World Debate, The [world Service]

Episodes

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20100116

20100116

One year into the Obama presidency, how is his foreign policy shaping up? Robin Lustig chairs a discussion from Washington looking at the President's stance on Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iran and China. Have his actions lived up to his promises?

20100117

20100117

One year into the Obama presidency, how is his foreign policy shaping up? Robin Lustig chairs a discussion from Washington looking at the President's stance on Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iran and China. Have his actions lived up to his promises?

20111125

Ahead of Congo's elections, we ask a live audience in Kinshasa whether Democratic Republic of Congo is a failed state

Ahead of Congo's elections, we ask a live audience in Kinshasa whether Democratic Repub.

2013100520131006 (WS)

A high-profile international debate on topics which matter.

A Place Called Home20161018

This live programme from Cardiff in Wales will look at the current Syrian refugee crisis and see how Lebanon and Wales have responded to this century’s largest humanitarian crisis.

Jointly presented by Jason Mohammad from BBC Wales and Rami Ruhayem from BBC Arabic we hear from refugees in both Lebanon and Wales and explore what sort of welcome can be expected by those who come. In a live studio discussion the programme asks if we have a moral obligation to do more or the costs are simply too high.

Picture: A Syrian refugee hangs her laundry at an unofficial refugee camp in Lebanon, Credit:

Mahmoud Zayyat/AFP/Getty Images

Asia - Sharing The Wealth20110618

Mishal Husain at the World Economic Forum hosts a debate that asks: how should new prosperity be sustained and shared in Asia?

Mishal Husain at the World Economic Forum hosts a debate that asks: how should new pros.

Asia - Sharing The Wealth20110619

Mishal Husain at the World Economic Forum hosts a debate that asks: how should new prosperity be sustained and shared in Asia?

Mishal Husain at the World Economic Forum hosts a debate that asks: how should new pros.

Burma - What Future?2013060820130609 (WS)

As Burma faces political and economic reform, what challenges lie ahead?

The World Debate comes from Nay Pyi Taw, in Burma, during the World Economic Forum on East Asia.

As Burma, also known as Myanmar, goes through major political and economic reforms, the panel will be discussing the future of the country, the opportunities and challenges facing the people. Nik Gowing will be moderating.

(Image: A young child, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Davos - Has America Lost Touch With The World?20140125

Davos - Has America Lost Touch With The World?20140125

Davos - Has America Lost Touch With The World?20140125

Davos - Has America Lost Touch With The World?2014012520140126 (WS)

Is the US losing credibility, influence and power on the international scene?

Davos - Has America Lost Touch With The World?20140125

The World Debate is at the World Economic Forum in Davos, where hundreds of business and political leaders will review the world’s most pressing issues. Following the recent US federal government shutdown, the Snowden scandal which has caused outrage from Berlin to Brasilia, and President Obama’s reluctance to intervene in Syria, Nik Gowing will be asking: Has America lost touch with the world? The panelists will include US senator John McCain, Russian parliament member, Alexey Pushkov and Saudi prince, Turki Al-Faisal. They will debate America’s role in the world in 2014 and whether the US is losing credibility, influence and power on the international scene.

Picture: The American Flag, Credit: Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

Davos - Has America Lost Touch With The World?2014012520140126 (WS)

The World Debate is at the World Economic Forum in Davos, where hundreds of business and political leaders will review the world’s most pressing issues. Following the recent US federal government shutdown, the Snowden scandal which has caused outrage from Berlin to Brasilia, and President Obama’s reluctance to intervene in Syria, Nik Gowing will be asking: Has America lost touch with the world? The panelists will include US senator John McCain, Russian parliament member, Alexey Pushkov and Saudi prince, Turki Al-Faisal. They will debate America’s role in the world in 2014 and whether the US is losing credibility, influence and power on the international scene.

Picture: The American Flag, Credit: Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

Nik Gowing in Davos chairs a debate asking: Syria, shutdown, Snowden and surveillance...

Nik Gowing in Davos chairs a debate asking: Syria, shutdown, Snowden and surveillance - has America lost touch with the world?

