World Routes

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20030816

Cairo Nights In the second of his two features on the Arabic music world, Samir Farah meets Mohammed Munir, one of Egypt's biggest stars.

Munir's latest album, a response to the current political climate, is devoted to Islamic songs.

He also talks to Hakim, a top singer in the popular style called 'shaabi'.

20030920

Oumou Sangare: The Songbird of Wasulu Lucy Duran visits the West African Republic of Mali, home to one of Africa's best-loved divas: Oumou Sangare.

Duran travels to the remote region of Wasulu in search of Oumou's roots, and talks to this iconic African about her music, her background and the controversial subject of women's rights.

20031025

Lucy Duran introduces music from around the globe: Janet Topp Fargion talks about the British Library Sound ArcHIVe's World and Traditional Music recordings, there's a report from Simon Broughton in Siberia, and Verity Sharp meets Sheila Stewart, one of the greatest singers of traditional Scottish music, who is the last in the line of a rich oral tradition of song, story and traveller culture.

20040320

Lucy Duran begins a two-week exploration of the Indonesian gamelan.

This week she travels east through Java from Jakarta to Solo, discovering the lively indigenous music of the south coast, the island's cultural centre that is Bandung, and the seat of Java's royal court at the Mankunagaran Palace.

She hears the sweet sound of the suling flute, a child bamboo orchestra hooked on Elvis, and the ethereal sound of the royal gamelan complete with wild swallows.

20040327

Lucy Duran concludes her two-week exploration of the Indonesian gamelan.

This week she travels to Bali, arriving on the feast day of the Goddess Saraswati.

The music on this beautiful island is dominated by Hindu ritual, from the extraordinary monkey chanting of the Kecak dance, to the hilarious drama of the shadow puppet theatre.

She also discovers the latest gamelan craze for which you have to be young, beautiful and male to take part!.

20040508

Lucy Duran introduces highlights from World on the Waterfront, Radio 3's world music festival held last weekend in Belfast.

Featuring Tuvan throat-singers Huun-Huur-Tu.

20040605

Music in the studio by the group From Pontus to Persia who combine the traditional sounds of Greece and Iran.

Plus new releases from the Middle East with the Israeli broadcaster Moshe Morad.

20040612

Senegalese superstar Youssou N'Dour talks about his new album, Egypt, a testament to his Islamic faith in which all the songs are dedicated to Sufi saints.

There's also music in the studio from Munadjat Yulchieva, a singer from Uzbekistan who was a nominee in this year's Radio 3 Awards for World Music.

20040716

The Hidden Music of Venezuela

The second of two programmes from Venezuela, exploring the country's rich and rarely heard music.

This week Lucy Duran seeks out the harp-playing cowboys of the vast central plains: a hot, lonely and unwelcoming landscape with one of Latin America's most exquisite musical traditions.

20040717
20040724

As part of Radio 3's WOMAD Weekend from Rivermead in Reading, Lucy Duran presents a live set by Malouma from Mauritania.

Her unique sound is inspired by the songs of the desert and the rhythms of the Senegal River, and sits at the crossroads of West Africa and the Arab world.

20040731

Highlights from last weekend's WOMAD Festival in Reading, including the performance from the Siam Tent by Culture Musical Club, a fifteen-piece traditional taarab orchestra from the island of Zanzibar.

Introduced by Lucy Duran

20040807

Lucy Duran reviews new world music releases and Verity Sharp visits the Sidmouth International Festival.

Studio guests are the Arabic Orchestra of the Royal Air Force of Oman.

20040814

Lucy Duran visits Epirus, a remote part of Greece near the Albanian border.

She meets local clarinettist Petroloukas Chalkias, who performs an exclusive set for the programme.

20040821

In the second of two programmes, Lucy Duran continues her search for some of the rarest and most exciting traditional music in Greece.

Lucy travels south to the island of Crete.

20040828

Khaled, superstar of Algerian rai music, talks about his new album.

DJ Ritu reviews new world music CDs and Simon Broughton reports from the Fez Festival of Sacred Music in Morocco.

20040904

Lucy Duran is joined by Charlie Gillett for a round up of new world releases, and live music from one of the great vocalists of INDIA, Ajoy Chakrabarty.

Plus Andy Kershaw meets the Rai-Rock star Rachid Taha whose new album is out this month.

20040911

Hugh Masekela and the Jazz Jamaica All Stars

A concert recorded at Symphony Hall, BIRMINGHAM.

The legendary South African jazzman teams up with one of the UK's leading big bands in a blend of Masekela classics with a little Bob Marley.

Introduced by Ghanaian musician Serena Dankwa.

20040918

Lucy Duran visits the village of Clejani in Romania to meet some local gypsy musicians.

She also talks to flute player Grigore Lese, who is keeping alive the traditions of Transylvania.

20040925

Samir Farah reviews new CDs from the Arab world, and there's a report from the Rainforest World Music Festival in Borneo, and a studio session from Portuguese fado singer Cristina Branco.

20041002

Lucy Duran meets African record producer Ibrahim Sylla, famous for having launched the international career of Salif Keita and for having worked with everyone from Orchestra Baobab to Youssou N'Dour.

His latest project, Mandekalou, brings together some of West Africa's most brilliant praise singers.

Plus, Michael Church travels to Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan to meet some of the musicians taking part in ENGLISH National Opera's Voices of Central Asia event.

20041009

Lucy Duran catches up on some of the latest world music releases with the journalist John L Walters.

Plus a studio session from the brilliant young INDIAn violinist Kala Ramnath.

20041016

Lucy Duran is joined by Jameela Siddiqi for a review of new CDs of INDIAn classical music, Eka Morgan reports from the Cameroon on a music project with the Baka people, and there is a studio session with Gambian kora player Jali Sherrifo Konteh.

20041023

A concert featuring Ljiljana Buttler and the Mostar Sevdah Reunion from this summer's Glatt und Verkehrt (Shaken not Stirred) festival in Austria.

Introduced by Lucy Duran

20041030

Lucy Duran and Paul Fisher review new CDs.

Japan's young tsugaru shamisen player Shinichi Kinoshita performs in the studio.

Plus an interview with Nigerian Afrobeat star Femi Kuti.

20041106

Lucy Duran and Francis Gay profile the nominees for the Radio 3 Awards for World Music 2005.

The nominations were announced on Sunday at WOMEX, the annual gathering of the world music industry.

The final Poll Winners' Concert is set for next March at The Sage Gateshead.

20041113

Lucy Duran with the best live music from this year's WOMEX world music fair in Essen, Germany.

20041120

In the first of three programmes this afternoon from the LONDON Jazz Festival Lucy Duran introduces a concert by legendary West African singer and kora player Mory Kanté and his band.

20041127

1/2.

Moshe Morad visits Israel to find out how the country's diverse ethnic makeup influences its music.

He records the coffee-grinding music of Bedouins on Mount Tabor, and attends a Peace Festival by the Sea of Galilee where he meets world music diva Noa and Palestinian rap group Dam.

Plus an introduction to central bus station music, and a session from chart-topping Ethiopians in Tel Aviv.

20041204

Moshe Morad explores the diverse mix of music in Israel where he meets the queen mother of central bus station music, a singer who's just had her vocal chords removed after suffering cancer.

Plus, a disappearing Iraqi tradition in Tel Aviv, RUSSIAn and Algerian roots at the Dead Sea Festival, and a trip to Jerusalem to celebrate Simhat Torah at the Wailing Wall and to hear songs from an ancient Sephardic neighbourhood.

20041211

In the first of two world music celebrity concerts, Youssou N'Dour performs music from Egypt, his new project dedicated to the Islamic Sufi saints of West Africa.

Lucy Duran introduces the performance, which was specially recorded for the programme at the Philharmonic Hall in LIVERPOOL.

20041218

Lucy Duran introduces the second of two world music celebrity concerts.

This week it's the turn of the Algerian-born King of Rai, Khaled in a performance especially recorded for the programme earlier this month at LONDON's Shepherds Bush Empire.

20050108

Lucy Duran introduces a session from Argentine virtuoso accordionist Chango Spasiuk, a nominee in the Radio 3 Awards for World Music, and there is a report from East Timor on musical life following the years of occupation and war.

20050115

Oumou Sangare: The Songbird of Wasulu

Lucy Duran visits the West African Republic of Mali, home to one of Africa's best-loved divas: Oumou Sangare.

Duran travels to the remote region of Wasulu in search of Oumou's roots, and talks to this iconic African about her music, her background and the controversial subject of women's rights.

20050122

BBC Radio 3 Awards for World Music

Thirty-one artists from around the world have so far been nominated in the 2005 Awards, and the winners of all but one of the categories are announced today live from the Pizza Express Jazz Club in LONDON.

As a prelude to the Poll Winners' Concert in March, Lucy Duran and Moshe Morad introduce CD tracks and special performances from winning artists past and present.

20050129

Lucy Duran enjoys Korean folk music live in the studio, and Joe Boyd introduces some of the latest sounds from Italy.

Plus an interview with Dan Storper, founder of Putumayo.

20050205

First of two programmes in which Samir Farah of the BBC Arabic Service visits Syria's capital Damascus to explore the character of the country and its people through its music.

20050212

Sam Farah of the BBC Arabic Service visits an Islamic Sufi gathering in Aleppo, in northern Syria.

With Israel on one border and Iraq on another, religion in Syria is often politically charged; at the gathering of Sheikh Habboush, music is seen as a potent force for Islam.

20050219

The Hidden Music of Venezuela

The first of two programmes from Venezuela, a country frequently in the news for political unrest, but little known for its immensely rich music and culture.

This week Lucy Duran explores the Afro-Venezuelan traditions of the Caribbean coast with rare field recordings made especially for the programme.

20050305

Africa Season

In the first of two special programmes Lucy Duran travels to the rarely visited Southern African country of Mozambique.

After decades of civil war, it's home to many diverse musical traditions which have rarely been recorded or heard by outsiders.

20050312

Lucy Duran continues her journey through the little-visited country of Mozambique.

She visits the beautiful Ilha do Mocambique to hear traditional Tufo songs of the women.

Plus there's panpipe music from the very hot north, and in Maputo, the first gig in four years by the country's best-loved veteran band Ghorwane.

20050319

Lucy Duran is joined by Nigel Williamson for a look at what's new in world music, and Simon Broughton travels to Tamanrasset in southern Algeria for a music festival with the desert Touaregs.

20050326

Lucy Duran is joined by the broadcaster Charlie Gillett for a round-up of new World Music releases.

Plus Andy Kershaw reviews the new box set I Am the Upsetter, by Jamaican reggae legend Lee Perry.

20050402

Jameela Siddiqi introduces highlights from a tribute concert for one of INDIA?s greatest musicians Vilayat Khan, who died last year.

There are performances from some of INDIA?s finest classical performers today, including santoor player SHIVkumar Sharma, flautist Hariprasad Chaurasia, singer Kishori Amonkar and Vilayat?s son, sitarist Shujaat Husain Khan.

20050409

Lucy Duran visits the village of Clejani in Romania for an impromptu session by some local gypsy musicians.

She also meets flute player Grigore Lese, who is keeping alive the rural traditions of Transylvania.

20050416

Lucy Duran introduces a concert by Congolese singer Koffi Olomide.

He is one of Africa's best-selling artists, but his music is largely unknown beyond African audiences.

After completing a maths degree in PARIS, he moved back home to become one of the continent's most controversial musical figures, clashing with the ruling regime in Zaire and finding his music banned for obscenity in Mali.

20050423

Lucy Duran reviews some of the latest world music releases with record producer Joe Boyd.

Navid Akhtar attends a musical celebration for the Birthday of the Prophet.

And Moshe Morad meets the young Argentinean tango singer, Cristobal Repetto.

20050507

Lucy Duran reviews new world music releases, Fiona Talkington presents a rough guide to the music of Northern Europe, and Swedish nyckelharpa player Johan Hedin plays in the studio.

20050521

Lucy Duran meets leading Congolese musician Papa Wemba, who is now returning to the international stage following three months in a French prison on immigration-related charges, an experience which he says profoundly changed him.

Plus music in the studio from INDIAn slide-guitarist Debashish Bhattacharya.

20050528

Africa Lives Roadshow

Live from Cardiff Bay, Lucy Duran hosts a concert organised with the city's Somali community.

Artists include the Congolese group Konono No 1, who play traditional trance music on electrified thumb-pianos, plus one of Somalia's leading groups, the Shego Band.

20050604

Lucy Duran introduces new world music releases and a live acoustic session by the legendary Iraqi singer Ilham Al Madfai.

Plus, Philip Sweeney reports from the Egrem Awards in Havana on the latest developments in Cuba's music and its world exports.

20050611

Lucy Duran is joined by the broadcaster Paul Fisher who reviews some of the latest releases from the Far East, and Andrew Mcgregor meets the Siberian folk singer Chyskyyrai.

Plus live Chinese gypsy music with The Hua Family Shawm Band.

20050618

Introduced by Jameela Siddiqi, two of INDIA's top musicians, bamboo flute player Hariprasad Chaurasia and santoor player SHIV Kumar Sharma, perform together in this concert recorded at the Royal Festival Hall in LONDON.

20050625

In the first of five programmes as part of Africa Lives on the BBC, Serena Dankwa visits the Fez Festival of Sacred Music, a gathering of religious music-makers from across the globe, held every year in this ancient Moroccan city.

The Festival includes international artists representing all the world's major religions.

This edition features highlights from the performances of Ravi Shankar and his daughter Anoushka Shankar.

Also featured is Said Hafid, the soulful performer of Egyptian song.

The programme also has highlights of the Tengir Too Ensemble, performing the little known traditional music of Kyrgyzstan.

20050709

Africa Lives on the BBC

Lucy Duran introduces a concert by Gigi, Ethiopia's leading young singer.

She grew up influenced by the church and folk music of northern Ethiopia, and although she moved to the USA during the oppressive Derg regime, she is still immensely popular back home.

20050716

A concert by the blind Malian duo Amadou and Mariam, recorded especially for the programme at the Marquee Club in London's Leicester Square.

Their new album Dimanche à Bamako was produced by Manu Chao, and has already sold over 100,000 copies in France.

Introduced by Lucy Duran.

Part of the BBC's Africa Lives season.

20050723

Africa Lives on the BBC

Lucy Duran introduces a variety of specially-recorded African sessions.

Musicians include the greatest living kora player Toumani Diabate, and also from Mali the kamelengoni-playing newcomer Kokanko Sata.

Plus, as part of Radio 3s Africa on Your Street, there's music from Zimbabwe recorded on the London Eye.

20050806

Womad Festival 2005

Recorded at last weekend's WOMAD world music festival in Reading, a performance by Farida and the Iraqi Maqam Ensemble.

Iraq has one of the richest of Arab classical music traditions, and Farida, a graduate of the Baghdad Music Institute, is acclaimed as one of its leading exponents.

Introduced by Lucy Duran

20050813

Lucy Duran reviews some of the latest albums from Pakistan with the writer and film-maker Navid Akhtar, and Michael Church goes in search of traditional vocal styles in the ex-Soviet state of Georgia.

Plus a session by jugalbandi singers Rajan and Sajan Misra who are visiting the UK from the ancient city of Varanasi in Northern India.

20050820

1/2.

Moshe Morad visits Israel to find out how the country's diverse ethnic make-up influences its music.

He records the coffee-grinding music of Bedouins on Mount Tabor, and attends a Peace Festival by the Sea of Galilee where he meets world music diva Noa and Palestinian rap group Dam.

Plus an introduction to central bus station music, and a session from chart-topping Ethiopians in Tel Aviv.

20050827

Moshe Morad explores the diverse mix of music in Israel where he meets the queen mother of central bus station music, a singer who's just had her vocal chords removed after suffering cancer.

Plus, a disappearing Iraqi tradition in Tel Aviv, Russian and Algerian roots at the Dead Sea Festival, and a trip to Jerusalem to celebrate Simhat Torah at the Wailing Wall and to hear songs from an ancient Sephardic neighbourhood.

20050903

Lucy Duran is joined by Ade Adeyemo for a review of new CDs of music from Africa, and Verity Sharp visits the Saint Chartier Folk Festival near the French city of Orléans.

20050910

Lucy Duran and the musician Viram Jasani travel to Northern India in search of music for the Lord Krishna.

They start their journey in the state of Gujarat where they find singing shepherds directly descended from the milk-maids and boys of Krishna's time.

They are joined by Gujarat's most famous folk musician Praful Dave who performs an exclusive session for the programme in Ahmedabad.

20050917

In search of music performed for Krishna, Lucy Duran and the musician Viram Jasani find themselves in a brothel in Kolkata, India.

Squeezed into a small bed-sit, two courtesan sisters perform songs for the Hindu Deity, rarely recorded and normally reserved for their paying clients.

Plus, the mad world of the Bauls - music by the tantric philosophers of rural Bengal.

20050924

Lucy Duran is joined by John L Walters for a review of new world music releases.

Joe Boyd reports from the Koprivshtitsa festival in Bulgaria, and there's live music in the studio from the South Indian Veena virtuoso Manjari Chandran.

20051001

Tengir Too

Serena Dankwa introduces a concert from the Fez Festival of Sacred Music given by an ensemble from the Central Asian Republic of Kyrgyzstan.

The musical traditions of its mountains that border China were almost lost in Soviet times, but are now being nurtured by the Aga Khan Music Initiative.

20051008

A session from Seth Lakeman, whose folk album Kitty Jay was nominated for a Mercury Music Prize.

Plus a visit to Brixton Prison, which now boasts its own Javanese gamelan.

Introduced by Lucy Duran

20051015

A profile of the biggest name in Bollywood playback singing, Asha Bhosle, who for her latest album has teamed up with the Kronos Quartet.

Plus a review of new releases with Charlie Gillett, and a live studio session by the South African protest singer Vusi Mahlasela.

Introduced by Lucy Duran

20051022

Lucy Duran introduces a concert given by one of the leading stars of Angola, Bonga Kwenda.

This rare UK appearance was recorded at Momo's in London.

Surprisingly, Bonga made his name as a footballer playing for Portuguese team Benfica, before turning to singing - initially as a way of protesting against Portugal's treatment of his homeland.

20051029

Live from the WOMEX world music expo at The Sage in Gateshead, Lucy Duran introduces concert highlights and acoustic sessions from the WOMEX showcases which feature emerging new talent in world music.

Artists include South African kwaito singer Thandiswa Mazwai, and singer-songwriter Pedro Luis Ferrer from Cuba.

20051105

Lucy Duran and Paris based DJ Daniel Brown are joined by musicians, promoters and critics from around the world in a profile of the nominees for the 2006 Radio 3 Awards for World Music.

20051112

Lucy Duran is joined by musicians from Kazakhstan, who throat-sing and play a wide range of instruments; including the dombra two stringed lute and the qyl-qobuz horse hair fiddle.

20051119

As their elections approach, Philip Sweeney reports from Gabon - one of the more stable and prosperous African countries.

The family of the long-serving president happens to include several musicians.

Also, Lucy Duran meets one of the great singers of West Africa, Cheikh Lo from Senegal.

20051126

1/2.

Lucy Duran heads to Zanzibar, and gets to know the Swahili Arab-influenced musical style Taarab, and visits Ikwan Safaa, Africa's oldest music club, which celebrates its centenary.

Part of Africa Lives on the BBC.

20051203

Africa Lives on the BBC

Lucy Duran presents the second of two programmes from Zanzibar.

She visits the world-famous Culture Musical Club, and meets the singer and 2005 WOMEX award-winner Bi Kidude, who at the age of 94 is still teaching young women and girls the art of good sexual practice through her songs.

20051210

Lucy Duran reviews new world music releases with Navid Akhtar.

Young Algerian activist Souad Massi talks about her latest album Honeysuckle, plus a session by refugee band Watmon Cultural Group from Northern Uganda, recorded especially for the programme in Kampala.

20051231

Lucy Duran brings to an end Radio 3's year-long Africa season with two programmes recorded in Uganda.

After decades of civil war and strife, the south of the country at least, is now becoming more stable.

Lucy goes in search of the breathtakingly complicated music of the Bugandan Royal Court and tries to get an audience with King Ronald Mutebi.

20060107

Lucy Duran presents the second of two programmes recorded on location in Uganda.

She travels east from the source of the Nile into the Busoga Kingdom, an area famed for its music.

Amongst other things she hears the giant pit xylophone, so named because of the large hole dug in the ground over which it resonates.

Another group turn out to be fans of the World Service and compose a special song about the BBC.

20060114

Simon Broughton visits the World Performing Arts Festival in the Pakistani city of Lahore, and Lucy Duran meets Chris Wood, the renaissance man of English folk, who performs songs from his album The Lark Descending.

20060121

A concert to mark the reopening of the Fruitmarket, one of the three venues in Glasgow's refurbished City Halls.

Mary Ann Kennedy introduces the Scottish debut of Quebec folk band Genticorum; and songs from a new and critically-acclaimed Scottish voice, Julie Fowlis.

20060128

1/2.

Samir Farah, of the BBC Arabic Service, visits Syria's capital Damascus to explore the character of the country and the people through its music.

20060204

Sam Farah of the BBC Arabic Service visits an Islamic Sufi gathering in Aleppo in northern Syria.

With Israel on one border, and Iraq on another, religion in Syria is often politically charged, and at the gathering of Sheikh Habboush, music is seen as a potent force for Islam.

20060211

Lucy Duran introduces concert performances by two of the nominees in the 2006 Radio 3 Awards for World Music; Israeli Sephardic singer Yasmin Levy and Cape Verdean singer Lura.

20060218

A rare UK performance at London's Shepherd's Bush Empire by Algerian-born King of Rai, Khaled, recorded especially for the programme.

The concert includes songs from his latest album Ya-Rayi, as well as the hits that have made him an international phenomenon, such as Aicha.

20060225

Lucy Duran is joined by Daniel Brown of Radio France International to announce the winners of the 2006 BBC Radio 3 Awards for World Music.

The event from Darbucka in London also features past winners.

20060304

Lucy Duran reviews world music releases with Joe Boyd, and Fiona Talkington travels to the town of Geilo in Norway for its first ever Ice Festival.

All instruments used are made from Norwegian ice.

20060311

Following the death this week of the mighty Malian guitarist Ali Farka Toure, Lucy Duran and Andy Kershaw present a special tribute to their friend.

The programme includes some of the desert bluesman's essential tracks, as well as material from the BBC's own archive, and contributions from Ali's friend and producer Nick Gold.

20060318

A concert from the Darbar Festival in Leicester given by Pandit Jasraj, one of the foremost voices in Indian classical music.

Introduced by Jameela Siddiqi

20060401

The first of two programmes profiling the winners of the 2006 Radio 3 Awards for World Music.

Lucy Duran meets Romanian gipsy band Fanfare Ciocarlia, Musadiq Sanwal of the BBC Pashto Service talks about Pakistani Sufi singer Sain Zahoor, and there is music from British Asian artist Nitin Sawhney and best Newcomers Konono No 1 from Congo.

20060408

Second of two programmes profiling the winners of the 2006 Radio 3 Awards for World Music.

Lucy Duran meets the Malian husband and wife duo Amadou and Mariam; guitarist Ry Cooder talks about the inspiration for his album Chavez Ravine, which won him the Americas category award; Andy Morgan chats to the Middle East and North Africa winner Souad Massi.

20060422

Lucy Duran introduces new world music releases, with the editor of Unknown Public, John L Walters.

Plus an acoustic studio session by alaskan-born, Argentinean-based singer-songwriter Kevin Johansen.

At the forefront of the self-proclaimed Subtropicalista movement, Johansen's latest album, City Zen, was nominated for a Latin Grammy.

20060429

Ten years on from the release of the phenomenally successful Buena Vista Social Club album, four of the original band members - trumpeter Guajiro Mirabal, bass player Orlando Cachaito Lopez, trombone player Jesus Aguaje Ramos and guitarist Manual Galban - are joined by other star performers from Havana in this concert from Sadlers Wells in London.

Introduced by Lucy Duran

20060506

Lucy Duran reviews new releases from the Middle East with Moshe Morad, and Fiona Talkington meets drummer Bill Bruford, who's just released a new album with his group the World Drummers Ensemble.

Plus a live studio session by the Lebanese oud player Rabih Abou-Khalil, who is in the UK collaborating with the BBC Concert Orchestra.

20060513

Highlights from the Nile Festival, an annual event at the Hammersmith Palais in London.

The headliner is Mahmoud Ahmed, who has been Ethiopia's leading singer for decades.

The event also marks the London debut of El Tanbura, a collective of veteran musicians from the Egyptian city of Port Said.

Introduced by Lucy Duran

20060520

Acclaimed as the greatest West African voice of his generation, Salif Keita gives a rare UK concert in Leeds, recorded as part of Radio 3's coverage of fuseleeds06.

He performs songs from his recent album MBemba, literally Ancestors, a homage to his family line which stretches back to the 13th century founder of the Mali Empire, Sunjata Keita.

Introduced by Lucy Duran

20060527

Lucy Duran and the musician Viram Jasani travel to Northern India in search of music for the Lord Krishna.

1/2.

They start their journey in the state of Gujarat where they find singing shepherds directly descended from the milk-maids and boys of Krishna's time.

Plus, they are joined by Gujarat's most famous folk musician, Praful Dave, who performs an exclusive session for the programme in Ahmedabad.

20060603

Lucy Duran and the musician Viram Jasani travel to India in search of music for the Lord Krishna.

2/2.

They find themselves in a brothel in Kolkata.

Squeezed into a sleazy little bedsit, two courtesan sisters perform songs for the Hindu Deity, rarely recorded and normally reserved for their paying clients.

Plus the mad world of the Bauls - music by the tantric philosophers of rural Bengal.

20060610

Lucy Duran meets Aynur, a Kurdish singer from south-east Turkey whose songs were once banned, but who is now part of the changing face of Turkish music.

Plus, from Algeria, Andy Kershaw pays tribute to Cheikha Rimitti, the first lady of rai, who died last month.

20060617

Lucy Duran introduces the Gipsy Kings from a recent concert at Hammersmith Apollo.

Their roots are in the gipsy camps of southern France, and their infectious music is known as rumba flamenco.

20060624

Featuring an interview with Miriam Makeba, one of the great voices of Africa, who has just completed her worldwide farewell concert tour.

Introduced by Lucy Duran

20060701

Samir Farah introduces a concert from a former palace in the old city of Aleppo in Syria, given by the Al Kindi Ensemble, directed by Julien Jalal Eddine Weiss.

20060708

Giorgos Markakis introduces a concert recorded in Greece featuring the English virtuoso of the Cretan lyra, Ross Daly.

20060722

Lucy Duran meets Tiken Jah Fakoly, a singer who fills stadiums in West Africa but is little known in Europe, and Eugene Skeef reviews Hugh Tracey recordings of traditional African music.

20060729

at WOMAD

Radio 3's live coverage of the 2006 WOMAD festival continues with a special edition of World Routes.

Lucy Duran introduces live sets by the desert blues group Etran Finatawa from Niger, and Roberto Pla's Colombian salsa band.

Plus recorded highlights of a performance by the sitarist Anouska Shankar.

20060812

Lucy Duran introduces highlights from two WOMAD festival performances.

