Word Of Mouth

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
20040418

Michael Rosen presents the programme about words and the way we speak.

3/8. A Chip off the Old Block.

Wood and wood working have provided us with some of our most useful and frequently used idioms. Michael Rosen and guests talk timber. Plus, best selling author Ben Schott rejoices in the romantic language of falconry. Then News.

20040423

Michael Rosen presents Radio 4's programme about words and the way we speak.

4/8. Cockney or Mockney

With their gentle satire on class in post-war Britain, the Ealing Comedies secured an abiding place in the national consciousness. But just how accurate was the speech of the union officials in The Man with the White Suit or the working class Londoners in Passport to Pimlico?; plus: It's written in the stars - how the language of astronomy came down to earth in words like consider, disaster and influenza.

20040507

Michael Rosen presents Radio 4's programme about words and the way we speak.

6. Abracadabra!

Michael Rosen and guests pull a rabbit out of a hat as they investigate magical words associated with conjuring.

20040509

Michael Rosen presents Radio 4's programme about words and the way we speak.

6. Abracadabra!

Michael Rosen and guests pull a rabbit out of a hat as they investigate magical words associated with conjuring. Then News.

20040516

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. [Rpt of Fri, 4.00pm] Then News.

20040806

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20040813

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20040815

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20040820

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20040822

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20040903

"

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]"

20040905

"

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News."

20040910

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20040912

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm]

20040917

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20040919

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20041203

1/7. Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words and the way we speak. This week, his linguistic investigations involve music, poetry, plain English and beekeeping.

20041205

1/7

Michael Rosen is back with a special edition of the programme that opens the door on words, language, and the way we speak. This week his linguistic investigations involve music, poetry, plain English and beekeeping.

Recorded at the Cheltenham Festival of Literature.

Rpt of Fri, 4.00pm] Then News

20041231

Michael Rosen presents a special edition of the show about words, language and the way we speak recorded at the Cheltenham Festival of Literature.

The programme includes an interview with the actor, director, writer and former Monty Python, Terry Jones; listeners questions answered by etymologist Michael Quinion and linguist Lynda Mugglestone; and a column from Miles Kington.

20050102

Michael Rosen presents a special edition of the show about words, language and the way we speak recorded at the Cheltenham Festival of Literature.

The programme includes an interview with the actor, director, writer and former Monty Python, Terry Jones; listeners questions answered by etymologist Michael Quinion and linguist Lynda Mugglestone; and a column from Miles Kington.

Then News.

20050107

Michael Rosen presents the programme that investigates the world of words, language and the way we speak. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20050109

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20050114

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20050116

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20050121

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20050123

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20050401

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rptd Sun 8.30.pm]

20050403

"

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rpt of Fri 4.00 pm] News follows."

20050403

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20050408

"

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rptd Sun 8.30.pm]"

20050408

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rptd Sun 8.30.pm]

20050410

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rpt of Fri 4.00 pm] News follows.

20050415

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rptd Sun 8.30.pm]

20050417

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rpt of Fri 4.00 pm] News follows.

20050422

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rptd Sun 8.30.pm]

20050424

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rpt of Fri 4.00 pm] News follows.

20050429

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rptd Sun 8.30.pm]

20050501

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rpt of Fri 4.00 pm] News follows.

20050506

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20050508

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rpt of Fri 4.00 pm] News follows.

20050513

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20050515

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. Then News.

20050520

The last in the series in which Michael Rosen takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20050805

Michael Rosen launches the new Word of Mouth competition known cryptically as WOMBAC in which listeners are invited to send in their own freshly minted acronyms that reflect contemporary Britain. What's a WOMBAC? It stands for the Word of Mouth Brilliant Acronyms Competition of course!

20050807

Michael Rosen launches the new Word of Mouth competition known cryptically as WOMBAC in which listeners are invited to send in their own freshly minted acronyms that reflect contemporary Britain. What's a WOMBAC? It stands for the Word of Mouth Brilliant Acronyms Competition of course! Then News.

20050812

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20050814

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20050819

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

20050821

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

Followed by News.

20050826

Michael Rosen presents this popular series exploring the world of words and the way we speak.

Word of Mouth links up with BBC Voices to bring you the Bulls of Gravesend, a Romany family who were recorded revealing the secrets of the language they use. There are also two explanations for the word pikey, and why gorgios - the term they use for us - is meant with no disrespect.

On the same theme, Gerry Anderson reports back to Michael from the world of hobos in the US. Also, the WOMBAC competition for the best acronym continues to draw attention from listeners with GSOH.

