the zoo up for sale.

It will be a hard move to make. Jean has a close relationship with many of the creatures - such as the lynx she calls 'Baby', and who will sit on her shoulder and purr as she strokes him fondly.

Jean and Alan have also fostered 42 children over the past 25 years.

"Animals for love - fostering for income".

They specialised in difficult teenagers - not unlike the 'naughty monkeys' that they have as pets. These are the children most unlikely to find foster homes - but Jean actually prefers them.

'They're more independent, more idealistic, more interesting." She says, "And they don't want love or cuddles. They want respect, and they want approval."

As the zoo goes up for sale, Alan Dein visits in the depths of Winter, to find out why the couple found themselves drawn to both professions - fostering and zoo keeping.

What has the rearing of disturbed children taught them? Can they find the right people to take over their family of animals?

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

In a rain sodden valley, close to the fresh winds of the Irish Sea, a leopard marches back and forth through the mud. Close by, capuchin monkeys chuckle as they cling to the bars, and in the warmth of a dark glass tank, a 14 foot python is being moved for feeding.

These are unwanted animals - some born in captivity, some abandoned and some just too big for their owners to keep. They've all found a home with Jean and Alan Mumbury, at The Animalarium, a small private zoo close to the fishing village of Borth, west Wales.

When Jean and Alan bought the property, they were given the keys by the previous owner, who left without a backward glance - throwing them into the world of zoo keeping without training or experience. 12 years later, full of enthusiasm for the place they have created and made their own, they are putting the zoo up for sale.

It will be a hard move to make. Jean has a close relationship with many of the creatures - such as the lynx she calls 'Baby', and who will sit on her shoulder and purr as she strokes him fondly.

Jean and Alan have also fostered 42 children over the past 25 years.

"Animals for love - fostering for income".

They specialised in difficult teenagers - not unlike the 'naughty monkeys' that they have as pets. These are the children most unlikely to find foster homes - but Jean actually prefers them.

'They're more independent, more idealistic, more interesting." She says, "And they don't want love or cuddles. They want respect, and they want approval."

As the zoo goes up for sale, Alan Dein visits in the depths of Winter, to find out why the couple found themselves drawn to both professions - fostering and zoo keeping.

What has the rearing of disturbed children taught them? Can they find the right people to take over their family of animals?

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

In a rain sodden valley, close to the fresh winds of the Irish Sea, a leopard marches back and forth through the mud. Close by, capuchin monkeys chuckle as they cling to the bars, and in the warmth of a dark glass tank, a 14 foot python is being moved for feeding.

These are unwanted animals - some born in captivity, some abandoned and some just too big for their owners to keep. They've all found a home with Jean and Alan Mumbray, at The Animalarium, a small private zoo close to the fishing village of Borth, west Wales.

When Jean and Alan bought the property, they were given the keys by the previous owner, who left without a backward glance - throwing them into the world of zoo keeping without training or experience. 12 years later, full of enthusiasm for the place they have created and made their own, they are putting the zoo up for sale.

It will be a hard move to make. Jean has a close relationship with many of the creatures - such as the lynx she calls 'Baby', and who will sit on her shoulder and purr as she strokes him fondly.

Jean and Alan have also fostered 42 children over the past 25 years.

"Animals for love - fostering for income".

They specialised in difficult teenagers - not unlike the 'naughty monkeys' that they have as pets. These are the children most unlikely to find foster homes - but Jean actually prefers them.

'They're more independent, more idealistic, more interesting." She says, "And they don't want love or cuddles. They want respect, and they want approval."

As the zoo goes up for sale, Alan Dein visits in the depths of Winter, to find out why the couple found themselves drawn to both professions - fostering and zoo keeping.

What has the rearing of disturbed children taught them? Can they find the right people to take over their family of animals?

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

1201Zoo For Sale2013022020130527

In a rain sodden valley, close to the fresh winds of the Irish Sea, a leopard marches back and forth through the mud. Close by, capuchin monkeys chuckle as they cling to the bars, and in the warmth of a dark glass tank, a 14 foot python is being moved for feeding.

These are unwanted animals - some born in captivity, some abandoned and some just too big for their owners to keep. They've all found a home with Jean and Alan Mumbray, at The Animalarium, a small private zoo close to the fishing village of Borth, west Wales.

When Jean and Alan bought the property, they were given the keys by the previous owner, who left without a backward glance - throwing them into the world of zoo keeping without training or experience. 12 years later, full of enthusiasm for the place they have created and made their own, they are putting the zoo up for sale.

It will be a hard move to make. Jean has a close relationship with many of the creatures - such as the lynx she calls 'Baby', and who will sit on her shoulder and purr as she strokes him fondly.

Jean and Alan have also fostered 42 children over the past 25 years.

"Animals for love - fostering for income".

They specialised in difficult teenagers - not unlike the 'naughty monkeys' that they have as pets. These are the children most unlikely to find foster homes - but Jean actually prefers them.

'They're more independent, more idealistic, more interesting." She says, "And they don't want love or cuddles. They want respect, and they want approval."

As the zoo goes up for sale, Alan Dein visits in the depths of Winter, to find out why the couple found themselves drawn to both professions - fostering and zoo keeping.

What has the rearing of disturbed children taught them? Can they find the right people to take over their family of animals?

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

These are unwanted animals - some born in captivity, some abandoned and some just too big for their owners to keep. They've all found a home with Jean and Alan Mumbury, at The Animalarium, a small private zoo close to the fishing village of Borth, west Wales.

1202An Occasional Island2013022720130528

The people of Muchelney, Alan Dein discovers, have an intimate relationship with water. They live on the flood plain of the River Parrett in the Somerset Levels. The name of their ancient village, from the Norse and Old English, means 'growing great island', and, despite the draining of the marshes, it is not unusual for Muchelney to become an island again, and the four roads leading to the village inundated.

Alan Dein visits in a time of flood and finds the villagers take it in their stride: farmer Graham Walker fires up his old tractor, puts a sofa on his trailer, and runs a bus service, ferrying people to the far shore so they can get to work and to school. He picks up food and mail. There's no traffic. People stop and talk. They look out for one another. It's not just the children who love it.

Widgeon, teal, geese, swans and gulls appear in flocks of thousands to the fields that become a lake of tranquil beauty. No one worries, the houses are old, built cannily on land always a few inches above the flood levels - until now.

In November the flood waters rose higher than anyone could remember. The potter John Leach describes how, for the first time, the water coming into his house and kiln. Michael Brown, eel smoker, who has lived by the river for decades, recounts his battle to keep the stealthy enemy out. Thatcher Nigel Bunce is thankful that his son's crying, as the waters approached the child's cot, woke him in time. Shirley Gove's beautiful barn conversion is wrecked. Whenever it rains now, she tells Alan, she will be scared.

Something is changing, and Alan Dein finds that the people of Muchelney, after centuries of living on their occasional island, much preoccupied, and some considering their options.

Producer: Julian May.

The people of Muchelney, Alan Dein discovers, have an intimate relationship with water. They live on the flood plain of the River Parrett in the Somerset Levels. The name of their ancient village, from the Norse and Old English, means 'growing great island', and, despite the draining of the marshes, it is not unusual for Muchelney to become an island again, and the four roads leading to the village inundated.

Alan Dein visits in a time of flood and finds the villagers take it in their stride: farmer Graham Walker fires up his old tractor, puts a sofa on his trailer, and runs a bus service, ferrying people to the far shore so they can get to work and to school. He picks up food and mail. There's no traffic. People stop and talk. They look out for one another. It's not just the children who love it.

Widgeon, teal, geese, swans and gulls appear in flocks of thousands to the fields that become a lake of tranquil beauty. No one worries, the houses are old, built cannily on land always a few inches above the flood levels - until now.

In November the flood waters rose higher than anyone could remember. The potter John Leach describes how, for the first time, the water coming into his house and kiln. Michael Brown, eel smoker, who has lived by the river for decades, recounts his battle to keep the stealthy enemy out. Thatcher Nigel Bunce is thankful that his son's crying, as the waters approached the child's cot, woke him in time. Shirley Gore's beautiful barn conversion is wrecked. Whenever it rains now, she tells Alan, she will be scared.

Something is changing, and Alan Dein finds that the people of Muchelney, after centuries of living on their occasional island, much preoccupied, and some considering their options.

Producer: Julian May.

1202An Occasional Island2013022720130528

The people of Muchelney, Alan Dein discovers, have an intimate relationship with water. They live on the flood plain of the River Parrett in the Somerset Levels. The name of their ancient village, from the Norse and Old English, means 'growing great island', and, despite the draining of the marshes, it is not unusual for Muchelney to become an island again, and the four roads leading to the village inundated.

Alan Dein visits in a time of flood and finds the villagers take it in their stride: farmer Graham Walker fires up his old tractor, puts a sofa on his trailer, and runs a bus service, ferrying people to the far shore so they can get to work and to school. He picks up food and mail. There's no traffic. People stop and talk. They look out for one another. It's not just the children who love it.

Widgeon, teal, geese, swans and gulls appear in flocks of thousands to the fields that become a lake of tranquil beauty. No one worries, the houses are old, built cannily on land always a few inches above the flood levels - until now.

In November the flood waters rose higher than anyone could remember. The potter John Leach describes how, for the first time, the water coming into his house and kiln. Michael Brown, eel smoker, who has lived by the river for decades, recounts his battle to keep the stealthy enemy out. Thatcher Nigel Bunce is thankful that his son's crying, as the waters approached the child's cot, woke him in time. Shirley Gove's beautiful barn conversion is wrecked. Whenever it rains now, she tells Alan, she will be scared.

Something is changing, and Alan Dein finds that the people of Muchelney, after centuries of living on their occasional island, much preoccupied, and some considering their options.

Producer: Julian May.

In November the flood waters rose higher than anyone could remember. The potter John Leach describes how, for the first time, the water coming into his house and kiln. Michael Brown, eel smoker, who has lived by the river for decades, recounts his battle to keep the stealthy enemy out. Thatcher Nigel Bunce is thankful that his son's crying, as the waters approached the child's cot, woke him in time. Shirley Gore's beautiful barn conversion is wrecked. Whenever it rains now, she tells Alan, she will be scared.

1203Academy Beat2013030620130529

Providing pastoral care is key to his role as head of year eleven at the London school and he does this by combining a no nonsense approach to bad behaviour with a sensitive handling of some of the difficulties encountered by his fifteen and sixteen year old charges. This is their GCSE exam year and although Dave left school in the 1970's with just one CSE in English he recognises the difficulties faced by those struggling with exam preparations and a lack of direction in today's tough economic climate.

Well versed in policing mixed communities the former East End officer thought he had pretty much seen it all - that was until he entered the corridors of this showpiece academy. For Dave the behaviour issues he first encountered in the job were a reflection of poor parenting, with many adults unsure about how to instil a sense of right and wrong in their children. A total of five former police officers were brought into the school: each appointed as a year head and providing pastoral support and care.

Their job is not an easy one but David Clifford tells Alan that it brings rewards, challenges, frustrations and excitement in equal measure. Having joined the police force at 19 he was due to retire at 49 when he saw the advert for "behaviour managers" at the academy. That was eight years ago and he and other four retired officers were quickly promoted to heads of year, where they have successfully tackled a whole range of issues in the school

"What I wasn't prepared for was how vulnerable some of the kids are - for all their talk of street life they really don't have the resilience that I and my friends had when we were young. There are huge contrasts in the job and I see everything from the funniest moments to some of the most distressing."

As Alan Dein tracks Dave Clifford through a school day he sees at first hand some of the challenges involved: a pupil who appears to have just dropped off the radar and another desperate to be in school but too ill to attend. He is called on to deal with a group of girls who swallow cinnamon for fun and he tracks down the culprits when chicken bones are discovered on the canteen floor. And in amidst these episodes there's an album to record and an outburst over a text book to resolve: it's all part of the working day for Dave Clifford.

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

Tackling poor behaviour is a key priority in an academy which has employed a team of former policeman as heads of year: Alan Dein meets Dave Clifford, the longest serving of them.

Well versed in policing mixed communities the former police former East End police officer, Dave Clifford, thought he had pretty much seen it all - that was until he entered the corridors of one of the country's new showpiece academies. Alan finds out how he and the other police officers recruited as "Heads of Year" are faring and what skills from their former lives they are currently drawing on.

Their job is not an easy one but David Clifford tells Alan that it brings rewards, challenges, frustrations and excitement in equal measure. Having joined the police force at 19 he was due to retire at 49 when he saw the advert for "behaviour managers" at a new London academy. That was eight years ago and now he and his police colleagues have become so invaluable that they've been promoted to Heads of Year. It's quite a grand title for someone like Dave, who left school with just one GCE!

"What I wasn't prepared for was how vulnerable some of the kids are - for all their talk of street life they really don't have the resilience that I and my friends had when we were young. There are huge contrasts in the job and I see everything from the funniest moments to some of the most distressing."

As Alan Dein tracks Dave Clifford through a school day he sees at first hand some of the challenges involved: a playground fight, classroom disruptions, a missing year eleven pupil with exams on the horizon and the mysterious chicken wings found over the canteen floor. None proves serious in itself but all take time and energy to resolve and have the potential to escalate...

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

Providing pastoral care is key to his role as head of year eleven at the London school and he does this by combining a no nonsense approach to bad behaviour with a sensitive handling of some of the difficulties encountered by his fifteen and sixteen year old charges. This is their GCSE exam year and although Dave left school in the 1970's with just one CSE in English he recognises the difficulties faced by those struggling with exam preparations and a lack of direction in today's tough economic climate.

Well versed in policing mixed communities the former East End officer thought he had pretty much seen it all - that was until he entered the corridors of this showpiece academy. For Dave the behaviour issues he first encountered in the job were a reflection of poor parenting, with many adults unsure about how to instil a sense of right and wrong in their children. A total of five former police officers were brought into the school: each appointed as a year head and providing pastoral support and care.

