Lives In A Landscape

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Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
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0102Wi' Ma Hands Full O' Nothin' - Poets From The Dundee Schemes2005071820060816

Gary works nights in a factory, Kevin used to box and Mark was a building labourer.

They come from Dundee's 'hoosin' schemes', the large estates on the edge of the city.

Each of their lives has been transformed - and in one case saved - by writing poetry.

They tell stories about the town of 'jute, jam and journalism' in its own language, and perform to its people in the pubs and clubs.

Now a world beyond their own is beginning to prick up its ears.

0103Clapham Mothers2005072520060823
20080731 (BBC7)
20160816 (BBC7)
20160817 (BBC7)
20080731 (R4)

Frances, Arlene and Melissa live at the heart of Abbevillage.

It's what the locals call Abbeville Road, an ordinary south London street near Clapham Common.

In between her pre-dawn power exercise, piano lessons, Italian classes, book groups and dog walking, Frances is up to her ears organising the local Abbeville fete.

With the great day approaching, Frances, Arlene and Melissa seem to have it all - big houses, big cars, gardeners and au pairs - but is it enough?

Frances, Arlene and Melissa seem to have it all - big houses, big cars, gardeners and au pairs, but is it enough?

Frances, Arlene and Melissa live in an ordinary south London street near Clapham Common.

In between her pre-dawn power exercise, piano lessons, Italian classes, book groups and dog walking, Frances is up to her ears organising the local fete.

'Busy busy' stay at home mum Frances's 'to do' list includes running a local fete.

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Frances, Arlene and Melissa live in an ordinary south London street near Clapham Common. In between her pre-dawn power exercise, piano lessons, Italian classes, book groups and dog walking, Frances is up to her ears organising the local fete.

0104The Lyke Wake Walk20050801

Fifty years ago a Yorkshire farmer called Bill Cowley wrote an article proposing a marathon walk that would cross the North York Moors for 40 miles, linking burial mounds and without passing through any villages: the Lyke Wake Walk was born.

Now Bill is dead, the number of walkers is dwindling and, on the 50th anniversary of the first crossing, the club is to be disbanded.

But one group of enthusiasts don't want the Walk to die and have formed a breakaway New Lyke Wake Club.

As the walkers set out on their final trek, there's friction in the high heather.

0105The Base2005080820060830

Tidworth is home to the 1st Battalion Staffordshire Regiment, currently serving a six month tour of Iraq.

It's a hard life for the wives and children left at home, who carry on with their day to day routines and wait for their men to come back, whilst coping daily with news of injuries and death in a hostile country thousands of miles from home.

Dropping in on Tidworth, home to the 1st Battalion Staffordshire Regiment, which served a six-month tour in Iraq.

It's a hard life for the wives and children left at home, who carry on with their day to day routines and wait for their men to come back, and have to cope with the daily news of injuries and death in a hostile country thousands of miles from home.

0106 LASTTied To The Takeaway20050815

For 52 weeks a year, and seven days a week, the Golden Bowl Chinese Takeaway in Birmingham is open for business.

For Ling Tsan's parents it is their only option - but for Ling, the very model of a modern London girl, it is a weekly return to a world she thought she'd left behind long ago.

0201Under Throckmorton *2006090420061227

James Maw visits the tiny village of Throckmorton, home to a giant old airfield and sandwiched between the Vale of Evesham and the Malvern Hills.

What is a group of former soldiers doing speeding around the runway? Why is there no electricity in the church? What are dozens of brand new pianos doing in an old chicken shed? And what else will be revealed 'Under Throckmorton'?

0202Barbaraville2006091120070103

A Romany gypsy village in Hertfordshire is under threat.

For over 40 years, a close-knit community has found a permanent home here - but proposals to build a huge composting plant next door could change their settled way of life forever.

Will the ghost of the village's great original benefactor, Barbara Cartland, come to its rescue?

0203Cruising For A Bruising2006091820070110

Essex Boys and their motors are inseparable, from the gold-flecked paint work to TV screens, huge speakers and tinted windows.

But what happens when girls get involved, rivalries occur and a lovingly souped up car ends up at the wrong end of a baseball bat? Two friends from Benfleet talk about their families, their cars, and the Southend On Sea cruise scene.

0204Tempers In Bloom *2006092520070124
20080814 (R4)

The villagers of Luddenden are turning detective to track down those who sabotaged their chances of victory in the Britain in Bloom competition and ensure there's no repeat of foul play this year.

This isn't the first time that short-listed villages in this Royal Horticultural Society contest have suffered from foul play - but who would want this Yorkshire village to lose and why?

0205The Garden Square2006100220070131

Behind the ivy clad railings of Notting Hill lie secret gardens, accessible only to those residents with a key.

You may glimpse a tennis court or a croquet lawn, hear distant laughter or a mower, but what really goes on inside the square? With acres of lawns this should be an urban utopia, but run by powerful and watchful committees, is this serene space really paradise after all?

0206 LASTWill Terrance Get A Degree2006100920070207

When Terrance first joined his Liverpool secondary school, he was bottom of the class.

Four years later, he was head boy and had passed four A-levels with flying colours.

Now he has won a place at Oxford University to study engineering.

The only problem is that Terrance is a Ugandan refugee and despite being resident here for four years, he only qualifies as a foreign student.

The race is on to raise £20,000 for his first year's fees.

0301The Lines Are Open2007092120080821

Every weekday the Mike Parr Show on BBC Radio Newcastle attracts callers from all over Northumberland.

What is it that brings these listeners together?

0302Show Girls2007092820080724

Glamour models Nikki-Lee, Lara-Lou and Vanessa make their living on a non-stop circuit of podium dancing and posing for punters.

But life is about to change for Vanessa.

Having travelled the world, performing to thousands and earning good money, she has met the love of her life.

Now she is expecting her first baby and has decided to give up the breakdancing for a while.

0303The Regatta20071005

For one week every year the peaceful village of Seaview on the Isle of Wight bursts into life to host its annual regatta.