20050828

Michael Rosen presents Radio 4's popular series exploring the world of words and the way we speak.

Word of Mouth links up with BBC Voices to bring you the Bull's of Gravesend, a Romany family who were recorded revealing the secrets of the language they use. There are also two explanations for the word pikey, and why gorgios - the term they use for us - is meant with no disrespect.

On the same theme Gerry Anderson reports back to Michael from the world of hobos in the US. Also, the WOMBAC competition for the best acronym continues to draw attention from listeners with GSOH. Then News.

20050902

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20050904

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20050909

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20050911

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20050916

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20050918

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20050923

Michael Rosen with the final programme in the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20050925

Michael Rosen with the final programme in the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20051204

Michael Rosen returns with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20051209

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20051211

Michael Rosen returns with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20051216

In a special edition to mark the start of the panto season, Michael Rosen reports on the language of the theatre, from stage names to funny voices. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20051218

In a special edition to mark the start of the panto season, Michael Rosen reports on the language of the theatre, from stage names to funny voices. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20051223

Michael Rosen with a festive edition which asks, among other things, why we feel the need at this time of year to use words like 'festive'. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20051225

Michael Rosen presents a festive edition which asks, among other things, why we feel the need at this time of year to use words like 'festive'. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20051230

Michael Rosen referees the Great Word of Mouth New Year Pub Quiz, in which points are awarded for getting the questions right. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20060101

Michael Rosen referees the Great Word of Mouth New Year Pub Quiz, in which points are awarded for getting the questions right.[Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20060106

Michael Rosen presents a special edition on matters equestrian, recorded at the London International Horse Show. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20060108

Michael Rosen presents a special edition on matters equestrian, recorded at the London International Horse Show. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20060113

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20060115

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20060120

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20060122

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

20060127

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

20060129

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rpt of Fri 4.00pm] Then News.

2006040420060409

He'll be launching a new competition, called Like a Hole in the Head.

2006040420060409

He'll be launching a new competition, called Like a Hole in the Head.

20060409

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. He launches a new competition, called Like a Hole in the Head. [Rpt of Tue 4.00pm]

20060411

In a special Easter edition, Michael Rosen considers the unique contribution of the King James Bible to the richness of the English language. He also hears from Humanist, Muslim and Christian speakers about how religious language is updated and made accessible to all.

2006041120060416

In a special Easter edition, Michael Rosen considers the unique contribution of the King James Bible to the richness of the English language.

He also hears from Humanist, Muslim and Christian speakers about how religious language is updated and made accessible to all.

2006041120060416

In a special Easter edition, Michael Rosen considers the unique contribution of the King James Bible to the richness of the English language.

He also hears from Humanist, Muslim and Christian speakers about how religious language is updated and made accessible to all.

20060416

In a special Easter edition, Michael Rosen considers the unique contribution of the King James Bible to the richness of the English language. He also hears from Humanist, Muslim and Christian speakers about how religious language is updated and made accessible to all.

Then News.

20060418

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

2006041820060423
2006041820060423

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak.

[Rpt of Tue 4.00pm]

20060423

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rpt of Tue 4.00pm] Then News.

20060425

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

2006042520060430
2006042520060430

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak.

[Rpt of Tue 4.00pm]

20060430

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rpt of Tue 4.00pm] Then News.

20060502

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

2006050220060507
2006050220060507

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak.

[Rpt of Tue 4.00pm]

20060507

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rpt of Tue 4.00pm] Then News.

20060509

In a Science Fiction special, Michael Rosen takes a crash course in Klingon, hears from a comic book novelist, and learns the art of talking to aliens. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

2006050920060514

In a Science Fiction special, Michael Rosen takes a crash course in Klingon, hears from a comic book novelist, and learns the art of talking to aliens.

2006050920060514

In a Science Fiction special, Michael Rosen takes a crash course in Klingon, hears from a comic book novelist, and learns the art of talking to aliens.

20060514

In a Science Fiction special, Michael Rosen takes a crash course in Klingon, hears from a comic book novelist, and learns the art of talking to aliens. [Rpt of Tue 4.00pm] Then News.

20060516

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rptd Sun 8.30pm]

2006051620060521
2006051620060521
20060521

Michael Rosen with the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them. [Rpt of Tue 4.00pm] Then News.

20060523

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak.

2006052320060528

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak.

[Rpt of Tue 4.00pm]

2006052320060528

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak.

[Rpt of Tue 4.00pm]

20060528

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rpt of Tue 4.00pm] Then News.