Their job is not an easy one but David Clifford tells Alan that it brings rewards, challenges, frustrations and excitement in equal measure. Having joined the police force at 19 he was due to retire at 49 when he saw the advert for "behaviour managers" at the academy. That was eight years ago and he and other four retired officers were quickly promoted to heads of year, where they have successfully tackled a whole range of issues in the school

"What I wasn't prepared for was how vulnerable some of the kids are - for all their talk of street life they really don't have the resilience that I and my friends had when we were young. There are huge contrasts in the job and I see everything from the funniest moments to some of the most distressing."

As Alan Dein tracks Dave Clifford through a school day he sees at first hand some of the challenges involved: a pupil who appears to have just dropped off the radar and another desperate to be in school but too ill to attend. He is called on to deal with a group of girls who swallow cinnamon for fun and he tracks down the culprits when chicken bones are discovered on the canteen floor. And in amidst these episodes there's an album to record and an outburst over a text book to resolve: it's all part of the working day for Dave Clifford.

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

1203Academy Beat2013030620130529

Providing pastoral care is key to his role as head of year eleven at the London school and he does this by combining a no nonsense approach to bad behaviour with a sensitive handling of some of the difficulties encountered by his fifteen and sixteen year old charges. This is their GCSE exam year and although Dave left school in the 1970's with just one CSE in English he recognises the difficulties faced by those struggling with exam preparations and a lack of direction in today's tough economic climate.

Well versed in policing mixed communities the former East End officer thought he had pretty much seen it all - that was until he entered the corridors of this showpiece academy. For Dave the behaviour issues he first encountered in the job were a reflection of poor parenting, with many adults unsure about how to instil a sense of right and wrong in their children. A total of five former police officers were brought into the school: each appointed as a year head and providing pastoral support and care.

Their job is not an easy one but David Clifford tells Alan that it brings rewards, challenges, frustrations and excitement in equal measure. Having joined the police force at 19 he was due to retire at 49 when he saw the advert for "behaviour managers" at the academy. That was eight years ago and he and other four retired officers were quickly promoted to heads of year, where they have successfully tackled a whole range of issues in the school

"What I wasn't prepared for was how vulnerable some of the kids are - for all their talk of street life they really don't have the resilience that I and my friends had when we were young. There are huge contrasts in the job and I see everything from the funniest moments to some of the most distressing."

As Alan Dein tracks Dave Clifford through a school day he sees at first hand some of the challenges involved: a pupil who appears to have just dropped off the radar and another desperate to be in school but too ill to attend. He is called on to deal with a group of girls who swallow cinnamon for fun and he tracks down the culprits when chicken bones are discovered on the canteen floor. And in amidst these episodes there's an album to record and an outburst over a text book to resolve: it's all part of the working day for Dave Clifford.

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

Tackling poor behaviour is a key priority in an academy which has employed a team of former policeman as heads of year: Alan Dein meets Dave Clifford, the longest serving of them.

Well versed in policing mixed communities the former police former East End police officer, Dave Clifford, thought he had pretty much seen it all - that was until he entered the corridors of one of the country's new showpiece academies. Alan finds out how he and the other police officers recruited as "Heads of Year" are faring and what skills from their former lives they are currently drawing on.

Their job is not an easy one but David Clifford tells Alan that it brings rewards, challenges, frustrations and excitement in equal measure. Having joined the police force at 19 he was due to retire at 49 when he saw the advert for "behaviour managers" at a new London academy. That was eight years ago and now he and his police colleagues have become so invaluable that they've been promoted to Heads of Year. It's quite a grand title for someone like Dave, who left school with just one GCE!

As Alan Dein tracks Dave Clifford through a school day he sees at first hand some of the challenges involved: a playground fight, classroom disruptions, a missing year eleven pupil with exams on the horizon and the mysterious chicken wings found over the canteen floor. None proves serious in itself but all take time and energy to resolve and have the potential to escalate.

1204 LASTWheelchair Pusher Needed2013031320130530

"Pusher needed for Silly Old Fart in Wheelchair".

When Terry Chambers had to use a wheelchair after a stroke, he needed someone to push him through the streets of Crouch End in North London. He already had one carer but it wasn't enough. So he placed this jokey advert in the local newsagent's window and found Robert.

Terry may describe himself as a silly old fart but he used to be a highly successful photographer. He took pictures of the Royal Family and many other famous faces. He would travel the world, going wherever the work was, too busy for a wife or family. And he was a regular in the wine bars and restaurants of the West End of London.

But three years ago his career was ended by the stroke. He can't walk and has limited movement in his hands. He needs help with everything. However, Terry still wants a semblance of the life he had before- the wine bars, the alcohol and the good lunches in particular.He can't get as far as he used to, so he stays around the area of Crouch End where he's lived for over 40 years. That's where Robert comes in- helping him get out and about.

Robert didn't start out as a carer. For decades, his work was in construction, building roads and pavements and refurbishing offices. Then a friend suggested he would be good at looking after people and he never looked back. At the start of the day he helps Terry wash, gets him dressed and prepares medicine for him. Then it's time to push the wheelchair out of the flat for the day for Terry to visit a wine bar- perhaps two- have a good lunch and some fun in the afternoon.

Alan Dein follows the pair of them as they navigate the streets and finds out how Terry's stroke has altered his landscape. How has his view of the world changed now that he is sitting in a wheelchair? And what are the qualities that make a really good pusher....?

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

"Pusher needed for Silly Old Fart in Wheelchair".

When Terry Chambers became wheelchair-bound after a stroke, he needed someone to push him through the streets of Crouch End in North London. He already had one carer but it wasn't enough. So he placed this jokey advert in the local newsagent's window and found Robert.

Terry may describe himself as a silly old fart but he used to be a highly successful photographer. He took pictures of the Royal Family and many other famous faces. He would travel the world, going wherever the work was, too busy for a wife or family. And he was a regular in the wine bars and restaurants of the West End of London.

But three years ago his career was ended by the stroke. He can't walk and has limited movement in his hands. He needs help with everything. However, Terry still wants a semblance of the life he had before- the wine bars, the alcohol and the good lunches in particular.He can't get as far as he used to, so he stays around the area of Crouch End where he's lived for over 40 years. That's where Robert comes in- helping him get out and about.

Robert didn't start out as a carer. For decades, his work was in construction, building roads and pavements and refurbishing offices. Then a friend suggested he would be good at looking after people and he never looked back. At the start of the day he helps Terry wash, gets him dressed and prepares medicine for him. Then it's time to push the wheelchair out of the flat for the day for Terry to visit a wine bar- perhaps two- have a good lunch and some fun in the afternoon.

Alan Dein follows the pair of them as they navigate the streets and finds out how Terry's stroke has altered his landscape. How has his view of the world changed now that he is sitting in a wheelchair? And what are the qualities that make a really good pusher....?

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

1204 LASTWheelchair Pusher Needed2013031320130530

"Pusher needed for Silly Old Fart in Wheelchair".

When Terry Chambers had to use a wheelchair after a stroke, he needed someone to push him through the streets of Crouch End in North London. He already had one carer but it wasn't enough. So he placed this jokey advert in the local newsagent's window and found Robert.

Terry may describe himself as a silly old fart but he used to be a highly successful photographer. He took pictures of the Royal Family and many other famous faces. He would travel the world, going wherever the work was, too busy for a wife or family. And he was a regular in the wine bars and restaurants of the West End of London.

But three years ago his career was ended by the stroke. He can't walk and has limited movement in his hands. He needs help with everything. However, Terry still wants a semblance of the life he had before- the wine bars, the alcohol and the good lunches in particular.He can't get as far as he used to, so he stays around the area of Crouch End where he's lived for over 40 years. That's where Robert comes in- helping him get out and about.

Robert didn't start out as a carer. For decades, his work was in construction, building roads and pavements and refurbishing offices. Then a friend suggested he would be good at looking after people and he never looked back. At the start of the day he helps Terry wash, gets him dressed and prepares medicine for him. Then it's time to push the wheelchair out of the flat for the day for Terry to visit a wine bar- perhaps two- have a good lunch and some fun in the afternoon.

Alan Dein follows the pair of them as they navigate the streets and finds out how Terry's stroke has altered his landscape. How has his view of the world changed now that he is sitting in a wheelchair? And what are the qualities that make a really good pusher....?

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

When Terry Chambers became wheelchair-bound after a stroke, he needed someone to push him through the streets of Crouch End in North London. He already had one carer but it wasn't enough. So he placed this jokey advert in the local newsagent's window and found Robert.

1301New School: Under Construction20130621

To kick off the new series of Lives in a Landscape, Alan Dein presents a two part special following a year in the life of a new primary school just outside Peterborough - from initial construction to the end of the third term.

For headteacher Jackie Ashley, the opening of St Michael's Church School will be the culmination of her life in teaching and probably her last role before retirement. She's keen to see the school grow to its full capacity of 210 pupils under her leadership.

But as building work continues, there are concerns it may not open its doors on time and Jackie only has five children confirmed to start in September.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

1301New School: Under Construction20130621

To kick off the new series of Lives in a Landscape, Alan Dein presents a two part special following a year in the life of a new primary school just outside Peterborough - from initial construction to the end of the third term.

For headteacher Jackie Ashley, the opening of St Michael's Church School will be the culmination of her life in teaching and probably her last role before retirement. She's keen to see the school grow to its full capacity of 210 pupils under her leadership.

But as building work continues, there are concerns it may not open its doors on time and Jackie only has five children confirmed to start in September.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

1302New School: The First Year20130628

Alan Dein follows the mixed fortunes of a new primary school in its first year.

In the second of two programmes, Alan Dein follows the mixed fortunes of a new primary school on a housing estate just outside Peterborough over the course of a year.

As the school opens its doors, the school is still struggling to attract the number of children headteacher Jackie Ashley hopes for. She leaflets the entire estate in the hope of boosting numbers.

Alan speaks to parents and joins the school at key moments in its first year from the Christmas play to the end of year disco.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

1302New School: The First Year20130628

In the second of two programmes, Alan Dein follows the mixed fortunes of a new primary school on a housing estate just outside Peterborough over the course of a year.

As the school opens its doors, the school is still struggling to attract the number of children headteacher Jackie Ashley hopes for. She leaflets the entire estate in the hope of boosting numbers.

Alan speaks to parents and joins the school at key moments in its first year from the Christmas play to the end of year disco.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

Alan Dein follows the mixed fortunes of a new primary school in its first year.

1303It's a Bargain20130705

We're all at it - from the very wealthiest amongst us to the very poorest: buying and selling on eBay. And no one knows better than Dave and Gary what's involved in shifting the items traded up and down the country.

The idea was simple: the depression in the building trade left Gary casting round for an alternative occupation. He's quite entrepreneurial and when someone suggested buying a van and cashing in on the eBay boom he decided to do just that, roping his uncle Dave in on what is now a family business.

They operate from a garage on a council estate in Cottingley, on the outskirts of Bradford, but for most of the week they're on the road - picking up and dropping everything from household goods to wool and even ornamental fountains! Their job takes them up and down the country and in just one journey they pick up a bed from the Speaker's wife, Sally Bercow - who has sold it on eBay to someone in the North - and drop off a rusting metal bench from Salford to a new owner in the South who hopes it will net him many thousands of pounds.

This might not be the future they once envisaged: Dave spent thirty years as a metal worker but when he topped 26 stones in weight his knees gave in and he lost his job. He has had gastric surgery and lost a third of his body weight but is sticking with the van driving for the time being. His nephew, Gary, needs him: he has a baby on the way and thinks he's identified an opportunity to make money from our national obsession with bargain hunting.

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

1303It's A Bargain20130705

We're all at it - from the very wealthiest amongst us to the very poorest: buying and selling on eBay. And no one knows better than Dave and Gary what's involved in shifting the items traded up and down the country.

The idea was simple: the depression in the building trade left Gary casting round for an alternative occupation. He's quite entrepreneurial and when someone suggested buying a van and cashing in on the eBay boom he decided to do just that, roping his uncle Dave in on what is now a family business.

They operate from a garage on a council estate in Cottingley, on the outskirts of Bradford, but for most of the week they're on the road - picking up and dropping everything from household goods to wool and even ornamental fountains! Their job takes them up and down the country and in just one journey they pick up a bed from the Speaker's wife, Sally Bercow - who has sold it on eBay to someone in the North - and drop off a rusting metal bench from Salford to a new owner in the South who hopes it will net him many thousands of pounds.

This might not be the future they once envisaged: Dave spent thirty years as a metal worker but when he topped 26 stones in weight his knees gave in and he lost his job. He has had gastric surgery and lost a third of his body weight but is sticking with the van driving for the time being. His nephew, Gary, needs him: he has a baby on the way and thinks he's identified an opportunity to make money from our national obsession with bargain hunting.

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

1304 LASTRocking The Rails At Castle Cary2013071220140602

Location, location, location - it's everything for idyllic Castle Cary Station, a quiet, sleepy commuter stop on the Great Western train line - because this particular sleepy station in Somerset just happens to be the closest station to Worthy Farm - home of the Glastonbury Festival.

For 11 months and 3 weeks of the year all is peaceful and quiet, chattering birdsong in the hedgerows the only disturbance to a day-in-the-life of station master Paul Mitchell. Then, as Paul puts it - "Glasto comes around", and as no less than the Rolling Stones, Mumford and Sons, Portishead and the Arctic Monkeys pitch up in a field nearby, everything changes.

Normally manned by one station master at a time; Paul is one of three railway employees on rota - their duties include every aspect of station keeping; maintenance, guard duties, ticket sales, sweeping up and planting flower beds - and it is a job well done; they have even won awards for best kept station.