Dona Rosa began as a busker on the streets of Lisbon.

Blind since childhood, she sings Portuguese fado on the Siam Tent with a special intensity.

Bulgarian clarinet virtuoso Ivo Papasov brings his Wedding Band to the Open Air Stage.

20060909

The Festival on the Niger

Some of Mali's top musicians perform on a floating stage in a new festival in Segou, central Mali.

The husband and wife duo, Amadou and Mariam, perform for their home audience, in a more raw and rootsy style than their European concert audiences hear.

20060916

Lucy Duran spotlights new releases from Spain, Mexico, Argentina, Brazil and Colombia.

Plus, live music in the studio from the virtuosic Venezuelan string band, Trabuco.

20060923

Paul Fisher hosts a World Routes special recorded on location in Japan.

1/2.

Paul is in Tokyo where he meets some of the country's top folk musicians - including the Minyo singers Shigeri Kitsu and Takio Ito.

He also hears Cicala Muta's take on Klezmer, meets the most famous exponent of the ubiquitous Taiko drum, and hires a Karaoke booth.

20060930

Paul Fisher hosts a World Routes special recorded on location in Japan.

2/2.

Paul is in Okinawa, the group of islands to the south of the mainland.

Home to a huge US military force, it has variously belonged to China, America and Japan, and is renowned for its rich musical heritage.

Includes sessions and interviews with some of Okinawa's top musicians - including Sadao China, Yoreko Ganeko and The Rinken Band.

20061007

Lucy Duran introduces a round-up of the latest World Music releases.

20061014

Youssou N'Dour performs music from Egypt, his 2004 project dedicated to the Islamic Sufi saints of West Africa.

Lucy Duran introduces the concert, which was specially recorded for the programme at the Philharmonic Hall in Liverpool.

20061021

Devotional singer Pandit Jasraj performs a raga for Diwali, the Hindu Festival of Lights, in a concert recorded at the Darbar Festival in Leicester.

Introduced by Jameela Siddiqi

20061028

Lucy Duran meets the Payvar Ensemble, a group of traditional classical musicians from Iran.

Maria Bakkalapulo attends spirit ceremonies on Bali to hear the little-known folk gamelan music of the island.

20061104

Lucy Duran and Paris-based DJ Daniel Brown are joined by musicians, promoters and critics in a profile of the nominees for the 2007 Radio 3 Awards for World Music.

20061111

Lucy Duran visits WOMEX in Seville, the annual gathering of the world music industry, and hears the newest bands and the freshest talent in world music.

20061118

Lucy Duran introduces a London Jazz Festival performance from the Union Chapel by Gamelan Shokbreker, a collaboration between the SambaSunda gamelan ensemble from Indonesia and four musicians from Norway.

20061125

Presented by Lucy Duran, including a live session by the Buena Vista Cuban diva Omara Portuondo.

Lucy reviews the nominations for the World Music Album of the Year category in the 2007 Awards organised by Roots magazine.

20070106

Northumbrian pipes player Kathryn Tickell and her band perform a studio session, and Lucy Duran reviews new CDs of world music with John L Walters and Laudan Nooshin.

20070113

1/2.

Rivermead Revisited

Lucy Duran introduces highlights from this summer's WOMAD Festival in Reading.

Featured performers include headliner Salif Keita on the Open Air stage, fellow Malian Djelimady Tounkara in the Siam Tent and French band Moussou T et les Jovents on the Radio 3 stage.

20070120

Lucy Duran introduces a concert recorded at last year's London Jazz Festival, featuring the young Cape Verdean singer Sara Tavares.

She is accompanied by Boy Ge Mendes (guitar), Fernando Embalo (bass) and N'du (percussion).

20070127

Lucy Duran presents the first of two programmes recorded in Uganda.

She goes in search of the breathtakingly complicated music of the Bugandan Royal Court and tries to get an audience with King Ronald Mutebi.

20070203

Lucy Duran presents the second of two programmes recorded in Uganda.

She travels east from the source of the Nile into the Busoga Kingdom, an area famed for its music.

She hears the giant pit xylophone, so named because of the large hole dug in the ground over which it resonates.

Another group turn out to be fans of the World Service and compose a special song about the BBC.

20070217

Lucy Duran reviews new releases from Latin America with Sue Steward and Juan Carlos Jaramillo.

Live music in the studio comes from the group Ghadim Sharq from Azerbaijan.

20070224

Ten years on from the release of the phenomenally successful Buena Vista Social Club album, four of the original band members - trumpeter Guajiro Mirabal, bass player Orlando Lopez, trombone player Jesus Ramos and guitarist Manual Galban - are joined by other star performers from Havana in this concert from Sadler's Wells in London.

Introduced by Lucy Duran

20070303

Lucy Duran is joined by Nigel Williamson to review the latest new releases.

Simon Broughton reports from the recent World Conference on Music and Censorship in Istanbul.

20070310

Lucy Duran presents highlights from Half the World, a series of concerts held at London's Pizza on the Park.

Featuring performances by Chinese gucheng and pipa player Liu Fang and the Swedish-Senegalese duo of Ellika and Solo.

20070317

Lucy Duran introduces a session by the Bedouin Jerry Can Band from Cairo whose coffee-grinding music tells of the exploits of ancient Arabian tribes.

The line-up includes instruments scavenged from the Sinai Desert, including jerry cans and ammunition boxes.

20070331

Lucy Duran is joined by Daniel Brown from Radio France International to announce the winners of the 2007 BBC Radio 3 Awards for World Music.

The event from the Pigalle Club in London includes a live performance from one of this year's winners, plus a guest appearance by the winner of last year's Audience Award, Arto Tuncboyaciyan of the Armenian Navy Band.

20070407

Lucy Duran introduces an acoustic session by the Belgian-born singer Natacha Atlas, whose music mixes traditional Middle Eastern and Western pop influences.

Plus, a round up of new releases with guest reviewers Charlie Gillett and John L Walters.

20070414

Ghana's Golden Jubilee

Serena Owusua Dankwa joins in the celebrations marking the fiftieth anniversary of Ghanaian independence with specially recorded performances from some of the country's star musicians.

Including palm-wine songs from veteran guitarist Koo Nimo, and a beach-party performance from electric griot King Ayisoba.

20070421

Ghana's Golden Jubilee

Serena Owusua Dankwa celebrates the 50th anniversary of Ghanaian independence.

With specially-recorded performances from Ghana's oldest gospel group, founded in the 1880s, and Batman Samini, who was voted Best African Act at last year's MOBO awards.

20070428

Lucy Duran chats to Andy Palacio, a Belizean musician who champions the language and cultural heritage of the Garifuna peoples of Central America.

He performs music from his album Watina, a collaboration by musicians from the Garifuna communities of Belize, Honduras and Guatemala.

Plus a review of new releases from Latin America.

20070512

Lucy Duran introduces a live studio session by virtuosic clarinettist and the king of Bulgarian wedding music Ivo Papasov.

A cultural icon for Bulgarian intellectuals during the Cold War, Papsov suffered years of persecution and a period of imprisonment, but is now again able to live in his homeland.

Plus a review of new world music releases by Joe Boyd and Nigel Williamson

20070519

Lucy Duran introduces a concert by the Gipsy Kings given at Hammersmith Apollo.

With roots in the gipsy camps of southern France and an infectious style known as rumba flamenco, the Gipsy Kings have topped the world music charts worldwide for 20 years, selling more than 14 million albums.

20070526

Live from the Freestage at London's Barbican Centre, Lucy Duran introduces a special programme as part of this weekend's Awards for World Music celebrations.

Algerian pianist Maurice El Medioni with British percussionist Paul Clarvis and Lebanese singer Ghada Shbeir perform songs from the Arabo-Andalusian muwashah tradition.

20070623

Lucy Duran introduces a studio session by a group of Sufi musicians from the Rajasthan desert in Western India.

Rajasthan is one of the sub-continent's most beautiful states and home to some of its most interesting music.

Plus Michael Church discusses his new album of music from Georgia and Chechnya.

20070630

Lucy Duran presents Congolese music with a Cuban spin, courtesy of Papa Noel and Bana Congo, recorded in Colchester during their UK tour.

20070707

A series of programmes marking the 60th anniversary of independence for India and Pakistan.

1/4.

Jameela Siddiqi introduces music from the Darbar Festival in Leicester, which features musicians from both Hindu and Muslim traditions.

Pandit Premkumar Mallick sings the ancient chants of dhrupad, and Ustad Shahid Parvez performs a raag on the sitar.

20070721

Jameela Siddiqi introduces performances from the Darbar Festival in Leicester, including music from South India with an ensemble led by flute player Mysore Chandan and raags played on the Indian slide guitar by Pandit Vishwa Mohan Bhatt.

Part of the India and Pakistan 07 season.

20070908

Lucy Duran celebrates the Ethiopian millennium with a specially recorded studio performance by singer and harpist Alemu Aga, and an interview with music historian and producer Francis Falceto.

Plus a report from Elizabeth Kinder from last year's Festival of 1000 Stars, which brings together some of the country's wide ranging musical traditions.

20070929

On the weekend of Radio 3's 40th anniversary, Lucy Duran introduces highlights from the station's landmark 1987 concert series Music of the Royal Courts, including Uighur music from China and a rare retelling of the Malian epic Sunjata by veteran griot Djely Madi Sissoko.

20071006

Lucy Duran introduces a concert by one of India's finest flute players, Pandit Hariprasad Chaurasia, with tabla player Yogesh Samsi.

They perform at the launch of London's newest music venue, the Music Room of the Asian Music Centre in Acton.

20071103

Lucy Duran and Athens-based DJ Giorgos Markakis are joined by musicians, promoters and critics to announce the nominees for the 2008 BBC Radio 3 Awards for World Music.

20071110
20071117

Lucy Duran introduces a studio session by the Palestinian oud group Trio Joubran with percussionist Yousef Hbeish, and a round-up of recent African releases with guests Robin Denselow and Mark Hudson.

20071124

Lucy Duran introduces a performance by Orchestra Baobab, the Senegalese veterans of Afro, Cuban, and Congolese fusion.

Recorded especially for the programme at London's Jazz Cafe as part of the 2007 London Jazz Festival.

20071201

Lucy Duran presents a studio session by the Vietnamese singer Huong Thanh, and a round-up of nominations for the Album of the Year category of the 2008 BBC Radio 3 Awards for World Music, with guests Mary Ann Kennedy and Charlie Gillett.

20071208

Caetano Veloso in Concert: Lucy Duran introduces a performance by Brazil's celebrated singer-songwriter, recorded at the Barbican in London.

20080105

Presented by Lucy Duran and featuring a specially recorded studio session by the South Indian violin duo of Nandini and Lalitha Muthuswamy, and a round-up of recent world music releases with guests Reda El Mawy and Sue Steward.

20080112

World Routes recalls the mud and the music at last summer's WOMAD Festival.

1/2.

Lucy Duran introduces Jamaican reggae from Toots and the Maytals, Chinese classical music from the Silk String Quartet, Palestinian songs from Reem Kelani and the sounds of the desert blues from Vieux Farka Toure.

20080126

World Routes recalls the mud and the music at last summer's WOMAD Festival.

2/2.

Lucy Duran introduces fado singer Mariza playing on the Open Air stage, bluesman Taj Mahal and a solo performance by vocal artist Sheila Chandra from the Siam Tent, plus Finnish folk fiddlers Frigg from the Radio 3 stage.

20080202

As Salif Keita prepares to return to the UK for his African Soul Rebels tour, Lucy Duran introduces a repeat of his concert in Leeds from 2006.

Keita also talks about his remarkable upbringing in a royal family line that stretches back to the 13th century founder of the Mali Empire, Sunjata Keita.

20080223

Lucy Duran presents a studio session by the American mandolin player Chris Thile with his new group Punch Brothers.

Plus a round-up of recent world music releases with guests Andy Morgan and Laudan Nooshin.

20080301

Lucy Duran introduces Taraf de Haidouks, acclaimed as the world's greatest gypsy band, in concert at Birmingham's Town Hall performing their own versions of gypsy-inspired classics by Bartok and Manuel de Falla.

20080308

Lucy Duran is joined by Doudou Sarr and Nigel Williamson to review new CDs of world music.

Plus a performance from the Soweto Gospel Choir, winners last month of the Grammy Award for Best Traditional World Music Album.

20080315

Lucy Duran introduces highlights from the London Flamenco Festival at Sadler's Wells.

Musicians featured include Cuatro Esquinas, a group combining two generations of the most accomplished flamenco artists, Miguel Poveda, who sings traditional flamenco with a modern twist, and Carmen Linares, described as 'a fundamental pillar of all current flamenco singing'.

20080412

Lucy Duran introduces a concert from the Barbican in London given by two of the nominees in this year's Radio 3 Awards for World Music.

Son de la Frontera have brought their own new sound to Spanish flamenco, and Mayra Andrade is a new young voice from Cape Verde.

20080419

Lucy Duran presents a specially-recorded studio set by Malian kora player Toumani Diabate and a review of recent Latin American releases with guests Kevin Le Gendre and Sue Steward.

20080426

Vocalist and BBC presenter Monica Vasconcelos introduces a solo performance given at the Barbican in London by fellow Brazilian Gilberto Gil, one of the iconic Latin American singer-songwriters of the past five decades.

20080503

Jameela Siddiqi introduces highlights from the Darbar Festival, featuring leading Indian classical musicians performing at Leicester's Phoenix Theatre.

The programme includes performances from South Indian vocalist Sanjay Subrahmanyan and Irshad Khan, who plays a solo on the rarely-heard surbahar.

20080510

Jameela Siddiqi introduces more music from the Darbar Fesitval in Leicester, including Dhrupad chant from Uday Bhawalkar, rarely-heard Tappa songs from Shashwati Mandal Paul and a recital from young sitar virtuoso Purbayan Chatterjee.

20080524

Lucy Duran introduces a session by Dessislava Stefanova and the London Bulgarian Choir, plus reviews and new releases from Eastern Europe with guests Joe Boyd and Max Reinhardt

20080531

Lucy Duran introduces a profile of Malian musician Bassekou Kouyate, a double winner in the 2008 Radio 3 Awards for World Music.

Including concert highlights with his band Ngoni Ba recorded at the Festival on the Niger in Segou, as well as a riverside session with Bassekou's mother Yakare Damba, one of Mali's iconic singers.

20080607

Lucy Duran introduces a one-off UK performance by South Africa's biggest world music star, Miriam Makeba.

In a performance given specially for the programme at the Brighton Festival, Makeba celebrates her 75th birthday with a mix of jazz, gospel and African roots.

20080628

Lucy Duran presents an all-Brazilian programme, with a session and interview with singer/guitarist Vinicius Cantuaria, plus recent CD releases with Sue Steward and Robin Denselow

20080705

Fiddles on Fire

Lucy Duran introduces a concert from weekend of folk fiddling in 2007 at The Sage, Gateshead, which features two of Scotland's finest bands.

Blazin' Fiddles showcase fiddle styles from across the country and Fiddlers' Bid champion the musical heritage of Shetland.

20080712

Kevin LeGendre introduces highlights from the recent Ethiopiques concert at London's Barbican.

Backed by the American Either/Orchestra and appearing together for the first time outside of Ethiopia, the artists include Mahmoud Ahmed and Alemayehu Eshete (vocals), Mulatu Astatqe (keyboard and percussion) and Getachew Mekurya (tenor saxophone).

20080719

On the eve of the Proms Folk Day, Lucy Duran introduces a review of new CDs of English folk.

She visits the village of Edale in Derbyshire and meets one of the performers, Bella Hardy, considered to be a bright new voice of English folk.

20080816

Lucy Duran introduces performances from the 2008 Festival on the Niger in Segou, central Mali, which drew around 10,000 people, from all parts of the country as well as neighbouring west African countries, Europe, Asia and the Americas.

With music by Abdoullaye Diabate and Yoro Diallo, who are both hugely popular in Mali but little known outside, as well as the rarely heard hunters' music of the region.

20080823

Lucy Duran introduces more highlights from the Festival on the Niger, which takes place on a floating stage on the River Niger in Segou in central Mali.

With performances by desert blues artist Afel Bocoum, balafon virtuoso Neba Solo, and one of Mali's most popular singers Mangala Camara.

20080830

Lucy Duran introduces two studio sessions, by Malian star Rokia Traore and by young Iraqi oud player Kyam Allami.

Producer and writer Andy Morgan reviews two African releases, and journalist Reda El Mawy has a look at what's new in Egypt.

20080906

Jameela Siddiqi introduces a performance of Raag Abhogi featuring singer Kaushiki Charkrabarty, given earlier this year at the Darbar Festival in Leicester.

Charkrabarty is accompanied by Ajay Joglekar on harmonium and Sanju Sahai on tabla.

Charkrabarty won a BBC Radio 3 Award for World Music in 2005 and has become one of the most revered singers in Indian classical music, even though she's still in her twenties.

Jameela talks to Kaushiki about her voice, the festival and the raag she performed.

20080927

Lucy Duran reviews new world music CDs with Dudu Sarr and Nigel Williamson, and is also joined in the studio by the Lani Singers.

The duo fled imprisonment by the Indonesian authorities in West Papua and their songs reflect the ancient rituals of the Lani people.

20081004

Lucy Duran introduces highlights from a concert by The Kamkars, a family ensemble of Kurdish musicians from Iran, given last week at the Barbican Centre, London, as part of its Ramadan Nights season.

The ensemble, a family of seven brothers and a sister, performs arrangements of ancient Kurdish folk songs and works from the Persian classical tradition.

20081011

The West African Balafon

Lucy Duran travels to Mali to hear traditional and modern players of the African xylophone, an instrument that has been used for centuries to announce news or simply to play for partying.

Following the rarely heard music of the small balani xylophone at a village celebration in central Mali, there is a performance by Neba Solo, who thrills a festival audience of 10,000 with the resonant tones of the Senufo bass balafon.

20081018

Lucy Duran presents music from last month's Ramadan Nights concert series at London's Barbican, featuring the inspiring virtuosity of the Kronos Quartet mixed with the fiery passion of Azerbaijan's most famous voice, Alim Qasimov.

20081025

Presented by Lucy Duran.

Featuring a session and interview with Abidjan-born Kouame Sereba, master of the dodo - an ancient West African mouth-bow, plus a round-up of recent world music releases with John L Walters and Rita Ray

20081101

Max Reinhardt presents highlights from sets by Bulgarian clarinet virtuoso Ivo Papasov and American slide guitarist Bob Brozman, recorded at last month's Musicport World Music Festival in Bridlington, East Yorkshire.

20081108

1/2.

Lucy Duran presents another programme from the WOMEX festival in Seville, the annual gathering of the world music industry, and hears the newest bands and the freshest talent in world music.

Artists showcased include the all-woman police band from West Africa Les Amazones de Guinee, the tango band Astillero from Argentina and Honduran singer-songwriter Aurelio Martinez.

20081115

2/2.

Lucy Duran presents another programme from the WOMEX festival in Seville, the annual gathering of the world music industry, with the newest bands and the freshest talent in world music.

Artists showcased include the all-woman police band from West Africa Les Amazones de Guinee, the tango band Astillero from Argentina and Honduran singer-songwriter Aurelio Martinez.

20081122

Lucy Duran presents Femi Kuti and The Positive Force at the London Jazz Festival 2008.

Lucy Duran introduces a concert given by Femi Kuti and his band The Positive Force at the Royal Festival Hall earlier this month as part of the London Jazz Festival.

His new album Day by Day is a tribute to his father, the famous Nigerian Afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti

20081129

Lucy Duran with highlights of a concert marking the centenary of folk musician AL Lloyd.

Lucy Duran presents highlights from a concert given at Cecil Sharp House in London to mark the centenary of English folk musician and song collector AL 'Bert' Lloyd.

The line-up includes performances by Maddy Prior and Martin Carthy.

20081213

Lucy Duran presents a tribute to the late, celebrated South African singer Miriam Makeba, who died in November 2008.

With contributions from musicians who knew her, excerpts from interviews she gave over the years and highlights from her final UK concert, recorded for World Routes at the Brighton Festival in May 2008.

20081220

Moshe Morad visits the childhood home of Jesus and visits a long-established oud factory.

Moshe Morad visits the childhood home of Jesus, Nazareth, meeting members of the Joubran musical dynasty, visiting their oud factory and meeting the Nazareth Arabic orchestra.

Plus a recording from the 2008 Jerusalem Oud Festival of Nazareth-born Dalal Abu Amana, who performs her songs in a special Palestinian dialect unique to Galilee.

20090110

Max Reinhardt presents the Warsaw Village Band at Bridlington's 2008 Musicport Festival.

Max Reinhardt presents a set by the Warsaw Village Band recorded at the 2008 Musicport Festival in Bridlington.

20090718

Moshe Morad introduces more specially recorded performances from the 2008 Jerusalem International Oud Festival.

Including old Turkish folk songs interpreted by Erkan Ogur and Ismail Demirioglu, recorded in the Jerusalem Theatre.

Plus a session by the Cretan lyra virtuoso Ross Daly, who is joined by Israeli percussionist Zohar Fresco and Yurdal Tokcan from Turkey on oud.

Moshe Morad introduces performances from the 2008 Jerusalem International Oud Festival.

20090905

Lucy Duran presents highlights from the 2009 Gnawa and World Music Festival in Essaouira on Morocco's Atlantic coast, an annual free festival which celebrates the ancient tradition of trance music.

With performances by Braim El Belkani, a gnawa master who once played with Led Zeppelin, and Morocco's most celebrated band, the veterans Nass El Ghiwane.

Essaouira is an old stone town that is home to an even older style of music which arrived in Morocco centuries ago with the slaves who came from across the Sahara.

It is a sacred music which is traditionally heard at all-night 'lilas', where animal sacrifices are made and people are healed from spiritual and physical ailments.

The sound of the music is characterised by the bass thump of the three-stringed gimbri and the strident clatter of metal castanets.

The Gnawa and World Music Festival was established 12 years ago to celebrate the gnawa tradition, with concerts featuring gnawa masters from all over Morocco, together with events where gnawa musicians collaborate with artists from across the globe.

Lucy Duran presents highlights from the 2009 Gnawa and World Music Festival in Morocco.

20100306

Rita Ray visits the Sauti za Busara Festival in Zanzibar to hear some of the island's leading big-band 'taraab' ensembles.

Including specially-recorded performances from Zanzibar's premier band Culture Musical Club, also the latest sensation Mohamed Ilyas and his Nyota Zameremeta Orchestra.

Taraab dates from the centuries when Zanzibar was a centre for trade in the Arab world - the main instruments in the bands are the Arabic lute and zither, and the scales are Arabic.

When the Arab Sultans left, the taraab orchestras formed themselves into collectives, and in the programme the founder members of Culture Musical Club recall the years leading up to independence in 1963, when their band was formed.

Taraab is now starting to reach international audiences through the albums and tours of musicians like Mohamed Ilyas.

The programme also features songs from Bi Kidude, Zanzibar's 'Little Granny', who despite her great age, can still thrill an audience of both old and young.

Rita Ray visits the Sauti za Busara Festival in Zanzibar to hear some 'taraab' ensembles.

20100313

Lucy Duran is joined by Max Reinhardt and Sue Steward to discuss the recent Grammy award winning albums by Bela Fleck and Mamadou Diabate, as well as other world music new releases.

Keepers of the flame of Cuban son, prize winning 9-piece Sierra Maestra, perform in the studio especially for World Routes, ahead of their UK tour.

Lucy Duran presents world music CD reviews and nine-piece Cuban son outfit Sierra Maestra.

20101113

More highlights from WOMEX, the annual gathering of the world music industry, which takes place for the second year running in Copenhagen and showcases the newest bands and the freshest talent in world music.

This week Lucy Duran introduces performances by the New York-based, Peruvian-inspired retro rockers Chicha Libre, and the Malian dancer, actress, and singer-songwriter, Fatoumata Diawara.

Plus, the ambassador of Congolese Rumba, Papa Wemba, is in town celebrating his 40-year career.

Producer James Parkin.

Chicha Libre were inspired by the Amazonian music craze that shares its name with the liquor favoured by the Incas and still very popular throughout Peru.

The Brooklyn-based band mix Latin rhythms, surf music and psychedelic pop, drawing inspiration from chicha, a form of Peruvian music that emerged in the early '70s, loosely derived from Colombian accordion-driven cumbias but incorporating Andean melodies and Cuban son, amongst other things.

Fatoumata Diawara was born in the Ivory Coast of Malian parents, and achieved local fame as a dancer before moving to Bamako in her early teens and starting an acting career.

Moving to Paris in her early twenties, she began recording and touring with Oumou Sangare.

She soon developed her own music, composing, arranging and playing her own material, blending Wassalou traditions of Southern Mali with wider influences.

Highlights from the 2010 WOMEX event in Copenhagen: Chicha Libre and Fatoumata Diawara.

20110611

World Routes Academy mentee Hari Sivanesan takes Lucy Duran on a trip around London to discover how the Tamil Sri Lankan diaspora keeps their culture and language alive in the UK.

With visits to the Sivan Kovil Temple in Lewisham, one of London's vibrant Tamil Hindu temples and home to a Tamil Language School, they also take a walk down East Ham high street to try and find the best South Indian lunch in town.

World Routes Academy mentee veena player Hari Sivanesan is also joined in concert by North Indian sarod player Soumik Datta for a one-off collaboration at the Bhavan Centre, Hari's former school in West Kensington, London.

Lucy Duran and musician Hari Sivanesan visit the Tamil community in London.

20111002

Lucy Duran presents Sufi music from around the world recorded at the recent Transcender Festival at the Barbican in London.

"The Ecstatic Journey: Music from around the Sufi world" was one evening gathering together classical traditions, ascetic mediations and exultant celebrations into a single, kaleidoscopic concert showcasing the Sufi songs of Morocco, Pakistan, India and Indonesia.

Features music from Pakistani minstrel Sain Zahoor.

Lucy Duran presents Sufi music performed at the 2011 Transcender Festival.

20111009

Lucy Duran meets 'Le Mystere Des Voix Bulgares', the choir of Bulgarian women who for the past three decades have brought the complexities and subtleties of traditional Bulgarian polyphonic singing to a world audience.

Plus a review of new world music tracks.

'Le Mystere Des Voix Bulgares' started out life as the Bulgarian State Television Female Vocal Choir.

In 1975 the Swiss musicologist Marcel Cellier released a compilation of their recordings with the title 'Le Mystere Des Voix Bulgares', which was later picked up by the English band Bauhaus and rereleased to great acclaim.

The choir won a Grammy in 1990, and have performed across the globe.

Their style is influenced by Bulgarian folk singing and also by the area's Byzantine and Ottoman heritage, with modal scales, dissonant hamonies and the use of glissando.

Their music has been described as ""the marriage of the avant-garde and the Middle Ages", and also as "somewhere between the Muslim call to prayer and the Beach Boys.".

Lucy Duran meets the extraordinary choir Le Mystere Des Voix Bulgares.

20120212

Lucy Duran heads to the mountainous north of Albania to a folk festival in the remote town of Bajram Curri to hear musicians from across northern Albania and neighbouring Kosovo.

Lucy Duran travels to the north of Albania for a folk festival in Bajram Curri.