Does Mining Benefit Africa?20110730

Some of the most mineral-rich African countries are also the poorest.

Could it be that mineral resources in Africa are a curse?

Could it be that.

Does Mining Benefit Africa?20110731

Some of the most mineral-rich African countries are also the poorest.

Could it be that mineral resources in Africa are a curse?

Could it be that.

Does Soft Power Really Matter?2014100420141005 (WS)

In a world where great power rivalry is back, does 'soft power' still matter?

The term ‘soft power’ has gained global prominence over the last two decades. It refers to the ability of a state to get others to do what it wants by the power of attraction, rather than by coercion or ‘hard power’, which focuses on the use of military and economic strength.

A whole series of recent global events including the Russian intervention in Ukraine, suggest it is hard, not soft, power that states are turning to in order to pursue their national interests.

Ritula Shah debates the question f o‘soft power’ with a distinguished international panel and a live audience at the Center for Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California.

Does The Eu Have A Future?20111001

Will the EU survive the Euro debt crisis? Is it just a failure of political leadership? Zeinab Badawi chairs a debate from Rome.

Will the EU survive the Euro debt crisis? Is it just a failure of political leadership?

Does The Eu Have A Future?20111002

Will the EU survive the Euro debt crisis? Is it just a failure of political leadership?

Is Democracy Winning?2013012520130126 (WS)

Nik Gowing in Davos asks: are democracies best equipped to deal with the complex challenges of the globalized world?

Is This The Asian Century?2013100520131006 (WS)

A special debate from the BBC World Service with the Asia Society in San Francisco

Is This The Asian Century?20131005

The conventional wisdom which started to develop from the middle of the last decade, and really gained hold with the 2008 financial and economic crisis, is that this is going to be the Asian century – particularly in the economic realm with the growth of China and India. But is this wisdom wrong? Is the dominance of Asia really inevitable?

It is a good time to be posing this question given the signs of life we are seeing from the US economy and President Obama’s much discussed pivot or rebalancing to Asia. The US’s continuing soft power advantage, coincides with the slow-down/rebalancing of the Chinese economy and economic/financial turbulence in India - which has been hit with slowing growth and is teetering on the edge of a currency and debt crisis again.

It is not simply an economic story given Asia is now the region where spending on defence and arms is rising fastest – as China modernises its military in competition with India and Japan, and south east Asian countries are also ramping up their defence spending – contrasting with declining defence spending in the US and Europe. The reason for Obama’s pivot to Asia is to focus scarcer military and economic resources on Asia and the Pacific.

The event will co-hosted by the Asia Society http://asiasociety.org/

Presenter: Ritula Shah

Islam V Science20110626

Belief and Modernity: Science and Culture in Islam.

Political change is sweeping through the Islamic world, with many countries questioning their traditions and looking for a new style of democracy.

But just what is the relationship between science and belief in the region? A thousand years ago the Middle East was the main repository for ancient scientific knowledge, which was not only preserved but nurtured and developed, laying the foundations of fields such as mathematics, astronomy and medicine as well as philosophy.

But today, not one of the world's top 400 universities is in a Muslim country.

So what went wrong and can it now begin to change? Can a culture of religious belief foster the questioning approach essential for scientific breakthroughs and the building of a science-based economy?

Writer and science editor Ehsan Masood chairs a discussion before an audience at the American University of Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates.

On his panel are Nidhal Guessoum, Professor of physics and astronomy at the American University of Sharjah; Rana Dajani, assistant professor of molecular biology at the Hashemite University, Amman, Jordan; writer and physicist Paul Davies who directs Beyond, the Center for Fundamental Concepts in Science at Arizona State University; and Qanta Ahmed, medical doctor and writer based in New York who has worked as a physician in Saudi Arabia.

Also contributing are distinguished guests and students from the audience.

The conference Belief in Dialogue: Science, Culture and Modernity was jointly organised by the British Council, in partnership with the American University of Sharjah and in association with the International Society for Science and Religion (ISSR).

The conference forms part of the British Council's global Belief in Dialogue program

Producer: Martin Redfern

A panel of distinguished guests in Sharjah debate issues around Islam and science

Islam Vs Science20110625

A panel of distinguished guests in Sharjah debate issues around Islam and science.