Sangita Myska follows the transformation of the station, peering through the well-polished ticket office window with station master Paul Mitchell, from quiet normal week to well managed chaos, as tens of thousands of wellie-wearing, tent carrying, over-excited music fans pour out of packed trains on their way to a weekend of mud and music.

And then they all go home again, and Paul gets back to his hanging baskets - checking to see if anyone has popped any mysterious and unexpected green plants in with his petunias.

Presenter: Sangita Myska

Producer: Sara Jane Hall

1304 LASTRocking the Rails at Castle Cary2013071220140602

Location, location, location - it's everything for idyllic Castle Cary Station, a quiet, sleepy commuter stop on the Great Western train line - because this particular sleepy station in Somerset just happens to be the closest station to Worthy Farm - home of the Glastonbury Festival.

For 11 months and 3 weeks of the year all is peaceful and quiet, chattering birdsong in the hedgerows the only disturbance to a day-in-the-life of station master Paul Mitchell. Then, as Paul puts it - "Glasto comes around", and as no less than the Rolling Stones, Mumford and Sons, Portishead and the Arctic Monkeys pitch up in a field nearby, everything changes.

Normally manned by one station master at a time; Paul is one of three railway employees on rota - their duties include every aspect of station keeping; maintenance, guard duties, ticket sales, sweeping up and planting flower beds - and it is a job well done; they have even won awards for best kept station.

Sangita Myska follows the transformation of the station, peering through the well-polished ticket office window with station master Paul Mitchell, from quiet normal week to well managed chaos, as tens of thousands of wellie-wearing, tent carrying, over-excited music fans pour out of packed trains on their way to a weekend of mud and music.

And then they all go home again, and Paul gets back to his hanging baskets - checking to see if anyone has popped any mysterious and unexpected green plants in with his petunias.

Presenter: Sangita Myska

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

Location, location, location - it's everything for idyllic Castle Cary Station, a quiet, sleepy commuter stop on the Great Western train line - because this particular sleepy station in Somerset just happens to be the closest station to Worthy Farm - home of the Glastonbury Festival.

For 11 months and 3 weeks of the year all is peaceful and quiet, chattering birdsong in the hedgerows the only disturbance to a day-in-the-life of station master Paul Mitchell. Then, as Paul puts it - "Glasto comes around", and as no less than the Rolling Stones, Mumford and Sons, Portishead and the Arctic Monkeys pitch up in a field nearby, everything changes.

Normally manned by one station master at a time; Paul is one of three railway employees on rota - their duties include every aspect of station keeping; maintenance, guard duties, ticket sales, sweeping up and planting flower beds - and it is a job well done; they have even won awards for best kept station.

Sangita Myska follows the transformation of the station, peering through the well-polished ticket office window with station master Paul Mitchell, from quiet normal week to well managed chaos, as tens of thousands of wellie-wearing, tent carrying, over-excited music fans pour out of packed trains on their way to a weekend of mud and music.

And then they all go home again, and Paul gets back to his hanging baskets - checking to see if anyone has popped any mysterious and unexpected green plants in with his petunias.

Presenter: Sangita Myska

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

1401The Longest Walk2013082620140526

It's rambling, but not as we know it. Every year the Long Distance Walkers' Association organises a 100 mile walk. It has to be completed in 48 hours, which for most people means walking through two nights with no sleep. By the end, hallucination is common, and many of the 500 who started out drop out or by the time they finish can barely walk any more.

Lives in a Landscape follows two participants in this year's walk, from Wadebridge in Cornwall to Teignmouth in Devon. One, George Foot, is 76, and has done 24 100-mile walks already. The other, Josh Wainwright, is 18. This is his first 100. Will either of them complete the walk, or will they have to "retire" early?

As George walks, he talks to presenter Alan Dein about his long-dead father - a distinguished public school headmaster. It becomes clear that George has spent much of his life in his father's shadow, feeling that he was a permanent disappointment to him. As a child, George was told by his father that he was "a bad walker". Now, completing the 100 mile walk is a way of redeeming himself in his father's eyes.

Josh, on the other hand, is walking the 100 miles with his father, Dave, a 21st century parent. Will Dave be more forgiving of failure, and more willing to praise success? An exploration not just of the challenges of walking and endurance, but of the changing nature of fatherhood.

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins

Presenter: Alan Dein.

1401The Longest Walk2013082620140526

It's rambling, but not as we know it. Every year the Long Distance Walkers' Association organises a 100 mile walk. It has to be completed in 48 hours, which for most people means walking through two nights with no sleep. By the end, hallucination is common, and many of the 500 who started out drop out or by the time they finish can barely walk any more.

Lives in a Landscape follows two participants in this year's walk, from Wadebridge in Cornwall to Teignmouth in Devon. One, George Foot, is 76, and has done 24 100-mile walks already. The other, Josh Wainwright, is 18. This is his first 100. Will either of them complete the walk, or will they have to "retire" early?

As George walks, he talks to presenter Alan Dein about his long-dead father - a distinguished public school headmaster. It becomes clear that George has spent much of his life in his father's shadow, feeling that he was a permanent disappointment to him. As a child, George was told by his father that he was "a bad walker". Now, completing the 100 mile walk is a way of redeeming himself in his father's eyes.

Josh, on the other hand, is walking the 100 miles with his father, Dave, a 21st century parent. Will Dave be more forgiving of failure, and more willing to praise success? An exploration not just of the challenges of walking and endurance, but of the changing nature of fatherhood.

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins

Presenter: Alan Dein.

It's rambling, but not as we know it. Every year the Long Distance Walkers' Association organises a 100 mile walk. It has to be completed in 48 hours, which for most people means walking through two nights with no sleep. By the end, hallucination is common, and many of the 500 who started out drop out or by the time they finish can barely walk any more.

Lives in a Landscape follows two participants in this year's walk, from Wadebridge in Cornwall to Teignmouth in Devon. One, George Foot, is 76, and has done 24 100-mile walks already. The other, Josh Wainwright, is 18. This is his first 100. Will either of them complete the walk, or will they have to "retire" early?

As George walks, he talks to presenter Alan Dein about his long-dead father - a distinguished public school headmaster. It becomes clear that George has spent much of his life in his father's shadow, feeling that he was a permanent disappointment to him. As a child, George was told by his father that he was "a bad walker". Now, completing the 100 mile walk is a way of redeeming himself in his father's eyes.

Josh, on the other hand, is walking the 100 miles with his father, Dave, a 21st century parent. Will Dave be more forgiving of failure, and more willing to praise success? An exploration not just of the challenges of walking and endurance, but of the changing nature of fatherhood.

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins

Presenter: Alan Dein.

1402The Wedding2013090220140917

Mimi and Ryan are getting married. Alan Dein presents a fly-on-the-wedding cake documentary that follows them through the day, from waking up with a hangover to chucking-out time at Sale Rugby Club.

In between there's a church wedding, a christening (their daughter Isabella is six months old), photographs, confetti, a lavish home-made buffet, speeches (ranging from tearful to inappropriate), dancing and a lot of laughter.

'We want to be a proper family,' says Ryan.

'It's the biggest party I'll ever throw in my life,' says Mimi. 'It started out as a budget wedding but it got a bit out of hand.'

Producer: Peter Everett.

Mimi and Ryan are getting married. Alan Dein presents a fly-on-the-wedding cake documentary that follows them through the day, from waking up with a hangover to chucking-out time at Sale Rugby Club.

In between there's a church wedding, a christening (their daughter Isabella is six months old), photographs, confetti, a lavish home-made buffet, speeches (ranging from tearful to inappropriate), dancing and a lot of laughter.

'We want to be a proper family,' says Ryan.

'It's the biggest party I'll ever throw in my life,' says Mimi. 'It started out as a budget wedding but it got a bit out of hand.'

Producer: Peter Everett.

1402The Wedding2013090220140917

Mimi and Ryan are getting married. Alan Dein presents a fly-on-the-wedding cake documentary that follows them through the day, from waking up with a hangover to chucking-out time at Sale Rugby Club.

In between there's a church wedding, a christening (their daughter Isabella is six months old), photographs, confetti, a lavish home-made buffet, speeches (ranging from tearful to inappropriate), dancing and a lot of laughter.

'We want to be a proper family,' says Ryan.

'It's the biggest party I'll ever throw in my life,' says Mimi. 'It started out as a budget wedding but it got a bit out of hand.'

Producer: Peter Everett.

1403St James' Gardens In Liverpool2013090920140527

In the shadow of Liverpool's Anglican cathedral sits St James' Gardens, an oasis of green space in the heart of the busy city.

The Gardens have been several things over the centuries. It was first a quarry from which the docks and much of the city of Liverpool was built. Once all the rock that could be removed had been excavated, a large hole was left and so in 1829 it was consecrated as a cemetery for the city.

Young and old, rich and poor, the city's dead ended up here. Between 1829 and 1936, nearly 58,000 bodies were buried in the cemetery. But by 1936 the cemetery was considered full and it became a garden. Over time the garden fell into a state of disrepair and became derelict: a haven for the homeless, drug dealers, prostitutes, drinkers and addicts. It was a no-go zone for most people of the city.

But ten years ago a plucky bunch of locals decided to take matters into their own hands. Robin Riley, a local sculptor, organised a group of friends and neighbours and over time cleaned the park up, restoring it to the beautiful setting that it is today.

Now it's a place people go to find peace and tranquillity, away from the hustle and bustle of the city.

Alan Dein visits St James' and meets Robin and the team that have reshaped the space, plus the band of dedicated dog-walkers who meet daily in the park. Among the walkers Alan meets Tommy, Frank and Aaron, a trio who met at the park and have since forged friendships.

Aaron shares his experiences of living near and using the park and tells Alan how visiting St James' has been therapeutic, not just for him in helping him in the tough times he's been through, but also for his mother who is suffering from leukaemia.

Alan also meets harmonica-playing Kevin: the last of the park's rough sleepers, Kevin inhabits one of the garden's abandoned catacombs.

Presenter: Alan Dein

Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.

1403St James' Gardens in Liverpool2013090920140527

In the shadow of Liverpool's Anglican cathedral sits St James' Gardens, an oasis of green space in the heart of the busy city.

The Gardens have been several things over the centuries. It was first a quarry from which the docks and much of the city of Liverpool was built. Once all the rock that could be removed had been excavated, a large hole was left and so in 1829 it was consecrated as a cemetery for the city.

Young and old, rich and poor, the city's dead ended up here. Between 1829 and 1936, nearly 58,000 bodies were buried in the cemetery. But by 1936 the cemetery was considered full and it became a garden. Over time the garden fell into a state of disrepair and became derelict: a haven for the homeless, drug dealers, prostitutes, drinkers and addicts. It was a no-go zone for most people of the city.

But ten years ago a plucky bunch of locals decided to take matters into their own hands. Robin Riley, a local sculptor, organised a group of friends and neighbours and over time cleaned the park up, restoring it to the beautiful setting that it is today.

Now it's a place people go to find peace and tranquillity, away from the hustle and bustle of the city.

Alan Dein visits St James' and meets Robin and the team that have reshaped the space, plus the band of dedicated dog-walkers who meet daily in the park. Among the walkers Alan meets Tommy, Frank and Aaron, a trio who met at the park and have since forged friendships.

Aaron shares his experiences of living near and using the park and tells Alan how visiting St James' has been therapeutic, not just for him in helping him in the tough times he's been through, but also for his mother who is suffering from leukaemia.

Alan also meets harmonica-playing Kevin: the last of the park's rough sleepers, Kevin inhabits one of the garden's abandoned catacombs.

Presenter: Alan Dein

Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.

In the shadow of Liverpool's Anglican cathedral sits St James' Gardens, an oasis of green space in the heart of the busy city.

The Gardens have been several things over the centuries. It was first a quarry from which the docks and much of the city of Liverpool was built. Once all the rock that could be removed had been excavated, a large hole was left and so in 1829 it was consecrated as a cemetery for the city.

Young and old, rich and poor, the city's dead ended up here. Between 1829 and 1936, nearly 58,000 bodies were buried in the cemetery. But by 1936 the cemetery was considered full and it became a garden. Over time the garden fell into a state of disrepair and became derelict: a haven for the homeless, drug dealers, prostitutes, drinkers and addicts. It was a no-go zone for most people of the city.

But ten years ago a plucky bunch of locals decided to take matters into their own hands. Robin Riley, a local sculptor, organised a group of friends and neighbours and over time cleaned the park up, restoring it to the beautiful setting that it is today.

Now it's a place people go to find peace and tranquillity, away from the hustle and bustle of the city.

Alan Dein visits St James' and meets Robin and the team that have reshaped the space, plus the band of dedicated dog-walkers who meet daily in the park. Among the walkers Alan meets Tommy, Frank and Aaron, a trio who met at the park and have since forged friendships.

Aaron shares his experiences of living near and using the park and tells Alan how visiting St James' has been therapeutic, not just for him in helping him in the tough times he's been through, but also for his mother who is suffering from leukaemia.

Alan also meets harmonica-playing Kevin: the last of the park's rough sleepers, Kevin inhabits one of the garden's abandoned catacombs.

Presenter: Alan Dein

Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.

1404 LASTFreeminers In The Forest Of Dean2013091620140529

Alan Dein meets the "free miners" of the Forest of Dean, still digging coal in their seventies. They're a dying breed, but one woman's attempt to join the club has stirred up strong feelings.

Once a major industry, coal mining in this corner of Gloucestershire is down to a handful of diehard individualists, who relish the freedom that comes from owning your own coal mine in the woods, and being answerable to no one.

"Free miners" have ancient birthrights that date back to Edward II - rights that have persisted through coal nationalisation, privatisation, and closure of almost the entire coal mining industry.

One man, Robin Morgan, is still digging coal at the age of 78. Robin tried to turn one of his mines into a tourist attraction, but got few visitors, lost a lot of money, and has now returned to doing what he loves best: hewing coal from narrow seams in much the same way as his ancestors did.