As locals prepare to join battle alongside the visitors who regularly come from London to sail, the dire weather forecast is the least of the committee's problems.

0304The Dawn Winder *2007101220080828

Twice a week, as the city of London rumbles slowly into life, a solitary figure hurries from room to room at the Royal Courts of Justice.

For 35 years, Jeffrey Rosson has wound the clocks that measure out the day in the country's famous law courts.

The job is as old as the building itself, but Jeffrey's tenure as the dawn winder will soon be coming to an end.

0305Middle Aged Shredders2007101920080807

Negotiating the half-pipes and bowls of the North's skateparks, Tim, Carl, Johnny, Woody and Daz look a little out of place.

At least 25 years older than most of their fellow skateboarders, they are the Middle Aged Shredders.

0306 LASTWhiteway: A Rather Barren Utopia20071026

The Whiteway Colony in the Cotswolds was established in 1898 by anarchist followers of Count Tolstoy.

Its former residents included conscientious objectors, radicals and refugees.

But does the spirit of freedom still flourish in this idealistic communnity?

0401Going To The Dogs *2008102720090803

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

When Walthamstow dog track closed its doors for the last time in August 2008, it was the end of an era.

Alan Dein was the only reporter allowed to join the crowds as the hare led the dogs round the circuit for the last time; the loudspeakers played Thanks for the Memory and the tears flowed freely.

But what now for the future of British greyhound racing, without the iconic Stow? For bookie Joe Bennett and young trainer Paul Rich the dogs are a way of life and a family tradition, in spite of the fact that in England greyhound racing's glory days are long past.

Alan follows them as they face an uncertain future.

While Joe is philosophical and knows that the sport has always had its ups and downs, Paul, who has devoted to his dogs and has only just taken over the family business, is more pessimistic.

Now he is racing in Kent, at Sittingbourne's track on a dreary industrial estate in the wrong end of town - a far cry from the glories of the Stow.

Alan Dein meets some of the people whose livelihoods depend on greyhound racing.

Alan Dein reports on the closure of Walthamstow greyhound racing track and hears from some of the people whose livelihoods depend on the declining greyhound racing business.

While bookmaker Joe Bennett is philosophical about the ups and downs of the business, trainer Paul Rich is more pessimistic, forced as he is to now race his dogs in Kent, a far cry from the glory of Walthamstow.

0402Fellside Photographer *2008110320090810

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Alan Dein meets Wayne Hutchinson, a Cumbrian farmer who combines the hard graft of shepherding with a second job - photographing some of Britain's most expensive livestock.

Wayne farms Swaledale sheep with his father in the hills linking Cumbria to the Yorkshire dales.

It is rugged territory, but Wayne has allied his farming pedigree with an enthusiasm for photography.

He now mixes his farming duties with time spent travelling the length and breadth of Britain taking pictures of pedigree livestock.

It takes him to the farms of some of the wealthiest landowners in Britain as well as smallholders with a passion for livestock.

But these are tough times for farmers, with the aftermath of foot and mouth still being felt, alongside the twin menaces of Blue Tongue and the increasing pressure put on them to protect the environment while at the same time keeping cheap food on our plates.

Alongside those tensions are the pressures of mixing farming and family life with the increasingly 'on call' nature of the photography business.

Alan introduces us to Wayne as he prepares for what nobody realised at the time was to be the penultimate Royal Show.

Alan Dein meets a Cumbrian farmer who combines shepherding with a second job.

Alan meets Wayne as he prepares for the Royal Show in Warwickshire and learns how he balances the pressures of modern farming with both family life and the 'on call' nature of his photography work.

0403Five Units On Fazeley Street2008111020090817

Alan Dein meets the diverse group of people that work in the units of Birmingham's Fazeley Street industrial estate, from a lone maker of precision steel components to a group of African evangelists.

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Alan Dein meets the diverse group of people that work in the units of Birmingham's Fazeley Street industrial estate, where every unit tells a story.

As the sun rises over this ramshackle grouping of canalside workshops, warehouses and offices, an unexpected array of characters set about their diverse businesses.

Whatever their line, industry is very firmly the name of the game here.

At 7.30am sharp, workaholic Roger opens up Clifton Steel and starts his daily rounds checking stock.

Surveying his vast stockyard and reflecting on life in the steel business, he proudly proclaims, 'I'm an industrialist'.

Next door, young Adam is starting his first car window tinting job of the day, a blue VW.

Heatgun in hand, he talks of the skill required to do it properly, declaring, 'I'm an artist'.

Upstairs, solitary Derek - a real Mr Fixit - is slowly but assiduously drilling 300 precision steel components, alone in his workshop save for the accompaniment of classical music.

Their businesses are different but their hopes and fears strikingly similar.

They talk of the influence of their fathers - for good or ill - their fears for the future and their pride in a job well done.

But as night settles and the industry ceases, Fazeley Street shifts gear.

Adam finishes his last tint of the day, Derek drills his final hole and next door a group of 20 African evangelists don white gowns and prepare to praise God, while slick young rockers Copter rehearse at full volume for their next gig.

Alan Dein meets the people that work in Birmingham's Fazeley Street industrial estate.

0404Stars, Stripes And Chalfont St Giles *2008111720090824

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Alan Dein meets members of the Chiltern American Women's Club, a 200-member club which caters for expat women whose husbands have been seconded to work in the UK.

The club ensures that there is something to do almost every day of the week, from newcomers' coffees with advice on how to drive around roundabouts and use UK washing machines, to organised hikes in the local countryside and volunteering for the annual charity bazaar.

Alan follows the lives of the club's president, Louise Fortier, and some of the newcomers who have yet to fully settle into their temporary life in the UK.

Alan Dein meets members of the Chiltern American Women's Club.

Alan meets members of the Chiltern American Women's Club.

He discovers that the life of a well-heeled expat may look glamorous to those on the outside, but for new comers to the UK it can often be lonely.

He learns about the activities organised by this 200-member club, from advice on how to get by in the UK to organised hikes and volunteering for the annual bazaar.