20120624

As part of the World Routes Academy, Lucy Duran travels to the Valledupar accordion festival and competition held in the north east of Colombia. Whilst there, she follows the progress of Academy protege Jose Hernando Arias Noguera who takes part in the amateur category of the event, and travels to the remote and dangerous Sierra Nevada mountain range to hear the music of the Kankuamos people. Plus she meets the President of Colombia who explains what business a head of state has opening a folk festival. Producer James Parkin. 1/2

Launched in 2010, the BBC Radio 3 World Routes Academy aims to support and inspire young UK-based world music artists by bringing them together with an internationally renowned artist in the same field belonging to the same tradition. This year the scheme explores the Colombian accordion folk tradition called vallenato through the eyes of self-taught, UK based accordionist José Hernando Arias Noguera.

Growing up in a Colombian household, José fell in love with vallenato, the popular folk style from the Caribbean coast of Colombia which he learned through watching internet clips and video cassettes his father brought back from Colombia. José plays in a number of Latin music bands in London and dreams of becoming an ambassador for Vallenato music in Europe. These 2 editions of the World Routes Academy see a dream come true for Jose Hernando who gets to take part in the famed "Legend of Vallenato" accordion festival which takes place once a year in the city of Valledupar. The programmes document Jose Hernando's progress as he competes in the amateur category of the competition. Making history, he becomes the first British-born Colombian to take part in the festival and becomes the first competitor to sing in English and Spanish.

20120701

As part of the 2012 World Routes Academy, Lucy Duran follows the progress of young protégé and accordionist Jose Hernando Arias Noguera as he competes in a folk music contest in North East Colombia. In last week's programme he reached the quarter-finals, but will he go further? There's also the specially-recorded music of the Arhuaco people, one of Colombia's indigenous groups who live high in the remote and dangerous Sierra Nevada mountain range. Producer James Parkin. 2/2

Launched in 2010, the BBC Radio 3 World Routes Academy aims to support and inspire young UK-based world music artists by bringing them together with an internationally renowned artist in the same field belonging to the same tradition. This year the scheme explores the Colombian accordion folk tradition called vallenato through the eyes of self-taught, UK based accordionist José Hernando Arias Noguera.

Growing up in a Colombian household, José fell in love with vallenato, the popular folk style from the Caribbean coast of Colombia which he learned through watching internet clips and video cassettes his father brought back from Colombia. José plays in a number of Latin music bands in London and dreams of becoming an ambassador for Vallenato music in Europe. These 2 editions of the World Routes Academy see a dream come true for Jose Hernando who gets to take part in the famed "Legend of Vallenato" accordion festival which takes place once a year in the city of Valledupar. The programmes document Jose Hernando's progress as he competes in the amateur category of the competition. Making history, he becomes the first British-born Colombian to take part in the festival and becomes the first competitor to sing in English and Spanish.

20120708

In October 2011 Lucy Duran travelled to Mali in West Africa to meet rapper Amkoullel and hear the music of young Malians. On the streets of Bamako she met and recorded musicians from Bambara, Fulani and Bobo ethnic groups, all of whom are drawing on their traditional roots and making music for the future. She attended the musical wedding parties that spread all over the city each weekend, the informal street discussions called Grins where young men discuss politics, music and local gossip, and went cassette shopping to find out how music piracy is affecting young musicians.

Since March 2012 Mali has been in the grip of an unprecedented political crisis, one of the most serious since the country gained independence from France in 1960. With Tuareg rebels controlling the north of the country, and political instability still rife in the capital, reports are that the music that resounded on the streets of Bamako when World Routes visited has now fallen silent.

On this week's World Routes hear the young, vital sound of one of Africa's most musical nations, before it was plunged into political crisis.

20120715

Lucy Duran presents a discussion recorded in Mali on traditional and modern African music.

Lucy Duran hosts a round table discussion in Bamako, Mali with some of the leading writers and academics of West Africa's post-independence era of dance band music.

Joined around the table at the French Institute in Bamako by Malian journalist Adam Thiam, Professor John Collins from the University of Ghana, French record collector Florent Mazzoleni, Nigerian-American writer Uchenna Ikonne and expert on the music of Guinea, Graeme Counsel, they discuss how the period of cultural-authenticity sowed the seeds of modern music rooted in traditional values, and how today's musicians navigate the tricky ideals of modernity, tradition and authenticity.

A Night Out In Aleppo20050430
A Night Out In Bamako20060415

Kora maestro Toumani Diabate leads his Symmetric Orchestra in a performance recorded at the Hogon Club in Mali's capital.

The concert also features the great voice of Kasse Mady Diabate.

Introduced by Lucy Duran

A Tribute To Cesaria Evora20120205

Lucy Duran presents a tribute to the "bare-foot Diva", Cesaria Evora from Cape Verde, who died in December 2011. She was one of world music's biggest and most colourful stars, bringing the soulful "morna" stlye to a world-wide audience. Today's programme includes an exclusive session of Cesaria covers by another Cape Verdean star, Tito Paris. Plus a chance to hear a Cesaria Evora session from the World Routes archive presented by Charlie Gillett. Producer James Parkin.

Cesaria Evora was born on 27 August 1941 in Mindelo, São Vicente, Cape Verde. Aged 16, she was persuaded by a friend to sing in a sailors' tavern. In the 1960s, she started singing on Portuguese cruise ships stopping at Mindelo as well as on the local radio. It was only in 1985 when at the invitation of Cape Verdean singer Bana she went to perform in Portugal.

Evora's international success came only in 1988 with the release of her first album La Diva Aux Pieds Nus recorded in France. Her 1992 album Miss Perfumado sold over 300,000 copies worldwide, and included one of her most celebrated songs, "Sodade".

In 2003, her album Voz d'Amor was awarded a Grammy in the World music category.

In September 2011, Évora's agent announced she was ending her career due to poor health and on 17 December 2011, aged 70, Évora died in São Vicente, from respiratory failure.

Tito Paris was also born in Mindelo on the island of São Vicente, and began his professional career in a family of musicians when he was nine. He was around 19 when Bana, once again, invited Tito to join his band, The Voz de Cabo Verde.

In Lisbon, it was as a composer that he made a name for himself, writing songs for many singers including Cesaria Evora.

Lucy Duran presents a tribute to the 'barefoot Diva', Cesaria Evora from Cape Verde.

Adriano Adewale20090131

Lucy Duran introduces a specially-recorded interview and studio session with Sao Paolo-born percussionist and composer Adriano Adewale, whose work combines jazz, classical and traditional music from Brazil and Nigeria.

Now based in London, his band includes Senegalese kora player Kadialy Kouyate, Australian bassist Nathan Riki Thomson and fellow Brazilian Marcelo Andrade on saxophone and flute.

WORLD ROUTES

  • adriano adewale (percussion and vocals)
  • album: africa to appalachia
  • album: kali sultana
  • album: orion
  • album: seya
  • album: vérité d'afrique
  • buda musique 860 178

    choice 4 (nigel)

  • contributors: Nigel Williamson/john l.

    walters

  • e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

    saturday 31st january, 3pm

    adriano adewale group

  • fax 020 7765 5052
  • jayme stone js200

    adewale: assim

  • jayme stone; mansa sissoko
  • kadialy kouyate (kora and vocals)
  • lusafrica 562 252

    choice 2 (john)

  • marcelo andrade (saxophones, flutes, rabeca)
  • naïve wn 145 173

    choice 3 (lucy)

  • nathan riki thomson (bass, flutes, kalimba)

    in session:

    adewale/kouyate/andrade/thomson: together

  • oumou sangare: seya
  • pierre akindengue: egomé ewoga (gabon)
  • presented by Lucy Duran
  • recorded at broadcasting house by andrew smillie and alison rhynas, january 2008

    adewale: family album

  • recorded at broadcasting house by andrew smillie and alison rhynas, january 2008

    adewale: passa por mim

  • recorded at broadcasting house by andrew smillie and alison rhynas, january 2008

    cd roundup with Nigel Williamson and john l.

    walters

    choice 1 (nigel)

  • recorded at broadcasting house by andrew smillie and alison rhynas, january 2008

    together, assim, family album passa por mim also appear on adriano's album sementes (segue records segcd0801)

    Lucy Duran with a special session by brazilian percussionist adriano adewale

  • sissoko: bibi
  • stelios petrakis: syrtos
  • tel.

    020 7765 4661

  • titi robin: sultana la kali
  • world circuit wwccd08

    choice 5 (john)

  • produced by.... - felix carey

  • Afghan Music, World Routes Academy 201120101030

    Lucy Duran explores the music of Afghanistan in a session with young rubab player Wahid Delahang and tabla player Wahid Wahidi, and talks to writer Simon Broughton about his new compilation of music from across the country's rich musical landscape.

    Looking ahead, Lucy launches the World Routes Academy 2011, with a session from the new mentee.

    Lucy Duran explores the music of Afghanistan and launches the World Routes Academy 2011.

    Ahmad Sham Sufi Qawali Group20090516

    Lucy Duran is joined by Andy Morgan and Reda El Mawy for a review of new CDs from Africa and the Arab world, plus the Ahmad Sham Sufi Qawali group from Afghanistan in their UK debut session.

    Lucy Duran is joined by Andy Morgan to review new CDs from Africa and the Arab world.

    Albanian Urban Music20111030

    Heading off in the footsteps of folklorist AL Lloyd, Lucy Duran visits Albania to record the little known urban music of a country that was closed to the outside world for almost 50 years.

    Lucy attends a garden party in the capital Tirana, where some of the city's best musicians get together over a glass of the local tipple, raki.

    She visits the Skanderberg castle in the town of Kruja, where the long standing vocal ensemble The Old Men of Kruja reflect on how life has changed since the fall of communism.

    Back in Tirana at a bar in the Bloku area, once home to the Party oligarchs but now the party capital of the city, she meets the Folk-Hip Hop group Westside Family, who are bringing traditional music up to date.

    Finally she heads to the town of Korca in the South of the country to attend a rehearsal of Grupi Lira, a choir that sings the partriotic serenades that are the trademark sound of the most cultured city in Albania.

    Lucy Duran visist Albania to record the urban music of this once-isolated country.

    Album Releases/kasai Allstars Session20090808

    Lucy Duran is joined by writer Nigel Williamson, and DJ and broadcaster Rita Ray for a round-up of the latest world music albums.

    Plus a specially-recorded session with Congolese trance music supergroup the Kasai Allstars.

    A round-up of the latest world music albums plus a studio session with the Kasai All Stars

    Album Review And Mali-brazil Collaboration Session20120722

    Lucy Duran with a review of new world music albums and a Mali-Brazil collaboration session

    A review of new world music albums, and a studio session with a Mali-Brazil collaboration featuring kora virtuoso Toumani Diabaté with songwriter Arnaldo Antunes and guitarist Edgard Scandurra. Presented by Lucy Duran.

    Toumani Diabaté first collaborated with Arnaldo Antunes and Edgard Scandurra at the 2010 Back2Black Festival in Rio de Janeiro. He then invited them to Bamako to record an album, and they were in the UK in early July for London's own Back2Black Festival. The album 'A Curva Da Cintura' was released in June, and both the album and this World Routes session also features the playing of Toumani's son, Sidiki.

    Album Review And Session With Fuyuki Enokido20120909

    Lucy Duran presents a review of new world music albums, and Paul Fisher introduces a studio session with Japanese Koto player Fuyuki Enokido.

    Including a review of new world music albums, and a studio session with Fuyuki Enokido.

    Album Review And Sidi Toure In Session20121202

    Lucy Duran introduces a review of new albums of world music, plus a studio session with Malian blues singer Sidi Toure.

    Sidi Toure has been on the prolific Malian music scene for many years, but he is only now starting to make waves internationally. His songs are rooted in the traditional music of the Songhai people of northern Mali, and he says he was inspired by a visit to a sacred sand dune by the River Niger, which, according to legend, is a meeting place for the most powerful wizards of the world. Even before the current troubles in Mali, Sidi Toure was writing about challenges and tensions in the country. He reflects "We have to be fighters, to say when things go right, when thing go wrong, especially when they go wrong. We have to sing to find solutions. We have a role, a duty to increase public awareness. I can only sing that Mali is a multiracial country, that we have to be united and reconciled, and we must forgive each other for a strong and prosperous Mali.".

    Amadou Bagayoko And Singer Mariam Doumbia20081206

    Lucy Duran presents a specially recorded session with Malian duo Amadou and Mariam.

    Lucy Duran presents world music CD releases as well as an interview and session with Amadou and Mariam, the husband and wife duo of guitarist Amadou Bagayoko and singer Mariam Doumbia, featuring material from their album Welcome to Mali.

    They formed as a group in Bamako in 1980 and became well known throughout Mali, Burkino Faso and Ivory Coast for their distinctive blend of Malian music, blues and rock with Bambara language lyrics.

    They have since established themselves on the international circuit, been championed by Manu Chao and Damon Albarn, and were winners at the Radio 3 Awards for World Music for their 2006 album Dimanche a Bamako.

    Aurelio Martinez20091212

    Presented by Lucy Duran

    Produced by Roger Short

    Tel.

    020 7765 4661

    Fax.

    020 7765 5052

    e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

    Saturday 12th December, 3:00pm

    Aurelio Martinez in session

    Aurelio Martinez (guitar/percussion/vocals)

    Rolando Sosa (maracas/turtle shells/vocals)

    Angel Bernardez (bass Garifuna drum/vocals)

    Onan Castillo (lead Garifuna drum)

    Eduardo Cedeno (lead guitar)

    Ivan Duran (electric guitar)

    Carlos Castillo (bass guitar)

    Martinez: Yange

    Aurelio Martinez and Ensemble

    BBC Recording by Martin Appleby and Andy Rushton, December 2009

    CD Round up with Sue Steward and Arwa Haider

    Choice 1 (Sue)

    Jet Buiguine

    Les Loups Noirs D'Haïti

    Album: Tumbélé! Biguine, afro and latin sounds from the French Caribbean 1963–74

    Soundway SNDWCD/LP017

    Choice 2 (Arwa)

    Kidjo: Dil Main Chuppa ke pyar Ka

    Angelique Kidjo

    Album: Õÿö

    Proper Records Promo CD

    Choice 3 (Sue)

    Tala: Bend Skin

    Andre Marie Tala

    Album: Bend Skin Beats

    Sterns Records/Retroafric RETRO23CD

    Choice 4 (Arwa)

    Hassan: Abeina U Manna

    Mariem Hassan

    Album: Shouka

    Nubenegra Promo CD

    Studio session with Aurelio Martinez

    Martinez: Lumalali Lumaniga

    Martinez: Bisienu

    Martinez: Mayahuaba

    Lucy Duran presents a review of new CDs of world music and Aurelio Martinez in session.

    Aurelio Martinez, South Pacific Music, Egypt20110312

    Lucy Duran presents Garifuna musician Aurelio Martinez in session.

    With his new album Laru Beya, Aurelio Martinez is bringing the music of the Garifuna people of Central America to the world.

    A marginalised but culturally distinct people, the Garifuna are descended from African slaves and Caribbean Indians, and the music is an intriguing blend of African, Caribbean, Indian, and Latin influences.

    The album is inspired by the late great Garifuna musician Andy Palacio, and Aurelio Martinez worked with Senegalese musician Youssou N'Dour on the recording.

    Lucy is also joined by journalists Jane Cornwell and Reda El Mawy to discuss new World music releases from the South Pacific, and the role that music has played in recent events in Egypt.

    Bahia20120318

    Lucy Duran is in Salvador da Bahia, Brazil to record some of that historic city's finest musicians, including the singer-songwriter Mateus Aleluia, rising stars Baiana System, and Bahia's most famous musical export, the elusive Virginia Rodrigues. Producer James Parkin.

    Lucy Duran visits Salvador da Bahia, Brazil to record some of the city's finest musicians.

    Ballake Sissoko And Vincent Segal, Fela!, Samy Ben Redjeb20101204

    Lucy Duran with kora and cello duo Ballaké Sissoko and Vincent Ségal in session, Rita Ray discusses the new musical FELA!, about the life of Nigerian musician Fela Anikulapo Kuti, and Lucy talks to Analogue Africa founder Samy Ben Redjeb about his latest musical discoveries in Angola and the challenges of working in Angola.

    Lucy Duran presents Ballake Sissoko and Vincent Segal in session.

    Bamako, Mali20120101

    Lucy Duran heads to Bamako, the capital of Mali in West Africa to explore dance band traditions new and old.

    Super Biton de Segou, recorded especially for World Routes on stage at the French Institute in Bamako, are one of the great dance bands from the post-independence era. Formed at the time of President Modibo Keita's drive towards Cultural Authenticity, they took the stories and rhythms of the Segou region and formed a distinctive, driving, modern sound. 50 years on they are still going strong, and although they've never performed in the UK, are one of the most loved bands in Mali.

    At the same time that government sponsored dance bands were being formed, other musicians were setting up their own brand of modern Malian music, inspired by the Apollo space missions, they became known as the Apollo bands. Today, there are few still performing, but the Freres Dambele are continuing a family tradition, and performing Apollo music in bars and clubs across Bamako. World Routes caught up with them in a dusty courtyard in a suburb of the capital for an exclusive session.

    Lucy Duran visits Bamako, Mali, to explore dance band traditions new and old.

    Bambara Blues20070324

    On the 200th anniversary of the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade in Britain, Lucy Duran introduces a programme of music recorded on location in Mali.

    It tells the story of pre-colonial slavery in Africa and uncovers a previously unknown link between the music around the Niger River and the blues of the southern states of America.

    Bhaktapur, Nepal20120902

    Lucy Duran travels to the ancient capital of Nepal, Bhaktapur in the Kathmandu Valley. The seat of culture in Nepal, it's a city full of diverse traditional music, and today's programme includes exclusively recorded sessions by The Master Drummers of Nepal, a group of flute-playing farmers, and the temple singing group Chandeshwari Dapha. Producer James Parkin.

    Lucy Duran listens to the traditional sounds of the ancient city of Bhaktapur in Nepal.

    Boban And Markovic Orchestra20100814

    In the weekend that the infamous Serbian trumpet festival Guca celebrates its 50th anniversary, Lucy Duran is joined by the Boban and Marko Markovic Orchestra for an explosive session of Serbian Gypsy Brass music.

    The Boban and Marko Markovic Orchestra are one of the most highly decorated Serbian brass bands, and 22 year old band leader and trumpeter Marko Markovic tells Lucy about his musical family, and why you have to be Roma to play this music.

    Garth Cartwright, author of Balkan music travelogue "Princes Amongst Men" joins writer Nigel Williamson to review a crop of recent World Music CDs, featuring music from Sephardic Spain, across the Balkans, and the vibrant UK Balkan party scene.

    Lucy Duran with session from gypsy brass band the Boban and Marko Markovic Orchestra.

    Brazil - Abril Pro Rock Festival20120513

    Concluding a season of music recorded on location in North East Brazil, Lucy Duran presents an exclusive World Routes residency at the Abril Pro Rock Festival in Recife. Recorded at the APR Club in the old city, the programme includes highlights from sets by the Afro-Brazilian drummers Bongar, big band Orquestra Contemporanea de Olinda, up and coming singer-songwriter Alessandra Leao, and Siba with his group of sugar cane workers The Forest. Producer James Parkin.

    Brighton Festival 2011: Lee Scratch Perry And Max Romeo.2011060420120318

    Lucy Duran introduces World Routes in concert at the Brighton Festival 2011, featuring dub reggae pioneers Lee 'Scratch' Perry and Max Romeo, together with UK producer Adrian Sherwood.

    Veteran, Grammy-winning producer and songwriter Lee 'Scratch' Perry has become a legend of Jamaican reggae, and is acclaimed as a pioneer of dub. He is now well into his 70s, but with no thoughts of retiring - he has just completed a new album 'Rise Again'. Here he teams up with Max Romeo, whose most successful album, 'War in a Babylon', Perry produced in 1976. Adrian Sherwood has worked as producer with a wide range of successful artists, but he is best known for his work with dub music - he has worked regularly with Lee Perry since the 1980s.

    Lucy Duran with a World Routes concert by Lee 'Scratch' Perry and Max Romeo.

    Lucy Duran introduces World Routes in concert at the Brighton Festival, featuring dub reggae pioneers Lee 'Scratch' Perry and Max Romeo, together with UK producer Adrian Sherwood.

    Veteran, Grammy-winning producer and songwriter Lee 'Scratch' Perry has become a legend of Jamaican reggae, and is acclaimed as a pioneer of dub.

    He is now well into his 70s, but with no thoughts of retiring - he has just completed a new album 'Rise Again'.

    Here he teams up with Max Romeo, whose most successful album, 'War in a Babylon', Perry produced in 1976.

    Adrian Sherwood has worked as producer with a wide range of successful artists, but he is best known for his work with dub music - he has worked regularly with Lee Perry since the 1980s.

    Lucy Duran with a concert from Brighton by Lee 'Scratch' Perry and Max Romeo.

    Burkina Faso, Nigeria, Benin, Mali20100911

    Fifty years after sixteen countries in Africa became independent, Lucy Duran and the French journalist Florent Mazzoleni play more rare tracks from that period.

    Music was to play a central role in the search for new identity, and in the 60s and 70s some of the continent's greatest dance music was created.

    Today's programme celebrates countries that became independent in the second half of 1960 including Burkina Faso, Nigeria, Benin and Mali.

    Producer James Parkin.

    Based in Bordeaux, the French writer and photographer Florent Mazzoleni has travelled all over Africa collecting music, and in particular, documentating the soundtrack of the golden era of Atlantic African music.

    He's written fifteen books, most notably "Epic of African music: Rhythms of Atlantic Africa" and "Salif Keita, Voice of the Mandingo".

    His latest book, "Motown: Soul and glamour" will be translated into English this autumn.

    The programme includes tracks from Florent's collection many of which have not been re-released since their limited pressing in the 60s and 70s - let alone played on British radio.

    And these are tracks that reflect a unique period in African history: a period of liberation and short-lived optimism.

    Lucy Duran with rare vintage music from African countries that became independent in 1960.

    Carlos Orozco Session20111023

    Lucy Duran introduces a session by the Venezuelan harp virtuoso Carlos Orozco.

    On a rare UK visit, he performs the lively "joropo" dance music found in the vast central plains of Venezuela.

    He is joined by a 3-piece band which includes his son Caryas, a leading exponent of the Venezuelan maracas.

    Producer James Parkin.

    Carlos Orozco and his band are in London for Viva Venezuela, a major celebration of dance at London's Palladium, in aid of the British Red Cross.

    Joropo is one of the dance forms that will feature, and, it is performing the music that accompanies this dance that has made Carlos Orozco his name.

    Joropo is from the Arabic, xärop, a sweet liquid.

    In modern joropo the dancers mark the rhythm stamping on the floor.

    The man hits the floor with the full force of his whole foot, whilst the woman responds in silence, shuffling her feet in a series of intricately sweeping, high speed patterns.

    The man and woman never lose touch with each other.

    The joyful music that Carlos and his band of virtuosic musicians play is fast, infectious, and above all, uplifting.

    Lucy Duran introduces a session by Venezuelan harp virtuoso Carlos Orozco.

    Carminho At The 2012 London Jazz Festival20121118

    A concert performance by a rising star of Portuguese fado, Carminho. The singer was recorded at the South Bank earlier this week as part of the 2012 London Jazz Festival. Introduced by Andrew McGregor.

    25-year-old Carminho combines traditional soul-searching, fado songs with modern arrangements of the music of Brazilian great masters. Her critically acclaimed debut album was deem as one of the best in 2011, and her new recording as well as her live concerts all over the world have made one critic say 'Carminho has a voice both beautifully translucent and stunning in its emotional charge'.

    Chamame20110319

    Banning Eyre heads into North East Argentina with Chamame accordionist Chango Spasiuk, to see the red earth and hear this unique accordion driven music.

    Misiones province in North East Argentina is a sliver of land between Brazil and Paraguay, more tropical than the rest of Argentina, it is part of the ancestral home of the Guarani people.

    Home to a large number of Jesuit missions in the 17th Century, during the early part of the 20th Century Misiones received an influx of European immigrants to work on the land, especially from Poland and the Ukraine.

    These East European farmers brought with them the accordion, which added Schottische and Polkas to an already rich cultural mix and the Chamame was born.

    Banning Eyre takes internationally renowned chamame accordionist Chango Spasiuk back to his roots in Misiones, to hear about how he learnt the accordion, and to meet and record local musicians.

    Sergio Tarnovsky is a young local talent from Apostoles who plays the 21 button diatonic accordion known as the verdulera.

    Lalo Doreto hails from the town of Obera, and is a local radio host, singer, and guitarist, and he puts on a special afternoon session with some friends in his back yard.

    As well as being the home of Chamame, Misiones is also the home of "yerba mate", the bitter green tea drunk with a metal straw from a hollowed out gourd by almost everyone in Argentina.

    Chango shows Banning the right, and the wrong way to make and drink it.

    On the way back from the North East they stop in at the Anconetani accordion factory in Buenos Aires, the first Argentine handmade accordion company, to meet its octagenarian patron Nazereno Anconetani, for a tour of the workshops and a session with one of Chamame's elder statesmen, accordionist Tilo Escobar.

    Presenter: Banning Eyre

    Producer: Peter Meanwell.

    Banning Eyre visits Misiones province in Argentina to learn about chamame music.

    Changui De Guantanamo20090711

    In the year of the 50th anniversary of the Cuban revolution, World Routes features a specially recorded studio session by Cuban five-piece Changui de Guantanamo.

    Presenter Lucy Duran first encountered this group on the road as part of her World Routes report from Cuba in June 2007.

    Changui is an old style from the Eastern Guantanamo province dating back to the 19th century and combining elements of Spanish guitar and African traditions.

    The songs are played on instruments such as the marimbula thumb piano, the tres (a kind of three-stringed guitar), and an array of percussion including the guiro, maracas and bongos.

    Lucy is also joined in the studio by Sue Steward and Crispin Robinson for a look at some recent Cuban and Latin-American releases on CD.

    A specially recorded studio session by Cuban five-piece Changui de Guantanamo.

    Charlie Gillett Tribute20100515

    Lucy Duran and Max Reinhardt look back on the career of Charlie Gillett, a key figure in world music and former Radio 3 presenter who died earlier this year.

    His work is celebrated through interviews, archive, and specially recorded music.

    With contributions from Sue Steward, Mark Lamarr, Roger Armstrong and Ben Mandelson, as well as tributes from some of the musicians he championed including Youssou N'Dour, Mariza, Chango Spasiuk, Yasmin Levy and Bassekou Kouyate.

    Lucy Duran and Max Reinhardt look back on the career of Charlie Gillett.

    Cimarron And Carlou D20090411

    Lucy Duran presents two specially recorded sessions from Latin America and Africa.

    Cimarron perform the joyful and energetic 'musica llanero' from the vast central plains of Colombia, with virtuosic harp-playing and songs to milk cows by.

    While Carlou D brings his big-range, soulful voice to a mixture of songs that celebrate Muslim mysticism and warn of the dangers facing his homeland Senegal.

    Specially recorded sessions by musicians visiting the UK from Colombia and Senegal.