But tradition says that only men can be free miners. When Elaine Morman tried to become one, the miners still active were almost unanimously opposed. Mining is no job for a woman, they say, and in any case, Elaine is not a true miner, since she works in caves that are a tourist attraction, where she does not dig coal, but scrapes small quantities of ochre for artists' pigments from the walls. Thanks to equality legislation, Elaine has succeeded in having her name entered on the free miners' roll, but is shunned by the male free miners.

So on the one hand, we have Robin, with his failed tourist mine and his deep attachment to tradition. On the other Elaine, with her successful tourist caves, and her determination to apply 21st century values to ancient customs. Who is the true free miner?

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.

1404 LASTFreeminers in the Forest of Dean2013091620140529

Alan Dein meets the "free miners" of the Forest of Dean, still digging coal in their seventies. They're a dying breed, but one woman's attempt to join the club has stirred up strong feelings.

Once a major industry, coal mining in this corner of Gloucestershire is down to a handful of diehard individualists, who relish the freedom that comes from owning your own coal mine in the woods, and being answerable to no one.

"Free miners" have ancient birthrights that date back to Edward II - rights that have persisted through coal nationalisation, privatisation, and closure of almost the entire coal mining industry.

One man, Robin Morgan, is still digging coal at the age of 78. Robin tried to turn one of his mines into a tourist attraction, but got few visitors, lost a lot of money, and has now returned to doing what he loves best: hewing coal from narrow seams in much the same way as his ancestors did.

But tradition says that only men can be free miners. When Elaine Morman tried to become one, the miners still active were almost unanimously opposed. Mining is no job for a woman, they say, and in any case, Elaine is not a true miner, since she works in caves that are a tourist attraction, where she does not dig coal, but scrapes small quantities of ochre for artists' pigments from the walls. Thanks to equality legislation, Elaine has succeeded in having her name entered on the free miners' roll, but is shunned by the male free miners.

So on the one hand, we have Robin, with his failed tourist mine and his deep attachment to tradition. On the other Elaine, with her successful tourist caves, and her determination to apply 21st century values to ancient customs. Who is the true free miner?

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.

Alan Dein meets the "free miners" of the Forest of Dean, still digging coal in their seventies. They're a dying breed, but one woman's attempt to join the club has stirred up strong feelings.

Once a major industry, coal mining in this corner of Gloucestershire is down to a handful of diehard individualists, who relish the freedom that comes from owning your own coal mine in the woods, and being answerable to no one.

"Free miners" have ancient birthrights that date back to Edward II - rights that have persisted through coal nationalisation, privatisation, and closure of almost the entire coal mining industry.

One man, Robin Morgan, is still digging coal at the age of 78. Robin tried to turn one of his mines into a tourist attraction, but got few visitors, lost a lot of money, and has now returned to doing what he loves best: hewing coal from narrow seams in much the same way as his ancestors did.

But tradition says that only men can be free miners. When Elaine Morman tried to become one, the miners still active were almost unanimously opposed. Mining is no job for a woman, they say, and in any case, Elaine is not a true miner, since she works in caves that are a tourist attraction, where she does not dig coal, but scrapes small quantities of ochre for artists' pigments from the walls. Thanks to equality legislation, Elaine has succeeded in having her name entered on the free miners' roll, but is shunned by the male free miners.

So on the one hand, we have Robin, with his failed tourist mine and his deep attachment to tradition. On the other Elaine, with her successful tourist caves, and her determination to apply 21st century values to ancient customs. Who is the true free miner?

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.

1501Rooms For Rent2013121120140528

Alan Dein returns with more extraordinary stories of ordinary life in Britain. In Rooms for Rent, he meets Helga and her daughter Melody in a small Norfolk town who, ever since husband - a Cliff Richard impersonator - upped sticks and left, rent out rooms. They've got two men in situ, and a newcomer has just turned up.

But as the 'family' gather round the communal dinnertable, they dream of a fulfilling future beyond this often noisy house of song and dance. And how will the five of them get on as the Christmas season sets everyone on edge?

Producers: Sarah Bowen and Simon Elmes

Also in this series: The Auction - sale of the century, Yorkshire style, and Christmas at 'Sandringham' - a popular seaside hotel puts up the streamers and doles out puds by the Santa-sackful... But are the guests having fun?

1501Rooms for Rent2013121120140528

Alan Dein returns with more extraordinary stories of ordinary life in Britain. In Rooms for Rent, he meets Helga and her daughter Melody in a small Norfolk town who, ever since husband - a Cliff Richard impersonator - upped sticks and left, rent out rooms. They've got two men in situ, and a newcomer has just turned up.

But as the 'family' gather round the communal dinnertable, they dream of a fulfilling future beyond this often noisy house of song and dance. And how will the five of them get on as the Christmas season sets everyone on edge?

Producers: Sarah Bowen and Simon Elmes

Also in this series: The Auction - sale of the century, Yorkshire style, and Christmas at 'Sandringham' - a popular seaside hotel puts up the streamers and doles out puds by the Santa-sackful... But are the guests having fun?

Alan Dein returns with more extraordinary stories of ordinary life in Britain. In Rooms for Rent, he meets Helga and her daughter Melody in a small Norfolk town who, ever since husband - a Cliff Richard impersonator - upped sticks and left, rent out rooms. They've got two men in situ, and a newcomer has just turned up.

But as the 'family' gather round the communal dinnertable, they dream of a fulfilling future beyond this often noisy house of song and dance. And how will the five of them get on as the Christmas season sets everyone on edge?

Producers: Sarah Bowen and Simon Elmes

Also in this series: The Auction - sale of the century, Yorkshire style, and Christmas at 'Sandringham' - a popular seaside hotel puts up the streamers and doles out puds by the Santa-sackful... But are the guests having fun?

1502Going, Going, Gone20131218

In the Sheffield auction room they see it all, from miners' welfare centres, to country manors and repossessed bowling alleys, and whatever state the buildings are in there's nearly always some-one willing to bid for them.

The process is largely overseen by Adrian Little, whose own father was a livestock auctioneer. His right hand man is Mohammed Mahroof, whose father came from Pakistan to work in the steel works and had no intention of staying in his rented accommodation where he slept twelve to a room.

Over a four week period viewings take place on a welfare centre in Grimethorpe, a council library in Sheffield and homes in various states of disrepair. One has cracks so large that daylight pours through the roof and the walls look like they're escaping down the street. It doesn't seem to deter. Scores of people come and dream about the type of home they can make for themselves in this desirable area of the city. Others don't view at all - preferring to turn up at the auction room to snap up anything which can provide them with a rental income or a conversion possibility.

As Mahroof drives round the city he can't resist reciting the value of nearly every building he passes: a habit he clearly inherits from his Dad. And for those in Grimethorpe, the auction represents the end of the days of community provision. Dot watches developers peer and poke their way round the galleried rooms: all of them want to bulldoze the site and erect flats in place of the meeting spaces she remembers from the miner's strike: "it's sad to see these buildings lost to us," she says, "but that's the way it is - the old times have gone for good."

Producer/reporter: Sue Mitchell.

1502Going, Going, Gone20131218

In the Sheffield auction room they see it all, from miners' welfare centres, to country manors and repossessed bowling alleys, and whatever state the buildings are in there's nearly always some-one willing to bid for them.

The process is largely overseen by Adrian Little, whose own father was a livestock auctioneer. His right hand man is Mohammed Mahroof, whose father came from Pakistan to work in the steel works and had no intention of staying in his rented accommodation where he slept twelve to a room.

Over a four week period viewings take place on a welfare centre in Grimethorpe, a council library in Sheffield and homes in various states of disrepair. One has cracks so large that daylight pours through the roof and the walls look like they're escaping down the street. It doesn't seem to deter. Scores of people come and dream about the type of home they can make for themselves in this desirable area of the city. Others don't view at all - preferring to turn up at the auction room to snap up anything which can provide them with a rental income or a conversion possibility.

As Mahroof drives round the city he can't resist reciting the value of nearly every building he passes: a habit he clearly inherits from his Dad. And for those in Grimethorpe, the auction represents the end of the days of community provision. Dot watches developers peer and poke their way round the galleried rooms: all of them want to bulldoze the site and erect flats in place of the meeting spaces she remembers from the miner's strike: "it's sad to see these buildings lost to us," she says, "but that's the way it is - the old times have gone for good."

Producer/reporter: Sue Mitchell.

1503Christmas At Sandringham20131225

As the Royal Family sit down to their festive dinner on the Queen's Norfolk estate, Alan Dein invites Radio 4 listeners to spend Christmas at a rather different Sandringham - the Sandringham Hotel in Weston super Mare.

Alan joins the seafront hotel's 'Turkey and Tinsel' celebrations as three coachloads of revellers - mostly retired people - head south to celebrate Christmas in November.

"We're not the bees' knees, we're not the finest hotel in Weston super Mare..." says Ken Perrett, the hotel's owner. And it's true - the hotel is a little rough around the edges. Yet Ken must be getting something right - nearly a hundred people have checked in for five days of early festivities.

Amidst the laughter, turkey and tinsel, a bittersweet story emerges - as Alan discovers many are here celebrating without the ones they love.

Producer: Laurence Grissell

1503Christmas at Sandringham20131225

As the Royal Family sit down to their festive dinner on the Queen's Norfolk estate, Alan Dein invites Radio 4 listeners to spend Christmas at a rather different Sandringham - the Sandringham Hotel in Weston super Mare.

Alan joins the seafront hotel's 'Turkey & Tinsel' celebrations as three coachloads of revellers - mostly retired people - head south to celebrate Christmas in November.

"We're not the bees' knees, we're not the finest hotel in Weston super Mare..." says Ken Perrett, the hotel's owner. And it's true - the hotel is a little rough around the edges. Yet Ken must be getting something right - nearly a hundred people have checked in for five days of early festivities.

Amidst the laughter, turkey and tinsel, a bittersweet story emerges - as Alan discovers many are here celebrating without the ones they love.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

1504Sirens of Yorkshire - Community First Responders20140101

1504Sirens Of Yorkshire - Community First Responders20140101

1504 LASTSirens Of Yorkshire - Community First Responders2014010120140530

It's Friday night in Hornsea, a small village in East Yorkshire; the air is cold and the stars seem to go on forever.

Just off the High Street, a small accountancy firm is closing up; Andy, a man who loves the challenges of VAT, has finished the filing, and is having a cup of tea, chatting on the phone to a friend about the plan to save the Floral Hall.

Suddenly a siren blasts out.

It's coming from a mobile phone, connected directly to the ambulance service.

Andy is not a paramedic, but he is a Community First Responder - someone trained in life saving techniques, who has volunteered to drop everything to go and be the first on the scene in an emergency.

The actions he takes over the next few minutes could mean the difference between life and death. Within seconds he's donned a high-vis jacket and, weighed down with a rucksack of life saving equipment, is running for his car. By the time the ambulance services arrives from the nearest hospital he may have been at the scene for some time - administering life-saving first aid.

First Responders come from every walk of life, and are all highly trained volunteers. But it's a huge commitment, and responsibility, and over Christmas and New Year, a busy one. So what motivates someone to take on such a role? Good Samaritans on the surface, but is it the adrenalin rush many say they feel that makes them addicted to saving lives?

Julie Gatenby meets the Community First Responders of East Yorkshire.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

1504 LASTSirens of Yorkshire - Community First Responders2014010120140530

It's Friday night in Hornsea, a small village in East Yorkshire; the air is cold and the stars seem to go on forever.

Just off the High Street, a small accountancy firm is closing up; Andy, a man who loves the challenges of VAT, has finished the filing, and is having a cup of tea, chatting on the phone to a friend about the plan to save the Floral Hall.

Suddenly a siren blasts out.

It's coming from a mobile phone, connected directly to the ambulance service.

Andy is not a paramedic, but he is a Community First Responder - someone trained in life saving techniques, who has volunteered to drop everything to go and be the first on the scene in an emergency.

The actions he takes over the next few minutes could mean the difference between life and death. Within seconds he's donned a high-vis jacket and, weighed down with a rucksack of life saving equipment, is running for his car. By the time the ambulance services arrives from the nearest hospital he may have been at the scene for some time - administering life-saving first aid.

First Responders come from every walk of life, and are all highly trained volunteers. But it's a huge commitment, and responsibility, and over Christmas and New Year, a busy one. So what motivates someone to take on such a role? Good Samaritans on the surface, but is it the adrenalin rush many say they feel that makes them addicted to saving lives?

Julie Gatenby meets the Community First Responders of East Yorkshire.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

It's Friday night in Hornsea, a small village in East Yorkshire; the air is cold and the stars seem to go on forever.

Just off the High Street, a small accountancy firm is closing up; Andy, a man who loves the challenges of VAT, has finished the filing, and is having a cup of tea, chatting on the phone to a friend about the plan to save the Floral Hall.

Suddenly a siren blasts out.

It's coming from a mobile phone, connected directly to the ambulance service.

Andy is not a paramedic, but he is a Community First Responder - someone trained in life saving techniques, who has volunteered to drop everything to go and be the first on the scene in an emergency.

The actions he takes over the next few minutes could mean the difference between life and death. Within seconds he's donned a high-vis jacket and, weighed down with a rucksack of life saving equipment, is running for his car. By the time the ambulance services arrives from the nearest hospital he may have been at the scene for some time - administering life-saving first aid.

First Responders come from every walk of life, and are all highly trained volunteers. But it's a huge commitment, and responsibility, and over Christmas and New Year, a busy one. So what motivates someone to take on such a role? Good Samaritans on the surface, but is it the adrenalin rush many say they feel that makes them addicted to saving lives?

Julie Gatenby meets the Community First Responders of East Yorkshire.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

1601The Show Must Go On2014040720140919

Alan Dein follows Pat and Hayley Mallon - a husband and wife singing duo - around the pubs of Bath. The show must go on - even as 69 year old Pat prepares for major surgery on an aneurysm.