0405The Queens Of Coal *2008112420090831

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Alan Dein meets former Coal Queens at a reunion of these former beauty queens who were elected by miners to represent their mines.

In the days of coal, each pit used to elect a Coal Queen to represent the mine.

The daughter or granddaughter of a miner would be put forward and if she claimed the crown, she went on to compete in county and even national championships.

A recent reunion of Coal Queens brought together former beauty queens from all over the coal mining regions of England, along with their memories and memorabilia.

Alan Dein meets them and explores the lives of two in particular to hear how that event, in their youth, changed the course of their lives.

Helen Coleman went on to open a beauty salon and married the drummer of Britain's leading Queen tribute band.

Maureen Griffiths ran a working men's club and is still remembered by locals for that golden day in 1951.

Both have watched the changing face of life after coal.

The Miners' Strike of 1984 brought an end to the Coal Queen tradition and changed pit community life forever, but what has happened since and why has a tradition like the Coal Queen beauty pageant endured in the memories of older generations while the teenagers barely know what coal is?

Alan Dein meets former Coal Queens at a reunion of these former beauty queens.

He hears from two in particular, Helen Coleman and Maureen Griffiths, about how winning the competition changed their lives for ever and their thoughts about the decline of the coal industry and its pit communities.

0406 LASTGone East *2008120120090907

In the dead of night, presenter Alan Dein once listened to the troubles of young teenager Hannah, pouring out her woes from a phone box during a turbulent night in the centre of the Kent resort town of Margate.

Alan went on to make a Radio 4 feature programme about Hannah's story; now, he finally encounters Hannah and her family.

0501Play For Tomorrow20091106

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Three sixth formers have the summer to get their band back on track after the bass player and best mate walks out on them.

Nick, Christian and Lawrence are all 17 and have lived most of their lives in Grimsby.

The closest of friends, they had hoped to spend the summer gigging with their band, Socio Republic.

But bassist Reece has just decided he no longer wants to be part of the group.

The remaining trio are left shell-shocked by their friend's decision and the future of the band is cast into serious doubt.

Alan Dein presents an intimate story of friendship under pressure as the three 'in-betweeners' - not yet men, no longer boys - spend a long wet summer trying to fill Reece's shoes and get some gigs.

Yet the weeks pass and the lads - heartbroken and mystified by Reece's departure - are still without a new bass player.

But, as Lawrence says, 'good things have to end for better things to begin'.

The relentless rain brings on severe boredom and the lads seem paralysed.

The three are aware that the clock is ticking.

University beckons in a year - when, once again, their friendships will be put to the test.

Alan Dein presents a story of three sixth formers trying to get their band back on track.

0502Tilting At Windmills20091113

Windfarms, Earth-destroying asteroids and raining fish - apocalyptic visions run surprisingly high in the sleepy beauty of the Welsh borders, as Alan Dein discovers when he visits the village of Knighton on the route of Offa's Dyke.

Situated with one foot in Wales and the other in England, Knighton is known for its picture-postcard tranquillity.

Yet today all is far from calm, as a new windfarm, with its giant slowly rotating turbines, is planned for the hill on the edge of town.

Some people look on this as their part in saving the Earth from the threat of climate change, others as the destruction of the ancient landscape.

Meanwhile, on the hill itself stands an observatory, the Spaceguard Centre, whose director sees its role as drawing attention to the dangers lurking in space, and the likelihood of the world's destruction by asteroid strike.

So did a strange shower of fish over the town hint at apocalypse? Alan Dein visits the town, reads the omens and tries to understand why the sky over Knighton is filled with portents.

Alan Dein discovers that passions run high in the quiet borderland village of Knighton.

0503Balancing Act *20091120

When Joni met Howie: the story of a long-distance love affair that blossomed amid the torn ligaments and strained quadriceps of some of Britain's top circus performers.

Joni, a leading Mayfair physiotherapist, could only marvel when she met the men and women of No Fit State circus, at the musculature and the perfection equilibrium of their bodies.

But Howie, a former horticulturalist, advertising stiltwalker and all-round free spirit was special, and soon they were more than friends.

Now, as if keeping their two lives together - ministering to the muscular misfortunes of City financiers and performing high in the Big Top all over Europe - weren't enough, Howie faces a special, personal ordeal.

He must undergo much-postponed surgery on his damaged left knee.

Meanwhile Joni has her own enormous physical challenges to face.

Circus artiste Howie prepares for make-or-break knee surgery.

0504The Maryfield Writers *20091127

Alan Dein goes to Northern Ireland to talk to former Royal Ulster Constabulary officers who have formed a writing group.

The Maryfield Writers meet once a month to share and discuss their work.

Alan spends time with three of them to understand why they write about their chosen subjects and finds that each of them deals with the past in different ways.

Bob has made a clean break with his police past.

He served for 22 years, was shot at, had bombs placed under his car and was forced to move house a number of times.

He chooses to write children's stories about fantasy and escape and has had a number of books published.

Keith is working on screenplays which fall into the police-procedural genre but avoid autobiographical references.

Not entirely at ease with modern Northern Ireland, Keith spends a lot of time at home, writing.

Teresa spent 20 years in Juvenile Liaisons and, as a Catholic, was in a minority in the RUC.

Her poetry has allowed her some catharsis as years of difficult experiences during the Troubles have now found a creative outlet.

They each reflect on their motivations for joining the police and the importance of their new lives as writers in post-Troubles Northern Ireland.

Alan Dein talks to former RUC officers in Northern Ireland who have taken up writing.

0505Bmx Brothers *20091204

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Trey and Daniel Whyte's talent on the BMX track has resulted in progress to an Olympic qualifying event in the south of France.

Within the space of six months they have seen their lives transformed, moving from a makeshift BMX track on their Peckham estate to preparations for the event in Nice.

The ruthlessness learnt on their run-down estate undoubtedly helps them on the race track, but will it also make it harder for them to adjust to their new lives?