    Edinburgh International Festival20110925

    Lucy Duran heads to the Edinburgh International Festival to meet musicians from around the world who have gathered in Scotland as the festival celebrates the vibrant and diverse cultures of Asia.

    Includes music from sarod player Amjad Ali Khan in concert, an interview with Vietnamese choreographer Ea Sola, and the sound of the Sindhi Sarangi played by Rajasthani master, Lakha Khan.

    Lucy Duran presents music performed at the 2011 Edinburgh International Festival.

    Eliades Ochoa20090307

    Lucy Duran introduces a review of new CDs of world music, plus a session with veteran Cuban singer and guitarist Eliades Ochoa, a key member of the Buena Vista Social Club and a specialist in Cuba's raunchy song style called guaracha.

    Lucy Duran presents a review of new CDs and a session with Cuban singer Eliades Ochoa.

    Fiddles On Fire20070505

    Lucy Duran introduces the opening concert of a weekend of folk fiddling at The Sage, Gateshead, which features two of Scotland's finest bands.

    Blazin' Fiddles showcase fiddle styles from across the country and Fiddlers' Bid champion the musical heritage of Shetland.

    Fode Lassana Diabate20110528

    Lucy Duran presents a session with Mali's most gifted balafon player and Afrocubism band member Fode Lassana Diabaté.

    Born in Guinea into a family of virtuoso balafon players, Lassana Diabaté moved as a young man to Bamako in the early 1990s.

    He plays the 22-key xylophone of the Mandé griots, and has appeared on albums by Salif Keita, Bassekou Kouyate, and Kasse Mady Diabaté, among others, and has been a long-standing member of Toumani Diabaté's Symmetric Orchestra.

    Lucy is also joined by writers Sue Steward and John L Walters to discuss new World Music releases and look at what's on offer at this summer's festivals.

    Lucy Duran presents a session with Mali's most gifted balafon player Fode Lassana Diabate.

    Gamelan Journeys 1 Java20030712
    Gamelan Journeys 2 Bali20030719
    Gnawa And World Music Festival 200920090822

    Lucy Duran visits the 2009 Gnawa and World Music Festival in Essaouira on Morocco's Atlantic coast.

    An annual free event attended by some 400,000 people, it celebrates the ancient tradition of trance music and is thought to have the power of spiritual healing.

    With music by Berber singer Brahim Assli and an improvised collaborative concert by New Orleans jazz band Congo Nation and local musicians Agadir Gnawa.

    WORLD ROUTES

    Presented by Lucy Duran

    Produced by Roger Short

    Tel.

    020 7765 4661

    Fax.

    020 7765 5052

    e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

    Saturday 22nd August 2009

    Raouf Bekkari: Baniya

    Agadir Gnawa

    BBC Recording by Marvin Ware, at the Essaouira World Music Festival 2009

    Interview with Neila Tazi, Director of Essaouira World Music Festival

    Assli: Yan gir Isagsan

    Assli: Awdi Ayahbibawa

    Assli: Ghar sigl Maghtssat

    Rais Braim Assli and Ensemble

    Interview with Braim Assli

    Assli: Irbi Ayasyakh

    Assli: Wim nga Wink

    Interview with Donald Harrison

    Improvised piece

    Congo Nation and Agadir Gnawa

    Lucy Duran with highlights from the 2009 Gnawa and World Music Festival in Morocco.

    Gnawa And World Music Festival 200920110416

    Lucy Duran joins 400,000 Moroccans at the 2009 Gnawa and World Music Festival in Essaouira on Morocco's Atlantic coast, an annual free festival which celebrates their ancient tradition of trance music which is thought to have the power of spiritual healing.

    With music by Berber singer Braim Assli and an improvised collaborative concert by New Orleans jazzband Congo Nation and local musicians Agadir Gnawa.

    Essaouira is an old stone town that is home to an even older style of music which arrived in Morocco centuries ago with the slaves who came from across the Sahara.

    It's a sacred music which is traditionally heard at all-night 'lilas', where animal sacrifices are made, people are healed from spiritual and physical ailments, and, it is said, a good time is had by all.

    The sound of the music is characterised by the bass thump of the three-stringed 'gimbri' and the strident clatter of metal castanets.

    The Gnawa and World Music Festival was established twelve years ago to celebrate the gnawa tradition, with concerts featuring gnawa masters from all over Morocco, together with events where gnawa musicians collaborate with artists from across the globe.

    Lucy Duran attends the 2009 Gnawa and World Music Festival in Morocco.

    Gonul Ekmekci And Nefes Ensemble In Session20121028

    Lucy Duran reviews new releases of World Music with critics Jane Cornwell and John L. Walters, and a session with Gonul Ekmekci and members of the Nefes Ensemble featuring Turkish folk songs on authentic instruments.

    Hari Sivanesan20110326

    Lucy Duran and World Routes Academy protege Hari Vrndavn Sivanesan unpick the roots of South Indian classical music.

    As the 2011 World Routes Academy shifts its focus to South India, Lucy Duran is joined by young British veena player Hari Sivanesan and his Guru Smt.

    Sivasakthi Sivanesan to discuss what makes Carnatic music unique.

    Using recordings from the BBC archive they discuss the rich traditions of classical music in South India and Northern Sri Lanka, and its religious and social contexts.

    Features an extended performance in the studio by World Routes Academy protege, veena player Hari Vrndavn Sivanesan.

    Lucy Duran discusses South Indian music with World Routes Academy protege Hari Sivanesan.

    Ilham Al Madfai, Khyam Allami20100807

    As part of the World Routes Academy, Lucy Duran travels to the Middle East with the Iraqi musician Ilham Al Madfai and the scheme's protege Khyam Allami.

    They meet and record with local musicians in Damascus where Khyam was born but has not been since he was nine.

    Plus, travelling overland to Jordan, there's a session with some of that country's best musicians recorded in an organic vineyard on the Syrian border.

    Producer James Parkin

    BBC Radio 3's World Routes Academy scholarship is a new scheme which aims to support and inspire young world music artists by bringing them together with an internationally-renowned figure in the same field.

    This year, Khyam Allami will be collaborating with, and learning from, one of the biggest stars of Middle Eastern music, the Iraqi singer and guitarist Ilham Al Madfai.

    The project culminates in a BBC Promenade concert on 9th August at 2200.

    The scheme has represented a broad range of Khyam's musical projects on World Routes as well as developing various outreach and educational projects in the UK.

    Details of the 2011 scheme - its geographical focus and those taking part - will be announced in the Autumn.

    A World Routes Academy special recorded on-location in Syria and Jordan.

    Jerusalem International Oud Festival20120617

    Moshe Morad with a final selection of highlights from the 2011 Jerusalem International Oud Festival which took place last November, including Palestinian songs sung by Sana Moussa, and the mighty voice of Aynur who was once banned in Turkey for singing in Kurdish. Producer James Parkin.

    Jerusalem International Oud Festival 200820090321

    Moshe Morad presents music recorded specially for the programme at the 2008 Jerusalem International Oud Festival.

    He introduces the ancient songs of two exiled communities - the Paytanim of ancient Aleppo and the Persian Jews of Iran.

    Moshe Morad presents music from Syria and ancient Jewish songs from Persia.

    Jerusalem International Oud Festival 201120111225

    Moshe Morad introduces recordings made exclusively for World Routes at the 2011 Jerusalem International Oud Festival which took place in November. In today's programme there's a tribute to the so-called Queen of the Greek Blues, Rosa Eskenazi with musicians from Greece, Turkey and Israel. Plus the Petrakis-Lopez-Chemirani Trio, virtuosi musicians from Crete, Spain and Iran. Producer James Parkin.

    In its 12th year, the Jerusalem International Oud Festival brings musicians and audiences from across the region together. Jews, Arabs, and groups from all denominations perform side by side.

    Today's programme presents an opportunity to discover the music of Rosa Eskanzi, a colourful character who was born to a Ladino Jewish family in Istanbul at the end of the 19th century. Her adult life and career was spent in Greece where she was shunned by the conservative Jewish community of Thessaloniki, and went on to become the leading exponent of Rebetiko or the Greek Blues as its known. Famed also for rescuing Greek Jews during World War 2, she ended her life suffering from dementia and was buried in an unmarked grave. The Greek, Turkish and Jewish-Ladino roots of her music were represented at this tribute concert by female singers from each tradition.

    In 2012, World Routes will feature more highlights from the festival including, amongst other things, the Kurdish singer Aynur from Turkey, Palestinian folk music from the West Bank, Classic Arab songs performed by an Egyptian-style orchestra from the Galilee, and one of the finest oud players in the world today, Taiseer Elias.

    Moshe Morad with recordings made at the 2011 Jerusalem International Oud Festival.

    Kenya20121021

    Lucy Duran visits Kenya where she meets the singer Suzanna Owiyo in Nairobi. Plus she hears rain songs in the north of the country which frequently suffers from terrible drought, and in the south, she records the Massai who sing of the dangers of cattle raiding. Producer James Parkin.

    Klezmatics20040529

    Lucy Duran introduces the 'rhythm and Jews' of the Klezmatics, one of the world's leading bands playing klezmer, a party music that emerged in the Jewish communities of eastern Europe.

    From a concert recorded earlier this month in Belfast as part of BBC Music Live.

    Ladysmith Black Mambazo20091226

    Africa's biggest band, Ladysmith Black Mambazo in concert, recorded specially for the programme at the Brighton Dome.

    Lucy Duran introduces an uninterrupted hour of music from the South African superstars, who won the 2009 Grammy Award for Best Traditional World Music CD.

    WORLD ROUTES

    Presented by Lucy Duran

    Produced by James Parkin

    Tel.

    020 7765 4661

    Fax.

    020 7765 5052

    e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

    Saturday 26th December, 3:00pm

    Ladysmith Black Mambazo

    Joseph Shabalala

    Msizi Shabalala

    Thulani Shabalala

    Sibongiseni Shabalala

    Thamsanqa Shabalala

    Albert Mazibuko

    Abednego Mazibuko

    Russel Mthembu

    Ngane Dlamini

    Ngqongqotha

    Nomathemba

    The way we do

    Thalaza

    Inkanyezi

    Hello my baby

    Yinhle

    Homeless

    Wentomb'unecala

    Amazing Grace

    Performed by Ladysmith Black Mambazo

    BBC Recording by James Birtwistle, Andy Rushton and Mike Page, December 2009, at the Brighton Dome

    Ladysmith Black Mambazo in concert, introduced by Lucy Duran.

    Ladysmith Black Mambazo20100710

    in South Africa: in a rare World Cup vuvuzela-free zone, Africa's most famous group go back to their roots in this special concert in a Zulu workers' hostel in Clermont Township.

    Lopa Kothari introduces the perfect antidote, as well as the perfect preparation, for tomorrow's World Cup Final.

    The distinctive musical style of Ladysmith Black Mambazo, called 'isicathamiya', originated in the Zulu workers' hostels in the townships around Durban, where migrant workers entertained each other with traditional music toned-down so it wouldn't disturb the neighbours.

    Ladysmith Black Mambazo were so good at it, they were banned from taking part in local music competitions, and after their participation in Paul Simon's album 'Graceland' in 1986, their success became worldwide.

    This concert was recorded on the evening of one of South Africa's World Cup matches - the workers came together to watch the game on a big screen, then settled down to enjoy a group who has had somewhat better success internationally than the Bafana.

    But don't expect the polite, restrained listening and warm applause of a European concert hall audience: feelings were high, the atmosphere was hot.

    Ladysmith Black Mambazo was founded by Joseph Shabalala, and the programme also includes a session with the band of one of his sons, Shabalala Rhythm, a huge local success in their own right.

    As for the vuvuzelas, well there are inevitably one or too - but for the most part, be assured indeed of a vuvuzela-free zone.

    Lopa Kothari presents a special World Cup concert from Ladysmith Black Mambazo.

    Live From Womad20100724

    Live from Radio 3's own stage at Charlton Park, Lucy Duran introduces music by Sufi mystics Rizwan-Muazzam Qawwali, fronted by nephews of the late Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan.

    Plus highlights from yesterday's set by Tourag band Toumast.

    Lucy Duran introduces live music by Sufi mystics Rizwan-Muazzam Qawwali.

    Live From Womad 2011, Susheela Raman, Khaira Arby20110730

    Live from Radio 3's own stage at Charlton Park, Lucy Duran introduces British Asian vocalist Susheela Raman, onstage with a band of musicians from Rajasthan.

    Plus highlights from an earlier performance by the Malian diva known as "The Nightingale of the North", Khaira Arby.

    Lucy Duran presents performances at WOMAD 2011 by Susheela Raman and Khaira Arby.

    Lobi Traore, Cheikh Lo, Brighton Kora Festival20100717

    Lucy Duran and Blur's Damon Albarn remember the life of the Malian guitarist Lobi Traore who died last month.

    Albarn's a big Malian music fan and actually produced Traore's self-titled 2005 album.

    Plus there's a session with Senegalese singer, songwriter and percussionist Cheikh Lo, and a preview of the UK's first kora festival in Brighton.

    Producer James Parkin.

    Lobi Traore was born in 1961 on the left bank of the River Niger near Segou in Mali.

    He died of a heart attack on 1st June 2010.

    Both his parents were singers, and members of the komo - the most important of three secret castes in Bambara society, charged with the custodianship of divine knowledge.

    Lobi followed in their footsteps living in a forest inhabited with wild animals, and going days without food and water.

    At the same time he pursued his training as a musician.

    Lucy and Damon reminisce and play some of their favourite tracks as well as preview a posthumous album due out in September.

    Cheikh Lo is one of the great mavericks of African music who dedicates both his life and music to Baye Fall, a specifically Senegalese form of Islam and part of the larger Islamic brotherhood of Mouridism.

    His 1995 album 'Ne La Thiass' was produced by Youssou N'Dour and in 1996, he was signed to Buena Vista Social club label World Circuit.

    His latest album 'Jamm' was released at the end of June.

    The UK's first festival of African Kora music is taking place for one day on Saturday 21st August 2010 at the Sallis Benney Theatre in Brighton.

    The festival is the concept of Les Sherwood, one of only a handful of Kora makers in the UK.

    One of the featured artists Kadialy Kouyate joins Lucy in the studio for a session.

    The Kora is a form of West African harp.

    Lucy Duran and Damon Albarn remember the life of Malian guitarist Lobi Traore.

    London Jazz Festival 2010, Afrocubism20101127

    AfroCubism: the legendary 'lost' project that became the Buena Vista Social Club is finally realised.

    In this concert from the London Jazz Festival, musicians from Mali and Cuba come together for the collaboration that was the original Buena Vista idea.

    Introduced from The Barbican by Lucy Duran.

    It was in 1996 that record producer Nick Gold planned a project involving veteran Cuban musicians with virtuoso performers from Mali, to be recorded in Havana.

    In the end, because of passport problems, the Malian musicians were unable to come, so the recording went ahead with just the Cubans - resulting in the classic Buena Vista Social Club album.

    Now Nick Gold has finally realised the original project for a new recording and concert tour.

    The musicians include Cuban singer Eliades Ochoa, one of the Buena Vista veterans, together with Malians Toumani Diabate on kora, Bassekou Kouyate on ngoni, and Djelimady Tounkara playing guitar, all now 14 years older, but still top performers.

    This London Jazz Festival concert was recorded at The Barbican on 21st November.

    Lucy Duran presents a concert by musicians from Mali and Cuba.

    London Jazz Festival 2010, Hugh Masekela, The Mahotella Queens20101120

    A London Jazz Festival concert featuring some of South Africa's biggest stars.

    Hugh Masekela has been a master of South African jazz since the 1960s, becoming an international celebrity with his hit 'Grazin' in the Grass'.

    The Mahotella Queens are of a similar vintage, and can still excite audiences with their high-energy township dance music.

    This concert was recorded on the opening night of the 2010 London Jazz Festival.

    Hugh Masekela learned the trumpet at the age of 14, and by the end of the 1950s was recognised as a top player.

    In 1960 following the Sharpeville massacre, he left South Africa and settled for a while in the USA.

    After his 1987 song 'Bring him back home' came true with the release of Nelson Mandela, he returned to South Africa.

    Now 71, he is still recording and still touring the world.

    The Mahotella Queens are young in comparison, forming in 1964.

    They had a string of hits with the 'King of the groaners' Simon Mahlatini Nkabinde, combining the energy of township 'mbaqanga' music with tight vocal harmonies.

    The current band members - Hilda, Nobesuthu and Midred - were all in the original 1964 line-up.

    A 2010 London Jazz Festival concert by Hugh Masekela and the Mahotella Queens.

    London Jazz Festival 201120111120

    : Lucy Duran introduces a concert from the Purcell Room on London's South Bank given by Iranian kamancheh virtuoso Kayhan Kalhor.

    Kayhan Kalhor is one of Iran's foremost classical musicians.

    He was born in Teheran in 1963, and studied the kamanche, a Persian bowed string instrument, from an early age.

    By the time he was thirteen he was performing with the National Orchestra of Radio and Television of Iran, and he later travelled to Italy and Canada to study western classical music.

    Now settled in the USA, he has performed with the New York Philharmonic Orchestra and the Kronos Quartet, and given solo concerts across the globe.

    For this concert he is joined by celebrated percussion artist Madjid Khaladj, with accompanying musicians Hossein Alishapoor and Ali Bahramifard.

    Lucy Duran presnets a concert given by Iranian kamancheh virtuoso Kayhan Kalhor.

    Lopa Kothari20090815

    explores some of the different vocal traditions in India, from Bollywood soundtracks to the virtuoso Varanasi style of the Misra Brothers.

    Her guests include director of the Asian Music Network Viram Jasani, writer and broadcaster Jameela Siddiqi, and singer Jayasree Sengupta.

    Lopa Kothari presents a special programme devoted to Indian vocal music.

    Mor Karbasi, New Music Releases20110702

    Lucy Duran welcomes to the studio the singer Mor Karbasi.

    Born in Jerusalem, but now living in the UK, Mor Karbasi sings Sephardic Jewish traditional songs, as well as performing her own material, informed by her Jewish, Moroccan and Persian roots.

    She has recently released her second album 'La Hija de la Primevera' ('Daughter of the Spring').

    Lucy is also joined in the studio by the writers David Hutcheon and Jane Cornwell, to review some of the latest world music CD releases.

    These include S�nd�rgő: a family of tambura players from Hungary, and Fatoumata Diawara, a former actress who ran away from her home in Mali to pursue her musical career.

    Producer: Sam Hickling.

    Lucy Duran introduces a performance by Sephardic singer Mor Karbasi.

    Mulatu Astatke20121125

    Lucy Duran presents Ethio-jazz pioneer Mulatu Astatke on stage at Koko in London, as part of the 2012 London Jazz Festival.

    Born in 1943, Ethiopian pianist and vibes player Mulatu Astatke is known as the father of Ethio-jazz, a genre that spans everything from traditional Ethiopian rhythms to straight ahead jazz, funk and latin. He studied in London and the US, where he went on to work with Duke Ellington, bringing a host of influences back to his native Ethiopia. In recent years he has been embraced by a new generation of fans, including film maker Jim Jarmusch (in Broken Flowers) and musicians Nas and Damian Marley.

    Music From The Golden Temple Of Amritsar20070811

    Every day, from four in the morning until ten at night, music drifts across the waters surrounding the most sacred shrine for Sikhs.

    As part of the India and Pakistan '07 season, Jameela Siddiqi profiles the temple and its music, and talks to some of the raagis who perform in it.

    Music From The Sufi Shrines Of Pakistan20070825

    As part of the India and Pakistan '07 season, Jameela Siddiqi visits the shrine of Pakpattan to hear music from Sufi fakir Sain Zahoor, and joins Rizwan-Muazzam Qawwali at their family shrine in a tribute to their uncle Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, who died ten years ago this month.

    New Music In The Middle East20100612

    Iraqi oud player Khyam Allami, the first recipient of the World Routes Academy scholarship, travels with Lucy Duran to explore new music in Beirut, Damascus and Amman.

    In this programme, Khyam Allami presents a broad picture of contemporary Middle Eastern music by focusing on the current independent music activities in three of its centres - the capital cities of Lebanon, Syria and Jordan.

    BBC Radio 3's World Routes Academy scholarship is a new scheme which aims to support and inspire young world music artists by bringing them together with an internationally-renowned figure in the same field.

    This year, Khyam Allami will be collaborating with, and learning from, one of the biggest stars of Middle Eastern music, the Iraqi singer and guitarist Ilham Al Madfai.

    The project culminates in a BBC Proms concert in August.

    New music in the Middle East: Lucy Duran and Khyam Allami in Beirut, Damascus and Amman.

    New World Music Releases, Online Archives20120506

    Lucy Duran is joined by journalists Jane Cornwell and Robin Denselow to review new World Music releases including Batida - Angolan / Portuguese DJ Mpula's project combining samples from 1970s Angolan tracks with modern electronic dance music, a new Taj Mahal produced album from South African singer Vusi Mahlasela and Flamenco expert Jan Fairley's Beginners Guide to Flamenco. They delve into the archives to find what new gems are now online to listen to as the the Alan Lomax Archive and the British Library have made thousands of recordings available. And they look at the huge catalogue of releases from Real World records, and play some of the defining tracks from the label's 23 year history.

    British Library World and Traditional Music Archive

    http://sounds.bl.uk/World-and-traditional-music

    Alan Lomax Archive

    http://research.culturalequity.org/.

    New World Music, Egyptian Music, Georgian Polyphony20120108

    Arwa Haider and John L Walters review new albums of world music, Banning Eyre reports from Egypt on music trends following the Arab Spring, and the Sakhioba Ensemble perform choral songs from the rich polyphonic traditions of Georgia. Presented by Lucy Duran.

    American author and broadcaster Banning Eyre recently spent a month in Egypt, recording music and interviewing performers and producers in Cairo, once the centre of the flourishing Arab music industry. He reports on the new interest in the music of the city's streets, as opposed to the commercially-produced sounds of the studios.

    The Sakhioba Ensemble is part of a new wave of groups exploring the choral heritage of Georgia. The country's rich and complex polyphony is thought to date from pre-Christian times, and the Sakhioba Ensemble are reviving ancient folk songs as well as the centuries-old repertory of church music.

    Lucy Duran introduces new albums of world music, and a session with the Sakhioba Ensemble.

    Oliver Mtukudzi And Baaba Maal20090314

    Rita Ray presents music by two of Africa's leading stars, as the programme joins the African Soul Rebels tour at Manchester's Bridgewater Hall.

    Featuring music from the best-selling Zimbabwean singer Oliver Mtukudzi, and in a new acoustic line-up, the great Senegalese singer/guitarist Baaba Maal.

    Oliver 'Tuku' Mtukudzi is one of the most respected singers and songwriters in southern Africa, as well as a successful artist in his home country of Zimbabwe.

    Since his first single in 1975 his music has chronicled years of struggle and civil war, urging tolerance and restraint.

    Baaba Maal, most recently a key member of Damon Albarn's Africa Express project, is one of Senegal's leading musicians.

    Following the release of 2008's On the Road album, he joins the tour with a new acoustic line-up.

    As well as making music, he has been working as a Youth Emissary for the United Nations Development Programme, raising awareness of the disadvantages faced by people whose countries are ravaged by poverty, a lack of education and the threat of disease.

    Rita Ray presents Oliver Mtukudzi and Baaba Maal recorded in concert in Manchester.

    Oumou Sangare Session, South Sudan Report20110910

    Lucy Duran is joined in the World Routes studio by the vocalist Oumou Sangare.

    Accompanied by her 8-piece band, she performs songs from her recent album Seya, as well as a new track, and a traditional song from her home country Mali.

    Journalist Robin Denselow reports on the music of South Sudan.

    This new country officially declared its independence on 9 July this year after years of civil war with Sudan.

    The report includes music from Emmanuel Kembe, who has returned to the country recently after years of exile which saw him walk all the way to Ethiopia.

    There's also a chance to hear cattle song from soldier Bol Deng, music played on the adungu (a women-only instrument), and songs celebrating independence from blind singer-songwriter Gordon Koang, who built his own instrument purely by touch.

    Lucy Duran presents Oumou Sangare in session and Robin Denselow reports from South Sudan.

    Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma20101002

    Lopa Kothari and Jameela Siddiqi introduce a recital by the Indian santoor virtuoso Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma, accompanied by Anindo Chatterjee on tabla, recorded earlier this year at the Darbar Festival in London.

    This is the last of three programmes from the 2010 Darbar Festival, which took place over the Easter weekend at Kings Place in London.

    Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma is a revered maestro of Indian classical music: he is based in Mumbai, but he regularly performs across the world - he first played in London back in 1968.

    The santoor is a hammered dulcimer which was originally a Kashmiri folk instrument - it was Shiv Kumar Sharma who reinvented it as an instrument suitable for playing Indian ragas, adding strings and developing a new delicate but powerful style of playing.

    Indian Santoor virtuoso Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma in concert at the Darbar Festival.

    Raf Vilar, Cd Review20110409

    Lucy Duran is joined in the studio by the Brazilian singer Raf Vilar, performing with his band.

    Raf's debut album Studies in Bossa consists of the songs he has been writing since his early teens, and draws on the influences he absorbed growing up in Rio de Janeiro, particularly the 1960s bossa nova of Tom Jobim.

    He now lives in London's East End, where he has assembled an international group of musicians to realise these intricate recordings in a live setting.

    Raf talks to Lucy about his inspirations, and also performs a solo version of one of his favourite Jobim songs.

    Lucy is also joined by the musician and broadcaster Monica Vasconcelos, and the writer David Hutcheon, to review some of the latest recordings of World Music.

    Under consideration are Portuguese fado singer Mariza, Italian superstar Vinicio Capossela, and Brazilian vocalist Mariana Aydar, as well as a new compilation of 'African Guitar Legends'.

    Lucy Duran presents a session from Brazilian musician Raf Vilar, plus new CD releases.

    Rango20091010

    Presented by Lucy Duran

    Produced by Roger Short

    Tel.

    020 7765 4661

    Fax.

    020 7765 4378

    e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

    Saturday 10th October 2009, 3:00pm

    In Session:

    Rango Sudani Voodoo

    Hassan Bergamon El Nagger (Rango Balafon, Kazaan Balafon, vocals, Ritual Tanbura and 5-string electric Simsimiyya)

    Essam TuTu Farag (Vocals, shaker sheikh* and percussion

    El Sayed Jackamo Abd Alla,Ritual Tanbura, vocals, percussion)

    Ravi Shankar Birthday20100403

    Mark Tully surveys the career of Ravi Shankar, who celebrates his 90th birthday on 7th April.

    He looks back on an interview recorded with Ravi Shankar ten years ago, and introduces some of his classic recordings.

    The interview was recorded in 2000 for a World Routes programme to mark Ravi Shankar's 80th birthday, and Ravi Shankar recalls his early life performing in Paris, his collaborations with Yehudi Menuhin and George Harrison, and talks about his eventful love-life.

    We also drop in on a lesson with Ravi's daughter Anoushka.

    Mark Tully is a writer and broadcaster, who for many years was the BBC's Delhi correspondent.

    WORLD ROUTES

    Presented by Mark Tully

    Produced by Roger Short

    Tel.

    020 7765 4661

    Fax.