Bath's pub circuit is a far cry from the packed houses that Pat was playing with his 5 piece Country and Western band back in the 1980s. His has been a life well-lived. During those heady days, he was on two bottles of whiskey and 100 cigarettes a day.

But now Pat's facing the prospect of major surgery. Fearing he may not be able to return to gigging, he's grooming wife Hayley - 23 years his junior - to take over.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

1601The Show Must Go On2014040720140919

Alan Dein follows Pat & Hayley Mallon - a husband and wife singing duo - around the pubs of Bath. The show must go on - even as 69 year old Pat prepares for major surgery on an aneurysm.

Bath's pub circuit is a far cry from the packed houses that Pat was playing with his 5 piece Country & Western band back in the 1980s. His has been a life well-lived. During those heady days, he was on two bottles of whiskey and 100 cigarettes a day.

But now Pat's facing the prospect of major surgery. Fearing he may not be able to return to gigging, he's grooming wife Hayley - 23 years his junior - to take over.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

Alan Dein follows Pat & Hayley Mallon - a husband and wife singing duo - around the pubs of Bath. The show must go on - even as 69 year old Pat prepares for major surgery on an aneurysm.

Bath's pub circuit is a far cry from the packed houses that Pat was playing with his 5 piece Country & Western band back in the 1980s. His has been a life well-lived. During those heady days, he was on two bottles of whiskey and 100 cigarettes a day.

But now Pat's facing the prospect of major surgery. Fearing he may not be able to return to gigging, he's grooming wife Hayley - 23 years his junior - to take over.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

1602Waxing And Filing - Jade's Beautiful Dream20140414

Jade has a dream - to run the best beauty parlour in the business.

Just off Oxford Street, shopping mecca of London's West End, Jade's salon paints nails to perfection, massages faces, and does intimate waxing with aplomb.

Intimacy with the clients is also what Jade is good at - knowing her customers, helping them make the most of their bodies, and their day. "Women come in to have their nails done," she tells Sangita Myska, "And they tell me I have saved their lives!"

A teenage rebel, she had a child at 14, and her life has had ups and downs. Growing up in Southampton she swore she would never move to London, but a chance encounter at a rave in Hackney, with a handsome Greek Cypriot, Angelo, changed her mind. Now she's married and hoping for another child - just as soon as she can find a like-minded beauty technician to share her passion for perfection.

Getting new talent is an up-hill battle - but if she can find the right person, the sky's the limit.

Presenter: Sangita Myska

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

1602Waxing and Filing - Jade's Beautiful Dream20140414

Jade has a dream - to run the best beauty parlour in the business.

Just off Oxford Street, shopping mecca of London's West End, Jade's salon paints nails to perfection, massages faces, and does intimate waxing with aplomb.

Intimacy with the clients is also what Jade is good at - knowing her customers, helping them make the most of their bodies, and their day. "Women come in to have their nails done," she tells Sangita Myska, "And they tell me I have saved their lives!"

A teenage rebel, she had a child at 14, and her life has had ups and downs. Growing up in Southampton she swore she would never move to London, but a chance encounter at a rave in Hackney, with a handsome Greek Cypriot, Angelo, changed her mind. Now she's married and hoping for another child - just as soon as she can find a like-minded beauty technician to share her passion for perfection.

Getting new talent is an up-hill battle - but if she can find the right person, the sky's the limit.

Presenter: Sangita Myska

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

1603Spirit Of Battle2014042120140603

Wrestling, which used to draw millions of viewers to the box on Saturday afternoons in the 1970's, is still going strong in theatres up and down the country. Characters like Big Daddy and Giant Haystacks have given way to The Avalanche, Tony Spitfire and Thunder who throw each other about and continue to delight and appal passionate audiences.

Alan Dein follows Gareth Pugh, a young wrestler touring the UK circuit. Known by the Welsh name Caden Lay (Spirit of Battle), Gareth is breaking into the big time having just turned professional. Alan takes a wild ride from the booming ringside along endless motorways into changing rooms and training gyms to Gareth's village in mid-Wales. There, in the family home, he discovers the source of Gareth's spirit of battle and learns how his dream to become a wrestler was born.

Producer Neil McCarthy.

Wrestling, which used to draw millions of viewers to the box on Saturday afternoons in the 1970's, is still going strong in theatres up and down the country. Characters like Big Daddy and Giant Haystacks have given way to The Avalanche, Robbie Spitfire and Thunder who knock each other about and continue to delight and appal the audience.

Alan Dein follows Gareth Pugh, a young wrestler touring the circuit. Known by the Welsh name Caden Lay (Spirit of Battle), Gareth is breaking into the big time having just turned professional. Alan takes a wild ride from the booming ringside along endless motorways into changing rooms and training gyms to Gareth's village in mid-Wales. There, in the family home, he discovers the source of Gareth's spirit of battle and learns how his dream to become a wrestler was born.

1603Spirit of Battle2014042120140603

Wrestling, which used to draw millions of viewers to the box on Saturday afternoons in the 1970's, is still going strong in theatres up and down the country. Characters like Big Daddy and Giant Haystacks have given way to The Avalanche, Tony Spitfire and Thunder who throw each other about and continue to delight and appal passionate audiences.

Alan Dein follows Gareth Pugh, a young wrestler touring the UK circuit. Known by the Welsh name Caden Lay (Spirit of Battle), Gareth is breaking into the big time having just turned professional. Alan takes a wild ride from the booming ringside along endless motorways into changing rooms and training gyms to Gareth's village in mid-Wales. There, in the family home, he discovers the source of Gareth's spirit of battle and learns how his dream to become a wrestler was born.

Producer Neil McCarthy.

Wrestling, which used to draw millions of viewers to the box on Saturday afternoons in the 1970's, is still going strong in theatres up and down the country. Characters like Big Daddy and Giant Haystacks have given way to The Avalanche, Tony Spitfire and Thunder who throw each other about and continue to delight and appal passionate audiences.

Alan Dein follows Gareth Pugh, a young wrestler touring the UK circuit. Known by the Welsh name Caden Lay (Spirit of Battle), Gareth is breaking into the big time having just turned professional. Alan takes a wild ride from the booming ringside along endless motorways into changing rooms and training gyms to Gareth's village in mid-Wales. There, in the family home, he discovers the source of Gareth's spirit of battle and learns how his dream to become a wrestler was born.

Producer Neil McCarthy.

Wrestling, which used to draw millions of viewers to the box on Saturday afternoons in the 1970's, is still going strong in theatres up and down the country. Characters like Big Daddy and Giant Haystacks have given way to The Avalanche, Robbie Spitfire and Thunder who knock each other about and continue to delight and appal the audience.

Alan Dein follows Gareth Pugh, a young wrestler touring the circuit. Known by the Welsh name Caden Lay (Spirit of Battle), Gareth is breaking into the big time having just turned professional. Alan takes a wild ride from the booming ringside along endless motorways into changing rooms and training gyms to Gareth's village in mid-Wales. There, in the family home, he discovers the source of Gareth's spirit of battle and learns how his dream to become a wrestler was born.

Producer Neil McCarthy.

1604 LASTGetting the House Ready2014042820140916

74 year old Myf Barker is turning her enormous home into a wedding venue in the hope that it will make money. Kate Lamble meets the family and uncovers memories amid the chaos.

Purton House has been lived in by Myf, her late husband and her children for decades. It's a rambling family mansion with grounds, and an organic farm attached. But Myf has an eye to the future and wants to leave the house to her children as a viable business. So she's working to turn the property into a venue where weddings can be held and bridal families can stay the night.

Her main job is to convert the upstairs rooms so that they meet the standards of the most exacting couples. Old furniture has to be renovated, walls have to be painted and new bathrooms are being put in. Myf will even have to move out of her own bedroom which is being turned into a sitting room.

It's a daunting workload. Will it be ready on time?

Kate Lamble meets Myf, some of her grown up children including daughters Rowie and Talia and also Glenn, the son she fostered. She hears about the renovations and finds out what the house and its landscape symbolises for all of them, especially since the death of Rowie's husband Alex several years ago.

Producer; Emma Kingsley.

74 year old Myf Barker is turning her enormous home into a wedding venue in the hope that it will make money. Kate Lamble meets the family and uncovers memories amid the chaos.

Purton House has been lived in by Myf, her late husband and her children for decades. It's a rambling family mansion with grounds, and an organic farm attached. But Myf has an eye to the future and wants to leave the house to her children as a viable business. So she's working to turn the property into a venue where weddings can be held and bridal families can stay the night.

Her main job is to convert the upstairs rooms so that they meet the standards of the most exacting couples. Old furniture has to be renovated, walls have to be painted and new bathrooms are being put in. Myf will even have to move out of her own bedroom which is being turned into a sitting room.

It's a daunting workload. Will it be ready on time?

Kate Lamble meets Myf, some of her grown up children including daughters Rowie and Talia and also Glenn, the son she fostered. She hears about the renovations and finds out what the house and its landscape symbolises for all of them, especially since the death of Rowie's husband Alex several years ago.

Producer; Emma Kingsley.

1604 LASTGetting The House Ready2014042820140916

74 year old Myf Barker is turning her enormous home into a wedding venue in the hope that it will make money. Kate Lamble meets the family and uncovers memories amid the chaos.

Purton House has been lived in by Myf, her late husband and her children for decades. It's a rambling family mansion with grounds, and an organic farm attached. But Myf has an eye to the future and wants to leave the house to her children as a viable business. So she's working to turn the property into a venue where weddings can be held and bridal families can stay the night.

Her main job is to convert the upstairs rooms so that they meet the standards of the most exacting couples. Old furniture has to be renovated, walls have to be painted and new bathrooms are being put in. Myf will even have to move out of her own bedroom which is being turned into a sitting room.

It's a daunting workload. Will it be ready on time?

Kate Lamble meets Myf, some of her grown up children including daughters Rowie and Talia and also Glenn, the son she fostered. She hears about the renovations and finds out what the house and its landscape symbolises for all of them, especially since the death of Rowie's husband Alex several years ago.

Producer; Emma Kingsley.

1701The Roman Way2014082220140915

Alan Dein follows the fast-moving story of a squatter who takes over a pub in Luton - he says for the benefit of the local community.

The Roman Way is a sprawling 1960s pub at the centre of the Lewsey Farm housing estate.

The landlord of fourteen years, Declan, made the decision earlier this year to give up the business and return to Ireland to start a new life.

But, just as Declan is leaving, on his very last morning in the pub, Biggs turns up; a larger-than-life local character determined to take over the pub on behalf of the newly formed Lewsey Farm Community Action Group.

Dressed in a hoodie and bandana and carrying a heavy chain, he negotiates his way past police and a representative from the pub's owners, and - in his terminology - 'legally occupies' the building.

Over the next few weeks the story takes many unexpected twists and turns, and draws in bailiffs, security guards, police and the local community.

Alan Dein watches as the story comes to a conclusive end.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Alan Dein follows the fast-moving story of a squatter who takes over a pub in Luton - he says for the benefit of the local community.

The Roman Way is a sprawling 1960s pub at the centre of the Lewsey Farm housing estate.

The landlord of fourteen years, Declan, made the decision earlier this year to give up the business and return to Ireland to start a new life.

But, just as Declan is leaving, on his very last morning in the pub, Biggs turns up; a larger-than-life local character determined to take over the pub on behalf of the newly formed Lewsey Farm Community Action Group.

Dressed in a hoodie and bandana and carrying a heavy chain, he negotiates his way past police and a representative from the pub's owners, and - in his terminology - 'legally occupies' the building.

Over the next few weeks the story takes many unexpected twists and turns, and draws in bailiffs, security guards, police and the local community.

Alan Dein watches as the story comes to a conclusive end.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

1701The Roman Way2014082220140915

Alan Dein follows the fast-moving story of a squatter who takes over a pub in Luton - he says for the benefit of the local community.

The Roman Way is a sprawling 1960s pub at the centre of the Lewsey Farm housing estate.

The landlord of fourteen years, Declan, made the decision earlier this year to give up the business and return to Ireland to start a new life.

But, just as Declan is leaving, on his very last morning in the pub, Biggs turns up; a larger-than-life local character determined to take over the pub on behalf of the newly formed Lewsey Farm Community Action Group.

Dressed in a hoodie and bandana and carrying a heavy chain, he negotiates his way past police and a representative from the pub's owners, and - in his terminology - 'legally occupies' the building.

Over the next few weeks the story takes many unexpected twists and turns, and draws in bailiffs, security guards, police and the local community.

Alan Dein watches as the story comes to a conclusive end.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

1702The Death Doulas20140829

Alan Dein meets doulas in Lewes in Sussex - people working in palliative care from all walks of life who have learned how to be companions for people who are dying. They also are involved in consciousness-raising about the end of life and run Death Cafes in Lewes. We follow doulas Polly and Jane as they reveal their motivation for being involved in this work, talk to people about end of life directives, and describe what a doula does in the room of a dying person.

Producer: Sara Conkey.

1702The Death Doulas20140829

Alan Dein meets doulas in Lewes in Sussex - people working in palliative care from all walks of life who have learned how to be companions for people who are dying. They also are involved in consciousness-raising about the end of life and run Death Cafes in Lewes. We follow doulas Polly and Jane as they reveal their motivation for being involved in this work, talk to people about end of life directives, and describe what a doula does in the room of a dying person.

Producer: Sara Conkey.

1703Branscombe Chalet Owners20140905

In February 2014, the worst storms in a generation hit the south Devon coast. Among those affected were the owners of five beach chalets at Branscombe. The sea took away much of the beach shingle beach and eroded the earth banks on which the chalets stood, exposing the foundations and making some of them uninhabitable.

