How Pleasant To Know Mr Lear

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
Genome: [r4 Bd=19880113]

He weeps by the side of the ocean, He weeps on the top of the hill; He purchases pancakes and lotion,

And chocolate shrimps from the mill

A monologue by Charles Lewsen drawn from the journals, letters, verse and songs of the great Victorian humorist.

Accompanist ANNA BERENSKA Producer HALLAM TENNYSON (R)

Genome: [r4 Bd=19880113]

He weeps by the side of the ocean, He weeps on the top of the hill; He purchases pancakes and lotion,

And chocolate shrimps from the mill

A monologue by Charles Lewsen drawn from the journals, letters, verse and songs of the great Victorian humorist.

Accompanist ANNA BERENSKA Producer HALLAM TENNYSON (R)

Genome: [r4 Bd=19880113]

Unknown: Charles Lewsen

Producer: Hallam Tennyson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19880113]

Unknown: Charles Lewsen

Producer: Hallam Tennyson

04The Essay20120503

(04/05)

Marking the bicentenary of Edward Lear's birth in 1812, this series of five essays considers the exuberant play of Edward Lear as a nonsense poet and artist and the influence of 'nonsense' on modern life.

In the fourth essay in the series, Art Historian at the Courtauld Institute of Art, Professor Caroline Arscott, considers Lear the artist.

Lear was well known as an artist long before he became famous for his writing, initially as an illustrator of birds and animals. He moved onto landscape painting, producing many thousands of studies as he travelled throughout Europe.

05 LASTThe Essay20120504

(05/05)

Marking the bicentenary of Edward Lear's birth in 1812, this series of five essays considers the exuberant play of Edward Lear as a nonsense poet and artist and the influence of 'nonsense' on modern life.

In the fifth and final essay in the series, artist and caricaturist Ralph Steadman casts a cartoonist's eye over the work of Lear, considering him as a highly skilled artist who "absorbs what he sees in front of him" and paints "without it going tired". A cartoonist who pricks the bubble of pomposity.

01Sara Lodge2012043020130730

Marking the centenary of Edward Lear's birth in 1812, this series of five essays considers the exuberant play of Edward Lear as a nonsense poet and artist and the influence of 'nonsense' on modern life.

In the first essay in the series, writer and academic Sara Lodge considers Lear as a tragicomic writer, whose poems reflect the key romantic themes of the time, but seek out the ridiculous amid the sublime.

Writer and academic Sara Lodge considers Edward Lear as a tragicomic writer.

First broadcast last year to mark the centenary of Edward Lear's birth in 1812, this series of essays considers the exuberant play of Edward Lear as a nonsense poet and artist and the influence of 'nonsense' on modern life.

01Sara Lodge2012043020130730

Marking the centenary of Edward Lear's birth in 1812, this series of five essays considers the exuberant play of Edward Lear as a nonsense poet and artist and the influence of 'nonsense' on modern life.

In the first essay in the series, writer and academic Sara Lodge considers Lear as a tragicomic writer, whose poems reflect the key romantic themes of the time, but seek out the ridiculous amid the sublime.

Writer and academic Sara Lodge considers Edward Lear as a tragicomic writer.

First broadcast last year to mark the centenary of Edward Lear's birth in 1812, this series of essays considers the exuberant play of Edward Lear as a nonsense poet and artist and the influence of 'nonsense' on modern life.

02Matthew Bevis2012050120130801

Marking the centenary of Edward Lear's birth in 1812, this series of five essays considers the exuberant play of Edward Lear as a nonsense poet and artist and the influence of 'nonsense' on modern life.

In the second essay in the series, Keble fellow and writer Matthew Bevis explores the story of nonsense. Looking back to a time before nonsense existed, he considers what nonsense is, how it fitted into the Victorian age and the role of Lear in its development.

Writer Matthew Bevis explores the historical development of Edward Lear's nonsense poetry.

02Matthew Bevis2012050120130801

Marking the centenary of Edward Lear's birth in 1812, this series of five essays considers the exuberant play of Edward Lear as a nonsense poet and artist and the influence of 'nonsense' on modern life.

In the second essay in the series, Keble fellow and writer Matthew Bevis explores the story of nonsense. Looking back to a time before nonsense existed, he considers what nonsense is, how it fitted into the Victorian age and the role of Lear in its development.

Writer Matthew Bevis explores the historical development of Edward Lear's nonsense poetry.

03Robert Crawford2012050220130806

Marking the centenary of Edward Lear's birth in 1812, this series of five essays considers the exuberant play of Edward Lear as a nonsense poet and artist and the influence of 'nonsense' on modern life.

In the third essay in the series, Robert Crawford, poet and professor of Modern Literature at the University of St Andrews, speaks about Edward Lear's literary legacy.

He will focus especially on T S Eliot, who often drew on the work of Lear in his writing, even going as far as to write the poem 'How Unpleasant to Meet Mr Eliot'.

Poet and academic Robert Crawford explores Edward Lear's literary legacy.

03Robert Crawford2012050220130806

Marking the centenary of Edward Lear's birth in 1812, this series of five essays considers the exuberant play of Edward Lear as a nonsense poet and artist and the influence of 'nonsense' on modern life.

In the third essay in the series, Robert Crawford, poet and professor of Modern Literature at the University of St Andrews, speaks about Edward Lear's literary legacy.

He will focus especially on T S Eliot, who often drew on the work of Lear in his writing, even going as far as to write the poem 'How Unpleasant to Meet Mr Eliot'.

Poet and academic Robert Crawford explores Edward Lear's literary legacy.

04Caroline Arscott2012050320130807

Marking the bicentenary of Edward Lear's birth in 1812, this series of five essays considers the exuberant play of Edward Lear as a nonsense poet and artist and the influence of 'nonsense' on modern life.

In the fourth essay in the series, Art Historian at the Courtauld Institute of Art, Professor Caroline Arscott, considers Lear the artist.

Lear was well known as an artist long before he became famous for his writing, initially as an illustrator of birds and animals. He moved onto landscape painting, producing many thousands of studies as he travelled throughout Europe.

Art historian Professor Caroline Arscott considers Edward Lear's work as an artist.

(04/05)

04Caroline Arscott2012050320130807

Marking the bicentenary of Edward Lear's birth in 1812, this series of five essays considers the exuberant play of Edward Lear as a nonsense poet and artist and the influence of 'nonsense' on modern life.

In the fourth essay in the series, Art Historian at the Courtauld Institute of Art, Professor Caroline Arscott, considers Lear the artist.

Lear was well known as an artist long before he became famous for his writing, initially as an illustrator of birds and animals. He moved onto landscape painting, producing many thousands of studies as he travelled throughout Europe.

Art historian Professor Caroline Arscott considers Edward Lear's work as an artist.

(04/05)

05 LASTRalph Steadman20120504

In the fifth and final essay in the series, artist and caricaturist Ralph Steadman casts a cartoonist's eye over the work of Lear, considering him as a highly skilled artist who "absorbs what he sees in front of him" and paints "without it going tired". A cartoonist who pricks the bubble of pomposity.

05 LASTRalph Steadman20120504

In the fifth and final essay in the series, artist and caricaturist Ralph Steadman casts a cartoonist's eye over the work of Lear, considering him as a highly skilled artist who "absorbs what he sees in front of him" and paints "without it going tired". A cartoonist who pricks the bubble of pomposity.