In preparation for the event, Daniel has moved to the UK's cycling academy in Manchester and 15-year-old Trey has been combining time there with his studies back in London at the Peckham Academy.

Their cycle coach believes the edge needed to live in places like Peckham has given the boys a real advantage on the track.

Daniel in particular is considered fearless by his rivals, and he gives an insight into his life before he took up cycling, and exactly how much trouble he was in.

It was a chance encounter with CK Flash, a part-time DJ and local BMX enthusiast, which led to the brothers taking up BMX riding and later resulted in parents forming a Peckham club which is now one of the best in the country.

The Whyte brothers have their sights set on the London Olympics, but how much will they be able to adapt to the changes they face as 2012 approaches?

Two teenage brothers swap life on a London estate for the elite British cycling academy.

0506 LASTFragile Isle20091211

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Alan Dein travels to Canna, one of the Small Isles in North West Scotland.

With a population of 18, six of whom are children, Canna is at a critical point.

There are just enough people to keep the island community going.

If any leave it will put huge pressures on the others.

If new people come, it will inevitably change the fragile balance that exists in such a small, tightly-knit populace.

Alan explores the connections between the different families and how they relate to the island as well as managing to feel connected to the wider world.

Neil has come from Wales with his family and is the island gardener; Magda is Basque and is the archivist of an enormous collection of Gaelic songs and stories; Murdo and Gerry are the farmers; John and Sheila run the guest house; Ellidh is the teacher in the school where two of the four pupils are her own children; Geoff, her husband, looks after their two year old twins at home.

What they all have in common is that they work for the Scottish National Trust, which owns the island and controls its population size.

It also controls the destiny of a young community trying to put down roots.

Alan Dein visits the tiny community on the Hebridean island of Canna.

0601Market Day20101117

Alan Dein returns with the series which captures stories from modern Britain.

1 Market Day.

The sleepy market town of Bicester is home to a smattering of small scale high street stores and a plethora of charity shops.

Yet less than ten minutes' walk from the market square lies one of the UK's most successful designer outlet centres - Bicester Village - hosting some of the biggest global brands.

Visitors flock from the Middle- and Far East to snap up a bargain.

Alan Dein joins them on board the Shopping Express coach and follows them on their shopping odyssey - in order to explore the worldwide appeal of designer bargain hunting in rural Oxfordshire.

Lives in a Landscape is Radio 4's award-winning documentary series, presented by Alan Dein, that tracks down people with stories to tell that reflect - in sometimes offbeat ways - the pleasure, the pain and the particularity of life in contemporary Britain.

Also in this series - the villagers of a remote Cornish community take on a threat to their timeless idyllic home; the story of the men for whom recession means good times - the boarders up of empty buildings and...

fighting it out in the City - inside the world of white-collar boxing.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

Market Day.

Alan Dein explores the allure of designer bargain hunting in Bicester Village.

0602City Fighters20101124

In the second of Alan Dein's features reflecting the lives of widely differing groups of people across the country today, he catches up with two busy young men, Matt and Simon.

Both have well-paid jobs in the City of London, but in recent months each has been training hard at a specialist boxing gym within sight of both the glass and steel towers of Broadgate and the cosier terraces of the old East End.

Their goal is three hard-fought rounds of amateur so called 'white-collar' boxing in front of an enthusiastic and partisan audience in the very public arena of Kensington Town Hall.

Neither fighter knows the other, and indeed all Matt has heard about Simon is that he's a southpaw.

City lawyer Simon's trainer Darren reckons his boy will be a hard nut to crack, especially with his vicious left hand.

But Matt's no pushover either.

Because, unbeknownst to his opponent, before he joined a select firm of employment consultants, tall and hefty Matt was a top-flight professional rugby player.

And bears the scars to prove it.

With so-called 'white collar' amateur boxing enjoying something of a boom, on the big night there's a fair contingent of supporters from the office as well as family and best buddies cheering Matt and Simon on across the three 2-minute rounds...

May the best man win.

Producer: Paula McGinley.

Alan Dein joins white-collar boxers on the way to a big City night out.

0603A Taste Of Home20101201

Alan Dein explores the lives of those making and buying chapattis as Bradford families mark Eid al-Adha, the Muslim Festival of Sacrifice.

The emergence of businesses based solely on providing warm fresh chapattis to accompany meals cooked at home meets a yearning for something provided in Pakistan where such sellers are commonplace.

In addition, as Alan discovers, there's a social aspect to the queues forming as all sorts of people wait to take this final part of the meal back home.

From Parveen's son, Aman, sent to buy 25 chapattis for a get together involving brothers, sisters, cousins and aunts, to eleven year old Alina, who already has her sights set on following her parents into a legal career and can't wait to get her warm food back home where it will sit alongside a feast prepared for family friends.

Thousands of chapattis and nan breads are made at Chach Valley every day by four men, one recently arrived from Pakistan.

At Eid, in mid-November, Muslims share food and remind themselves of their own sacrifices.

These are hard times in this part of Bradford and cultural and economic pressures leave the older generations worrying about what will happen to the young

But the relentless turnover as the chapatti orders flow - each batch carried off to tables across the city - is a reminder of what can bring people together.

The ties between families but also the links between communities as those in the snaking queue wait their turn.

The popularity of businesses providing chapattis and little else besides has taken many by surprise but whether it's a taste of the past, a sign of the times or just a convenient by product of both it's certainly something exciting and new

Producer: Sue Mitchell.

A Taste of Home - Alan Dein explores the lives of Bradford chapatti buyers and sellers.

0604The Battle Of Trevalga20101208

Alan Dein visits the tiny Cornish village of Trevalga, recently put up for sale by Marlborough College.

The village of Trevalga sits on the north Cornish coast between the tourist magnets of Boscastle and Tintagel.

It has no pub, no shops and no second homes.

Virtually every villager pays rent, and homes are permanently occupied.

For the last fifty years, the villagers of Trevalga have paid rents to their landlord; a trust set up by the former owner of the village, Gerald Curgenven.