Before the storm, the chalets were worth up to £250,000 each but now they are virtually unsaleable. The owners would like to rebuild them, and move shingle back up the beach to protect them from future storms. But there's a problem: Branscombe beach is part of a Site of Special Scientific Interest, and falls under the control of Natural England. Natural England won't let the owners move shingle, partly because the upper shoreline is home to the very rare scaly cricket. They also adhere to a "Shoreline Management Plan", which says that there should be "no active intervention" to protect the beach from erosion.

There is a stand-off between the owners and Natural England, but the clock's ticking: without urgent action, the chalets could fall into the sea in the next big storm. Some of the chalet owners are not wealthy - they have mortgages on their chalets and depend on the income from letting them out in the summer. Now, with an entire season's income gone, some of them are staring at financial ruin. One man in particular, Philip Trenchard, was brought to the chalets by his father when he was a child, and now brings his own family every year. This continuity is a key part of his identity, and he'd expected to be able to continue using the chalets for many more years. But the coastal erosion, which is more severe than anyone predicted, has thrown all his assumptions about time scales into doubt.

Presenter: Alan Dein

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.

1703Branscombe Chalet Owners20140905

In February 2014, the worst storms in a generation hit the south Devon coast. Among those affected were the owners of five beach chalets at Branscombe. The sea took away much of the beach shingle beach and eroded the earth banks on which the chalets stood, exposing the foundations and making some of them uninhabitable.

Before the storm, the chalets were worth up to £250,000 each but now they are virtually unsaleable. The owners would like to rebuild them, and move shingle back up the beach to protect them from future storms. But there's a problem: Branscombe beach is part of a Site of Special Scientific Interest, and falls under the control of Natural England. Natural England won't let the owners move shingle, partly because the upper shoreline is home to the very rare scaly cricket. They also adhere to a "Shoreline Management Plan", which says that there should be "no active intervention" to protect the beach from erosion.

There is a stand-off between the owners and Natural England, but the clock's ticking: without urgent action, the chalets could fall into the sea in the next big storm. Some of the chalet owners are not wealthy - they have mortgages on their chalets and depend on the income from letting them out in the summer. Now, with an entire season's income gone, some of them are staring at financial ruin. One man in particular, Philip Trenchard, was brought to the chalets by his father when he was a child, and now brings his own family every year. This continuity is a key part of his identity, and he'd expected to be able to continue using the chalets for many more years. But the coastal erosion, which is more severe than anyone predicted, has thrown all his assumptions about time scales into doubt.

Presenter: Alan Dein

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.

1704 LAST20140912

Gerry Marshall was one of the most famous racing drivers of his generation; a larger-than-life character with big appetites, who eventually died of a heart attack behind the wheel at Silverstone in 2005. His son, Gregor, always wanted to follow in his father's footsteps, but Gerry discouraged him, saying "what's the point, you'll never be as good as me".

But Gregor hasn't given up on his dream of racing. He has bought a vintage car, similar to the one his father raced, and is restoring it, with the help of two of his father's old friends - fellow ex-racer Denis, and car salesman Brian, known as "Slim". For Denis and Brian, it's a chance to relive their youths. Brian in particular is itching to get behind the wheel again, to smell the petrol fumes and hear the noise of the track.

They plan to get the car ready for Gregor to race in the summer season. Meanwhile, Gregor is trying to get in some track time, using a friend's borrowed car. But it's not all straightforward, as the car breaks down on its first outing ...

Presenter: Alan Dein

Producers: Jolyon Jenkins and Polly Weston.

1704 LAST20140912

Gerry Marshall was one of the most famous racing drivers of his generation; a larger-than-life character with big appetites, who eventually died of a heart attack behind the wheel at Silverstone in 2005. His son, Gregor, always wanted to follow in his father's footsteps, but Gerry discouraged him, saying "what's the point, you'll never be as good as me".

But Gregor hasn't given up on his dream of racing. He has bought a vintage car, similar to the one his father raced, and is restoring it, with the help of two of his father's old friends - fellow ex-racer Denis, and car salesman Brian, known as "Slim". For Denis and Brian, it's a chance to relive their youths. Brian in particular is itching to get behind the wheel again, to smell the petrol fumes and hear the noise of the track.

They plan to get the car ready for Gregor to race in the summer season. Meanwhile, Gregor is trying to get in some track time, using a friend's borrowed car. But it's not all straightforward, as the car breaks down on its first outing...

Presenter: Alan Dein

Producers: Jolyon Jenkins and Polly Weston.

1801The Horses of Holme Wood20141124

Bradford Council regularly monitors horse numbers on its Holme Wood estate, with workers and police carrying out late night raids to round them up. Alan Dein meets the animal owners and explores their bitter battle with the council as they tether horses in parks, alleys and even their own gardens.

Gaz has tried dogs, cats and guinea pigs. Last week when his seven kids wanted a new pet he picked up a £50 horse form a mate on the street. The horse is now in his back garden and during the day he risks the council's wrath by moving it into the park outside his home. It is a huge council estate but his home is let by a private landlord and although he has no income he's asking that landlord if he can build a stables for Sausage in his garden! The estate is literally teeming with horses and no one bats an eyelid at one more joining their ranks.

Across the road Pip is engaged in a game of cat and mouse with council officials as he tries to hide his horses. Eviction notices have been served on his parents and he's received an anti-social behaviour order for having horses loose on the estate. His Mum won't have him back home after a bitter argument which ended with the police being called. He's now homeless and out of school.

And then there's nine year old Holly Leigh who has long dreamed of owning a horse. That dream has just come true and Billy is now in the garden of her small council home.

The Holme Wood estate is home to about 10,000 people and pets of all variety, from horses to pigs, snakes, lizards and monkeys. But it's the horses that are causing the problems...

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

1801The Horses Of Holme Wood20141124

Bradford Council regularly monitors horse numbers on its Holme Wood estate, with workers and police carrying out late night raids to round them up. Alan Dein meets the animal owners and explores their bitter battle with the council as they tether horses in parks, alleys and even their own gardens.

Gaz has tried dogs, cats and guinea pigs. Last week when his seven kids wanted a new pet he picked up a £50 horse form a mate on the street. The horse is now in his back garden and during the day he risks the council's wrath by moving it into the park outside his home. It is a huge council estate but his home is let by a private landlord and although he has no income he's asking that landlord if he can build a stables for Sausage in his garden! The estate is literally teeming with horses and no one bats an eyelid at one more joining their ranks.

Across the road Pip is engaged in a game of cat and mouse with council officials as he tries to hide his horses. Eviction notices have been served on his parents and he's received an anti-social behaviour order for having horses loose on the estate. His Mum won't have him back home after a bitter argument which ended with the police being called. He's now homeless and out of school.

And then there's nine year old Holly Leigh who has long dreamed of owning a horse. That dream has just come true and Billy is now in the garden of her small council home.

The Holme Wood estate is home to about 10,000 people and pets of all variety, from horses to pigs, snakes, lizards and monkeys. But it's the horses that are causing the problems...

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

1802Last Port of Call20141201

Alan Dein visits an old mariners' home on the banks of the River Mersey. Mariners' Park in Wallasey is home to over 150 former Merchant Navy seamen and their wives or widows. Many of them set off on their maiden voyage as young sailors from Liverpool, passing the home on their port side as they embarked on a life of discovery, adventure and hard work at sea. Now, having "swallowed the anchor", they settled here in retirement and watch the occasional vessel pass up and down the river.

But, as Alan discovers, life on dry land has given many of these sailors a new lease of life. They track ships on the internet, take the ferry across the Mersey and throw themselves into a sports day. But he also finds a reflective side to the Park and a very strong attachment to its own history. The Merchant Navy is often overlooked in Remembrance services, but not at Mariners' Park.

Producer Neil McCarthy.

1802Last Port Of Call20141201

Alan Dein visits an old mariners' home on the banks of the River Mersey. Mariners' Park in Wallasey is home to over 150 former Merchant Navy seamen and their wives or widows. Many of them set off on their maiden voyage as young sailors from Liverpool, passing the home on their port side as they embarked on a life of discovery, adventure and hard work at sea. Now, having "swallowed the anchor", they settled here in retirement and watch the occasional vessel pass up and down the river.

But, as Alan discovers, life on dry land has given many of these sailors a new lease of life. They track ships on the internet, take the ferry across the Mersey and throw themselves into a sports day. But he also finds a reflective side to the Park and a very strong attachment to its own history. The Merchant Navy is often overlooked in Remembrance services, but not at Mariners' Park.

Producer Neil McCarthy.

1803Jam, Jerusalem and an Awful Lot of Glitter20141208

Jam, Jerusalem and an Awful Lot of Glitter

When Jeannie joined her local branch of the Women's Institute in Liverpool, she hoped for a bit of distraction from an ongoing, long term illness. But what she found there was a whole lot more than jam and Jerusalem. Before you could say Victoria sponge cake, she was sashaying down a catwalk dressed as a space alien, complete with ray gun, 8 inch heels and 3 inch red eyelashes, in front of a screaming audience.

Welcome to the Vogue Ball - Liverpool's 21st century version of a phenomenon that swept the streets, and then the underground clubs of New York back in the 1980's.

You might remember the Madonna song "Vogue" which spread the word - but this dance movement originated in the world of excluded black, gay street kids. Vogueing was an escape from a world which was set up to exclude them. It was all about fantasy, taking on a role for one night only of your dream persona; a Wall Street Banker; a glamorous diva; a film star, or even a creature from another galaxy.

In "Lives In A Landscape", Julie Gatenby follows two teams competing in the Vogue Ball - the House of Lisbon, represented by Stephen the bartender, and The House of Twisted Stiches - made up of the entrire committee of the the Iron Maidens WI, while compere of the ball, Rikki Beadle-Blair fills in the history.

Producer

Sara Jane Hall.

1803Jam, Jerusalem And An Awful Lot Of Glitter20141208

When Jeannie joined her local branch of the Women's Institute in Liverpool, she hoped for a bit of distraction from an ongoing, long term illness. But what she found there was a whole lot more than jam and Jerusalem. Before you could say Victoria sponge cake, she was sashaying down a catwalk dressed as a space alien, complete with ray gun, 8 inch heels and 3 inch red eyelashes, in front of a screaming audience.

Welcome to the Vogue Ball - Liverpool's 21st century version of a phenomenon that swept the streets, and then the underground clubs of New York back in the 1980's.

You might remember the Madonna song "Vogue" which spread the word - but this dance movement originated in the world of excluded black, gay street kids. Vogueing was an escape from a world which was set up to exclude them. It was all about fantasy, taking on a role for one night only of your dream persona; a Wall Street Banker; a glamorous diva; a film star, or even a creature from another galaxy.

In "Lives In A Landscape", Julie Gatenby follows two teams competing in the Vogue Ball - the House of Lisbon, represented by Stephen the bartender, and The House of Twisted Stiches - made up of the entrire committee of the the Iron Maidens WI, while compere of the ball, Rikki Beadle-Blair fills in the history.

Producer

Sara Jane Hall.

1804 LASTSails and Oars Only - Oyster Fishing on the Fal20141215

In 1602 Sir Richard Carew saw fishermen catching oysters with 'a thick strong net fastened to three spills of iron, and drawn to the boat's stern, gathering whatsoever it meeteth lying in the bottom of the water, out of which... they cull the oyster'. When Les Angel and Timmy Heard show Alan Dein how they catch oysters in the Fal today he finds that, in four centuries, nothing's changed.

The last wild native oyster beds lie in this beautiful Cornish estuary. In 1876, in an early example of conservation legislation, Truro Corporation passed byelaws forbidding the mechanised harvesting of oysters. The Fal oystermen use gaff-rigged cutters, some over a century old, the last in Europe to fish commercially under sail. Upstream they dredge with punts; not what see boys in blazers and girls in muslin poling along the Cam in, but hefty rowing boats.

Twenty years ago mussel farming was introduced. Ropes are suspended from rafts, obliging molluscs attach themselves and grow, and grow.

The methods are simple, the times, complicated. Carol Thorogood and David Robertson of Cornwall Port Health Authority take Alan up the Fal, explaining how they have to test shellfish. This summer some readings showed E coli present in concentrations above the limit; sections of the fishery were closed for a time, threatening fishermen's livelihoods.

Out on the water Alan Dein meets Les Angel and Timmy Heard. The oysters have grown well; they're optimistic. But mussel-farmer Gary Rawle has abandoned the Fal, moving his rafts out to sea.

The Fal has always flowed through farmland and towns. Is the water quality deteriorating, or being tested more rigorously? Alan ponders the future of the oystermen's precarious, wonderful way of life.

Producer: Julian May.

1804 LASTSails And Oars Only - Oyster Fishing On The Fal20141215

In 1602 Sir Richard Carew saw fishermen catching oysters with 'a thick strong net fastened to three spills of iron, and drawn to the boat's stern, gathering whatsoever it meeteth lying in the bottom of the water, out of which... they cull the oyster'. When Les Angel and Timmy Heard show Alan Dein how they catch oysters in the Fal today he finds that, in four centuries, nothing's changed.

The last wild native oyster beds lie in this beautiful Cornish estuary. In 1876, in an early example of conservation legislation, Truro Corporation passed byelaws forbidding the mechanised harvesting of oysters. The Fal oystermen use gaff-rigged cutters, some over a century old, the last in Europe to fish commercially under sail. Upstream they dredge with punts; not what see boys in blazers and girls in muslin poling along the Cam in, but hefty rowing boats.

Twenty years ago mussel farming was introduced. Ropes are suspended from rafts, obliging molluscs attach themselves and grow, and grow.

The methods are simple, the times, complicated. Carol Thorogood and David Robertson of Cornwall Port Health Authority take Alan up the Fal, explaining how they have to test shellfish. This summer some readings showed E coli present in concentrations above the limit; sections of the fishery were closed for a time, threatening fishermen's livelihoods.