With Professor Rana Dajani and Dr Qanta Ahmed

With.

Nobel Minds20111210

From the King's Library of the Royal Palace in Stockholm, Zeinab Badawi talks to some of the Nobel prize-winners about the challenges for science in the 21st Century.

The role of science in public policy, and the incredible path of revolutionary discoveries.

Guests include:

Saul Perlmutter (Physics)

Brian Schmidt (Physics)

Adam Riess (Physics)

Dan Schechtman (Chemistry)

Jules Hoffmann (Medicine)

Bruce Beutler (Medicine)

Thomas Sargent (Economic Sciences)

Christopher Sims (Economic Sciences)

Zeinab Badawi talks to some of the Nobel prize-winners about the challenges for science

Nobel Minds2012121520121216 (WS)

Zeinab Badawi speaks to Nobel Prize winners.

Powering Development In The 21st Century20110716

Zeinab Badawi and guests discuss how do we power the developing world in the 21st century?

Powering Development In The 21st Century20110717

Zeinab Badawi and guests discuss how do we power the developing world in the 21st century?

Reinventing Capitalism20120127

With a debt crisis hanging over the Eurozone, an international protest movement occupying key financial centres, and slowing economic growth in Asia, what's next for the future of the global economy?

Is capitalism at a crisis point?

Nik Gowing chairs a panel of global decision makers at the World Economic Forum in Davos, featuring live questions from around the world via social media.

Nik Gowing chairs a panel of global decision makers at the World Economic Forum in Davos.

Reporting Terror - A Dangerous Game2016100120161002 (WS)

Do reports of terror attacks aid terrorism? Journalists debate whether media organisations need to rethink their coverage.

Reporting Terror: A Dangerous Game20161001

Reporting Terror: A Dangerous Game2016100120161002 (WS)

A string of terrorist attacks in France and Germany dominated the news agenda in summer 2016. Now, some journalists are asking if their approach needs to change.

More than 30 years after the former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher famously coined the phrase "the oxygen of publicity" when referring to media coverage of the Irish Republican Army (IRA), the leading French newspaper Le Monde has pledged to stop publishing photographs of terrorists in an attempt to deny them "posthumous glorification".

So should media outlets change the way in which they cover terrorism?

The BBC's Security Correspondent, Gordon Corera, and an expert panel of journalists and editors covering the UK, France, Germany and the Middle East debate the topic in front of an audience at Chatham House, the Royal Institute of International Affairs in London.

They discuss the different considerations journalists have both when reporting live on mass casualty attacks, and on reporting the aftermath.

Should the media treat terrorist killings differently to other types of murder? And what's the balance to be struck between reporting terrorism whilst suppressing terrorist propaganda?

DISCUSSION PANELLISTS:

Simon Jenkins, Columnist at The Guardian and former Editor of The London Times (1990-92)

Jonathan Munro, Head of Newsgathering, BBC News

Fatima Manji, News Correspondent, Channel 4 News (UK)

Amil Khan, Media consultant; Advisor to Syrian Opposition Coalition (2013-14); Middle East Correspondent, Reuters (2003-06)

Sophie Desjardin, Head, French Service, Euronews

Dr Peter Busch, Senior Lecturer, Department of War Studies, King's College London and Senior Broadcast Journalist, Zweites Deutsches Fernsehen (Germany)

CHAIR: Gordon Corera, BBC Security Correspondent

PRODUCER: Alex Burton

Reporting Terror: A Dangerous Game2016100120161002 (WS)

A string of terrorist attacks in France and Germany dominated the news agenda in summer 2016. Now, some journalists are asking if their approach needs to change.

More than 30 years after the former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher famously coined the phrase "the oxygen of publicity" when referring to media coverage of the Irish Republican Army (IRA), the leading French newspaper Le Monde has pledged to stop publishing photographs of terrorists in an attempt to deny them "posthumous glorification".

So should media outlets change the way in which they cover terrorism?

The BBC's Security Correspondent, Gordon Corera, and an expert panel of journalists and editors covering the UK, France, Germany and the Middle East debate the topic in front of an audience at Chatham House, the Royal Institute of International Affairs in London.

