Yes, Minister - The View From Whitehall [documentary]

From John Buchan to David Steel, Gordon Brown and Douglas Alexander MP, sons of the Manse have had a disproportionate impact on Scottish politics.

What explains the Eric Liddell effect? Modern Scottish Politics has been shaped by the Scottish Church, and by men who spent their boyhood in the Manse.

From the dashing Tory John Buchan to the dour Presbyterian Gordon Brown, the Church of Scotland has been a rich seed-bed, producing some of the brightest and best Scottish Politicians.

Even opponents of the Kirk note its power: the political philosopher Tom Nairn once quipped that Scotland would only be free ""once the last minister had been strangled with the last copy of the Sunday Post"".

The connections between church and state in Scotland go deep and wide.

When Donald Dewar died, his funeral was taken by the Reverend Douglas Alexander, father to the cabinet office Minster Douglas Alexander MP, and to his sister Wendy, member of the Scottish Parliament.

The comparison between the minister and the politician goes deeper than mere pastoral care.

Like the MP, the minister is responsible for his own geographical patch, where he is ""Pope in his own parish."" But the Church also has a long-standing reputation in Scotland for producing driven, scholarly men, Calvinistic heroes, fired by a protestant work ethic to improve the lot of society.

In this talk, journalist and broadcaster Colin Bell offers an entertaining insight into the close connections between church and state in Scotland, explaining how and why the sons of Kirk Ministers often follow in their father's footsteps to become Ministers of the Crown.

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From John Buchan to David Steel, Gordon Brown and Douglas Alexander MP, sons of the Manse have had a disproportionate impact on Scottish politics.

What explains the Eric Liddell effect? Modern Scottish Politics has been shaped by the Scottish Church, and by men who spent their boyhood in the Manse.

From the dashing Tory John Buchan to the dour Presbyterian Gordon Brown, the Church of Scotland has been a rich seed-bed, producing some of the brightest and best Scottish Politicians.

Even opponents of the Kirk note its power: the political philosopher Tom Nairn once quipped that Scotland would only be free ""once the last minister had been strangled with the last copy of the Sunday Post"".

The connections between church and state in Scotland go deep and wide.

When Donald Dewar died, his funeral was taken by the Reverend Douglas Alexander, father to the cabinet office Minster Douglas Alexander MP, and to his sister Wendy, member of the Scottish Parliament.

The comparison between the minister and the politician goes deeper than mere pastoral care.

Like the MP, the minister is responsible for his own geographical patch, where he is ""Pope in his own parish."" But the Church also has a long-standing reputation in Scotland for producing driven, scholarly men, Calvinistic heroes, fired by a protestant work ethic to improve the lot of society.

In this talk, journalist and broadcaster Colin Bell offers an entertaining insight into the close connections between church and state in Scotland, explaining how and why the sons of Kirk Ministers often follow in their father's footsteps to become Ministers of the Crown.