    020 7765 5052

    e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

    Saturday 3rd April, 3:00pm

    Raga Devgiri Bilawal

    Ravi Shankar; accompanied by Alla Rakha (tabla)

    Album: Ravi Shankar Rare and Glorious

    Saregama Records CDNFC 150918-9

    Ravi Shankar: Sare Jahan Se Achchha

    Bismillah Khan

    Album: Bismillah Khan

    Regal Classics D/ELRZ 13

    Raga Piloo

    Ravi Shankar

    Album: The Ravi Shankar Collection –West meets East

    Angel 567180-2

    Shankar: Homage to Mahatma Gandhi

    Album: Ravi Shankar – The Master

    DG 4778798

    Shanti Mantra

    Album: Ravi in Celebration - Highlights

    Angel Records 55617-2

    Raga Shudh Kalyan

    Mark Tully surveys the career of Ravi Shankar, who celebrates his 90th birthday in 2010.

    Review And Session With Uday Bhawalkar20120610

    Lucy Duran is joined by Arwa Haider and John L Walters for a review of new world music albums, and Uday Bhawalkar sings the ancient Indian classical style of dhrupad.

    Uday Bhawalkar comes from the Indian city of Pune, and he has devoted his life to singing 'dhrupad', an ancient style of devotional singing. In dhrupad, the sacred words are drawn out over a long period, the singer slowly exploring the sound of each syllable, intended to induce a trance-like state in both singer and listeners.

    Rivermead Revisited - 120061223

    Lucy Duran introduces highlights from this summer's WOMAD Festival in Reading.

    Featured performers include headliner Salif Keita on the Open Air stage, fellow Malian Djelimady Tounkara in the Siam Tent and French band Moussou T et les Jovents on the Radio 3 stage.

    Rivermead Revisited - 220061230

    Lucy Duran introduces more highlights from last year's WOMAD festival.

    Including the flamenco singing of Enrique Morente from Spain, the electric thumb-pianos of Congolese band Konono No 1 and a rare acoustic performance by Malian kora virtuoso Toumani Diabate.

    Rodrigo Y Gabriela Session20120226

    Lucy Duran with a review of new world music albums, and a studio session with Rodrigo y Gabriela, the Mexican acoustic guitar duo who have just released a collaborative album with C.U.B.A., a band of young musicians from Havana.

    Rodrigo Sanchez and Gabriela Quintero met while playing in a heavy metal band in Mexico City, then decided to forge their own path as an acoustic duo, drawing influences from flamenco, Latin styles and the blues. They moved to Ireland, starting off playing in Dublin pubs, and through successful albums and tours they became known worldwide - they have sold more than a million albums internationally. Last year they collaborated on the music of the latest 'Pirates of the Caribbean' movie. Their new album and tour reworks some of their existing pieces together with the band C.U.B.A, with arrangements by the Switzerland-based musician Alex Wilson.

    Lucy Duran presents a review of new world music albums and Rodrigo y Gabriela in session.

    Salvador Da Bahia And The Source Of Samba20120422

    Lucy Duran's in Bahia, Northeast Brazil, searching for the source of Samba. Samba has become synonymous with Rio de Janeiro, but it was in the sugar plantations of the poor northeast that African slaves first developed this iconic dance form. And in the small towns of Sao Bras and Santo Amaro, Lucy records the famous Brazilian dance form in its most authentic form. Producer James Parkin.

    Lucy Duran visits Bahia in Brazil to search for the source of samba.

    Samba Mapangala20090704

    Rita Ray introduces one of East Africa's biggest stars, Samba Mapangala, with Orchestra Virunga in concert at the 2009 Sauti za Busara Festival in Zanzibar.

    Mapangala took the sounds of soukous and rumba from Congo-Zaire, making his own blend with traditions from Uganda and Kenya.

    In Zanzibar he sings to a Swahili-speaking audience in an event that also features celebrated guitarist Syran Mbenza.

    Rita Ray introduces Samba Mapangala at the 2009 Sauti za Busara Festival in Zanzibar.

    Sayan Ring Festival20120401

    Andy Kershaw visits the Sayan Ring Festival in Shushenskoe in deepest Siberia. Modelled on the UK's WOMAD Festival, it draws artists and audiences from across the Russian Federation and beyond. Andy meets some of the headline acts, including local boys Huun Huur Tu from nearby Tuva, Daler Nazarov from Tajikistan, and veteran German world music band Dissidenten, and he gets a masterclass in throat singing.

    The Sayan Ring Festival is located in Siberia's Sayan Ring mountains. Shushenskoe was a major tourist town during the Soviet era, as one of Lenin's places of exile - and as interest in Lenin declined in the post-Soviet years, the town turned to music and culture to fill its monolithic hotel. Huun Huur Tu is the area's best-known band, having taken their Tuvan throat-singing style all over the world. Daler Nazarov started out as a rock musician, spent years as a successul film music composer, and has now returned to touring with a band, this time with music strongly based on Tajik traditions. Berlin-based band Dissidenten have been called the 'grandfathers of world beat', and had great success in the 1990s with songs such as 'Fata Morgana'. Andy's throat-singing lesson comes from Albert Kuvezin, one of the pioneers of the popularisation of Tuvan music through his work with Huun Huur Tu and Yat Kha. The programme was recorded at the 2010 Sayan Ring Festival.

    Andy Kershaw visits the Sayan Ring Festival in Shushenskoe in deepest Siberia.

    Sayan Ring Festival 201120110709

    Andy Kershaw visits the Sayan Ring Festival in Shushenskoe in deepest Siberia.

    Modelled on the UK's WOMAD Festival, it draws artists and audiences from across the Russian Federation and beyond.

    Andy meets some of the headline acts, including local boys Huun Huur Tu from nearby Tuva, Daler Nazarov from Tajikistan, and veteran German world music band Dissidenten, and he gets a masterclass in throat singing.

    The Sayan Ring Festival, located in Siberia's Sayan Ring mountains, is now in its seventh year.

    Shushenskoe was a major tourist town during the Soviet era, as one of Lenin's places of exile - and as interest in Lenin declined in the post-Soviet years, the town turned to music and culture to fill its monolithic hotel.

    Huun Huur Tu is the area's best-known band, having taken their Tuvan throat-singing style all over the world.

    Daler Nazarov started out as a rock musician, spent years as a successul film music composer, and has now returned to touring with a band, this time with music strongly based on Tajik traditions.

    Berlin-based band Dissidenten have been called the 'grandfathers of world beat', and had great success in the 1990s with songs such as 'Fata Morgana'.

    Andy's throat-singing lesson comes from Albert Kuvezin, one of the pioneers of the popularisation of Tuvan music through his work with Huun Huur Tu and Yat Kha.

    The programme was recorded at last summer's 2010 Sayan Ring Festival.

    Andy Kershaw visits the 2010 Sayan Ring Festival in Shushenskoe in deepest Siberia.

    Seun Kuti, Africa 8020110507

    Rita Ray introduces a concert given last month in Edinburgh, as part of the 2011 Africa Soul Rebels tour, featuring Seun Kuti and Africa 80.

    Seun is the son of legendary Nigerian musician Fela Kuti, and the band contains the musicians who played with his late father.

    Their sound is a fusion of brass-driven funk and traditional Yoruba Afrobeat rhythms.

    Rita Ray introduces a concert featuring Seun Kuti and Africa 80.

    Seun Kuti, Egypt 8020120408

    Rita Ray introduces a concert from Edinburgh, given as part of the 2011 Africa Soul Rebels tour and featuring Seun Kuti and Egypt 80. Seun is the son of legendary Nigerian musician Fela Kuti, and the band contains the musicians who played with his late father. Their Afrobeat sound is a fusion of brass-driven funk and traditional Yoruba rhythms.

    Rita Ray introduces a concert featuring Seun Kuti and Egypt 80.

    Songlines Music Awards 2012 Concert20121209

    Lucy Duran presents music from around the world recorded at the Songlines Music Awards concert.

    On stage at the Barbican in London, winners of this years awards gather to play live, including Touareg desert rock band Tinariwen, winners of the 2012 Best Group category.

    Tinariwen is a band whose music is inextricably linked with the plight of the Saharan Touareg people. From their early days fighting in the Touareg rebellion of the early 1990s its members now face threats of violence if they return to their homes in the North of Mali, an area for whose independence they once fought and is now under control of armed Islamist groups. Having made their distinctive desert-rock sound world famous, Tinariwen have inspired a new generation of Touareg musicians, yet their music still embodies a raw power, both of the desert and of the struggle of the Touareg people over the years.

    Sri Lanka2011091820120826

    Lucy Duran travels around Sri Lanka to explore its varied musical cultures.

    Having visited the North of Sri Lanka earlier this year for the World Routes Academy, Lucy Duran continues her journey around the island to explore its diverse musical cultures.

    Sinhala is the most widely spoken language in Sri Lanka, and Sinhalese music focuses on drumming and dancing. In the city of Kandy, capital of the ancient Sinhalese empire, Lucy witnesses the weekly ritual of the washing of the Tooth of the Buddha. The tooth is enshrined in seven bejewelled golden caskets, and kept within the inner sanctum of the Sri Dalada Maligawa temple where each week the caskets are washed and the perfumed water handed out to the faithful. At the other end of the spectrum, she meets an astrologer and his two sons, who perform all night Low Country healing rituals, based on Sri Lankan Buddhist horoscopes and accompanied by a haunting style of singing and virtuosic drumming.

    On the East coast of Sri Lanka in the city of Batticaloa the Burgher community have preserved the music dancing and language of the Portuguese settlers of the 16th century. Descended from these early Portuguese settlers, the Burghers are a small community who still speak a Portuguese Creole and in the company of Sonny Ockersz Lucy attends a party at the Burgher Union Hall, to hear their unique wedding music and learn how the community have picked up the pieces after the devastating tsunami of 2004.

    Batticaloa is also famous for its singing fish. A documented phenomenon, legend has it that if you head out into the middle of the lagoon at midnight on a full moon you can hear the fish sing, if you're happy to brave the alligators and a tipsy boatman that is.

    Back on the West coast of Sri Lanka there exists a community smaller than the Burghers, but who also trace their roots back to the 16th century. Proudly calling themselves Kaffirs, this group of musicians from Sirambiadiya are descended from African slaves brought to Sri Lanka from Mozambique by the Portuguese, as soldiers to fight against the Sinhalese Kings. With a population dwindling, the Kaffir Manja group still play the music of their ancestors, and transport a little bit of East Africa to the Indian Ocean.

    Lucy ends her journey round the island with a Sri Lankan national obsession. At cricket matches throughout the recent Cricket World Cup, the sound of the Pappare bands could be heard egging on supporters and players. With their cross-cultural repertoire of Tamil, Sinhala and Hindi popular songs and film hits the Kuja Pappara band are one of the best in town, and recording their session they get the whole neighbourhood dancing!

    Presented by Lucy Duran

    Produced by Peter Meanwell

    First broadcast in September 2011.

    Sinhala is the most widely spoken language in Sri Lanka, and Sinhalese music focuses on drumming and dancing.

    In the city of Kandy, capital of the ancient Sinhalese empire, Lucy witnesses the weekly ritual of the washing of the Tooth of the Buddha.

    The tooth is enshrined in seven bejewelled golden caskets, and kept within the inner sanctum of the Sri Dalada Maligawa temple where each week the caskets are washed and the perfumed water handed out to the faithful.

    At the other end of the spectrum, she meets an astrologer and his two sons, who perform all night Low Country healing rituals, based on Sri Lankan Buddhist horoscopes and accompanied by a haunting style of singing and virtuosic drumming.

    On the East coast of Sri Lanka in the city of Batticaloa the Burgher community have preserved the music dancing and language of the Portuguese settlers of the 16th century.

    Descended from these early Portuguese settlers, the Burghers are a small community who still speak a Portuguese Creole and in the company of Sonny Ockersz Lucy attends a party at the Burgher Union Hall, to hear their unique wedding music and learn how the community have picked up the pieces after the devastating tsunami of 2004.

    Batticaloa is also famous for its singing fish.

    A documented phenomenon, legend has it that if you head out into the middle of the lagoon at midnight on a full moon you can hear the fish sing, if you're happy to brave the alligators and a tipsy boatman that is.

    Back on the West coast of Sri Lanka there exists a community smaller than the Burghers, but who also trace their roots back to the 16th century.

    Proudly calling themselves Kaffirs, this group of musicians from Sirambiadiya are descended from African slaves brought to Sri Lanka from Mozambique by the Portuguese, as soldiers to fight against the Sinhalese Kings.

    With a population dwindling, the Kaffir Manja group still play the music of their ancestors, and transport a little bit of East Africa to the Indian Ocean.

    Lucy ends her journey round the island with a Sri Lankan national obsession.

    At cricket matches throughout the recent Cricket World Cup, the sound of the Pappare bands could be heard egging on supporters and players.

    With their cross-cultural repertoire of Tamil, Sinhala and Hindi popular songs and film hits the Kuja Pappara band are one of the best in town, and recording their session they get the whole neighbourhood dancing!

    Taraf De Haidouks20090228

    Lucy Duran introduces Taraf de Haidouks, feted as the world's greatest gypsy band, in concert at Birmingham's Town Hall, performing their own versions of gypsy-inspired classics by Bartok and Manuel de Falla.

    WORLD ROUTES

    Presented by Lucy Duran

  • albert ketelby

    lezghica

  • aram khachaturian

    danza rituel del fuego

  • bela bartok

    improvised balada

  • e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

    saturday 28th february 2009, 3:00pm

    taraf de haidouks recorded for world routes in november 2007 at birmingham's town hall.

    the return of the magical horses

  • fax.

    020 7765 4378

  • manuel de falla

    tot taraful

  • sapo perapaskero

    romanian folk dance (the missing dance)

  • sapo

    briu and ciocarlia

  • taraf de haidouks

    hora si briu

  • taraf de haidouks

    in a persian market

  • taraf de haidouks

    romanian band taraf de haidouks perform gypsy-inspired classics by bartok and falla

  • produced by.... - roger short

    tel.

    020 7765 4661

  • The Festival On The Niger20060826

    A gathering of some of Mali's most popular musicians in the town of Segou on the banks of the Niger River.

    Lucy Duran introduces music from balafon virtuoso Neba Solo, singer Abdoulaye Diabate and star singer-songwriter Habib Koite.

    The Hidden Music Of Venezuela - 120040710

    The first of two programmes from Venezuela, a country frequently in the news for political unrest, but little-known for its immensely rich music and culture.

    This week Lucy Duran explores the Afro-Venezuelan traditions of the Caribbean coast with rare field recordings made especially for the programme.

    The Hidden Music Of Venezuela 2 Last20050226

    This week Lucy Duran seeks out the harp-playing cowboys of the vast central plains - a hot, lonely and unwelcoming landscape with one of Latin America's most exquisite musical traditions.

    The Imagined Village20120603

    Max Reinhardt introduces a concert from Liverpool Philharmonic Hall by The Imagined Village, a group of musicians taking a fresh look at English traditions through arrangements of folk songs, as well as new compositions. The band includes folk legend Martin Carthy, singers Eliza Carthy and Jackie Oates, composer and guitarist Simon Emmerson, sitar player Sheema Mukherjee and percussionist Johnny Kalsi.

    The Jean Jenkins Archive20111127

    Lucy Duran heads to the National Museum of Scotland to explore the archive of pioneering ethnomusicologist Jean Jenkins.

    Curated by the Keeper of World Cultures Henrietta Lidchi, the NMS has recently opened its Jean Jenkins collection to the public, incorporating her musical instrument collection, diaries, hundreds of field recordings and radio archive.

    Producer Peter Meanwell.

    Jenkins travelled widely throughout Africa and Central Asia between the 1950s and 1980s creating exceptional recordings, and taking detailed notes.

    She was a key figure in laying the ground for the contemporary world music scene, and as well as a fascinating insight into traditional music from around the world, her archives reveal a larger than life woman, who fled McCarthy, was friends with Haile Selassie and who was meticulous, packing silk handkerchiefs and girdles whenever she travelled.

    Lucy Duran explores the archive of pioneering ethnomusicologist Jean Jenkins.

    Timitar Festival 200920100410

    Carlinhos Brown in concert: the iconic Brazilian singer recorded live in the Moroccan city of Agadir, also a set from veteran Jamaican reggae singer Max Romeo - both artists were making their debut appearance in Africa.

    Introduced by Lucy Duran.

    The Timitar Festival in Agadir gave these two artists a chance to fulfil a dream - to go and perform in the continent that both consider their spiritual home.

    When Max Romeo released his song 'Wet Dream' in 1969, the BBC never quite believed his claim that it was about a leaky roof, and the record was famously banned.

    In the 1970s he moved away from what he called his 'saucy' songs and became a Rastafarian, writing songs such as 'War in-a Babylon'.

    Carlinhos Brown's music has its roots in religious music of the African Yoruba deities, but his style ranges far and wide.

    He is seen as hugely influential in Brazil, not only because of his music, but also because of his work in the favelas of northern Brazil, where he runs a music school.

    Lucy Duran presents Carlinhos Brown and Max Romeo performing in Agadir, Morocco.

    Toumani Diabate20100605

    Lucy Duran presents Toumani Diabate in concert, performing his Ali Farka Touré Variations, recorded on stage at the Barbican in London.

    Toumani and his band perform their interpretations of the music of the late great Malian guitarist and singer Ali Farka Touré, including tracks from their recently released final recording together, 'Ali and Toumani'.

    Lucy Duran presents Toumani Diabate and his band in concert at the Barbican, London.

    Vieux Farka Toure20090606

    Lucy Duran presents highlights from a concert by Malian guitarist and songwriter Vieux Farka Toure, recorded at London's Jazz Cafe.

    Lucy Duran with highlights from a concert by Malian guitarist/songwriter Vieux Farka Toure

    Womad 2010 Highlights20100731

    Lucy Duran introduces highlights from last weekend's WOMAD Festival in Wiltshire, including the Radio 3 Stage performance by singer Dobet Gnaore from the Ivory Coast, plus Congolese street band Staff Benda Bilili on the Open Air stage.

    This year BBC Radio 3 marks ten years at WOMAD, a long track record of broadcasting performances from the leading stars of world music.

    The Radio 3 Stage continues the tradition of hosting a unique mix of new and emerging artists, and the on-site Radio 3 studio will be broadcasting main-stage highlights, exclusive interviews as well as the celebrated truck sessions.

    Lucy Duran with highlights from WOMAD 2010, including Dobet Gnaore and Staff Benda Bilili.

    Womad 2011 - Fatoumata Diawara, Savoy Cajun Family Band20110806

    Lucy Duran presents more highlights from this year's WOMAD festival.

    Including music from rising star, Malian singer Fatoumata Diawara and some earthy footstomping from Lousiana Cajun royalty, the Savoy Cajun Family Band.

    Highlights from WOMAD 2011, featuring Fatoumata Diawara and the Savoy Cajun Family Band.

    Womad 2012 Highlights20120805

    Lucy Duran presents more highlights from last weekend's WOMAD festival in Wiltshire, including Frank Yamma from Australia, Abdallah Oumbadougou from Niger and the panpie group Narasirato from the Solomon Islands. Producer James Parkin.

    Lucy Duran presents highlights from the 2012 WOMAD festival.

    Womad 2012 Highlights: Nazaket Teymurova, Boubacar Traore20120812

    Lucy Duran presents a final programme of highlights from the WOMAD Festival. Nazaket Teymurova, a classical singer from Azerbaijan, makes her much-anticipated UK debut on the BBC Radio 3 stage, and Malian singer and guitarist Boubacar Traore performs in the giant Siam Tent.

    Highlights from the 2012 WOMAD festival, featuring Nazaket Teymurova and Boubacar Traore.

    Womad New Zealand20050514

    Charlie Gillett introduces highlights from one of WOMAD's international offshoots, held in Taranaki on New Zealand's North Island.

    Featured artists include Maori singer Mahinarangi Tocker, Australian Aboriginal rocker George Rrurrambu with his band Birdwave, and Kari Kari from the world's most isolated island, Rapanui (Easter Island).

    Womad Unheard20101023

    : a look back at last summer's festival, with highlights not broadcast before, including the Radio 3 Stage's memorable closing act, Kanda Bongo Man.

    Introduced by Lucy Duran.

    Lucy Duran presents highlights from the 2010 WOMAD festival.

    Women Of The World Festival 201120110402

    Lucy Duran presents a performance by fadista Claudia Aurora and Algerian Arab Andalusian singer Nassima, in concert at the Women of the World Festival from the South Bank, London.

    Claudia Aurora is a fadista from Oporto in Portugal.

    She is now based in Bristol and has recently released her first album called Silencio, written in the UK.

    Nassima is a fervent ambassador of the ancient tradition of Andalusian music of Algeria known as the san'a tradition.

    She has played an important role in preserving this classical genre that was traditionally associated with men.

    This is Nassima's debut performance in the UK.

    Lucy Duran presents a concert of Algerian Arab Andalusian music and Portuguese Fado.

    Womex 201020101106

    Highlights from WOMEX, the annual gathering of the world music industry, which takes place this year in Copenhagen.

    WOMEX showcases the newest bands and the freshest talent in world music, and Lucy Duran introduces performances by Finnish accordion virtuoso Maria Kalaniemi, the leading singer of the Reunion Islands Danyel Waro, and Welsh band Mabon, named after the stormy winds of the autumn equinox.

    Producer Roger Short.

    Maria Kalaniemi is a leading figure in the extraordinary Scandinavian accordion movement, playing music rooted in folk styles as well as contemporary music in bands such as Accordion Tribe.

    Danyel Waro grew up singing his local style called 'Maloya', which combines influences from across the Indian Ocean.

    Maloya was once banned by the French colonists, and became a symbol of the Islands' struggle for independence.

    Mabon are based in Wales, but draw their influences from across the celtic world.

    They are led by Jamie Smith on accordion, with fellow Welshman Oli Wilson-Dickson on fiddle, Scottish musician Calum Stewart on wooden flute, and Jamie's dad Derek on guitar.

    Highlights from the 2010 WOMEX event in Copenhagen: Maria Kalaniemi, Danyel Waro, Mabon.

    World Routes Academy20100327

    Lucy Duran is joined in the studio by Radio 3's World Routes Academy mentee, the young oud player Khyam Allami.

    Lucy talks to Khyam about his roots and is given a personal introduction to the Iraqi maqam tradition of music.

    Featuring live oud performances and exclusive recordings of Iraqi musicians from the BBC archives.

    Producer Helene Frisby.

    Khyam is a London based musician of Iraqi descent and the first beneficiary of Radio 3's World Routes Academy which aims to support and inspire young world-music artists by bringing them together with an internationally renowed mentor belonging to the same tradition.

    Khyam's mentor is the celebrated Iraqi guitarist, singer and composer Ilham al Madfai, who lives in Jordan and who Khyam will be working with in Lebanon, Syria and Jordan later this year.

    BBC Radio 3 World Routes Academy is about celebrating world music talent by both supporting existing performers through exploring new collaborations and enabling younger musicians to develop and hone their skills.

    The scheme offers both participants the opportunity to share their musical experiences with particular emphasis on the importance of the mentor passing on his extensive musical experience and cultural heritage to the younger musician.

    Performance is key to the project and the musicians will feature in BBC studio sessions, workshops, performance and concerts.

    The forthcoming collaboration between Khyam Allami and Ilham al-Madfai reflects the development of traditions amongst musical refugees in their new homes and how their desire to fit in with their new environment is both challenged and inspired by their yearning for the land that made them the musicians they are.

    Ilham left Iraq for Jordan and his musical influences reflect western influences and genres.

    Khyam's family left Iraq for Syria and then London and it seems that as he travels further from his homeland the closer he is drawn to his roots and the hard-core musical traditions of his native Iraq.

    Playlist:

    LIVE OUD SOLO

    Longa Furaq by Jamil Bashir, performed by Khyam Allami

    DUR: 1.30

    Farida

    Medri Ana

    Album: Ishraqaat

    33433 Snail Records

    DUR: 6.48

    BBC ARCHIVAL RECORDING

    Abu dhiyya poem sung by Zuhoor Hussein

    accompanied by an Iraqi Ensemble (violin, oud, qanun)

    Recorded in 1940 approx.

    DUR: 3.49

    Yusuf Omar with Tchalghi Baghdadi

    (santur zither, djozé bowed lute and percussions)

    Maqam Nawa

    Album: Maqam Iraqien

    W 260063 NT103 Maison des Cultures du Monde

    DUR.

    3.00

    Maqam Al-Khanabaat, performed by Khyam Allami

    5.00

    ‘Music from Iraq'

    Jamil Bashir oud solo

    Recorded in 1975 approx.

    DUR: 01.31

    Ashgar Be Shama

    Performers unknown

    Recorded in 1980 approx.

    02.05

    Iham Al Madfai

    Album: Ilham Al Madfai

    EMI music (Virgin Records)

    04:48

    A turkish composition, performed by Khyam Allami

    DUR: 3.00

    Performances from the World Routes Academy: British-Iraqi oud player Khyam Allami.

    World Routes Academy 2012: The Launch Concert20120129

    Lucy Duran launches the 2012 World Routes Academy with live performances by oud player Khyam Allami and veena player Hari Sivanesan, as well as the new apprentice and their mentor, who are announced at this special event from the BBC Radio Theatre in London. Producer James Parkin.

    World Routes celebrates the 2012 apprentice and mentor of the BBC Radio 3 World Routes Academy. It will be announced that a UK-based, 19 year old self-taught virtuoso will become the youngest member of the World Routes Academy. His or her mentor is flying in specially from the other side of the world to be at the BBC Radio Theatre. Launched in 2010, the BBC Radio 3 World Routes Academy aims to support and inspire young world music artists by bringing them together with an internationally renowned artist in the same field and belonging to the same tradition. The scheme targets forms of music and musical skills that are under threat to help preserve them.

    Tonight's programme broadcasts highlights of the event held in London two days previously. Oud player Khyam Allami and Veena player Hari Sivanesan took part in the World Routes Academy in 2010 and 2011 respectively.

    From the BBC Radio Theatre, London, Lucy Duran launches the 2012 World Routes Academy.

    World Routes Academy Revisited20121230

    Lucy Duran revisits World Routes Academy 2012 with British-Colombian accordionist Jose Hernando Arias Noguera, reflecting on the challenges, memories and lessons of his apprenticeship. Apart from highlights of the project, which include two trips to Colombia, a Proms concert at the Royal Albert Hall as well as other events, Jose Hernando performs in the studio.

    World Routes Academy, 2011: The Music Of South India, Hari Sivanesan In Jaffna20110723

    For the 2011 World Routes Academy, London born veena player Hari Sivanesan, retraces his family's roots in the Northern Sri Lankan province of Jaffna, and discovers how music is faring now that the civil war is over.

    Making the tricky journey to Northen Sri Lanka, along the bumpy A9 highway flanked by military checkpoints and gun posts, Lucy Duran and Hari Sivanesan head to the lively town of Jaffna, where Hari lived briefly as a baby before spending the rest of his life in London.

    They visit a riotous Temple Chariot Festival as the country celebrates New Year, and Hari meets and plays with one of the foremost performers in the Carnatic tradition, violinist Radakrishnan.