They discuss the different considerations journalists have both when reporting live on mass casualty attacks, and on reporting the aftermath.

Should the media treat terrorist killings differently to other types of murder? And what's the balance to be struck between reporting terrorism whilst suppressing terrorist propaganda?

DISCUSSION PANELLISTS:

Simon Jenkins, Columnist at The Guardian and former Editor of The London Times (1990-92)

Jonathan Munro, Head of Newsgathering, BBC News

Fatima Manji, News Correspondent, Channel 4 News (UK)

Amil Khan, Media consultant; Advisor to Syrian Opposition Coalition (2013-14); Middle East Correspondent, Reuters (2003-06)

Sophie Desjardin, Head, French Service, Euronews

Dr Peter Busch, Senior Lecturer, Department of War Studies, King's College London and Senior Broadcast Journalist, Zweites Deutsches Fernsehen (Germany)

CHAIR: Gordon Corera, BBC Security Correspondent

PRODUCER: Alex Burton

Rescuing The Global Economy € What Next?2012101320121014 (WS)

The global recovery has suffered more setbacks this year and risks remain high. Growth has disappointed around the globe. The euro area economy has contracted while activity has decelerated in other major advanced economies such as the UK and US.

Major emerging economies have suffered slower growth, notably China, Brazil and India. Economic policies appear to be failing to rebuild confidence. So what will it take to get the global economic recovery back on track?

Nik Gowing presents a debate on the world economy from the IMF in Tokyo. The panel includes;

Christine Lagarde, Managing Director, IMF

• Peter Orszag, Vice Chairman of Global Banking, Citigroup

• Raghu Rajan, Chief Economist Advisor, Indian government

• Wolfgang Schäuble, Finance Minister, Germany

Syria-should The International Community Intervene2012070620120707

Stephen Sackur presents a debate on the international response to the crisis in Syria,...

Stephen Sackur presents a debate on the international response to the crisis in Syria, from the Arab World Institute in Paris.

The Arab Uprising - Is America Getting It Right?20110529

What has been the US response to the Arab Spring so far?

And how has it differed in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, Syria and the Gulf?

Has President Obama learnt the lessons of the past, and is he getting it right now?

The World Debate discusses US foreign policy in North Africa and the Middle East.

Presenter Matt Frei will be joined to debate this topic by:

• Elliott Abrams, Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations

• Marwan Muasher, former Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of Jordan

• Joseph Nye, Professor at Harvard, and former Dean of the Kennedy School

A debate on the US response to the Arab Uprising so far.

Has America learnt lessons?

The Engineers2016061820160619 (WS)

Razia Iqbal meets three of the world's greatest engineers

Razia Iqbal meets three of the world's greatest engineers for a special event at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, held in collaboration with the Royal Commission of 1851. The record-breaking engineers are Bill Baker, the chief engineer of the Burj Khalifa - the world's tallest skyscraper; Michel Virlogeux, the chief engineer of the Millau Viaduct - the world's tallest bridge; Ilya Espino de Marotta, the chief engineer of one of the biggest engineering projects on the planet - the expansion of the Panama Canal.

(Photo: L-R, Razia Iqbal, Michel Virlogeux, Ilya Espino de Marotta, and Bill Baker)

The Genomic Revolution From The Francis Crick Institute20161019
The Genomic Revolution From The Francis Crick Institute2016101920161023 (WS)

The ethics, promise and pitfalls of genomic research

The field of biology changed forever following the discovery of the structure of DNA in the 1950s, and now we live in an age of genomics. We can analyse our own DNA in great detail, learn about our past, where our ancestors came from, but also perhaps our future – the diseases our individual genetic make-up makes us susceptible to.

There are huge questions over the ownership and use of our genetic data. Claudia Hammond hosts a discussion from The Francis Crick Institute on the ethics, promise and pitfalls of genomic research.

Main Image copyright: The Francis Crick Institute

The New America2016100820161009 (WS)

In Arizona, Marco Werman presents a debate on the issues that could motivate US Latinos to vote in the Presidential election.