Out on the water Alan Dein meets Les Angel and Timmy Heard. The oysters have grown well; they're optimistic. But mussel-farmer Gary Rawle has abandoned the Fal, moving his rafts out to sea.

The Fal has always flowed through farmland and towns. Is the water quality deteriorating, or being tested more rigorously? Alan ponders the future of the oystermen's precarious, wonderful way of life.

Producer: Julian May.

1901Titans Together20150408

In the start of the new series of Lives in a Landscape Alan Dein discovers that instead of prescribing tablets local GPs are writing out prescriptions for a few weeks of Titan therapy: watching rugby games, attending weekly lunches and fitness classes. The pensioners are sitting alongside the players as they train and even as they strip down for next year's fund-raising calendar.

Titan therapy, at Rotherham Titans rugby club, has been so successful that many of those initially given funding for six weeks are still attending.

Those like 82 year old Grace couldn't be happier: "Tuesday morning and the weekend games are the highlight of my week - I was close to taking my own life when the doctor arranged for me to come here. But now it's changed my life completely."

For Match Day Captain, Tom Holmes, the idea has its roots in the club's long history of encouraging community involvement: "We need this more than ever in this area now and we all look forward to Grace and the others being here. I haven't told them this, but they are sort of like my own grand-parents. We've christened them the Conservatory Choir - on match days they sit there in our VIP section and you can hear them chant through the game."

Val is 70 and when her husband died just over a year ago she was hit by loneliness and ill health as she adapted to her new life. Coming to the Titans every week gives some structure to her week: "The players look out for me and they're the first to notice if I'm looking ill or down. The loneliness of the four walls is really hard. I loved my husband very much and it's so hard being without him. We get treated so well here - I love the lads and they sit with us for hours chatting and eating. I don't know how I'd have managed without this."

Producer Susan Mitchell.

1901Titans Together20150408

In the start of the new series of Lives in a Landscape Alan Dein discovers that instead of prescribing tablets local GPs are writing out prescriptions for a few weeks of Titan therapy: watching rugby games, attending weekly lunches and fitness classes. The pensioners are sitting alongside the players as they train and even as they strip down for next year's fund-raising calendar.

Titan therapy, at Rotherham Titans rugby club, has been so successful that many of those initially given funding for six weeks are still attending.

Those like 82 year old Grace couldn't be happier: "Tuesday morning and the weekend games are the highlight of my week - I was close to taking my own life when the doctor arranged for me to come here. But now it's changed my life completely."

For Match Day Captain, Tom Holmes, the idea has its roots in the club's long history of encouraging community involvement: "We need this more than ever in this area now and we all look forward to Grace and the others being here. I haven't told them this, but they are sort of like my own grand-parents. We've christened them the Conservatory Choir - on match days they sit there in our VIP section and you can hear them chant through the game."

Val is 70 and when her husband died just over a year ago she was hit by loneliness and ill health as she adapted to her new life. Coming to the Titans every week gives some structure to her week: "The players look out for me and they're the first to notice if I'm looking ill or down. The loneliness of the four walls is really hard. I loved my husband very much and it's so hard being without him. We get treated so well here - I love the lads and they sit with us for hours chatting and eating. I don't know how I'd have managed without this."

Producer Susan Mitchell.

190220150415

Alan Dein meets the modern residents of the Holy Island of Lindisfarne. While the recorded history of of the place can be traced back to the 6th century and includes the followers of St. Aiden and St Cuthbert, the current residents try to maintain a way of life that has existed for hundreds of years. Where the monks of Lindisfarne had contend with the Vikings and the Reformation, today's residents face an annual invasion of half a million tourists.

When the tide is out coachloads of tourists and pilgrims flood onto the island. But when the tide comes in and the island is cut off from the mainland, the visitors disappear and silence descends.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

190220150415

Alan Dein meets the modern residents of the Holy Island of Lindisfarne. While the recorded history of of the place can be traced back to the 6th century and includes the followers of St. Aiden and St Cuthbert, the current residents try to maintain a way of life that has existed for hundreds of years. Where the monks of Lindisfarne had contend with the Vikings and the Reformation, today's residents face an annual invasion of half a million tourists.

When the tide is out coachloads of tourists and pilgrims flood onto the island. But when the tide comes in and the island is cut off from the mainland, the visitors disappear and silence descends.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

190320150422

Ms Pope runs a tight ship in her class of 27 at Bowling Park Primary School: she has little option given her pupils come from 18 different countries, speak 31 languages between them and have to all pitch in on the frequent occasions when classmates leave and new ones arrive

Maja tells me that teaching her Mum English is one of the hardest things she has ever attempted: she's given up now! She learnt from class-mate Casper, who has taught others in the class. Maja is now teaching L'Annee, who arrived from the Congo and speaks no English at all. This system of catch-up operated by the pupils and ensures that all new arrivals can quickly integrate into Bradford life.

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

190320150422

Ms Pope runs a tight ship in her class of 27 at Bowling Park Primary School: she has little option given her pupils come from 18 different countries, speak 31 languages between them and have to all pitch in on the frequent occasions when classmates leave and new ones arrive

Maja tells me that teaching her Mum English is one of the hardest things she has ever attempted: she's given up now! She learnt from class-mate Casper, who has taught others in the class. Maja is now teaching L'Annee, who arrived from the Congo and speaks no English at all. This system of catch-up operated by the pupils and ensures that all new arrivals can quickly integrate into Bradford life.

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

1904Herd Under The Hammer20150429

Alan Dein meets farmer Steve Graham as he sells his herd of 1000 dairy cows - the largest UK sale this year. Having woken at dawn for 35 years to milk the cows, he has decided to sell - but how will he adjust to life without them?

Steve's life has been governed by the relentless pattern of milking twice a day, and the pressures of rearing the cows from birth and caring for them throughout their lives. On his farm in Devon, he says "There are a lot easier ways of making money than milking cows. But if you don't look after them, they won't look after you."

Alan joins Steve on the farm on the final days with his herd and travels with him to the market. When the cows hit the ring, it is not just them being judged, but Steve's reputation on the line.

At auction, Alan hears from fellow farmers about the state of the dairy industry and the pressures put upon them by a falling milk price. But Steve reveals that his reasons for leaving the industry are more personal.

Producer: Clare Walker.

1904Herd under the Hammer20150429

Alan Dein meets farmer Steve Graham as he sells his herd of 1000 dairy cows - the largest UK sale this year. Having woken at dawn for 35 years to milk the cows, he has decided to sell - but how will he adjust to life without them?

Steve's life has been governed by the relentless pattern of milking twice a day, and the pressures of rearing the cows from birth and caring for them throughout their lives. On his farm in Devon, he says "There are a lot easier ways of making money than milking cows. But if you don't look after them, they won't look after you."

Alan joins Steve on the farm on the final days with his herd and travels with him to the market. When the cows hit the ring, it is not just them being judged, but Steve's reputation on the line.

At auction, Alan hears from fellow farmers about the state of the dairy industry and the pressures put upon them by a falling milk price. But Steve reveals that his reasons for leaving the industry are more personal.

Producer: Clare Walker.

2001The Adoption Party20150817

In the last few years, 'adoption activity days' have gathered momentum in the UK, where children waiting to be adopted meet prospective adoptive parents at a party.

The children are often 'hard to place,' either because of medical issues, their age, or behavioural problems. The hope is that once the families meet them face to face, they will get a much better idea of the children, rather than from paper and photo alone.

For these children, the party day is often their last chance to find a family, before they are put into long-term foster care.

Alan Dein joins couples Rob and Sarah, and Emma and John, and single adopter Rachael, as they look for a child.

Producer in Bristol: Sara Conkey.

2001The Adoption Party20150817

In the last few years, 'adoption activity days' have gathered momentum in the UK, where children waiting to be adopted meet prospective adoptive parents at a party.

The children are often 'hard to place,' either because of medical issues, their age, or behavioural problems. The hope is that once the families meet them face to face, they will get a much better idea of the children, rather than from paper and photo alone.

For these children, the party day is often their last chance to find a family, before they are put into long-term foster care.

Alan Dein joins couples Rob and Sarah, and Emma and John, and single adopter Rachael, as they look for a child.

Producer in Bristol: Sara Conkey.

2002The River Cam20150824

Alan Dein tackles the picturesque but crowded stretch of the River Cam that winds in and out of Cambridge. Here, house-boats, punts, rowing boats and cruisers fight for space on what is, the river manager says, the most crowded stretch of river in Britain.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

2002The River Cam20150824

Alan Dein tackles the picturesque but crowded stretch of the River Cam that winds in and out of Cambridge. Here, house-boats, punts, rowing boats and cruisers fight for space on what is, the river manager says, the most crowded stretch of river in Britain.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

2003The Glastonbury Tales20150831

Alan Dein joins African and Afro Caribbean Catholics from Bristol as they take part in the annual pilgrimage to the ancient abbey at Glastonbury. On board the pilgrim bus, parishioners share their life stories, and explain why they are all drawn to worship in the church of St Nicholas of Tolentino.

Producer: Chris Ledgard

2003The Glastonbury Tales20150831

Alan Dein joins African and Afro Caribbean Catholics from Bristol as they take part in the annual pilgrimage to the ancient abbey at Glastonbury. On board the pilgrim bus, parishioners share their life stories, and explain why they are all drawn to worship in the church of St Nicholas of Tolentino.

Producer: Chris Ledgard

2004The Life Of Reilly20150907

For every stand-up comedian that's a household name, there are dozens of hard-working, funny, committed comedians who haven't quite broken through into the national consciousness.

Christian Reilly is a musical stand-up, a wandering minstrel, whose comedy material is delivered through song. He's a popular and successful act who's in great demand on the comedy-club circuit. His diary is packed: Some weeks he'll do two gigs in one night, in two different cities. It's an exhausting schedule. His year, along with so many others, reaches its peak at the Edinburgh festival in August.

In this week's Lives in a Landscape Alan Dein hears Christian's story and travels with him to gigs in Manchester, Liverpool and, ultimately, Edinburgh. From behind-the-scenes at comedy venues, to the share-house Christian rents for a month in Edinburgh with fellow comedians, Alan discovers what motivates Christian, what his ambitions are, and whether he believes he can achieve them.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

2004The Life of Reilly20150907

For every stand-up comedian that's a household name, there are dozens of hard-working, funny, committed comedians who haven't quite broken through into the national consciousness.

Christian Reilly is a musical stand-up, a wandering minstrel, whose comedy material is delivered through song. He's a popular and successful act who's in great demand on the comedy-club circuit. His diary is packed: Some weeks he'll do two gigs in one night, in two different cities. It's an exhausting schedule. His year, along with so many others, reaches its peak at the Edinburgh festival in August.

In this week's Lives in a Landscape Alan Dein hears Christian's story and travels with him to gigs in Manchester, Liverpool and, ultimately, Edinburgh. From behind-the-scenes at comedy venues, to the share-house Christian rents for a month in Edinburgh with fellow comedians, Alan discovers what motivates Christian, what his ambitions are, and whether he believes he can achieve them.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

212015111320160804 (R4)

When pensioners Viv and Fred Morgan read about a teenager committing suicide clutching her teddy, they decided to act - turning their home into a school to help other bullied kids.

They took their Bed and Breakfast in Hatton, Warwickshire and turned rooms into classrooms and built recreation and therapy facilities in the grounds. Now they have 17 pupils attending, more than half of whom have tried to take their own lives in the past.

Children aged between 11 and 16 can be referred by their local authorities and most stay for about a year. At first they often struggle with the curriculum but gradually they join classes - with 22 full and part time teachers covering everything from Science and English through to Photography GCSE.

Fred was 90 when they founded Northleigh House School but even now, four years on, he has no interest in retiring and Viv agrees: "We're not people who sit back and do nothing. When we heard of the situation facing youngsters we just knew we should try and help."

Alan Dein meets pupils and also those who have successfully taken their GCSEs and moved back into mainstream for 6th form. Ruth was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome when she was 12 and struggled so desperately with school that she wanted her life to end. When she eventually arrived at Northleigh it took her weeks to develop the trust and build up the energy needed to attend lessons. Now she has her sights set on applying to study law at University:

"When I first walked in here it was like being at a friend's house. I didn't know what to expect but I saw the fire in the grate and the welcoming feel of the place. It has been the best thing that has happened to me coming here and I wish others knew it existed and could help them as well."

Producer Susan Mitchell.

When pensioners Viv and Fred Morgan read about a teenager committing suicide clutching her teddy, they decided to act - turning their home into a school to help other bullied kids.

They took their Bed and Breakfast in Hatton, Warwickshire and turned rooms into classrooms and built recreation and therapy facilities in the grounds. Now they have 17 pupils attending, more than half of whom have tried to take their own lives in the past.

Children aged between 11 and 16 can be referred by their local authorities and most stay for about a year. At first they often struggle with the curriculum but gradually they join classes - with 22 full and part time teachers covering everything from Science and English through to Photography GCSE.

Fred was 90 when they founded Northleigh House School but even now, four years on, he has no interest in retiring and Viv agrees: "We're not people who sit back and do nothing. When we heard of the situation facing youngsters we just knew we should try and help."

Alan Dein meets pupils and also those who have successfully taken their GCSEs and moved back into mainstream for 6th form. Ruth was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome when she was 12 and struggled so desperately with school that she wanted her life to end. When she eventually arrived at Northleigh it took her weeks to develop the trust and build up the energy needed to attend lessons. Now she has her sights set on applying to study law at University:

"When I first walked in here it was like being at a friend's house. I didn't know what to expect but I saw the fire in the grate and the welcoming feel of the place. It has been the best thing that has happened to me coming here and I wish others knew it existed and could help them as well."

Producer Susan Mitchell.

Alan Dein meets pensioners who have transformed their home into a school for bullied kids.

212015111320160804 (R4)

When pensioners Viv and Fred Morgan read about a teenager committing suicide clutching her teddy, they decided to act - turning their home into a school to help other bullied kids.