    They watch a performance by a troupe of Vasanthan Koothu dancers, who have not been able to return to their village because of the strict military control over certain High Security Zones, and are now the sole custodians of this rural song and dance tradition.

    As night draws in, Hari and Lucy meet with a group of women who sing a disappearing lullaby tradition, and who also sing mourning songs.

    The painful reality is that each of the women has lost a husband or a son in the civil conflict that tore the country apart, and as they talk they perform these heart rending laments bringing Sri Lankas recent past into sharp focus.

    The World Routes Academy is a BBC Radio 3 initiative which aims to support and inspire young UK based world music artists by bringing them together with an internationally renowned artist in the same field and belonging to the same tradition.

    World Routes Academy protege Hari Sivanesan heads to the Sri Lankan province of Jaffna.

    World Routes Academy, 2011: The Music Of South India, Hari Sivanesan In Tamil Nadu20110716

    As part of the 2011 World Routes Academy, British born veena player Hari Sivanesan travels around Tamil Nadu in South India, to learn more about the classical music of South India that he has grown up playing.

    Together with his mentor, acclaimed South Indian vocalist Aruna Sairam, and presenter Lucy Duran, they embark on a journey of musical and emotional discovery.

    Around the ancient city of Thanjavur, known as the land of temples, they visit the the shrine of Saint Thyagaraja, the venerated South Indian composer, and perform an intimate session in the confines of the shrine.

    They attend a Sampradaya Bhajan session of devotional singing by a Brahmin community in Aruna Sairam's ancestral village, and eat a traditional South Indian meal from a banana leaf on the floor.

    They discover folk music from the other end of the social scale at a village temple deep in the countryside, performed by a troupe of folk drummers and dancers, and Hari makes a pilgrimage to the world's only temple devoted to the Hindu Goddess of knowledge, music and the arts, Saraswati, to pay tribute to his late teacher, Smt Kalpakkam Swaminathan.

    The World Routes Academy is a BBC Radio 3 initiative which aims to support and inspire young UK based world music artists by bringing them together with an internationally renowned artist in the same field and belonging to the same tradition.

    World Routes Academy protege Hari Sivanesan discovers the roots of Carnatic music.

    World Routes Academy, 2011: The Music Of South India, Part 220110430

    This year's World Routes Academy protégé Hari Sivanesan travels to the Indian city of Chennai for his first meeting with his mentor, the singer Aruna Sairam.

    He explores the roots of South Indian music at a temple festival, and talks to fellow veena player Rajesh Vaidya, who draws inspiration in his playing from Michael Jackson.

    He also looks at the contemporary music scene in Chennai with a visit to the city's own Radio One, and meets star film playback singer Srinivas.

    World Routes Academy protégé Hari Sivanesan travels to the Indian city of Chennai.

    World Routes Academy, 2012, London Programme20120311

    World Routes Academy 2012: this year's protégé, London-born teenage accordionist José Hernando, introduces the Colombian 'vallenato' style, looking back to great performers of the past, and playing a studio session with his own band. Plus highlights from José's first session with his mentor, celebrated accordionist Egidio Cuadrado, recorded in José's bedroom at his home in Acton. Introduced by Lucy Duran.

    Launched in 2010, the BBC Radio 3 World Routes Academy aims to support and inspire UK based young world music artists by bringing them together with an internationally renowned artist in the same field and belonging to the same tradition. The scheme targets forms of music and musical skills that are under threat to help preserve them.

    Born in London but of Colombian descent, the talented young José Hernando fell in love with Vallenato, the popular folk style from the Caribbean coast of Colombia, which he learned from watching clips online and on tapes his father brought back from Colombia. José Hernando plays in a number of Vallenato and Cumbia folk bands in London and is the musical director of Revolucion Vallenata, a multi-cultural band celebrating the Vallenato tradition. José Hernando is also currently studying for a degree in Guitar at the Tech Music School in West London.

    For the BBC Radio 3 World Routes Academy 2012, José is paired with Egidio Cuadrado, the gifted Colombian accordion player, perhaps best known for his work with Carlos Vives, the Grammy-winning Colombian star and one of the most celebrated performers in Latin America.

    Lucy Duran with a session by World Routes Academy protege and accordionist Jose Hernando.

    World Routes Academy, 2012, Part 320120429

    World Routes Academy 2012 protégé José Hernando visits Colombia to work with his mentor, celebrated accordionist Egidio Cuadrado. He is also invited to join a session with one of Colombia biggest stars, singer Carlos Vives, and he gets a chance to record one of his own songs in a Bogota studio. With Juan Carlos Jaramillo and Lucy Duran.

    Launched in 2010, the BBC Radio 3 World Routes Academy aims to support and inspire UK based young world music artists by bringing them together with an internationally renowned artist in the same field and belonging to the same tradition. The scheme targets forms of music and musical skills that are under threat to help preserve them.

    Born in London but of Colombian descent, the talented young José Hernando fell in love with Vallenato, the popular folk style from the Caribbean coast of Colombia, which he learned from watching clips online and on tapes his father brought back from Colombia. José Hernando plays in a number of Vallenato and Cumbia folk bands in London and is the musical director of Revolucion Vallenata, a multi-cultural band celebrating the Vallenato tradition. José Hernando is also currently studying for a degree in Guitar at the Tech Music School in West London.

    For the BBC Radio 3 World Routes Academy 2012, José is paired with Egidio Cuadrado, the gifted Colombian accordion player, perhaps best known for his work with Carlos Vives, the Grammy-winning Colombian star and one of the most celebrated performers in Latin America.

    World Routes Academy 2012 protégé José Hernando visits Colombia to work with his mentor.

    World Routes At Womad 2009, Gochaq Askerove And Cimarron *20090725

    From Radio 3's stage in Charlton Park's arboretum, Lucy Duran presents the WOMAD debut of one of the great voices of Central Asia, Azerbaijani singer Gochaq Askerov, as well as highlights from a set by Cimarron, a Colombian seven-piece band who play the fiercely virtuosic Joropo folk style.

    Lucy Duran presents highlights from WOMAD 2009, including Gochaq Askerove and Cimarron.

    World Routes At Womad 2009, Rokoa Traore20090801

    Lucy Duran presents highlights from a set by Malian singer and guitarist Rokia Traore, recorded at the 2009 WOMAD Festival at Charlton Park in Wiltshire.

    Traore performs material from her most recent album Tchamanchte - songs inspired by the sound of old Gretsch guitar.

    Highlights from a set by Malian singer and guitarist Rokia Traore, from WOMAD 2009.

    World Routes In Madagascar - 420120115

    In the first of two programmes Lucy Duran travels to Madagascar to record that island's unique traditional music. Starting high on the central plateau in the musical capital, Fianarantsoa, she then travels to the seaside town of Tulear in the far south. En route, she shops in a magic market, goes Lemur spotting, and passes through the wild boom-town of Ilakaka, famed for its precious stones. All along the way there's specially recorded music from some of the island's best musicians. Producer James Parkin.

    In January 2010 World Routes broadcast three programmes made on the high central plateau of Madagascar. In January 2012, Lucy Duran and the team continue the journey, moving from the plateau down to the coast in the far south. As with all World Routes on-location programmes, all the music was specially recorded in or near the homes of the musicians. This mysterious island is full of extraordinary animal and plant life - home to more unique species than just about anywhere on the planet. But for us, what makes this island of strange dreams, ancestral worship and sorcery so special is its music. And, like the natural life, its unique evolution - neither African nor Asian - makes it a wonderful melting pot of instruments and styles.

    Lucy Duran visits the the musical capital of Madagascar, Fianarantsoa.

    World Routes In Madagascar - 5 Last20120122

    Lucy Duran's in Madagascar to record the island's unique traditional music. This week, she's in the sleepy seaside town of Tulear, home of musician, wrestler and magician Mandindry. Plus she takes a small boat to the remote community of Anakao where she meets a group who play mandolins stringed with fishing line, and has to kill a goat in order to visit the grave of renowned local musician Robert Rindy. Producer James Parkin.

    In January 2010 World Routes broadcast three programmes made on the high central plateau of Madagascar. In January 2012, Lucy Duran and the team continue the journey, moving from the plateau down to the coast in the far south. As with all World Routes on-location programmes, all the music was specially recorded in or near the homes of the musicians. This mysterious island is full of extraordinary animal and plant life - home to more unique species than just about anywhere on the planet. But for us, what makes this island of strange dreams, ancestral worship and sorcery so special is its music. And, like the natural life, its unique evolution - neither African nor Asian - makes it a wonderful melting pot of instruments and styles.

    Lucy Duran travels to Tulear and Anakao in Madagascar to hear traditional music.

    World Routes In Poland20100320

    In a special edition of the programme, Lucy Duran travels to Poland to explore the folk music of Chopin's homeland, meeting suka player Maria Pomianowska, the folk group Kapela Brodow and the Warsaw Village Band.

    All music recorded on location in Warsaw, 9/10 May 2008, by Andrew Smillie

    Music details:

    Josef Rosinski: An old style oberek (0.57)

    album: Sources of Polish Folk Music: Mazowsze

    Polish Radio PRCD 170

    Warsaw Village Band: Polka (0.34)

    Recorded at Pracovnia Arts Club, Warsaw, 10 May 2008

    BBC recording - not commercially available

    More details below

    Kapela Brodow:

    Mazurka (2.20)

    Anna Broda (vocal/percussion); Witek Broda (fiddle)

    Polonaise (3.41)

    Anna Broda (vocal/percussion); Witek Broda (fiddle); Jacek Mielcarek (clarinet)

    Harvest Song (1.56)

    Anna Broda (vocal/percussion); Witek Broda (hurdy gurdy)

    Recorded at St Dominic's Monastery, Warsaw, 9 May 2008

    Maria Pomianowska Ensemble:

    Oberek od Kajokow (2.55)

    Maria Pomianowska (fiddle from Plock); Iwona Rapacz (bass suka); Robert Sziwak (drum)

    Suwany na suke (2.18)

    Maria Pomianowska (suka); Marta Maslanka (dulcimer)

    Chopin's Mazurka Op.68 No.2 (2.21)

    Maria Pomianowska (fiddle from Plock); Iwona Rapacz (bass suka); Robert Sziwak (drum); Marta Maslanka (dulcimer); Malgorzata Szarlik (hollow violin)

    Recorded at Royal Castle, Warsaw, 9 May 2008

    Warsaw Village Band:

    When Johnny Went to Fight in the War (5.29)

    Fishie (3.03)

    Four Wild Horses (3.42)

    Sylvia Swiatkowska (violin/suka/vocal); Wojtek Krzak (violin/vocal); Maja Kleszcz (cello/vocal/percussion); Maciej Szajkowski (percussion); Piotr Glinski (percussion)

    Lucy Duran travels to Poland to explore the folk music of Chopin's homeland.

    01African Artists
    01African Artists, Amadou And Mariam20091219

    Lucy Duran presents concert recordings by African artists who have broken through to the mainstream.

    Following successful appearances this year at Hyde Park and the main stage at Glastonbury, the highly-rated Malian duo Amadou and Mariam play an end-of-year gig at the HMV Forum in London's Kentish Town.

    Lucy Duran presents Malian duo Amadou and Mariam in concert in London's Kentish Town.

    01An Appalachian Road Trip20091017

    In a programme recorded on location in the USA, broadcaster, writer and musician Banning Eyre discovers and records the uniquely American folk music that was born in the southern Appalachian mountains through the 18th and 19th centuries.

    He visits the small town of Mount Airy, in Surry County, North Carolina, home to the Mount Airy Fiddlers Convention, where he meets the extraordinary players and singers that are keeping this music alive, and finds out how old-time music is the direct precursor of what we now call country and bluegrass.

    In an interview with musician and field recordist Mike Seeger, recorded just a few months before he died, Banning discovers the roots of the music in the parallel histories of the European settlers and African slaves, and how post-Emancipation, a distinctly American music was forged from the interplay of the African banjo and the European fiddle.

    Banning also visits local radio station WPAQ and tries the festival delicacy that is deep-fried oreos.

    World Routes: An Appalachian Roadtrip

    Presenter: Banning Eyre

    Producer: Peter Meanwell

    Sound Engineer: Martin Appleby

    Saturday 17th October 2009

    Cumberland Gap

    Banjo player C.B.

    Wohlford (Maric, VA)

    Recorded by Maud Karpeles in 1950

    Soldier's Joy played on the mountain dulcimer

    BBC recording from the Mt Airy Fiddler's Convention, Mt Airy, North Carolina, USA: 5th June 2009

    The Boatsman

    Haywire Family (Nashville, TN)

    Interview with musician and folklorist Mike Seeger

    Woah Mule

    Benton Flippen and the Smokey Valley Boys (Mt Airy, NC)

    June Apple

    The Midriffs (Durham, NC)

    Interview with, Kelly Epperson, General Manager WPAQ 740AM, featuring music from the WPAQ archive.

    www.wpaq740.com/

    Hop Old Rabbit

    Singer Elizabeth LaPrelle (Rural Retreat, VA)

    BBC recording from the Mt Airy Fiddler's Convention, Mt Airy, North Carolina, USA: 6th June 2009

    Kiss me sweet

    Fiddle player Mark Campbell (Richmond, VA)

    Interview with musician and broadcaster Paul Brown

    Undone in sorrow

    Singer Karly Dawn Higgins (Morehead, KY)

    Sugar Hill

    Slate Mountain Ramblers (Ararat, VA)

    Chilly Winds

    Banjo player John Hermann (Asheville, NC)

    Interview with dance caller, musician, and flatfoot dancer Phil Jamison

    Cotton Eye Joe

    Snow Creek Old Time Band (Sandy Ridge, NC)

    Cluck Old Hen

    Cool Springs Ramblers (Statesville, NC)

    Banning Eyre visits Mount Airy, North Carolina, and talks to folk musician Mike Seeger.

    01An Appalachian Road Trip, Mount Airy Fiddlers Convention20100619

    In the first of two programmes recorded on-location for World Routes, broadcaster, writer and musician Banning Eyre embarks on his own Appalachian roadtrip to discover and record the uniquely American folk music that was born in the southern Appalachian mountains through the 18th and 19th Centuries.

    He visits the small town of Mount Airy, in Surry County, North Carolina, home to the Mount Airy Fiddlers Convention, where he meets the extraordinary players and singers that are keeping this music alive, and finds out how Old Time music is the direct precursor of what we now call Country and Bluegrass.

    In an interview with musician and field recordist Mike Seeger, recorded just a few months before he died, Banning discovers the roots of the music in the parallel histories of the European settlers and African slaves, and how post-Emancipation a distinctly American music was forged from the interplay of the African banjo and the European fiddle.

    Surry County musician Paul Brown explains the record companies' part in defining Old Time music as a predominantly white occupation, and what's so speacial about this part of the country.

    He visits local radio station WPAQ to hear how they are keeping this traditional rural music alive, and tries the festival delicacy that is deep-fried Oreos.

    Producer: Peter Meanwell

    Repeat.

    Banning Eyre visits Mount Airy, North Carolina, and talks to folk musician Mike Seeger.

    01Argentina, Tango20101009

    In the first of a series of programmes recorded earlier this year in Argentina, musician and writer Banning Eyre travels to the country as it celebrates the 200th Anniversary of its independence from colonial rule, to discover the rich musical cultures that span this vast nation.

    Banning starts his journey in Buenos Aires, a teeming city that feels like a crumbling turn-of-the-century European capital, but with the colour and vibrancy of Latin America.

    Modern Argentina was built upon waves of European immigration in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries, and it was the music of these immigrants, mixed with the milonga of the Argentine countryside, the habanera of Cuban sailors, and the candombe rhythms of African slaves, that formed a potent new form, one that stood for the passion, the grit and the hardships of this new city - Tango.

    Tango's origin as a music is complex, born as it was in the brothels and cabarets on the fringes of society, yet it is intimately connected with the identity of urban Argentina.

    Stepping past the cliches of the dancer with the red rose, Banning meets musicians who explore the rich history of the music, both as a key to its future, but also to their place in modern Argentine society.

    As well as the music, Banning takes a visit to the decorated grave of singer Carlos Gardel and samples the famed Dulce de Leche ice cream, that the inhabitants of Buenos Aires believe is the greatest in the world.

    Featuring on-location sessions and interviews with:

    Adriana Varela: one of the foremost female tango singers in Argentina today, accompanied by 3 guitarists and a bandoneon, evokes the song of the early immigrant tenements in the Rio de la Plata.

    El Arranque: a septet who play every Friday in Buenos Aires, and for the last fifteen years have been slowly documenting the music of the golden era of Argentine tango, the 1930s and 40s.

    Founded by double bass player Ignacio Varchausky, who also runs the organisation Tango Via, they discuss how in contemporary Argentina tango is a potent mirror to reflect on the often turbulent history of the country, and asks difficult questions for today.

    Cristobal Repetto: a singer with an international career, has a voice that recalls the earliest days of Tango Cancion, a form popularised across the world by singer Carlos Gardel.

    He draws on both the urban song as well as the milonga styles that preceded Tango.

    Ramiro Gallo: a young tango composer, who with his quintet draws on the music of the past to create a tango sound whose roots are solid but treads a clear path to the future.

    Especially for World Routes he brings together a 14 piece tango orchestra, which for many is the "true" sound of the music.

    Banning Eyre travels to Argentina to learn about the roots of the tango.

    01Brazilian Performers
    01Darbar Festival 200920090523

    Lopa Kothari and Jameela Siddiqi introduce highlights from the Darbar International South Asian Music Festival 2009, held at the South Bank Centre in London.

    Featuring morning ragas from santoor virtuoso Rahul Sharma and one of the great voices of Hindustani classical music, Ashwini Bhide Deshpande.

    Presented by Lopa Kothari and Jameela Siddiqi

    Produced by Roger Short

    Saturday 23rd May 2009

    Interview between Lopa Kothari and Rahul Sharma

    Sharma: Raag Bhopal Todi

    Rahul Sharma (santoor); Subhankar Banerjee (tabla)

    Highlights from the Darbar South Asian Music Festival 2009, including Rahul Sharma.

    01Darbar Festival 201020100417

    Lopa Kothari and Jameela Siddiqi present highlights from the Darbar Festival of Indian classical music, held earlier this month at Kings Place in London.

    In a focus on South Indian music, veena player Hari Sivanesen is joined by T Pirashanna on mridangam, and Jyotsna Srikanth plays the carnatic-style violin.

    Producer: Roger Short

    This is the first of three programmes from this year's Darbar Festival - the second is next week, and the third, featuring santoor virtuoso Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma, will be broadcast in the autumn.

    The Darbar Festival is the biggest event of its kind in Europe: artists from both North and South Indian musical traditions were presented in fourteen concerts over the Easter weekend - a special feature of Darbar is that the concerts are held across the day from morning until night, allowing for the different raags to be heard in their true time context.

    Lopa Kothari and Jameela Siddiqi will be bringing their own expertise and insights to these programmes, as well as talking to the performers themselves.

    Highlights from the 2010 Darbar Indian classical music festival: Hari Sivanesen.

    01Darbar Festival 2011, Arati Ankalikar-tikekar, Alam Khan20110514

    Lopa Kothari and Jameela Siddiqi present highlights from the Darbar Festival of Indian classical music, held last month at Kings Place in London.

    Featuring a morning raga from the powerful voice of Arati Ankalikar-Tikekar, and a sarod recital from Alam Khan, who as the son of Indian legend Ali Akbar Khan, has to balance his 500-year heritage with an upbringing in contemporary California.

    This is the first of a pair of programmes from this year's Darbar Festival.

    The Darbar Festival is the biggest event of its kind in Europe: artists from both North and South Indian musical traditions were presented in fourteen concerts over the Easter weekend - a special feature of Darbar is that the concerts are held across the day from morning until night, allowing for the different ragas to be heard in their true time context.

    Lopa Kothari and Jameela Siddiqi will be bringing their own expertise and insights to these programmes, as well as talking to the performers themselves.

    Highlights from the 2011 Darbar Festival: Arati Ankalikar-Tikekar and Alam Khan.

    01Jerusalem And Nazareth, Nazareth, The Oud, And Dalal Abu Amana2009032820100925

    Moshe Morad visits the childhood home of Jesus, Nazareth, meeting members of the Joubran musical dynasty, visiting their oud factory and meeting the Nazareth Arabic orchestra.

    Plus a recording from the 2008 Jerusalem Oud Festival of Nazareth-born Dalal Abu Amana, who performs her songs in a special Palestinian dialect unique to Galilee.

    Moshe Morad visits the childhood home of Jesus and visits a long-established oud factory.

    Lucy Duran examines the music of Azerbaijan, focusing on the old songs of the Ashig troubadours and the art music of the virtuosic Mugham performers.

    Focusing on the music of Azerbaijan, including old songs of the Ashig troubadours.

    01Malick Pathe Sow And Kronos Quartet2009061320090620

    Lucy Duran introduces a specially recorded session by Senegalese singer and hoddu player Malick Pathe Sow.

    Plus an interview with David Harrington about the making of Floodplain, Kronos Quartet's new album of rare music from Central Asia, East Africa and beyond.

    Presented by Lucy Duran

    Produced by Felix Carey

    Saturday 13th June 2009

    Malick Pathe Sow plus David Harrington of the Kronos Quartet

    Malick Pathé Sow (hoddu/guitar/vocals)

    Komlan Octave (calabash)

    Bao Sissoko (kora)

    Mady Kouyate (guitar)

    Sow: Jeeri Bona

    Malick Pathe Sow and Ensemble

    Interview with David Harrington of Kronos Quartet

    Midhat Assem, Arr Osvaldo Golijov and Kronos: Ya Habibi Ta'ala

    Kronos Quartet

    Album: Floodplain

    Nonesuch 518349

    Trad.

    Iran, Arr Jacob Garchik and Kronos: Lullaby

    Alemu Aga: Tew semagn hagere (Listen to me, my fellow countrymen)

    Said Rustamov, arr Alim Qasimov, string arr.

    Jacob Garchik: Getme, Getme

    Interview with Malick Pathe Sow

    Sow: Maayo Men

    Sow: Sama

    Sow: Fantang

    Recorded by BBC sound engineer James Birtwistle at Broadcasting House 2009

    Featuring Malick Pathe Sow and Kronos Quartet.

    In a programme recorded on location in China, Lucy Duran explores the music of three of the country's 56 different ethnic groups.

    Featuring the songs of the Hani and Yi people in Yunnan Province.

    Living high up in the mountains near the borders with Vietnam, Laos and Burma, they make instruments from grass to accompany songs that were born in the world's most spectacular paddy fields.

    Lucy Duran explores the music of the Hani and Yi people in Yunnan Province, China.

    01Music From The Festival On The Niger 20082010052220100501

    Ten thousand people from all parts of Mali, from neighbouring West African countries, and from Europe, Asia and the Americas, gathered in Segou in central Mali earlier this year for the annual Festival on the Niger.

    Lucy Duran introduces performances by Abdoullaye Diabate and Yoro Diallo, who are both hugely popular in Mali but little known outside, and she goes in search of the rarely-heard hunters music of the region.

    The Festival is literally on the Niger, as the performers play from a barge that floats on this great African river.

    It was started three years ago to promote culture and tourism in that region, to try and tempt travellers on their way to Timbuktu to stop in Segou for a while.

    The artist line-up is a mix of internationally known Malian artists such as Afel Bocoum from Niafunke, and artists who are popular in Mali but less well known outside.

    Abdoullaye Diabate is a singer who comes from Segou.

    He sees himself as a modern-day griot, giving social and political messages to people while entertaining them with great songs for dancing.

    Yoro Diallo comes from Wassulu in the west, and is a leading player of the hunters music of that region.

    Music from the 2008 Festival on the Niger, including Abdoullaye Diabate and Yoro Diallo.

    Fifty years after sixteen countries in Africa became independent, Lucy Duran and the French journalist Florent Mazzoleni play rare tracks from that period.

    Music was to play a central role in the search for new identity, and in the 60s and 70s some of the continent's greatest dance music was created.

    Today's programme celebrates countries that became independent in the first half of 1960 including Congo, Senegal, Guinea and Cameroon.

    Producer James Parkin.

    Based in Bordeaux, the French writer and photographer Florent Mazzoleni has travelled all over Africa collecting music, and in particular, documentating the soundtrack of the golden era of Atlantic African music.

    He's written fifteen books, most notably Epic of African music: Rhythms of Atlantic Africa" and "Salif Keita, Voice of the Mandingo".

    His latest book, "Motown: Soul and glamour" will be translated into English this autumn.

    The programme includes tracks from Florent's collection many of which have not been re-released since their limited pressing in the 60s and 70s - let alone played on British radio.

    And these are tracks that reflect a unique period in African history: a period of liberation and short-lived optimism.

    Another programme with Florent will be broadcast in September 2010, and will celebrate some of the African countries that became independent in the second half of 1960, such as Mali, Ivory Coast, Nigeria and Gabon.

    Lucy Duran with rare vintage music from African countries that became independent in 1960."

    01Tenth Anniversary20101211

    In the first of two programmes, Lucy Duran celebrates ten years of World Routes with highlights from a special event recorded at the BBC's Maida Vale studios.

    There are performances from Senegal, Azerbaijan, Mongolia, Peru and Turkey, as well as recordings from around the world taken from the Radio 3 World Music Archive.

    Producer James Parkin

    World Routes was first broadcast on Radio 3 in the autumn of 2000 - then on a Sunday night, it proved popular and was soon moved to a Saturday afternoon.

    Presenting the programme since the beginning, is its anchor, the Grammy-winning record producer, teacher and world music expert Lucy Duran.

    In 10 years, World Routes has broadcast sessions and live concerts with a complete "Who's Who" of world music artists from Youssou N'Dour, Ladysmith Black Mambazo and Khaled, to Mariza, Caetano Veloso and Ravi Shankar.

    Not just interested in the stars of world music, World Routes is on a mission to travel to the most far-flung corners of the planet to document and - in its own small way - preserve endangered musical traditions.

    In the past 10 years World Routes producers and sound engineers, along with Lucy Duran and a team of guest presenters, have left the comfort of Broadcasting House in search of real roots traditions.

    To date, the programme has visited some 51 countries, including 15 in Africa, 15 in Asia , and 9 in the Americas - countries as diverse as Haiti, Iraq, Belize, Vietnam, Georgia, China, Madagascar and Cape Verde.

    World Routes has recorded at festivals throughout the world including WOMAD (in the UK, the Canaries and New Zealand), the Jerusalem Oud Festival, the Fez Festival of Sacred Music, the Sayan Ring Festival in Siberia, and, in 2010, had its own residency at the Abril Pro Rock Festival in Recife, Brazil.

    Lucy Duran marks ten years of World Routes, with music from Senegal, Azerbaijan, Mongolia.

    01Timitar Festival 200920091128

    Lucy Duran introduces highlights from the 2009 Timitar Festival, held in the Moroccan coastal town of Agadir.

    This celebration of Berber culture attracts audiences of more than 100,000 to the city's vast central square, drawn by the chance to see Berber artists whose music is rarely heard outside Morocco.

    With performances by Rays Aarab Atigui from the Tiznit region as well as local stars Iguida.