In his will, Curgenven stipulated that the village be preserved and maintained by a trust, with any monies from rents left over to go to his former school, Marlborough College in Wiltshire.

Earlier this year, the college took legal advice which convinced them that the trust was invalid, and that they were actually the outright owners of the village and wider estate of Trevalga.

They decided to sell and, as properties were measured and glossy brochures produced, Trevalgans reeled as their cosy existence was threatened for the first time in living memory.

The villagers organised, and sought their own legal advice, which flatly contradicted that given to the College.

They were told that the trust was indeed valid, and that the village was not Marlborough's to sell.

Until the question of ownership is resolved, the future of this tiny, fragile community remains unclear.

Alan meets the tenant farmers, artists, childminders and gravediggers of Trevalga, trying to plan for an uncertain future.

Producer : John Byrne.

Alan Dein visits a Cornish community fighting for survival.

0605The Hall20101215

In the heart of London's former docklands on the Isle of Dogs, surrounded by the steel and glass of Canary Wharf stands an outpost of an old London that's all but disappeared.

St John's Community Centre is a little hall that's used seven days a week by a staggering variety of people, from the devout evangelical Christians who hold services there to the Moslem worshippers for whom the same space is their mosque.

But for tango dancers it's the East End's equivalent of Buenos Aires, while for the bingo brigade, it's Full House - and for those who fancy a pint of an evening, St John's is simply the Local: at St John's, when one group have finished, another one is poised to move in.

At the hub of these extraordinarily diverse groups and juggling the space's complex timetable is George, now in his 70s but still working as piermaster just down the road at Canary Wharf.

As a fifth generation stevedore, George Pye has seen the ships disappear from the river and the old wharves nearby transformed into gentrified pads for wealthy loft-dwellers.

With Christmas approaching George has his time cut out to meet the many demands on the the little space that's been home to so many people for more than three decades.

Producer: Neil Mccarthy.

Alan Dein meets the many people for whom St John's Centre is a home from home.

0701Passion At Glasgow Cross2011031820120402

On the wall above the Val D'Oro, one of the oldest fish and chip shops in Glasgow hangs a painting of the Crucifixion, painted to commemorate the residents of one of the poorest areas of the city.

Completed in 2010 David Adam's stark image of a crucified Christ in a street scene at Glasgow Cross places Christ in the midst of the city. At the foot of the cross where Christ's grieving mother Mary traditionally stands, is another Mary, Mary Paterson, a valued customer and local character, now in her nineties, huddled over the basket in which she carried her dog Sheba.

To the left of the cross, Luigi Corvi, owner of the shop, stands poised to sing, bearing a plate of fish and chips. In his innocence, a small boy offers up the remains of his Irn Bru to Jesus while a woman to his right attempts to pick the pocket of a passer-by and a man nearby injects heroin into his thigh.

But as Alan Dein discovers in the first of the new series of Lives in a Landscape, exploring offbeat aspects of contemporary Britain, the Passion at Glasgow Cross also describes Luigi's long suppressed dream: he serves fish and chips by day but dreams of life singing opera at La Scala...

Producer David Stenhouse

Coming up in this series: Alan is in deepest Northamptonshire at midnight on a Sunday in December to hear the mind-bending racket of the village of Broughton's "Tin Can Band". Unshackled from the dense silence that pervades this corner of rural England, the villagers, armed with pots, pans and anything that rattles, unleash as much noise as they process through the freezing lanes...

In Liverpool, Alan finds himself exploring violence and relationships and... theatre; while there's a nod to the royal celebrations at the end of April as he joins a couple of Iraq veterans in Gloucestershire who've turned from military imaging to wedding snaps... And will north London teenage hopeful JJ make it through his troubled family past to win a part in a big stage show?

Alan Dein unearths a Crucifixion in a historic Glasgow chippie.

Completed in 2010 David Adam's stark image of a crucified Christ in a street scene at Glasgow Cross places Christ in the midst of the city.

At the foot of the cross where Christ's grieving mother Mary traditionally stands, is another Mary, Mary Paterson, a valued customer and local character, now in her nineties, huddled over the basket in which she carried her dog Sheba.

To the left of the cross, Luigi Corvi, owner of the shop, stands poised to sing, bearing a plate of fish and chips.

In his innocence, a small boy offers up the remains of his Irn Bru to Jesus while a woman to his right attempts to pick the pocket of a passer-by and a man nearby injects heroin into his thigh.

Coming up in this series: Alan is in deepest Northamptonshire at midnight on a Sunday in December to hear the mind-bending racket of the village of Broughton's "Tin Can Band".

Unshackled from the dense silence that pervades this corner of rural England, the villagers, armed with pots, pans and anything that rattles, unleash as much noise as they process through the freezing lanes...

In Liverpool, Alan finds himself exploring violence and relationships and...

theatre; while there's a nod to the royal celebrations at the end of April as he joins a couple of Iraq veterans in Gloucestershire who've turned from military imaging to wedding snaps...

And will north London teenage hopeful JJ make it through his troubled family past to win a part in a big stage show?

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St Peter's church, a 13th century jewel, is empty.

Inside, the workings of the clock tick ominously, moving the hands towards midnight. On the street outside a group of people, maybe a hundred, huddle against the cold, waiting for the clock to strike.

This is the scene on the second Sunday in December, every year, in the village of Broughton, near Kettering in Northamptonshire. This is a quiet village, the bypass takes traffic away, the few commuters leaving town early in the morning. The few pubs are jolly, but not rowdy, and the Co-op acts as an unofficial meeting point for the locals.

Not much to distinguish it from the other villages nearby; flat, farmland stretching from one village to the next, with the odd superstore or garden centre between them. But come midnight something different happens; something unique, ancient, mysterious; something rather noisy. For every year for as long as anyone can remember, and even further back, the devil is beaten out of Broughton, by the tin can band - a collection of villagers who patrol the streets after midnight, banging, pots and pans, milk churns and hip baths, drums and hammers, colanders and frying pans - anything that makes a noise in fact, and for one night a year, Broughton becomes the noisiest place in Northamptonshire. And no one quite knows why... Alan Dein joins them with a microphone.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

Alan Dein on how Northants villagers shatter the midnight peace in a din of pots and pans.

