I Was A Child Prodigy

Chris Ledgard presents a series looking at the lives of people who were labelled child prodigies.

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
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20080902

Chris Ledgard presents a series looking at the lives of people who were labelled child prodigies.

1/5. He meets Mark Bennet, a vicar in Essex who was one of the brightest schoolboy mathematicians of his generation. He won a gold medal and scored full marks in the International Maths Olympiad in 1981. He went on to Cambridge, intent on staying there to become a Professor. Tiring of academic life, however, he entered the church. Has he any regrets?

20080909

Chris Ledgard presents a series looking at the lives of people who were labelled child prodigies.

2/5. Jocelyn Lavin shone both academically and musically at primary school. She won a place at the prestigious Chetham's School in Manchester, where she was a classmate of Anna Markland, BBC Young Musician of the Year in 1982. But she can't find a job and doesn't understand why her talents seem to mean nothing to potential employers. Jocelyn and Anna reflect on their fortunes since leaving school.

20080923

Chris Ledgard presents a series looking at the lives of people who were labelled child prodigies.

4/5. Jonathan Cocking could read Shakespeare and remember long sequences of numbers at the age of three. In 1950, he featured in the national press. But Jonathan firmly denies that he was a prodigy and has been living down the label ever since.

20080930

Chris Ledgard presents a series looking at the lives of people who were labelled child prodigies.

5/5. Retired civil servant David Heigham spent years looking for someone to explain why his schooling left him incapable of fulfilling his intellectual talents. This year he found Professor Carol Dweck of Stanford University, whose theories David believes offer important lessons to anyone dealing with a gifted child.

01

01*2008090220090831

He meets Mark Bennet, a vicar in Essex who was one of the brightest schoolboy mathematicians of his generation.

He won a gold medal and scored full marks in the International Maths Olympiad in 1981.

He went on to Cambridge, intent on staying there to become a professor.

Tiring of academic life, however, he entered the church.

Has he any regrets?

Chris Ledgard meets Mark Bennet, an Essex vicar who was a brilliant young mathematician.

01*2008090220090831

He meets Mark Bennet, a vicar in Essex who was one of the brightest schoolboy mathematicians of his generation.

He won a gold medal and scored full marks in the International Maths Olympiad in 1981.

He went on to Cambridge, intent on staying there to become a professor.

Tiring of academic life, however, he entered the church.

Has he any regrets?

Chris Ledgard meets Mark Bennet, an Essex vicar who was a brilliant young mathematician.

02

02*2008090920090901

Jocelyn Lavin shone both academically and musically at primary school.

She won a place at the prestigious Chetham's School in Manchester, where she was a classmate of Anna Markland, BBC Young Musician of the Year in 1982.

But she can't find a job and doesn't understand why her talents seem to mean nothing to potential employers.

Jocelyn and Anna reflect on their fortunes since leaving school.

Jocelyn Lavin shone both academically and musically at school, but cannot find a job.

02*2008090920090901

Jocelyn Lavin shone both academically and musically at primary school.

She won a place at the prestigious Chetham's School in Manchester, where she was a classmate of Anna Markland, BBC Young Musician of the Year in 1982.

But she can't find a job and doesn't understand why her talents seem to mean nothing to potential employers.

Jocelyn and Anna reflect on their fortunes since leaving school.

Jocelyn Lavin shone both academically and musically at school, but cannot find a job.

03

03*2008091620090902

Demis Hassabis was once the highest-ranked twelve-year-old chess player in the world.

He wanted a career in chess and hoped one day to become world champion.

Then he gave up playing the game seriously, a decision he doesn't regret.

Why does chess have such a hold on so many bright young people? International Masters Bill Hartston and Malcolm Pein join the debate.

Demis Hassabis was once the highest-ranked 12-year-old chess player in the world.

03*2008091620090902

Demis Hassabis was once the highest-ranked twelve-year-old chess player in the world.

He wanted a career in chess and hoped one day to become world champion.

Then he gave up playing the game seriously, a decision he doesn't regret.

Why does chess have such a hold on so many bright young people? International Masters Bill Hartston and Malcolm Pein join the debate.

Demis Hassabis was once the highest-ranked 12-year-old chess player in the world.

04

04* *2008092320090903

Jonathan Cocking could read Shakespeare and remember long sequences of numbers at the age of three.

In 1950, he featured in the national press.

But Jonathan firmly denies that he was a prodigy and has been living down the label ever since.

Jonathan Cocking could read Shakespeare and remember number sequences at the age of three.

04* *2008092320090903

Jonathan Cocking could read Shakespeare and remember long sequences of numbers at the age of three.

In 1950, he featured in the national press.

But Jonathan firmly denies that he was a prodigy and has been living down the label ever since.

Jonathan Cocking could read Shakespeare and remember number sequences at the age of three.

05

05 LAST*2008093020090904

Retired civil servant David Heigham spent years looking for someone to explain why his schooling left him incapable of fulfilling his intellectual talents.

Then he found Professor Carol Dweck of Stanford University, whose theories David believes offer important lessons to anyone dealing with a gifted child.

Retired civil servant David Heigham's schooling failed to fully nurture his talents.

Why?

This year he found Professor Carol Dweck of Stanford University, whose theories David believes offer important lessons to anyone dealing with a gifted child.

05 LAST*2008093020090904

Retired civil servant David Heigham spent years looking for someone to explain why his schooling left him incapable of fulfilling his intellectual talents.

Then he found Professor Carol Dweck of Stanford University, whose theories David believes offer important lessons to anyone dealing with a gifted child.

Retired civil servant David Heigham's schooling failed to fully nurture his talents.

Why?

This year he found Professor Carol Dweck of Stanford University, whose theories David believes offer important lessons to anyone dealing with a gifted child.