They took their Bed and Breakfast in Hatton, Warwickshire and turned rooms into classrooms and built recreation and therapy facilities in the grounds. Now they have 17 pupils attending, more than half of whom have tried to take their own lives in the past.

Children aged between 11 and 16 can be referred by their local authorities and most stay for about a year. At first they often struggle with the curriculum but gradually they join classes - with 22 full and part time teachers covering everything from Science and English through to Photography GCSE.

Fred was 90 when they founded Northleigh House School but even now, four years on, he has no interest in retiring and Viv agrees: "We're not people who sit back and do nothing. When we heard of the situation facing youngsters we just knew we should try and help."

Alan Dein meets pupils and also those who have successfully taken their GCSEs and moved back into mainstream for 6th form. Ruth was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome when she was 12 and struggled so desperately with school that she wanted her life to end. When she eventually arrived at Northleigh it took her weeks to develop the trust and build up the energy needed to attend lessons. Now she has her sights set on applying to study law at University:

"When I first walked in here it was like being at a friend's house. I didn't know what to expect but I saw the fire in the grate and the welcoming feel of the place. It has been the best thing that has happened to me coming here and I wish others knew it existed and could help them as well."

Producer Susan Mitchell.

Alan Dein meets pensioners who have transformed their home into a school for bullied kids.

21Care for Claire2015110620160728 (R4)

Lives in a Landscape reports from Penistone, where Claire Throssell is being helped by her community after her sons were killed by their father in a house fire exactly a year ago.

As well as killing his sons and himself, Darren Sykes also destroyed much of the house, lighting fires throughout the terraced home and luring his boys into the loft with the promise of a new train set. He had cancelled the home insurance before the blaze and Claire faced both the devastating loss of her sons and also the terrible reminder in a home she couldn't sell because of such extensive fire damage.

Local people wanted to stand firm against such 'evil', according to a local singer and archivist, Dave Cherry, who has helped raise money. Teams of volunteers organised by Reverend David Hopkins at St John's Church and both the Rotary and 41 Clubs, have overseen the rebuilding of the home.

Whilst nothing will replace her loss, Claire tells Alan Dein that such community support has helped her focus on creating a legacy for her sons. Jack, who was 12 when he died, was a promising trumpet player and his younger brother, Paul, was only nine and already showing considerable athletic talent. She has set up awards in their name and wants to ensure that their lives are remembered.

The volunteer project manager is Ged Brearley, who has coordinated 480 plus volunteer hours and manages a core team of 40 through house clearance, stripping back the walls to complete rewiring, re-plastering and re-plumbing.

Dave Cherry was one of the first to offer to help: "That man destroyed everything. Her house, her kids and her life. If we don't do anything then he wins. If we can help this lass then we can stop him from winning."

Producer Susan Mitchell.

Lives in a Landscape reports from Penistone, where Claire Throssell is being helped by her community after her sons were killed by their father in a house fire exactly a year ago.

As well as killing his sons and himself, Darren Sykes also destroyed much of the house, lighting fires throughout the terraced home and luring his boys into the loft with the promise of a new train set. He had cancelled the home insurance before the blaze and Claire faced both the devastating loss of her sons and also the terrible reminder in a home she couldn't sell because of such extensive fire damage.

Local people wanted to stand firm against such 'evil', according to a local singer and archivist, Dave Cherry, who has helped raise money. Teams of volunteers organised by Reverend David Hopkins at St John's Church and both the Rotary and 41 Clubs, have overseen the rebuilding of the home.

Whilst nothing will replace her loss, Claire tells Alan Dein that such community support has helped her focus on creating a legacy for her sons. Jack, who was 12 when he died, was a promising trumpet player and his younger brother, Paul, was only nine and already showing considerable athletic talent. She has set up awards in their name and wants to ensure that their lives are remembered.

The volunteer project manager is Ged Brearley, who has coordinated 480 plus volunteer hours and manages a core team of 40 through house clearance, stripping back the walls to complete rewiring, re-plastering and re-plumbing.

Dave Cherry was one of the first to offer to help: "That man destroyed everything. Her house, her kids and her life. If we don't do anything then he wins. If we can help this lass then we can stop him from winning."

Producer Susan Mitchell.

Alan Dein hears how a community has helped following the death of two youngsters.

21Care For Claire2015110620160728 (R4)

Lives in a Landscape reports from Penistone, where Claire Throssell is being helped by her community after her sons were killed by their father in a house fire exactly a year ago.

As well as killing his sons and himself, Darren Sykes also destroyed much of the house, lighting fires throughout the terraced home and luring his boys into the loft with the promise of a new train set. He had cancelled the home insurance before the blaze and Claire faced both the devastating loss of her sons and also the terrible reminder in a home she couldn't sell because of such extensive fire damage.

Local people wanted to stand firm against such 'evil', according to a local singer and archivist, Dave Cherry, who has helped raise money. Teams of volunteers organised by Reverend David Hopkins at St John's Church and both the Rotary and 41 Clubs, have overseen the rebuilding of the home.

Whilst nothing will replace her loss, Claire tells Alan Dein that such community support has helped her focus on creating a legacy for her sons. Jack, who was 12 when he died, was a promising trumpet player and his younger brother, Paul, was only nine and already showing considerable athletic talent. She has set up awards in their name and wants to ensure that their lives are remembered.

The volunteer project manager is Ged Brearley, who has coordinated 480 plus volunteer hours and manages a core team of 40 through house clearance, stripping back the walls to complete rewiring, re-plastering and re-plumbing.

Dave Cherry was one of the first to offer to help: "That man destroyed everything. Her house, her kids and her life. If we don't do anything then he wins. If we can help this lass then we can stop him from winning."

Producer Susan Mitchell.

Alan Dein hears how a community has helped following the death of two youngsters.

21Goodbye to Boleyn2015112020160811 (R4)

The Boleyn Ground, Upton Park. Home to West Ham since 1904. No one would call the stadium, or indeed the streets that closely bind it in the borough of Newham, beautiful but it has echoed to one of football's oldest anthems 'I'm Forever Blowing Bubbles' since the 1920's. Now that song and the stones & grass that have been an arena for legends like Hurst, Moore & Peters will not just fade and die but be demolished. Very soon the club will move from E13 to E20 & the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, no longer owners but tenants in a very different space. Match days around Green Street and the other roads that bind the stadium to the area will be like every other day. But for these last few months the pavements still reverberate to the returning tribes of Essex, their family ties strong in a place that has greatly changed since Bobby Moore and his other '66 immortals made West Ham a global name.

Amidst the throng on match day, Alan Dein weaves his way through the streets to chronicle lives enfolded by the stadium. On the corner of the ground stands Our Lady of Compassion, in fact it was the church that originally sold the ground to the club. Now their Saturday services are shaped by the footfall of match day. Directly opposite the stadium live two nuns with a new found affinity for the Claret & Blue. Standing on a step ladder, shouting to the arriving crowds a scary looking skinhead offers wise insight into the passing of time and place. Inside Queen's Market, flogging his apples and pears, Bradley is waiting until the clock hits 2.30 before he pulls on his replica shirt and dives out into the thickening crowds making their way towards the big match.

Producer: Mark Burman.

The Boleyn Ground, Upton Park. Home to West Ham since 1904. No one would call the stadium, or indeed the streets that closely bind it in the borough of Newham, beautiful but it has echoed to one of football's oldest anthems 'I'm Forever Blowing Bubbles' since the 1920's. Now that song and the stones & grass that have been an arena for legends like Hurst, Moore & Peters will not just fade and die but be demolished. Very soon the club will move from E13 to E20 & the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, no longer owners but tenants in a very different space. Match days around Green Street and the other roads that bind the stadium to the area will be like every other day. But for these last few months the pavements still reverberate to the returning tribes of Essex, their family ties strong in a place that has greatly changed since Bobby Moore and his other '66 immortals made West Ham a global name.

Amidst the throng on match day, Alan Dein weaves his way through the streets to chronicle lives enfolded by the stadium. On the corner of the ground stands Our Lady of Compassion, in fact it was the church that originally sold the ground to the club. Now their Saturday services are shaped by the footfall of match day. Directly opposite the stadium live two nuns with a new found affinity for the Claret & Blue. Standing on a step ladder, shouting to the arriving crowds a scary looking skinhead offers wise insight into the passing of time and place. Inside Queen's Market, flogging his apples and pears, Bradley is waiting until the clock hits 2.30 before he pulls on his replica shirt and dives out into the thickening crowds making their way towards the big match.

Producer: Mark Burman.

21Goodbye To Boleyn2015112020160811 (R4)

The Boleyn Ground, Upton Park. Home to West Ham since 1904. No one would call the stadium, or indeed the streets that closely bind it in the borough of Newham, beautiful but it has echoed to one of football's oldest anthems 'I'm Forever Blowing Bubbles' since the 1920's. Now that song and the stones and grass that have been an arena for legends like Hurst, Moore and Peters will not just fade and die but be demolished. Very soon the club will move from E13 to E20 and the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, no longer owners but tenants in a very different space. Match days around Green Street and the other roads that bind the stadium to the area will be like every other day. But for these last few months the pavements still reverberate to the returning tribes of Essex, their family ties strong in a place that has greatly changed since Bobby Moore and his other '66 immortals made West Ham a global name.

Amidst the throng on match day, Alan Dein weaves his way through the streets to chronicle lives enfolded by the stadium. On the corner of the ground stands Our Lady of Compassion, in fact it was the church that originally sold the ground to the club. Now their Saturday services are shaped by the footfall of match day. Directly opposite the stadium live two nuns with a new found affinity for the Claret and Blue. Standing on a step ladder, shouting to the arriving crowds a scary looking skinhead offers wise insight into the passing of time and place. Inside Queen's Market, flogging his apples and pears, Bradley is waiting until the clock hits 2.30 before he pulls on his replica shirt and dives out into the thickening crowds making their way towards the big match.

Producer: Mark Burman.

21Rip2015112720160818 (R4)

Alan Dein travels to Nottingham to meet with the 4th and 5th generations of a family firm of Funeral Directors (with a 6th generation already on the horizon). When furniture maker and dealer Arthur William Lymn started 'undertaking' funerals with his son Harold Percy in 1907, their first premises were on Goosegate - next door to a man selling potions and lotions. Although Arthur and Harold could not match the subsequent success of their next-door-neighbours, the Boots Pure Drug Company Ltd, AW Lymn did have to move to larger premises in 1915. And in the hundred years since they have continued to grow, now operating out of 25 offices, employing 110 staff and conducting 3,500 funeral every year.

Last year a brain tumour forced Harold's grandson, Nigel Lymn Rose to hand over the reins of the company to his son Matthew while he underwent brain surgery and recuperated. This summer, fully recovered and back at work, this temporary arrangement was made permanent. As Matthew and Nigel work out the parameters of their new roles within the company (alongside Matthew's aunt, Jackie, and sister Chloe - all also involved in the family firm), Alan Dein goes behind the scenes with them to discover what goes on beyond the formal funeral attire of top hats and tails and Roll Royce hearses. With them he visits the hospital morgue to pick up recently deceased 'patients', enters the world of the firm's embalmers and observes them in the chapels of rest - to find out what it's like to deal with death on a daily basis.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

21RIP2015112720160818 (R4)

Alan Dein travels to Nottingham to meet with the 4th & 5th generations of a family firm of Funeral Directors (with a 6th generation already on the horizon). When furniture maker and dealer Arthur William Lymn started 'undertaking' funerals with his son Harold Percy in 1907, their first premises were on Goosegate - next door to a man selling potions and lotions. Although Arthur and Harold could not match the subsequent success of their next-door-neighbours, the Boots Pure Drug Company Ltd, AW Lymn did have to move to larger premises in 1915. And in the hundred years since they have continued to grow, now operating out of 25 offices, employing 110 staff and conducting 3,500 funeral every year.

Last year a brain tumour forced Harold's grandson, Nigel Lymn Rose to hand over the reins of the company to his son Matthew while he underwent brain surgery and recuperated. This summer, fully recovered and back at work, this temporary arrangement was made permanent. As Matthew and Nigel work out the parameters of their new roles within the company (alongside Matthew's aunt, Jackie, and sister Chloe - all also involved in the family firm), Alan Dein goes behind the scenes with them to discover what goes on beyond the formal funeral attire of top hats and tails and Roll Royce hearses. With them he visits the hospital morgue to pick up recently deceased 'patients', enters the world of the firm's embalmers and observes them in the chapels of rest - to find out what it's like to deal with death on a daily basis.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

Alan Dein travels to Nottingham to meet with the 4th & 5th generations of a family firm of Funeral Directors (with a 6th generation already on the horizon). When furniture maker and dealer Arthur William Lymn started 'undertaking' funerals with his son Harold Percy in 1907, their first premises were on Goosegate - next door to a man selling potions and lotions. Although Arthur and Harold could not match the subsequent success of their next-door-neighbours, the Boots Pure Drug Company Ltd, AW Lymn did have to move to larger premises in 1915. And in the hundred years since they have continued to grow, now operating out of 25 offices, employing 110 staff and conducting 3,500 funeral every year.

Last year a brain tumour forced Harold's grandson, Nigel Lymn Rose to hand over the reins of the company to his son Matthew while he underwent brain surgery and recuperated. This summer, fully recovered and back at work, this temporary arrangement was made permanent. As Matthew and Nigel work out the parameters of their new roles within the company (alongside Matthew's aunt, Jackie, and sister Chloe - all also involved in the family firm), Alan Dein goes behind the scenes with them to discover what goes on beyond the formal funeral attire of top hats and tails and Roll Royce hearses. With them he visits the hospital morgue to pick up recently deceased 'patients', enters the world of the firm's embalmers and observes them in the chapels of rest - to find out what it's like to deal with death on a daily basis.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.