Inside, the workings of the clock tick ominously, moving the hands towards midnight.

On the street outside a group of people, maybe a hundred, huddle against the cold, waiting for the clock to strike.

This is the scene on the second Sunday in December, every year, in the village of Broughton, near Kettering in Northamptonshire.

This is a quiet village, the bypass takes traffic away, the few commuters leaving town early in the morning.

The few pubs are jolly, but not rowdy, and the Co-op acts as an unofficial meeting point for the locals.

Not much to distinguish it from the other villages nearby; flat, farmland stretching from one village to the next, with the odd superstore or garden centre between them.

But come midnight something different happens; something unique, ancient, mysterious; something rather noisy.

For every year for as long as anyone can remember, and even further back, the devil is beaten out of Broughton, by the tin can band - a collection of villagers who patrol the streets after midnight, banging, pots and pans, milk churns and hip baths, drums and hammers, colanders and frying pans - anything that makes a noise in fact, and for one night a year, Broughton becomes the noisiest place in Northamptonshire.

And no one quite knows why...

Alan Dein joins them with a microphone.

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Alan Dein follows the lives of two brothers - Alex, searching for a fresh start away from London gangs and his adopted brother JJ, who is poised for success on the London stage.

Alan charts the lives of Alex, JJ and parents Liz and Andreas as they cope with changes which will fundamentally shift the balance of their family life.

As JJ approaches 16 he must make decisions about his life and is preparing for auditions which could see him relaunch his acting career. This was put on hold five years earlier when the woman he knew as his 'mum' died and he was taken in by best friend Alex and adopted by Alex's parents, Andreas and Liz. Before this he had toured with productions like the King and I and his teachers believe he has the talent, drive and determination to succeed.

These are characteristics in short supply for Alex who is preparing to move to the Philippines to live with his maternal grandmother. He has been selling Cannabis and now owes money to a local gang. Excluded from school he sees little prospect of his life improving and welcomes the opportunity to start afresh somewhere new - even though that means leaving best friend JJ.

The recordings track events from the initial intervention of family therapists offering intensive support in London to the equally enticing offer from relatives abroad. As Alex prepares to leave England JJ prepares for the auditions which could seal his future and both brothers get use to the idea of living their separate lives.

Alan Dein with a story of two brothers with very different destinies.

As JJ approaches 16 he must make decisions about his life and is preparing for auditions which could see him relaunch his acting career.

This was put on hold five years earlier when the woman he knew as his 'mum' died and he was taken in by best friend Alex and adopted by Alex's parents, Andreas and Liz.

Before this he had toured with productions like the King and I and his teachers believe he has the talent, drive and determination to succeed.

These are characteristics in short supply for Alex who is preparing to move to the Philippines to live with his maternal grandmother.

He has been selling Cannabis and now owes money to a local gang.

Excluded from school he sees little prospect of his life improving and welcomes the opportunity to start afresh somewhere new - even though that means leaving best friend JJ.

The recordings track events from the initial intervention of family therapists offering intensive support in London to the equally enticing offer from relatives abroad.

As Alex prepares to leave England JJ prepares for the auditions which could seal his future and both brothers get use to the idea of living their separate lives.

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Alan Dein follows the fortunes of Iraq veteran turned wedding photographer Stefan Edwards as he contends with the difficulties of life on civvy street and tries to cut himself a slice of the increasingly competitive wedding market.

It's a March wedding for Lorraine and Richard from Newport and photographer Stefan Edwards exudes an air of military authority as he helps to chronicle the pair's big day. On the inside, though, Stefan's every bit as nervous as the couple anxiously awaiting the exchanging of vows. For Stefan's a newcomer to the wedding photography business - six months previously, he'd been out in Iraq using his camera to chronicle the war ravaged country, first for the British army and then for a private security contractor.

Having visited virtually every corner of Iraq, Stefan eventually decided to return to the UK to be with his Newport-based family who'd grown increasingly concerned at his absence. With steady work hard to find, Stefan has decided to go into the photography business, swapping one risk for another. Alan Dein joins him at the start of the wedding season as he attempts to drum up trade for his new venture and put the trauma of Iraq behind him.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

Alan Dein follows the fortunes of Iraq veteran turned wedding photographer Stefan Edwards.

It's a March wedding for Lorraine and Richard from Newport and official photographer Stefan Edwards exudes an air of military authority as he chronicles the pair's big day.

On the inside, though, Stefan's every bit as nervous as the couple anxiously awaiting the exchanging of vows.

For Stefan's a newcomer to the wedding photography business - six months previously, he'd been out in Iraq using his camera to chronicle the war ravaged country, first for the British army and then for a private security contractor.

Having visited virtually every corner of Iraq, Stefan eventually decided to return to the UK to be with his Newport-based family who'd grown increasingly concerned at his absence.

With steady work hard to find, Stefan has decided to go into the photography business, swapping one risk for another.

Alan Dein joins him at the start of the wedding season as he attempts to drum up trade for his new venture and put the trauma of Iraq behind him.

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Every six weeks a group of women in affluent Putney by the Thames in south-west London meets to discuss a book they've all been reading. This is no casual club open to the public but a close knit circle of friends and bibliophiles whose group is exclusive. As Boat Race Saturday - spring highpoint of the social calendar - approaches, Alan Dein joins the women as they go about their daily lives to hear about their relationship with Putney, with each other and the meaning the book club has for them.

Producer: Neil McCarthy.

Alan Dein joins a group of female friends in an exclusive south-west London reading circle

5.

Readers' Lives.

Every six weeks a group of women in affluent Putney by the Thames in south-west London meets to discuss a book they've all been reading.

This is no casual club open to the public but a close knit circle of friends and bibliophiles whose group is exclusive.

As Boat Race Saturday - spring highpoint of the social calendar - approaches, Alan Dein joins the women as they go about their daily lives to hear about their relationship with Putney, with each other and the meaning the book club has for them.