    Highlights from the 2009 Timitar Festival.

    With music from Rays Aarab Atigui and Iguida.

    01Womex 2009
    01Womex 2009, Womex 200920091107

    Lucy Duran presents highlights from WOMEX, the annual gathering of the world music industry.

    The 2009 event takes place in Copenhagen in Denmark and showcases the newest bands and the freshest talent in world music.

    With performances by Chinagrass band Hanggai from the Chinese province of Inner Mongolia, and Quebec folk band Yves Lambert and the Bebert Orchestra.

    Highlights from 2009's WOMEX in Copenhagen.

    With Yves Lambert and the Bebert Orchestra.

    01Womex 2011, Womex 201120111113

    Highlights from WOMEX, the annual gathering of the world music industry, which takes place this year in Copenhagen.

    WOMEX showcases the newest bands and the freshest talent in world music, and Lopa Kothari introduces performances by Mars Melto and the Melanesian Allstars, Mexican accordion virtuoso Celso Piña, and multi-national klezmer band The Other Europeans.

    Mars Melto and the Melanesian Allstars is led by Vanuatu musician Marcel Meltherorong, who draws inspriation from reggae as well as Melanesian traditions, with a band featuring players from across the region.

    Celso Piña is a veteran of some eighteen albums, with a style rooted in cumbia, but bringing in influences from ska and rap.

    The Other Europeans was founded by American accordionist and pianist Alan Bern, best known for his work with Brave Old World.

    He teamed up with Hungarian cimbalom player Kalman Balogh to create a band which has set out to "uncover the traces of the lost world of the shared musical culture of the Jews and Roma, who lived, intermarried and played music together in pre-WWII Bessarabia.".

    Lopa Kothari presents highlights from the 2011 WOMEX world music festival in Copenhagen.

    01World Cup 2010
    01World Cup 2010, When The Whites Go Marching In20100703

    When the Whites go Marching in: Lopa Kothari joins the England supporters' brass band at the World Cup in South Africa, and introduces highlights of the live music at the Fan Parks, including a set from the kwaito queen of the townships, Thandiswa Mazwai.

    Yes, more of that great music we've been hearing on TV World Cup broadcasts.

    South Africa has one of the world's richest musical cultures, and artists like Ladysmith Black Mambazo and Hugh Masekela are major international stars.

    Local music is playing an essential role in the World Cup, with performances of live music at the official Fan Parks.

    In the first of two programmes, we hear music from the Rustenburg Fan Park - and there's that special session with the England Band, the brass ensemble that follows the England team everywhere, and who will be swapping football anthems with Johannesburg choir Memeza.

    Lopa Kothari presents highlights of live music at the World Cup Fan Parks in South Africa.

    01World Routes In Azerbaijan2009032820100925
    01World Routes In Brazil20081227

    Lucy Duran travels to rural North East Brazil, going in search of traditional Forro music.

    Lucy Duran travels to rural North East Brazil, going in search of traditional Forro, a style of country music much-loved there but little-known outside.

    And, travelling deeper inland towards the Sertao - Brazil's wild semi-desert area - she has a chance encounter with some singing cowboys.

    01World Routes In Brazil, - North East Brazil20100130

    YOU CAN WATCH SOME VIDEO CLIPS IN THE SPECIAL PLAYERS AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS PAGE.

    In the first of two programmes, Lucy Duran travels to rural North East Brazil.

    This week she goes in search of traditional Forro, a style of country music much-loved in Brazil but little-known outside.

    Plus, travelling deeper inland towards the Sertao - Brazil's wild semi-desert area - she has a chance encounter with some singing cowboys.

    World Routes

    Presented by Lucy Duran

    Produced by James Parkin

    Recorded and mixed by Martin Appleby

    Tel.

    020 7765 4661

    Fax 020 7765 5052

    e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

    Saturday 30th January, 3pm

    Gonzaga: Danado de Bom

    Luiz Gonzaga

    Brazilian Classics 3

    Luaka Bop 7599-26323-2

    Gonzaga: A Feira de Caruaru

    Herbert Lucena: Balanca Boeiro

    Azulao with his musicians

    Recorded by the BBC in Caruaru, Pernambuco on 8th September 2008

    Azulao: Dona Teresa

    Azulao: Dor de Cotovelo

    Silva: Nesse coco eu mao brinco mais

    Walmir Silva

    Silva: Improvisation for Paulo Andre

    Silva: Casa de Maroca

    Melo: Brasil Pernambuco

    Maciel Melo

    Volume 1 of Musica de Pernambuco: Forro,

    Trad: Balanco da canoa

    Coco Raizes

    Recorded by the BBC in Arcoverde on 7th September 2008

    Trad: Abelha

    Improvisation about the World Routes team

    Unknown cowboys

    Recorded by the BBC in the Sertao of Pernambuco on 7th September 2008

    Lucy Duran on location, with music recorded for the programme in North East Brazil.

    01World Routes In Brazil: Carnival20090207

    As part of series of programmes celebrating the Brazilian carnival and its music, Lucy Duran travels to two places famous for their Carnivals - Recife in the Northeast and Rio de Janeiro in the Southeast.

    She discovers some of the rhythms unique to Recife including maracatu, frevo and ciranda, recorded on a beach, in a cow-shed and in the old colonial city of Olinda.

    She also finds out about the mangue bit movement and its frontman, the late Chico Science.

    Lucy Duran discovers Brazilian Carnival music, including maracatu, frevo and ciranda.

    01World Routes In Canada, A Visit To The Chants De Vielles Festival In Quebec20111211

    Mary Ann Kennedy explores the rich folk traditions of Quebec at the annual Chants de Vielles Festival in the tiny village of Calixa La Vallée.

    Its main stage, set up in a barn, hosts a performance by star a cappella group Les Charbonniers d'Enfer; Les Chauffeurs a Pied play for a barn dance; and trio Serre l'Ecoute lead the audience in some rousing anti-English songs from the eighteenth century.

    This is the first of two programmes from Quebec and Cape Breton, the first time World Routes has visited Canada.

    The Chants de Vielles Festival takes place in the local village showground, and one of the tasks of festvial volunteers is to clear the main barn of 'dirt' to prepare for the concerts.

    Local people house the artists, put up the marquees and feed the festival-goers, but it's also an international event which attracts performers and audience from Europe as well as across North America.

    It's a festival where top performers mingle freely with amateurs, and there are improvised music sessions starting up throughout the day, and well into the night.

    Mary Ann Kennedy visits the Chants de Vielles Festival in Quebec.

    01World Routes In Cape Verde20090912

    Lucy Duran visits Cape Verde, the windswept and dramatic archipelago off the west coast of Africa.

    She explores the arrival of slaves in the 15th century and the subsequent departure of generations of Cape Verdeans searching for a better life in America and Europe.

    With rare and specially-made music recordings, including the morna style made famous by Cesaria Evora, which longs for life back on the islands.

    Lucy Duran presents Cape Verdean music exploring slavery, emigration and longing for home.

    01World Routes In China2009061320090620
    01World Routes In China, World Routes In China -part 120090620

    In a programme recorded on location in China, Lucy Duran explores the music of three of the country's 56 different ethnic groups.

    Featuring the songs of the Hani and Yi people in Yunnan Province.

    Living high up in the mountains near the borders with Vietnam, Laos and Burma, they make instruments from grass to accompany songs that were born in the world's most spectacular paddy fields.

    WORLD ROUTES

    Presented by Lucy Duran

    Produced by James Parkin

    Tel.

    020 7765 4661

    Fax.

    020 7765 5052

    e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

    Saturday 20th June 2009, 3:00pm

    Yi Musicians in Ar Zhe he, Honghe County, Yunnan Province: Cha War Hge

    Recorded Wednesday 26 March 2008 in a quarry near Ar Zha he

    Lucy talks with her guide Jiang Anxi, musician and researcher

    Yi Musicians in Ar Zhe he, Honghe County, Yunnan Province: Indoor Love Song (Evening Music)

    Lucy and Anxi on the dirt road to Ar Zha he, high up in the mountains

    Hani Musicians in Ar Zha he, Honghe County, Yunnan Province: Sung Loudly

    In the rock quarry near the village of Ar Zha he, Lucy and Anxi discuss the look of the Yi people.

    Hani Musicians in Ar Zha he, Honghe County, Yunnan Province: Wu Chu a ci

    Lucy wanders amongst the musicians as they construct their instruments from leaves.

    Lucy and Anxi talk with the leader of the musicians

    Voice over: Haoyu Zhang

    Hani Musicians in Ar Zha he, Honghe County, Yunnan Province: Wedding Lament

    Anxi explains the song: it's about a daughter leaving home.

    Her mother tells her she doesn't want her to leave, then her friends join in the lament and start to weep.

    Yi Musicians in Ar Zhe he, Honghe County, Yunnan Province: Song and Dance - we're about to dance and have fun, why don't you join us?

    Lucy talks about Yunnan Province and its rice terraces

    Hani Musicians in Ar Zha he, Honghe County, Yunnan Province: Hani Festival Song

    Interview with Professor Zhang, who organised the session in Ar Zha he

    Voice over: David Yip

    On the new road to Shi Ping, Lucy reflects on changes in Yunnan.

    Meanwhile, Anxi tells her more about tofu.

    Yi Musicians of the Flower Waist branch: Untitled Dance

    Recorded Thursday 27 March at the Tobacco Hotel in Shi Ping, Yunnan Province

    Interview with Zhang Feng Xian of the Flower Waist branch musicians

    Voice over: Angel Shi

    Yi Musicians of the Flower Waist branch: Circle Dance of Joy

    Closing thoughts from Lucy

    Hani Musicians: Wu chu a ci

    album: Alili - Multi-part folksongs of Yunnan's ethnic minorities

    Pan Records PAN7012/13

    Recorded by Professor Zhang in 1995

    Unless otherwise stated, all recordings were made on location, specially for the BBC by sound engineer James Birtwistle

    Lucy Duran explores the music of the Hani and Yi people in Yunnan Province, China.

    01World Routes In Georgia20090117

    Music recorded on location for the programme includes lively polyphonic drinking songs and the beautiful choral music of the Georgian Church.

    Music includes the beautiful choral music of the Georgian Church.

    01World Routes In Istanbul20100213

    Istanbul is a European Capital of Culture for 2010 and in the first of two programmes Moshe Morad goes in search of traditional music in this melting-pot of peoples and cultures.

    Including a live session at Badehane's bar with gypsy clarinettist Selim Sesler, troubadour songs recorded in one of the city's oldest hamams, and a rare recording of an Alevi ceremony.

    A minority branch of Shia Islam, the Alevis controversially believe in equality between men and women, and meet once a week for music and mass-wailing.

    Producer James Parkin.

    1/2

    Istanbul is a rich and diverse meeting point for musicians in Turkey, and it's a city where you can find every type of Turkish traditional music represented.

    It's also a cross-roads between Europe and Asia, East and West.

    In World Routes in Istanbul, Moshe Morad explores this rich mix and records sessions with many of Turkey's top musicians - from one of the best clarinettists in the world (Selim Sesler), to the country's most famous Kurdish voice (Aynur), and the sublime guitar playing of Erkan Ogur.

    The music and the city are brought to life in a number of atmospheric settings such as the 15th Century bath-house Cemberlitas, Istanbul's most iconic music venue Babylon, and the tiny bar called Badehane - in a quiet street away from the hustle and bustle of Taksim, it's where Selim Sesler has played every Wednesday night for nearly a decade.

    Moshe learns about some of Turkey's best-loved traditional instruments such as the kamanche and the saz, hears the stories behind the music, and finds out from the people who live there what Istanbul means to them.

    Is this vibrant city an island in Turkey, is it in Europe or Asia, and is it secular or religious? Next week Moshe meets Aynur, Erkan Ogur, finds the one genre of music that hasn't emmigrated to Istanbul, and meets the record executive who was sent to jail for his love of minority musics.

    Moshe Morad visits Istanbul and presents music from gypsy clarinettist Selim Sesler.

    01World Routes In Jordan
    01World Routes In Madagascar
    01World Routes In Madagascar, Justin Vali20100102

    Lucy Duran visits the Indian Ocean island of Madagascar to discover its remarkable music.

    She profiles musician Justin Vali and records his Malagasy Orkestra, an all-star collection of the island's best musical talent.

    Lucy Duran profiles Madagascan musician Justin Vali and records his Malagasy Orkestra.

    01World Routes In Zanzibar20090418

    Rita Ray introduces highlights from Sauti za Busara 2009, a festival held in Zanzibar's historic Stone Town which celebrates music from East Africa and beyond.

    With 'muziki wa dansi' from the veterans of Msondo Ngoma, East Africa's oldest surviving band, the soulful songs of Nawal from the Comoros Islands and the hard-driving Berber music of Moroccan band Oudaden.

    Rita Ray introduces highlights from Sauti za Busara 2009, a festival held in Zanzibar.

    02An Appalachian Road Trip2009042520090404

    Lucy Duran ends her exploration of the music of Azerbaijan as she meets the country's most successful musician, the Mugham singer Alim Qasimov.

    She also visits the extraordinary natural gas fires of Yanar Dag, and listens to traditional music in the contemporary context of a noisy wedding party.

    Focusing on the music of Azerbaijan, with Mugham and traditional wedding music.

    02An Appalachian Road Trip, North Carolina20100626

    Following his experiences at the Mount Airy Fiddlers Convention writer and musician Banning Eyre embarks on a journey across the state of North Carolina to hear the music and stories of some of the older players and singers who can trace a direct line back to before the age of the radio and the gramophone, to when Old Time music was a strictly oral tradition.

    Banning meets 90 year old fiddler Jo Thomson, who is perhaps the only known surviving Old Time African-American string band player.

    His playing and stories capture a period of time before this music was delineated on race grounds, of a time when both black and white string bands flourished.

    Sat out on her porch on top of a mountain near Mars Hill, eighth generation ballad singer Sheila Kay Adams, tells stories and sings songs as her grandmother taught her, out in the open, singing to the fireflies and crickets.

    Her ballads, that tell of Knights and Ladies and boats at sea, hail from the 'Old Country': England, Ireland and Scotland.

    Passed down through singing generations in the little settlement of Sodom where she grew up, she preserves the haunting and often macabre song of her ancestors, and is today passing it on to her children and grandchildren.

    89 year-old Benton Flippen and his Smokey Valley boys, are remnants of a past age and of the heyday of Old Time stringband music, having learnt their tunes at the knee of their parents and grandparents.

    It won't be long before the last of this generation has passed, and those guardians of the flame, who knew this music as a vital pre-modern part of everyday life in the rural south are with us no longer.

    Produced by Peter Meanwell

    Repeat.

    Banning Eyre meets traditional US musicians and singers from around North Carolina.

    02Brazilian Performers
    02Darbar Festival 201020100424

    Lopa Kothari and Jameela Siddiqi with more highlights from the Darbar Festival of Indian classical music, held earlier this month at Kings Place in London.

    With a performance from some of the leading exponents of the ancient dhrupad vocal style, Ramakant and Umakant Gundecha, and music on the saranghi from Murad Ali.

    This is the second of three programmes from this year's Darbar Festival, which claims to be the biggest event of its kind in Europe: artists from both North and South Indian musical traditions were presented in fourteen concerts over the Easter weekend.

    A special feature of Darbar is that the concerts are held across the day from morning until night, allowing for the different raags to be heard in their true time context.

    Lopa Kothari and Jameela Siddiqi will be bringing their own expertise and insights to these programmes, as well as talking to the performers themselves.

    Highlights from 2010's Darbar Indian music festival: Ramakant and Umakant Gundecha.

    02Music From The Festival On The Niger 200820100529
    02Timitar Festival 200920091205

    Lucy Duran introduces highlights from the 2009 Timitar Festival, held in the Moroccan coastal town of Agadir.

    This celebration of Berber culture attracts audiences of over 100,000 in the city's vast central square.

    With Berber songs from local diva Raissa Aicha Tachinouit, Saharawi music from Rachida Talal and a rare live apperarance by Morocco's biggest star in the Arab world, Samira Said.

    Timitar Festival 2009 highlights.

    With music from Raissa Aicha Tachinouit and Samira Said.

    02Womex 2009
    02World Routes At Womad 2009
    02World Routes In Brazil: Carnival20090214

    As part of series of programmes celebrating the Brazilian carnival and its music, Lucy Duran travels to two places famous for their Carnivals - Recife in the Northeast and Rio de Janeiro in the Southeast.

    She records music from the Afro-Brazilian Candomble cult as well as singer Renato Rosa.

    In Rio, she visits Brazil's biggest slum to attend its first carnival rehearsal of the year, and meets one of the city's most decorated samba groups, Velha Guarda - the old guard - of Portela.

    Lucy Duran discovers Brazilian Carnival music, including the Candomble cult.

    02World Routes In Cape Verde20090919

    Lucy Duran visits Cape Verde, the windswept and dramatic archipelago off the west coast of Africa, and travels to one of the most beautiful islands, San Antao.

    She hears songs for making grogue, Cape Verde's national drink, which is said to make bulls weep as they operate an ancient sugar press.

    The programme ends in the unofficial musical capital, Mindelo, on the island of Sao Vicente, where Cesaria Evora was born and where many other Cape Verdean greats began their careers.

    Including sessions by two such musicians - virtuosic guitarist Bau and singer-songwriter Tito Paris.

    Lucy Duran visits Cape Verde's musical centre in Mindelo on the island of Sao Vicente.

    02World Routes In Istanbul2010022020100206

    YOU CAN WATCH SOME VIDEO CLIPS IN THE SPECIAL PLAYERS AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS PAGE.

    In the second of two programmes, Lucy Duran travels deep into rural North East Brazil.

    This week she reaches the Sertao: Brazil's vast, hot, and in parts, lawless semi-desert.

    She meets a community descended from run-away slaves who settled in this remote part of the country to escape their Portuguese Masters.

    Plus, there's music for the indigenous Pifano flute and a session by local politician-cum-protest singer Sebastiao Dias.

    World Routes

    Presented by Lucy Duran

    Produced by James Parkin

    Recorded and mixed by Martin Appleby

    Tel.

    020 7765 4661

    Fax 020 7765 5052

    e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

    Saturday 3rd January, 3pm

    Including:

    Trad: Marchinha Cultural

    Performed by the Banda de Pifanos led by Pedro Sobrino

    Recorded by the BBC in Santa Antonio di Carnaiba, Pernambuco, Brazil on 6th September 2008

    Trad: Vesa Vaqueiro Falta

    Trad: Vaqueiro Novo Na Serra

    Trad: Embolada

    All performed by the Comunidade Quilombola do Leitao da Carapuca

    Recorded by the BBC on 6th September 2008

    Pedro Sobrin: Xote - Promessa a Padro Cicero

    Trad: Cultura Nordestina

    All performed by Banda de Pifanos led by Pedro Sobrino

    Arr.

    Dias: Senarios do Pajeu

    Dias: Short Improvisation

    Dias: Suplica dos ecologos/Cancao da Floresta

    Dias: Cancao da Paz

    All performed and composed by Sebastiao Dias

    Recorded by the BBC in Sao Joaquin near Tabiram, Pernambuco, Brazil on 7th September 2008

    Lucy Duran on location, with music recorded for the programme in North East Brazil.

    02World Routes In Madagascar20100109

    Lucy Duran visits the Indian Ocean island of Madagascar to discover its remarkable music.

    She is joined by guides Justin Vali and Paddy Bush and hears the ancient music of Madagascar's royal court as well as the extraordinary and rarely-recorded Hira Gasy.

    Hundreds of villagers gather to hear a variety performance which spreads news, entertains and teaches people a lesson.

    Lucy Duran presents music from the 18th-century Malagasy royal court in Madagascar.

    02 LASTAn Appalachian Road Trip20091024

    Broadcaster, writer and musician Banning Eyre embarks on a journey across the state of North Carolina to hear the stories of some of the older players and singers of traditional US music.

    Some can trace a direct line back to before the age of the radio and the gramophone, when old-time music - North American folk music - was a strictly oral tradition.

    Banning meets 90-year-old fiddler Jo Thomson, who is perhaps the only known surviving Old Time African-American string band player.

    His playing and stories capture a period of time before this music was delineated on race grounds, of a time when both black and white string bands flourished.

    Sat out on her porch on top of a mountain near Mars Hill, eighth-generation ballad singer Sheila Kay Adams tells stories and sings songs as her grandmother taught her, out in the open, singing to the fireflies and crickets.

    Her ballads, which tell of knights and ladies and boats at sea, hail from the 'old country' - England, Ireland and Scotland.

    Passed down through singing generations in the little settlement of Sodom where she grew up, she preserves the haunting and often macabre song of her ancestors, and is today passing it on to her children and grandchildren.

    And Banning talks to 89-year-old Benton Flippen and his Smokey Valley boys, remnants of a past age and of the heyday of old-time string band music, having learnt their tunes at the knee of their parents and grandparents.

    World Routes: An Appalachian Roadtrip (part 2)

    Presenter: Banning Eyre

    Producer: Peter Meanwell

    Sound Engineer: Martin Appleby

    Saturday 24th October 2009

    Opening sequence recorded at Olympia Restaurant, Mt Airy, NC

    Music: Cornbread and Butterbeans (Carolina Sunshine Trio)

    Cotton Eyed Joe

    Benton Flippen and the Smokey Valley Boys

    Benton Flippen (fiddle), Frank Bode (guitar and vocals), Verlen Clifton (mandolin and vocals), Chester MacMillan (guitar), Andy Edmonds (banjo)

    BBC recording at the home of Benton Flippen, Mt Airy, North Carolina, USA: 7th June 2009

    Fortune

    Interview with Benton Flippen and Andy Edmonds

    Cackling Hen

    June Apple

    A Soldier and a Lady

    Rick Ward (fretless banjo)

    BBC recording at the workshop of Rick Ward, Beech Mountain, Watauga County, North Carolina, USA: 8th June 2009

    Interview with musician and instrument maker Rick Ward

    The Bald Headed End of the Broom (from the singing of Lee Monroe Presnell)

    Rick Ward (voice)

    The Daemon Lover (from the singing of Dellie Chandler Norton)

    Sheila Kay Adams (voice)

    BBC recording at the home of Sheila Kay Adams, Mars Hill, North Carolina, USA: 8th June 2009

    Interview with ballad singer Sheila Kay Adams

    The Farmer's Cursed Wife (from the singing of Inez Chandler)

    Pretty Saro (from the singing of Mary Sands)

    Georgie Buck

    Joe Thompson (fiddle and voice)

    Bob Carlin (banjo)

    BBC recording at the home of Joe Thompson, Mebane, North Carolina, USA: 10th June 2009

    Interview with fiddler Joe Thompson and banjo picker Bob Carlin

    Goin' Down the Road Feeling Bad

    Pumpkin Pie

    Must Jesus Bear the Cross Alone

    Joe Thompson (voice)

    Banning Eyre meets traditional US musicians and singers from around North Carolina.

    02 LASTArgentina, The Humahuaca Valley20101016

    Banning Eyre heads into northwest Argentina, travelling through the provinces of Salta and Jujuy to hear the songs and carnival music of the Quebrada de Humahuaca, a mountain valley in the foothills of the Andes.

    Away from the Europe-centric metropolis of Buenos Aires, the northwest of Argentina is characterised by a history of invasion, where indigenous groups such as the Aymara and Coya were conquered first by Incas from the Altiplano, then by the earliest Spanish conquistadors in the 15th Century.

    The music of the Humahuaca valley is a mix of pan-pipes and end-blown flutes, frame drums and cow horns, mixed with guitars, accordions and mandolins; songs are sung in Spanish as well as Quechua, and the Virgin Mary is venerated alongside Pachamama.

    In the fertile Humahuaca valley Banning meets local musician Tomas Lipan, who tells stories of his childhood embarrassment at eating local foods and playing indigenous instruments, rather than eating spaghetti and playing guitar, and the cultural pressure he felt not to express his indigenous heritage.

    He sings with immense love of his hometown Purmamarca.

    Fortunato Ramos, poet, teacher, restaurant owner plays carnival music with his band in the town of Humahuaca, as well as the spectacularly long horn, the erquencho.

    Michaela Chauque is a young quena (end blown flute) player, who draws heavily on the ancestral music, and performs a song about the Pucara de Tilcara, a pre-Incan fortress, as well as singing Coplas from the Tilcara Carnival.

    Banning also discovers a mechanical Saint that delivers clockwork benedictions.

    Banning Eyre travels to northwest Argentina to hear the music of the Humahuaca valley.

    02 LASTBrazilian Performers, Caetano Veloso20091003

    Lucy Duran introduces a performance given at the Barbican in London by Caetano Veloso, one of the great figures of Brazilian music.

    Recorded in 2007, this classic concert includes songs Veloso wrote while in exile in Britain in the 1960s, including his psychedelic London, London.

    Veloso also chats to Lucy.

    The great Brazilian singer-songwriter Caetano Veloso in concert at the Barbican in London.

    02 LASTDarbar Festival 200920090530

    Lopa Kothari and Jameela Siddiqi introduce highlights from the 2009 Darbar International South Asian Music Festival, held at the South Bank Centre in London.

    Featuring performances by an artist who is a star in South India but little-known in Europe - singer Aruna Sairam.

    Highlights from the Darbar South Asian Music Festival 2009, including singer Aruna Sairam.

    02 LASTDarbar Festival 201120110521

    Lopa Kothari and Jameela Siddiqi present highlights from the Darbar Festival of Indian classical music, held last month at Kings Place in London.

    Featuring a recital by the veteran singer Pandit Ulhas Kashalkar, and the extraordinary sound of the classical Carnatic saxophone, as adapted and played by Kadri Gopalnath.

    This is the second of a pair of programmes from this year's Darbar Festival.

    The Darbar Festival is the biggest event of its kind in Europe: artists from both North and South Indian musical traditions were presented in fourteen concerts over the Easter weekend - a special feature of Darbar is that the concerts are held across the day from morning until night, allowing for the different ragas to be heard in their true time context.

    Lopa Kothari and Jameela Siddiqi will be bringing their own expertise and insights to these programmes, as well as talking to the performers themselves.

    02 LASTGnawa And World Music Festival 200920110423

    Lucy Duran presents more highlights from the 2009 Gnawa and World Music Festival in Essaouira on Morocco's Atlantic coast, an annual free festival which celebrates the ancient tradition of trance music.

    With performances by Braim El Belkani, a gnawa master who once played with Led Zeppelin, and Morocco's most celebrated band, the veterans Nass El Ghiwane.

    Essaouira is an old stone town that is home to an even older style of music which arrived in Morocco centuries ago with the slaves who came from across the Sahara.

    It's a sacred music which is traditionally heard at all-night 'lilas', where animal sacrifices are made, people are healed from spiritual and physical ailments, and, it is said, a good time is had by all.

    The sound of the music is characterised by the bass thump of the three-stringed 'gimbri' and the strident clatter of metal castanets.

    The Gnawa and World Music Festival was established twelve years ago to celebrate the gnawa tradition, with concerts featuring gnawa masters from all over Morocco, together with events where gnawa musicians collaborate with artists from across the globe.

    Lucy Duran with more highlights from the 2009 Gnawa and World Music Festival in Morocco.

