Wow! How Did They Do That?

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Roger Law goes in search of the entrepreneurs who are behind some of the Britain's best designs and inventions.

Adam Lowe is the man who can recreate any object in perfect detail. His company Factum Arte has reproduced great works of art, such as Veronese's The Marriage at Cana which was taken by Napoleon's troops from Venice and now hangs in the Louvre. Adam created an exact replica which is now displayed in the original setting in the Palladian refectory in Venice. The next challenge was even more ambitious - a life size reproduction of Tutankamun' tomb. Roger Law travels to Madrid to discover the secrets behind these extraordinary creations.

Steve Haines also creates great works of art - for other artists. He is the craftsman behind some of the great monumental pieces of sculpture to be found in the UK and beyond. All this is produced in a modest workshop underneath the railway arches in Deptford, south-east London.

Two contrasting styles and two contrasting characters with one thing in common. Creating objects in perfect detail.

Roger Law goes in search of the entrepreneurs who are behind some of the Britain's best designs and inventions.

Adam Lowe is the man who can recreate any object in perfect detail. His company Factum Arte has reproduced great works of art, such as Veronese's The Marriage at Cana which was taken by Napoleon's troops from Venice and now hangs in the Louvre. Adam created an exact replica which is now displayed in the original setting in the Palladian refectory in Venice. The next challenge was even more ambitious - a life size reproduction of Tutankamun' tomb. Roger Law travels to Madrid to discover the secrets behind these extraordinary creations.

Steve Haines also creates great works of art - for other artists. He is the craftsman behind some of the great monumental pieces of sculpture to be found in the UK and beyond. All this is produced in a modest workshop underneath the railway arches in Deptford, south-east London.

Two contrasting styles and two contrasting characters with one thing in common. Creating objects in perfect detail.

0220130819

0220130819

Roger Law goes in search of the entrepreneurs who are behind some of the Britain's best designs and inventions.

In a converted garage in rural Cambridgeshire, Wesley West has been busy creating real objects out of almost anything he can find. His garden is full of robots made of cartons and iron creatures of various shapes and sizes, and he has worked in advertising for many years making finely crafted objects for his clients. All Wesley's ingenious solutions are made by hand then filmed or photographed, and no computer is involved. Roger steps into an intriguing world where everything is, in its own way, real.

Tim Webber on the other hand does all his effects on the computer. He works at Framestore, a post-production house in London, and he is the magician behind the Harry Potter films. Roger joins him in Soho to find out how these visual effects are created, and what it is that British artists can offer the film industry.

Two contrasting creators, both of whom have plenty to offer in ingenuity and skill, either with or without the aid of a computer.

Producer Mark Rickards.

0220130819

Roger Law goes in search of the entrepreneurs who are behind some of the Britain's best designs and inventions.

In a converted garage in rural Cambridgeshire, Wesley West has been busy creating real objects out of almost anything he can find. His garden is full of robots made of cartons and iron creatures of various shapes and sizes, and he has worked in advertising for many years making finely crafted objects for his clients. All Wesley's ingenious solutions are made by hand then filmed or photographed, and no computer is involved. Roger steps into an intriguing world where everything is, in its own way, real.

Tim Webber on the other hand does all his effects on the computer. He works at Framestore, a post-production house in London, and he is the magician behind the Harry Potter films. Roger joins him in Soho to find out how these visual effects are created, and what it is that British artists can offer the film industry.

Two contrasting creators, both of whom have plenty to offer in ingenuity and skill, either with or without the aid of a computer.

Producer Mark Rickards.

022013081920140909

Roger Law goes in search of the entrepreneurs who are behind some of the Britain's best designs and inventions.

In a converted garage in rural Cambridgeshire, Wesley West has been busy creating real objects out of almost anything he can find. His garden is full of robots made of cartons and iron creatures of various shapes and sizes, and he has worked in advertising for many years making finely crafted objects for his clients. All Wesley's ingenious solutions are made by hand then filmed or photographed, and no computer is involved. Roger steps into an intriguing world where everything is, in its own way, real.

Tim Webber on the other hand does all his effects on the computer. He works at Framestore, a post-production house in London, and he is the magician behind the Harry Potter films. Roger joins him in Soho to find out how these visual effects are created, and what it is that British artists can offer the film industry.