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With the trauma surrounding the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan and the increasing urgency of the debate about Britain's future use of nuclear power, Alan Dein joins a group for whom the nuclear industry has been an uninterrupted staple of their daily lives.

But the golfing members of SASRA, the Sellafield Area Sports and Recreation Association, have a life away from the pressure of working at one of the most recognisable nuclear establishments in the world.

Alan Dein joins Don Gash, the treasurer, fixtures secretary and - in his own words - general dogsbody for the SASRA golf society and a small group as they play their weekly competition round on the old golf that hugged the Cumbrian coast between Seascale and Calder Hall long before the nuclear industry arrived to dominate the landscape.

The talk is of dry fairways, short rough and the business of working for an industry that was once seen as heroic and pioneering before entering a period of intense critical scrutiny.

And Alan also wonders how these British nuclear workers view events at Fukushima where their Japanese colleagues face the worst nightmare of people involved in this business.

As they make their way to the far end of the course, the holes which neighbour the Sellafield landscape of their working lives, Alan learns how they balance a very particular kind of work and leisure.

Producer: Tom Alban.

Alan Dein shares a memory-rich round of golf with a group of nuclear workers at Sellafield

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Alan Dein meets Arthur Lowe, a 75-year-old life model and former financial adviser, from Shipston-On-Stour who poses for art students as a contribution to society.

Arthur puts his trim physique down to the lengths he regularly swims in his local pool - training which helped him win a gold medal at last year's world master's swimming competition in Sweden.

Alan visits an art class and observes the students at work as they capture the essence of the man at the front of the class.

Although, he is physically naked before them, many know little of the life within and the issues that concern Arthur.

Away from the studio, Alan explores exposure, vanity and the ageing process with Arthur who is acutely aware that his days as a model may be numbered.

Alan Dein meets a 75-year-old life model in Shipston-On-Stour.

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It was a chance encounter with the President himself which saw Zimbabwean musician, Wilson Magwere, become a well rewarded propagandist for Robert Mugabe's regime. While he and his fellow musicians from the band Storm were asked to perform at pro-government rallies and events, all around them they witnessed their friends, neighbours and family members suffer at the hands of the same repressive regime. It was soon too much for Wilson to bear. Leaving his wife and baby daughter behind in Harare, he ran away from the band, from Mugabe and from Zimbabwe. Eight years later, he has found himself living alone in Belfast, a city synonymous with its own set of political complexities. There he continues to wait for his political refugee status to be reviewed and prays that one day his wife and child will be able to join him. But for now Wilson has been trying to make a success of 'Magwere,' the new band he's formed with a disparate group of Belfast based musicians hailing from a hotchpotch of different countries around the world. Alan Dein meets Wilson as he attempts to carve out a life for himself in Belfast and Magwere prepare for their next big gig.

Producer: Conor Garrett.

Alan Dein meets Zimbabwean refugee Wilson Magwere in his adopted home of Belfast.

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Millie is about to reach the astonishing age of 104; at 94, Lily is a mere youngster, while 95-year-old Hetty is still as voluble and lively as she was when she worked in a football factory or ran her own business...

Alan Dein visits Vi and John Rubens House in Ilford, Essex, where elderly residents of the old East End Jewish community in London now spend their days.

Talking to them about how they spend their time now he discovers a rich landscape of experience in the lives of these entertainingly lively and thoughtful old people.

Producer: Simon Elmes.

Alan Dein explores the feisty and the frail sides of ageing in an elderly people's home.

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In May, major forest fires swept through a corner of Berkshire.

12 fire services were engaged in tackling the blaze which lasted a week and is estimated to have caused £100,000 of damage to woodland.

On the edge of a section of the forest known as Crowthorne Wood a small row of wooden houses narrowly avoided being destroyed by the fire which reached the end of the road.

The residents of these one-time foresters' houses were evacuated whilst firefighters tried to regain control.

Alan Dein meets this small neighbourhood whose existence was suddenly thrown into peril as the fire moved quickly towards it.

He also returns to the much loved forest with some of the residents, now a charred remnant of what it used to be.

Producer: Neil McCarthy.

In May, Berkshire suffered its biggest ever forest fire.

Alan Dein meets the evacuees.

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Alan Dein explores the impact of last summer's riots on one London man and his friends.

"Ten years work gone in one night".

On Monday, 8th August, 2011, Siva's shop, "The Clarence Convenience Store" in the heart of Hackney, London, fell prey to looters during the riots that swept UK city centres. A Tamil refugee, Siva had spent a decade building up the small shop in Clarence Road, which was destined, one hot summer night, to become the 'front-line' in a battle between police and rioters.

Over the days and weeks that followed, presenter Alan Dein talked to Siva and others affected by the turmoil in this area of north London, for this Sony nominated "Lives in a Landscape".

Immediately after the attack, pictures of Siva's shop, a whirlwind of wreckage created by a dark carnival of looters, were circulated across the globe by social media. Siva was left devastated - his was no chain store selling trainers or electrical goods. This was a small business, with no contents insurance. Bewildered by the attack, he was left wondering how he'd ever get his life and business back together.

But locals, determined that this would not be the end of the road for a popular local trader, got together to raise money and get help to rebuild his shop, and the Help Siva fund was born.

In the new series of "Lives in A Landscape" Alan Dein follows the immediate aftermath of the disturbances, meeting the people whose lives, for one night, were turned upside down and shaken violently.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall

Also in this series: Up for the Cup - Alan Dein follows the lives of the sportsmen and their families in a village near Manchester as they bid to win the National Village Cricket Cup... and the story of the evangelical traveller people who are trying to convert the inhabitants of a tough Edinburgh estate.

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The village of Woodhouses is half-rural, half-suburban idyll. It has two pubs, a bowling green, a working men's club, a golf course and a thriving cricket club. Just ten minutes from the heart of Manchester, the village is full of excitement and anticipation because, as Alan Dein discovers, it's just won the semi-final of the 2011 Village Cricket Cup; the final - at Lords - is only a few weeks away.