    02 LASTTenth Anniversary20101218

    In the second of two programmes, Lucy Duran celebrates ten years of World Routes with highlights from a special event recorded at the BBC's Maida Vale studios.

    There are performances from Senegal, Azerbaijan, Mongolia, Peru and Turkey, as well as recordings from around the world taken from the Radio 3 World Music Archive.

    Producer Roger Short.

    World Routes was first broadcast on Radio 3 in the autumn of 2000 - then on a Sunday night, it proved popular and was soon moved to Saturday afternoon.

    Presenting the programme since the beginning, is its anchor, the Grammy-winning record producer, teacher and world music expert Lucy Duran.

    In 10 years, World Routes has broadcast sessions and live concerts with a complete "Who's Who" of world music artists from Youssou N'Dour, Ladysmith Black Mambazo and Khaled, to Mariza, Caetano Veloso and Ravi Shankar.

    Not just interested in the stars of world music, World Routes is on a mission to travel to the most far-flung corners of the planet to document and - in its own small way - preserve endangered musical traditions.

    In the past 10 years World Routes producers and sound engineers, along with Lucy Duran and a team of guest presenters, have left the comfort of Broadcasting House in search of real roots traditions.

    To date, the programme has visited some 51 countries, including 15 in Africa, 15 in Asia , and 9 in the Americas - countries as diverse as Haiti, Iraq, Belize, Vietnam, Georgia, China, Madagascar and Cape Verde.

    World Routes has recorded at festivals throughout the world including WOMAD (in the UK, the Canaries and New Zealand), the Jerusalem Oud Festival, the Fez Festival of Sacred Music, the Sayan Ring Festival in Siberia, and, in 2010, had its own residency at the Abril Pro Rock Festival in Recife, Brazil.

    Lucy Duran marks ten years of World Routes, with music from Mongolia, Peru and Turkey.

    02 LASTTimitar Festival 200920091205
    02 LASTWomex 2009, Womex 200920091114

    Lucy Duran presents more highlights from WOMEX, the annual gathering of the world music industry, which in 2009 takes place in Copenhagen.

    It showcases the newest bands and the freshest talent in world music, such as Carlou D from Senegal.

    Lucy also catches up with the Iranian kamancheh master Kayhan Kalhor.

    Music from WOMEX 2009 in Copenhagen.

    With Carlou D, plus conversation with Kayhan Kalhor.

    02 LASTWomex 201120111204

    More highlights from WOMEX, the annual gathering of the world music industry, which takes place this year in Copenhagen.

    WOMEX showcases the newest bands and the freshest talent in world music, and Lopa Kothari introduces specially-recorded performances by the Mairtin O'Connor Band from Ireland, the flamboyant Orquesta Tipica Fernandez Fierro from Argentina, and the Pakistani Qawaali party led by Asif Ali Khan.

    Plus a session by the master Iranian percussionist Mohammad Reza Mortazavi.

    Producer James Parkin.

    Mairtin O'Connor, Cathal Hayden, Seamie O'Dowd and Jim Higgins have been the Mairtin O'Connor Band since 2001.

    Individually recognised figureheads of the Irish tradition, they have built solid reputations as master musicians with astounding skill, diversity and virtuosity.

    Mairtin was one of the main musical forces behind the now legendary Riverdance phenomenon.

    Orquesta Tipica Fernandez Fierro is a revolutionary force on the Argentinian tango scene.

    The formation is the typical four bandoneons, three violins, viola, violoncello, double-bass, piano and a singer but the sound they make is aggressively modern, taking inspiration from the great tango orchestras of the past and infusing it with a rock attitude.

    When at home in Buenos Aires, they perform every Wednesday at their own venue, Club Atletico Fernandez Fierro.

    Praised by the great qawaali singer, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, as one of his finest students, Asif Ali Khan from Pakistan, has established himself as a worthy bearer of the late maestro's torch.

    Lopa Kothari introduces highlights from the 2011 WOMEX festival in Copenhagen.

    02 LASTWorld Routes In Albania, Iso-polyphony In Southern Albania20111106

    Continuing her journey around Albania, Lucy Duran heads south to hear the unique Albanian Iso-Polyphony. She drinks raki and eats spring-onions with a group of singers in the ancient city of Gjirokaster, explores the concrete bunkers left by the regime of Enver Hoxha, and hears how the old songs of emigration are as relevant today as they were in Ottoman times.

    Lucy Duran explores the distinctive sound of iso-polyphony in Southern Albania.

    02 LASTWorld Routes In Azerbaijan2009042520090404

    Lucy Duran ends her exploration of the music of Azerbaijan as she meets the country's most successful musician, the Mugham singer Alim Qasimov.

    She also visits the extraordinary natural gas fires of Yanar Dag, and listens to traditional music in the contemporary context of a noisy wedding party.

    Focusing on the music of Azerbaijan, with Mugham and traditional wedding music.

    Rita Ray introduces highlights from Sauti za Busara 2009, a festival held in Zanzibar's historic Stone Town which celebrates music from East Africa and beyond.

    With Rachel Magoola, who has had one of Uganda's all-time greatest hits, Comrade Fatso, a white Zimbabwean rap artist who speaks out boldly against the Mugabe regime, Kenyan singer Iddi Achien'g, whose songs carry powerful social messages, and Katapila Sangula Ngoma from Tanzania, who just wants to have a good time.

    Music from the Sauti za Busara Festival 2009 from Rachel Magoola and Comrade Fatso.

    02 LASTWorld Routes In Brazil20090103

    Lucy Duran on location, with music recorded for the programme in North East Brazil.

    In the second of two programmes, Lucy Duran travels deep into rural North East Brazil.

    This week she reaches the Sertao: Brazil's vast, hot, and in parts, lawless semi-desert.

    She meets a community of run-away slaves who settled in this remote part of the country to escape their Portuguese Masters.

    Plus, there's music for the indigenous Pifano flute and a session by local politician-cum-protest singer Sebastian Dias.

    Producer James Parkin.

    Including:

    Trad: Marchinha Cultural

  • all performed and composed by sebastiao dias
  • all performed by banda de pifanos led by pedro sobrino
  • all performed by the comunidade quilombola do leitao da carapuca
  • dias: cancao da paz
  • dias: short improvisation
  • dias: suplica dos ecologos/cancao da floresta
  • e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

    saturday 3rd january, 3pm

  • fax 020 7765 5052
  • performed by the banda de pifanos led by pedro sobrino
  • recorded and mixed by martin appleby

    tel.

    020 7765 4661

  • recorded by the bbc in santa antonio di carnaiba, pernambuco, brazil on 6th september 2008

    arr.

    dias: senarios do pajeu

  • recorded by the bbc in santa antonio di carnaiba, pernambuco, brazil on 6th september 2008

    trad: vesa vaqueiro falta

  • recorded by the bbc in sao joaquin near tabiram, pernambuco, brazil on 7th september 2008

    world routes

    presented by Lucy Duran

  • recorded by the bbc on 6th september 2008

    pedro sobrin: xote - promessa a padro cicero

  • trad: cultura nordestina
  • trad: embolada
  • trad: vaqueiro novo na serra
  • produced by.... - james parkin

  • 02 LASTWorld Routes In Brazil, - North East Brazil - The Sertao2010022020100206

    YOU CAN WATCH SOME VIDEO CLIPS IN THE SPECIAL PLAYERS AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS PAGE.

    In the second of two programmes, Lucy Duran travels deep into rural North East Brazil.

    This week she reaches the Sertao: Brazil's vast, hot, and in parts, lawless semi-desert.

    She meets a community descended from run-away slaves who settled in this remote part of the country to escape their Portuguese Masters.

    Plus, there's music for the indigenous Pifano flute and a session by local politician-cum-protest singer Sebastiao Dias.

    World Routes

    Presented by Lucy Duran

    Produced by James Parkin

    Recorded and mixed by Martin Appleby

    Tel.

    020 7765 4661

    Fax 020 7765 5052

    e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

    Saturday 3rd January, 3pm

    Including:

    Trad: Marchinha Cultural

    Performed by the Banda de Pifanos led by Pedro Sobrino

    Recorded by the BBC in Santa Antonio di Carnaiba, Pernambuco, Brazil on 6th September 2008

    Trad: Vesa Vaqueiro Falta

    Trad: Vaqueiro Novo Na Serra

    Trad: Embolada

    All performed by the Comunidade Quilombola do Leitao da Carapuca

    Recorded by the BBC on 6th September 2008

    Pedro Sobrin: Xote - Promessa a Padro Cicero

    Trad: Cultura Nordestina

    All performed by Banda de Pifanos led by Pedro Sobrino

    Arr.

    Dias: Senarios do Pajeu

    Dias: Short Improvisation

    Dias: Suplica dos ecologos/Cancao da Floresta

    Dias: Cancao da Paz

    All performed and composed by Sebastiao Dias

    Recorded by the BBC in Sao Joaquin near Tabiram, Pernambuco, Brazil on 7th September 2008

    Lucy Duran on location, with music recorded for the programme in North East Brazil.

    Istanbul is a European Capital of Culture for 2010 and Moshe Morad continues his search for traditional music in this melting-pot of peoples and cultures.

    Including a session recorded at Istanbul's most iconic music venue, Babylon, with one of Turkey's most important Kurdish voices, Aynur.

    Plus a session with the virtuosic multi-instrumentalist Erkan Ogur, and a visit to the Aegean city of Izmir, the birth-place of Rembetiko.

    Producer James Parkin.

    2/2

    Istanbul is a rich and diverse meeting point for musicians in Turkey, and it's a city where you can find every type of Turkish traditional music represented.

    It's also a cross-roads between Europe and Asia, East and West.

    In World Routes in Istanbul, Moshe Morad explores this rich mix and records sessions with many of Turkey's top musicians - from the country's most famous Kurdish voice (Aynur), and the sublime guitar playing of Erkan Ogur, to the wonderful sound of oud and kamanche with Yurdal Tokcan and Derya Turkan.

    Moshe learns about some of Turkey's best-loved traditional instruments such as the kamanche and the saz, hears the stories behind the music, and finds out from the people who live there what Istanbul means to them.

    Amongst them, he meets record executive Hasan Saltik, who set-up and runs the Kalan label, and who was sent to jail on more than one occasion for his love of minority musics.

    Moshe also travels the short distance to the Aegean coast where he records one type of music that has stayed in its original home rather than emigrate to Istanbul: Rembetiko.

    Moshe Morad visits Istanbul and presents music from Aynur and Erkan Ogur.

    02 LASTWorld Routes In Canada, Cape Breton Island20111218

    Mary Ann Kennedy makes a musical tour of Canada's Cape Breton Island, where three distinct cultures are embraced in one community.

    She visits a session at the celebrated Red Shoe Pub, with music from the island's Celtic tradition of folk fiddling; some of the island's Scots Gaelic speakers sing traditional songs; there is music from the Mi'kmaq aboriginal people; and she joins in a kitchen party with some home-grown music from the island's French Acadians.

    Featured artists include Glenn Graham, who also talks about Cape Breton's folk history; Chrissy Crowley, one of the young generation of folk fiddlers; singer Mary Jane Lamond, who invites the local Gaelic community to a 'milling frolic', a traditional Scots work-party with music; Beverley and Joel Denny, who sing in the Mi'kmaq village of Eskasoni; and French Acadians Celeste, Weldon and Delores Boudreau - none of whom are related.

    This is the second of two programmes from Quebec and Cape Breton, the first time World Routes has visited Canada.

    Mary Ann Kennedy visits Canada to make a musical tour of Cape Breton Island.

    02 LASTWorld Routes In Cape Verde20090919
    02 LASTWorld Routes In Cape Verde, Cesaria Evora, Bau And Tito Paris20110625
    02 LASTWorld Routes In Cape Verde, Cesaria Evora, Bau And Tito Paris20110618

    Lucy Duran visits Cape Verde, the windswept and dramatic archipelago off the west coast of Africa, and travels to one of the most beautiful islands, San Antao.

    She hears songs for making grogue, Cape Verde's national drink, which is said to make bulls weep as they operate an ancient sugar press.

    The programme ends in the unofficial musical capital, Mindelo, on the island of Sao Vicente, where Cesaria Evora was born and where many other Cape Verdean greats began their careers.

    Including sessions by two such musicians - virtuosic guitarist Bau and singer-songwriter Tito Paris.

    Presented by Lucy Duran

    Produced by James Parkin

    Tel.

    020 7765 4661

    Fax.

    020 7765 5052

    e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

    Lucy Duran visits Cape Verde's musical centre in Mindelo on the island of Sao Vicente.

    02 LASTWorld Routes In China2009062020090627

    In the second of two special programmes recorded on location in China, Lucy Duran explores the music of three of the country's 56 different ethnic groups.

    She visits Xinjiang, China's largest province that makes up one-sixth of the country's land-mass.

    On the ancient Silk Route, it is also home to the Muslim Uyghur people who perform muqam, a type of music that can be found all over the region from Azerbaijan in the west to China in the east.

    Lucy Duran explores the music of the Uyghur people in China's Xinjian Province.

    02 LASTWorld Routes In Georgia20090124

    Lucy Duran continues her musical journey through Georgia.

    She travels to the highest and remotest part of Europe, Svaneti.

    An area of extraordinary natural beauty, it's also infamous for its banditry and war-lording, as well as being home to some of the world's oldest music.

    With the help of the Georgian military, the programme makes rare location recordings of these wild songs.

    WORLD ROUTES

    Presented by Lucy Duran

  • accompanied by the chianuri fiddle and the changi harp
  • accompanied by the chonguri lute
  • e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

    saturday 24 january 2009, 3:00pm

    teatralebi ensemble: tsin tsqaro

  • eldar shoshitashvili (duduk); archil alaverdashvili (accordion); tengiz gigauri (first duduk); zaur tsereteli (bass duduk); vano tatiashvili (drum); irma shoshitashvili (vocals)
  • fax.

    020 7765 4378

  • recorded 12 september 2007 at the philharmonia hall, tbilisi

    interview: Lucy Duran and rob parsons discuss the current situation in georgia

  • recorded 14 september 2007 in a mountain meadow near mestia, svaneti

    interview: Lucy Duran and rob parsons discuss the svaneti region and the choir riho

    riho ensemble: lazhgvashi

  • recorded 14 september 2007 in a mountain meadow near mestia, svaneti

    interview: Lucy Duran and rob parsons in a georgian graveyard

    riho ensemble: vitsbil/matsbil

  • recorded 14 september 2007 in a mountain meadow near mestia, svaneti

    interview: Lucy Duran and rob parsons near the black sea and the border with turkey

    matchakhela: macthakhluri tagunia (matchakhluri mouse)

  • recorded 14 september 2007 in a mountain meadow near mestia, svaneti

    interview: lucy with vartan pilpani of riho ensemble

  • recorded 17 september 2007 in the village hall at chchuneti, south west georgia

    interview: Lucy Duran and matchakhela

    matchakhela: atcharuli shairebi

  • recorded 17 september 2007 in the village hall at chchuneti, south west georgia

    interview: Lucy Duran and rob parsons on the black sea coast in batumi

  • recorded 18 december 2007 in paris

    the teatralebi ensemble: odoia

  • recorded 18 september 2007 in guria province

    interview: Lucy Duran and rob parsons discuss stalin

    eldar shoshitashvili and his ensemble: shushtari

  • recorded 18 september 2007 in guria province

    interview: Lucy Duran with tristan of shalva chemo, discussing the georgian yodelling style know as krimanchuli

    shalva chemo: shalva chemo

  • recorded 18 september 2007 in guria province

    shalva chemo: hasanbegura

  • recorded 19 september 2007 in betsy's hotel, tbilisi

    all music recordings were made on location, specially for the bbc by sound engineer james birtwistle.

    music includes rare location recordings of the wild songs of svaneti

  • recorded 19 september 2007 in betsy's hotel, tbilisi

    interview: Lucy Duran and rob parsons in a helicopter

  • recorded at the narikala fortress in tbilisi

    riho ensemble: lile

  • riho are a male choir based in the remote town of mestia, in georgia's svaneti region
  • rob parsons is the bbc's former moscow correspondent
  • rob parsons translates

    riho ensemble: kvria

  • the singers demonstrate how the song is layered
  • they discuss the legend of the golden fleece and its relevance to the area

    shalva chemo: shvidkatsa (seven men)

  • this song is over 2000 years old; the meaning of the words have been forgotten
  • produced by.... - james parkin

    tel.

    020 7765 4661

  • 02 LASTWorld Routes In Istanbul2010022020100206
    02 LASTWorld Routes In Zanzibar2009042520090404
    03An Appalachian Road Trip20090502

    Presented by Lucy Duran

    Produced by James Parkin

    Saturday 2nd May 2009

    Line-up:

    Oumou Sangare (vocals)

    Souleymane Sidibe (calabash)

    Sekou Bah (bass guitar)

    Hamane Toure (guitar)

    Brehima ‘Benego' Diakite (kamel ngoni)

    Aliou Dante (drums)

    Cheick Oumar Diabate (djembe)

    Amadou Traore (flute)

    Dandio Sidibe (backing vocals)

    Fatoumata Diawara (backing vocals)

    1.

    Sounsoumba (Sangare, Arr.

    Cheick Tidiane Seck)

    2.

    Iyo djeli (Sangare, Arr.

    Massambou Wele Diallo)

    3.

    Seya (Arr.

    Sangare/Cheick Tidiane Seck)

    Interview with Oumou Sangare

    4.

    Donso (Trad, Arr.

    Sangare)

    5.

    Kounandya (Sangare, Arr.

    6.

    Mogo Kele (Sangare, Arr.

    7.

    Yalla (Sangare)

    All recordings made by engineers James Birtwistle and Simon Tindall

    Lucy Duran, who has studied the music of Oumou Sangare for many years, writes the following notes about the songs we hear in this concert programme from the Barbican Hall.

    Oumou's song texts are deeply metaphorical and philosophical, reflecting the common beliefs and discourses of Malians, as a way of provoking them to think more critically about their values - especially regarding women.

    SOUNSOUMBA is the name of a large tree of the savannah.

    The song compares a young woman to this proud tree, until she is forced to marry, when she shrinks to a small stunted tree.

    When women marry in the villages of Wasulu, they have to leave their parental home and move in with their husband's family, often far away.

    The song reflects on the isolation and grief this causes.

    IYO DJELI (celebrating of the art of the griot).

    In this song, Oumou pays tribute to Djekani Djeli, a griot woman singer who lived in Wasulu in the 1960s.

    The song talks of one of the great problems that female artists in Mali face, even to this day: the belief that women who pursue a profession will be unable to have children.

    To be childless in Mali is to be stigmatised, which is what people said would happen to Djekani Djeli, only because she was a singer.

    Until one day, God gave her a child! Oumou draws parallels with her own decision to become a singer, thanking her mother for her support, and she avows that she too will always sing for those who are “true men”.

    SEYA (joy).

    In this song, the title track of her most recent album, her first in six years, Oumou celebrates her joyful return to the Malian public.

    She talks of her pleasure in ordering her clothes when she visits the tailors, and the coquettish way of wearing a skirt low on the hips.

    In Mali, all women have their clothes specially tailored, to individual designs; this is one way in which they can express their own identity.

    She describes how young girls go to the market wearing their waist beads, being flirtatious; in short, this is a song celebrating female sensuality and the right of women to enjoy themselves in public.

    DONSO (hunter).

    This song reaches deep into one of Mali's oldest and most revered cultural traditions, that of the hunters' associations.

    Hunters are regarded as healers and protectors, upholding the true values of Mande society across the centuries.

    Oumou uses the special musical style of Wasulu hunters' songs, usually only performed by men, featuring the loping rhythms of the 6-string hunters' harp and scraper.

    She laments the early death of several great artists from Wasulu, including Allata Brulaye, whom many credit with the invention of the kamalengoni, the youth harp that has become the trademark of her own music.

    She also laments the death of her own father, Bari Sangare.

    Death is hard, but it teaches us wisdom and forgiveness.

    KOUNADYA (good fortune).

    Many Malian songs reflect on the nature of destiny.

    This one says, if you are lucky enough to be blessed with good fortune, either in your marriage, your health, or your profession, don't take it for granted - use it wisely, be grateful, and don't be selfish.

    Oh, good fortune!

    MOGO KELE (one person).

    This song is about the brevity of life and the need to do something of importance in the short moment we have in the world.

    Oumou sings: There have been many great leaders and warriors in Mali's pre-colonial past, but their time is over.

    Banzoumana Sissoko, Mali's “old lion”, a great musician, was a brave and uncompromising critic of Mali's rulers, but his time has gone.

    You cannot dwell on what others have done - you must do some things yourself.

    Malians, what are you thinking of? Get on with it!

    YALA (roaming).

    This is the only song featured in this programme that is not from her recent album SEYA.

    It was first released in 2002 on a local cassette in Mali and became a huge hit.

    It warns young people of the dangers they face when tempted by city nightlife: drugs, alcohol, even prostitution.

    Oumou criticises men who are out womanising, bringing nothing but problems, but women don't get off lightly either: she compares those who go out roaming the streets at night to a dog looking for a bone to chew.

    Lucy Duran presents highlights of a concert given by Malian singer Oumou Sangare.

    Presented by Lucy Duran

  • aliou dante (drums)
  • amadou traore (flute)
  • brehima ‘benego' diakite (kamel ngoni)
  • cheick oumar diabate (djembe)
  • dandio sidibe (backing vocals)
  • fatoumata diawara (backing vocals)

    Lucy Duran presents highlights of a concert given by malian singer oumou sangare

  • hamane toure (guitar)
  • oumou sangare (vocals)
  • sekou bah (bass guitar)
  • souleymane sidibe (calabash)
  • produced by.... - james parkin

  • 03Oumou Sangare20090502
    03World Routes In Madagascar20100116

    Lucy Duran continues her journey through Madagascar recording the ancient music of this mysterious island.

    This week she hears songs that accompany the important exhumation and reburial ceremonies and visits the village of her guide, Justin Vali.

    Whilst there she hears the delicate sound of the ancestral zither, visits a Spirit House, finds out why you can't whistle after 6pm.

    3/3.

    Producer James Parkin

    In September 2009, World Routes travelled to Madagascar, the giant Indian Ocean island off the coast of Mozambique - East of the African continent.

    This mysterious island is full of extraordinary animal and plant life - home to more unique species than just about anywhere on the planet.

    It's in the grip of political turmoil and its people are some of the poorest in the world.

    But for us, what makes this island of strange dreams, ancestral worship and sorcery so special is its music.

    And, like the natural life, its unique evolution - neither African nor Asian - makes it a wonderful melting pot of instruments and styles.

    Throughout 2010, we'll be broadcasting the recordings we made for World Routes.

    Two weeks ago on the programme, Lucy was introduced to the music of Madagascar by Justin Vali and his Malagasy Orkestra.

    This week she continues a journey of her own to discover some of that music in its true context.

    She's joined by Justin and a great friend of his; someone he calls his brother.

    An instrument-maker, musician, producer and - it's fair to say - a Malagasy music fanatic: Paddy Bush (who also happens to be Kate's brother).

    Lucy learns about the ceremony of reburial - the bones of ancestors are removed from their tombs every 7 years and danced around, re-dressed and introduced to new members of the family.

    This joyous occasion is accompanied by uplifting music for flute.

    Lucy and the World Routes team then travel deep into the high interior.

    They visit a zebu (the holy cattle of Madagascar) market and record music in the remote and magical village that Justin was born in.

    Lucy Duran presents Madagascan songs accompanying exhumation and reburial ceremonies.

    03 LASTAn Appalachian Road Trip, Music From Georgia2010022720100918

    Musician and writer Banning Eyre heads to the American state of Georgia, gateway to the Deep South, and southern end of the Appalachian Mountains, to record some of the unique vocal music that has been preserved in the area, and meet the personalities who have kept the traditions alive.

    He meets 92 year old blind gospel legend Sister Fleeta Mitchell, who still sings and plays the piano alongside her musical companion the Revd Willie Mae Eberhardt, herself in her late 70s.

    Together they recall disturbing tales of life in the south, and the songs that gave people hope.

    Banning drops in to the converted chicken shack that is home to Phil Tanner and the Skillet Lickers, to hear them in their weekly session.

    Phil is the grandson of chicken farmer Gid Tanner who in 1924, with the original Skillet Lickers, became the first southern rural artist to record for the Columbia record label, and whose blend of music and comedy sold millions.

    The Myers Family and Friends, a singing family of guitar playing ladies, recall the songs they sang as children for corn shuckings and bean stringings, and local artist and folk song collector Art Rosenbaum talks about the unique character of North Georgia, and picks a tune on one of his many banjos.

    As well as the banjos and the ballads, Banning also attends the 141st Annual Alpharetta June Singing, and discovers that the 19th Century tradition of congregational 'shape note' singing still lives on in the south.

    Banning Eyre presents traditional music recorded on location in the state of Georgia, USA.

    03 LASTWorld Routes In Brazil: Carnival20090221

    As part of series of programmes celebrating the Brazilian carnival and its music, Lucy Duran travels to Rio, visiting Rocinha, which is Brazil's largest slum, or favela.

    Controlled by drug dealers, its 200,000 residents live in constant fear of violence.

    However, among all this, Lucy discovers a small music school where the children are taught to sing and play samba.

    She also goes in search of the African roots of samba, and meets a star of modern-day samba, Mart'nalia.

    World Routes

  • album: Antonio Carlos Jobim e convidados
  • album: acoustic brazil
  • album: brazil: the essential album
  • album: madrugada
  • album: ost tropa de elite
  • album: quant gente veio ver
  • album: rio by night
  • anon: song 2
  • bbc recording made in the carioca da gema club in lapa, rio

    trad: jongo de serrinha

  • biscoito fino bf866

    caetano veloso: pe do meu samba

  • casuarina
  • deo rian
  • e-mail world.routes@bbc.co.uk

    saturday 21st february, 3pm

    joao do vale/luiz vieira: a voz do povo

  • emi 5130022

    calado: flor amorosa

  • emi cdems1488

    gil: pela internet

  • fax 020 7765 5052
  • from a private recording belong to the artist made at a concert in maputo, mozambique in november 2008

    tom jobim/vinicius de moraes: so danca samba

  • gilberto gil
  • jair jongueiro: vou pra serra
  • manteca mantdcd201

    Lucy Duran is in rio, at a music school where children are taught to sing and play samba

  • mart'nalia
  • mart'nalia/mombass: pretinhosidade
  • mc junior and mc leonardo
  • paulinho da viola
  • presented by Lucy Duran
  • putumayo put234-2

    nossa bandeira

  • razoes africanas
  • recorded and mixed by martin appleby
  • recorded by the bbc at the trapiche gamboa in rio

    thiago mocoto: nao encontro quem me queira

  • recorded by the bbc in rocinha, rio

    ary barroso: aquarela do brasil

  • recorded by the bbc in rocinha, rio

    jaco do bandolim: noites cariocas

  • students of the rocinha music school, rio de janeiro
  • tel.

    020 7765 4661

  • tom jobim
  • verve 8266652

    anon: song 1

  • warner 3984232182

    jobim/vinicius de moraes: ela e carioca

  • produced by.... - james parkin

  • 03 LASTWorld Routes In Madagascar20100116