The Power Of Asia - Democracy Or Prosperity?20110630

Where does the power of Asia come from?

What is the most favourable model for socio-economic development, Chinese, Singaporean, Indonesian or Indian?

A panel of guests from Asia talk about their vision for the region and where its heading.

The War the World Needs to Remember20150926

The War the World Needs to Remember2015092620150927 (WS)

Recalling the Iran-Iraq war of the 1980s, and its continuing legacy

The War the World Needs to Remember20150926

Thirty-five years ago the longest conventional war of the 20th Century broke out when forces belonging to Saddam Hussein’s Iraq attacked neighbouring Iran, following the latter’s Islamic revolution and a long history of border disputes. It was to be eight long years before the fighting would end, and by then casualties were estimated at upwards of a million, and possibly much more. Today, with so many more recent crises gripping the Middle East, the conflict is in danger of being overlooked by the wider world. How were those involved affected? And, what are the longer term legacies for the region and the international order?

The first part of the programme consists of a documentary recounting the experiences of combatants, civilians, and others, amid a seemingly endless struggle that, like World War One before it, quickly came to epitomise the futility and immense suffering of war. We hear from the former soldiers of both sides, and some of their relatives, and learn about some of the personal consequence that the call to arms has had upon them.

But the Iran-Iraq war had some wider ramifications, including the fate of Iran’s Islamic revolution and those who have sought to reform it, the determination of Iran to become a nuclear power, and the attitude of both sides to the West and in particular, the United States. The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in 1990, and all that has stemmed from that crisis, up to and including the fall of Saddam Hussein’s Sunni Muslim elite in Iraq and the subsequent sectarian conflict, can also be seen in the context of the war with Iran. These ideas are discussed within the documentary and in the debate which follows.

(Photo: Iraqi soldiers pose 20 April 1988 in front of a huge bullet-pocked mural of Iranian leader Ayatollah Khomeini in the Faw peninsula. Credit: Getty Images)

Ukraine - Power And Protest20140301

This weekend the BBC World Service holds a live debate from Kiev, the capital of a country thrown into a turmoil by protests that cost a hundred lives and caused a president to flee.

It’s often described as a battle between East and West, between those who look to Europe and those who look to Russia for their future stability and prosperity, but where do the people of Ukraine see their future now? And who has the power? And how should the world respond?

Jamie Coomarasamy hosts this special live debate with guests and an audience in Kiev - asking what next for Ukraine, and what are the implications for Russia and the EU?

Why Poverty?2012112420121125 (WS)

Part of a global event hosted by the BBC and 50 other broadcasters around the world.

This Debate is part of a global event hosted by the BBC and 50 other broadcasters around the world. The debate explores the causes of and cures for the enduring problem of severe poverty which still affects many people in the world.

It was recorded in front of a live audience in Johannesburg earlier this year. On the panel are Tony Blair, former UK Prime Minister; Oby Ezekwesili from the Open Society Foundation, Africa and a former Nigerian government minister; Moeltesi Mbeki, South African author and Chair of SA Institute of International Affairs; and Vandana Shiva, Indian activist, environmentalist and scientist. Chaired by Zeinab Badawi.

(Image: A young boy crying. Credit: AP Photo/Wally Santana)

World Economic Forum20111119

A debate from the World Economic Forum.

World Economic Forum20111120

A debate from the World Economic Forum.

World Economic Forum in Davos20160126

World Economic Forum in Davos20160126

Is Europe at a tipping point? After the Paris terrorist attacks, there are increasing doubts that Europe’s passport-free open borders can survive in their current form. European solidarity is being put to the test, as countries struggle to agree on common solutions, both to the migrant crisis and to the terrorism threat. Is there a price to pay if Europe decides to tighten its borders? The free movement of people, trade and capital within Europe is a basic principle of the EU. At a time when Europe and its most fundamental values are facing renewed threats from outside – a growling Russian bear and a fanatical so-called Islamic State, to name but two - can the dream of a united Europe survive?

The debate will be moderated by the BBC’s chief international correspondent Lyse Doucet taking comments and questions from social media and front row VIP guests.