However this proud Lancashire cricketing village, once home to quarter of a million pigs, suddenly finds itself part of a broader national debate about Britain's threatened countryside, because Woodhouses is today in real danger of being consumed by bricks and concrete. Although the very, very smelly pigs have all but gone, a handful of horses remain, keeping the builders at bay. But how long will Woodhouses remain a village? Will the bowling green become a car park as the rumour has it? If the building does not stop will Woodhouses be eligible to enter the National Village cup? The future could be up to a few horses, six small pigs and the final result at Lords.

Producer: Neil George.

Alan Dein visits Woodhouses, Lancashire where more than national cricket fame is at stake.

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Alan Dein is in Edinburgh to meet evangelical travellers surviving amid decaying estates.

In a 1930s art deco building on an industrial site in Edinburgh's Craigmillar estate, a group of evangelical travellers meets every Sunday and Thursday in the Life and Light church.

Alan Dein meets Violet and other members of the church as they mingle with former heroin addicts, and joins them and Pastor Alister as they go 'witnessing' on Craigmillar.

Once a thriving community, today Craigmillar lies two thirds empty, with promised re-development on hold.

For the last twenty years Craigmillar has been in a constant state of flux as one housing project after another has been flattened and entire neighbourhoods moved from one end of the estate to the other.

In contrast, the travellers' site has been isolated from Craigmillar's ever changing landscape.

Through their church they have created a bubble in which to live.

It's a small pocket of life, pretty much self contained and contrasts greatly with the fragmented estate next door.

Venturing into the heart of a housing scheme rife, so say the travellers, with drug dealers, Alan is not sure what kind of reception they will receive.

On the estate he meets Heather, Craigmillar born and bred, who takes him to a wasteland.

Once her home, it's now an eerie landscape with the roads and street lights still there but the houses gone.

Violet and Heather: a story of a small patch of inner-city life with two very different perspectives...

Producer: Kate Bissell.

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Alan Dein goes to Boston, Lincs to explore tensions caused by an influx of migrant workers

Alan Dein goes to Boston, Lincolnshire to explore the simmering tensions caused by a large influx of migrant workers from Eastern Europe.

On arriving in this traditional market town dominated by its vast church known locally as the Stump, Alan hears rumours of escalating crime, homelessness and enforced repatriations. Migration is without doubt the number one issue here - the population of this market town has swollen dramatically since the expansion of the EU, with workers drawn by the ready supply of agricultural work.

Alan talks to Bostonians and migrant workers alike. He witnesses for himself the troubles in the town on a Saturday night, attempting to build up a balanced picture of the truth behind the rumours.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

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Elsecar Park, Barnsley has been both paradise and hell for one man. Alan Dein investigates

Alan Dein travels to Elsecar Park, Barnsley.For the past 4 years it has been home to Francis McDonald who both runs the cafe and acts as unofficial park keeper. This was once called 'Elsecar by the sea'. Day trippers from Sheffield and hordes of local children from the pit village would play and swim in its reservoir. There's a wrought iron bandstand, a modern playground and the water still laps against the shore. In the last of the golden autumn sun, with eddies of brown leaves skittering around, it is a place of quiet beauty.

It seemed like a paradise when McDonald opened the doors on a world he had known since his childhood. But gradually it became a kind of lonely hell. Now this will be his last autumn and the house on the hill will fall silent and shuttered.

Producer: Mark Burman.

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In the first of a new series of documentary stories from contemporary Britain, Alan Dein captures the dramas of young families just moving into Cardea: a brand new housing estate on the outskirts of Peterborough. Just two years ago, Cardea was just open fields - now it's a burgeoning community.

Two families in particular attract Alan's attention. Sara Jane and Stacey are both expectant mums in their early twenties. Together with their partners, they're about to embark on a new life on a new-build estate.

Cardea represents a fresh start for both women after an often difficult past. Sara Jane was brought up on council estate and vowed that she wanted a different upbringing for her own children. At the same time, Stacey hopes that her ambitions to become a midwife - thwarted through ill-health - might yet bear fruit as she starts out in a new home.

Alan follows the young families up to and beyond moving day, talking to them about their hopes and fears for the future.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

Alan Dein captures the dramas of families moving into a new Peterborough housing estate.

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Golf has put Portrush on the map once again. The seaside town in Northern Ireland is home to two stars of the sport, Graeme McDowell and Darren Clarke. Their names are proudly displayed on the 'Welcome to Portrush' road signs.

Along with fellow Northern Ireland player, Rory McIlroy, the two men have reinvigorated the local sports scene, so much so that the Irish Open golf tournament is coming to the Royal Portrush Golf Club at the end of June 2012. For four days the town will turn into a golf lover's paradise. Most of the hotels are booked out and people are renting out their houses.

The Irish Open was last held at Royal Portrush in 1947 when the town was a popular holiday resort. But the advent of package holidays and affordable foreign travel eventually lead to a slow-down in the local tourism trade. For this Lives in a Landscape Alan Dein is in Portrush as it carries out a major spring-clean. Derelict buildings, described as 'eyesores', are one legacy of the recent property boom and bust. Now an injection of cash from the government is paying for their demolition and many of the town's buildings are being repainted. Some in Portrush fear this will be a temporary patch-up job and that once the big sporting event ends, and the world's TV cameras depart, things will return to normal. Others are hoping the Irish Open will breathe new life into Portrush.

Alan meets residents as they prepare for the eyes of the world to fall on their town.

Producer: Claire Burgoyne.

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Alan Dein visits a Hastings allotment and finds that a plot of land means a lot more to people than a place to grow vegetables. He joins various allotmenteers as they tend their plot and, in turn, hears how differently they use it. A young family have created a haven where the children learn about nature; a teacher uses the allotment to help him deal with depression; two friends meet up under a full moon and await the wild original inhabitants of the allotment whilst reflecting on life and their place in it.

Produced by Sarah Bowen and Neil McCarthy.