Two contrasting creators, both of whom have plenty to offer in ingenuity and skill, either with or without the aid of a computer.

Producer Mark Rickards.

032013082620140910

Roger Law goes in search of the entrepreneurs who are behind some of the Britain's best designs and inventions.

Chris Wise is one of the most outstanding engineers of his generation. Responsible for the Stockton-on-Tees Infinity Bridge and the revamp of the Barcelona bullring, these were complicated projects resolved by Wise in a cool and stylish way. His best known work is the Velodrome for the London Olympics, a place where Roger's second guest also made his mark. Piers Shepperd is the man who made sure the opening ceremony went with a bang. As chimneys reached for the sky whilst the world held its breath, Shepperd was behind the scenes making sure the technology performed with his stopwatch.

Roger Law meets these two hugely talented backroom boys to find out how it was all done.

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Roger Law goes in search of the entrepreneurs who are behind some of the Britain's best designs and inventions.

Charlie Paton may not be able to turn water into wine but he is working on making seawater turn into a cooling system for hot and arid countries. The invention could increase crop yields in the driest parts of Africa as it uses a natural resource to cool greenhouses. As he says, "It's counter-intuitive to most people. Anybody who knows anything knows you don't have seawater in greenhouses and you don't have greenhouses in arid countries. On every level it is the opposite of what we do." Yet he believes this system can and will work, as he explains to Roger Law.

Roger's second guest helped create some of the most useful objects for those with disabilities by recognizing what they themselves wanted. Roger Coleman first got involved in a friend's kitchen after she developed multiple sclerosis. 'I asked her what the most important thing was about the design. She said 'I want the neighbours to be jealous!'. It was a real light bulb moment for me. That's about being like everyone else."

It set Roger on the path of designing a whole range of things that people really wanted, from the big button telephone to brightly coloured seating for kids in special schools which helped integrate them into the classrooms. It also led him to develop medical equipment for the NHS that suited users in hospital, such as a unique design for a resuscitation trolley.

Two contrasting inventors who are changing the world one small design at a time.

Producer Mark Rickards.

Roger Law goes in search of the entrepreneurs who are behind some of the Britain's best designs and inventions.

Charlie Paton may not be able to turn water into wine but he is working on making seawater turn into a cooling system for hot and arid countries. The invention could increase crop yields in the driest parts of Africa as it uses a natural resource to cool greenhouses. As he says, "It's counter-intuitive to most people. Anybody who knows anything knows you don't have seawater in greenhouses and you don't have greenhouses in arid countries. On every level it is the opposite of what we do." Yet he believes this system can and will work, as he explains to Roger Law.

Roger's second guest helped create some of the most useful objects for those with disabilities by recognizing what they themselves wanted. Roger Coleman first got involved in a friend's kitchen after she developed multiple sclerosis. 'I asked her what the most important thing was about the design. She said 'I want the neighbours to be jealous!'. It was a real light bulb moment for me. That's about being like everyone else."

It set Roger on the path of designing a whole range of things that people really wanted, from the big button telephone to brightly coloured seating for kids in special schools which helped integrate them into the classrooms. It also led him to develop medical equipment for the NHS that suited users in hospital, such as a unique design for a resuscitation trolley.

Two contrasting inventors who are changing the world one small design at a time.

Producer Mark Rickards.

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Roger Law goes in search of the entrepreneurs who are behind some of the Britain's best designs and inventions.

Ross Lovegrove has earned the nickname 'Captain Organic' through his extraordinary designs based on organic shapes and forms. Roger Law visits his studio and finds him inspired by anything from an elephant skull to a honeycomb. As he explains, Lovegrove draws on the experiences of mankind over the ages. "Ten thousand years ago most of our ancestors lived in caves. They made things from organic material and I don't think we've moved far from that." From this starting point Lovegrove has developed the most extraordinarily beautiful objects which can be used in everyday life.

Hussein Chalayan has created his innovative work in the world of fashion. Roger Law talks to him about how he sees his role. "I am a designer," he says, "but I happen to have a narrative approach". Chalayan has become famous for his bold and daring productions, and he explains his thinking behind the events which showcase his work. Roger gets to discuss dresses that can reconfigure whilst being worn, including one which can disappear completely. "Startling stuff," concludes Roger, "especially if you happen to be wearing it at the time.".