20060807

1/8. Matt Harvey returns with a new series, investigating the world of words and the way we speak. [Rptd Tue 4.00pm]

20060808

1/8. Matt Harvey returns with a new series, investigating the world of words and the way we speak. [Rpt of Mon 11.00pm]

20060814

Matt Harvey presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rptd Tue 4.00pm]

20060815

Matt Harvey presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rpt of Mon 11.00pm]

20060821

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rptd Tue 4.00pm]

20060822

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rpt of Mon 11.00pm]

20060828

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rptd Tue 4.00pm]

20060829

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rpt of Mon 11.00pm]

20060904

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rptd Tue 4.00pm]

20060905

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rpt of Mon 11.00pm]

20060911

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rptd Tue 4.00pm]

20060912

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rpt of Mon 11.00pm]

20060918

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rptd Tue 4.00pm]

20060919

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rpt of Mon 11.00pm]

20060925

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rptd Tue 4.00pm]

20060926

Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. [Rpt of Mon 11.00pm]

20061204

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. [Rptd Tue 4.00pm]

20061205

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. [Rpt of Mon 11.00pm]

20061211

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20061212

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20061218

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20061219

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20061226

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

2006122620070102
2006122620070102
20070101

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

2007010120070102
2007010120070102
20070102

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20070108

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

2007010820070109
2007010820070109
20070109

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20070115

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

2007011520070116
2007011520070116
20070116

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20070122

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

2007012220070123
2007012220070123
20070123

Michael Rosen and guests take another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20070409

Michael Rosen presents the series on words, language and the way we speak.

He is joined by Craig Brown to launch a new competition in search of 21st Century Proverbs. The programme looks at military terms such as yomping, bennies and tabbing, which became more widely used during the Falklands conflict 25 years ago.

2007040920070410

He is joined by Craig Brown to launch a new competition in search of 21st-Century Proverbs.

The programme looks at military terms such as yomping, bennies and tabbing, which became more widely used during the Falklands conflict 25 years ago.

2007040920070410

He is joined by Craig Brown to launch a new competition in search of 21st-Century Proverbs.

The programme looks at military terms such as yomping, bennies and tabbing, which became more widely used during the Falklands conflict 25 years ago.

20070410

Michael Rosen presents the series on words, language and the way we speak.

He is joined by Craig Brown to launch a new competition in search of 21st-Century Proverbs. The programme looks at military terms such as yomping, bennies and tabbing, which became more widely used during the Falklands conflict 25 years ago.

20070416

Michael Rosen presents the series on words, language and the way we speak. Christine Sutton celebrates the 75th anniversary of splitting the atom, Matt Harvey offers the Word of the Week and Craig Brown presents the C21 proverbs competition.

2007041620070417

Christine Sutton celebrates the 75th anniversary of splitting the atom, Matt Harvey offers the Word of the Week and Craig Brown presents the C21 proverbs competition.

2007041620070417

Christine Sutton celebrates the 75th anniversary of splitting the atom, Matt Harvey offers the Word of the Week and Craig Brown presents the C21 proverbs competition.

20070417

Michael Rosen presents the series on words, language and the way we speak. Christine Sutton celebrates the 75th anniversary of splitting the atom, Matt Harvey offers the Word of the Week and Craig Brown presents the C21 proverbs competition.

20070423

John Lloyd presents the series on words, language and the way we speak. This edition includes a look at educational jargon with Mike Baker and Robin Bevan, elocution and posh accents with Bart Cale and a proverbs competition

2007042320070424

John Lloyd presents the series on words, language and the way we speak.

This edition includes a look at educational jargon with Mike Baker and Robin Bevan, elocution and posh accents with Bart Cale and a proverbs competition.

2007042320070424

John Lloyd presents the series on words, language and the way we speak.

This edition includes a look at educational jargon with Mike Baker and Robin Bevan, elocution and posh accents with Bart Cale and a proverbs competition.

20070424

John Lloyd presents the series on words, language and the way we speak. This edition includes a look at educational jargon with Mike Baker and Robin Bevan, elocution and posh accents with Bart Cale and a proverbs competition.

20070430

Michael Rosen presents the series on words, language and the way we speak.

This special edition comes from America and features Seattle-based lexophile Anu Garg, a pundit poet known as Sparrow, a woman who has used a computer programme to study Jane Austen's use of words, and the organiser of the annual Festival of Punning in Austin, Texas.

2007043020070501

This special edition comes from America and features Seattle-based lexophile Anu Garg, a pundit poet known as Sparrow, a woman who has used a computer programme to study Jane Austen's use of words, and the organiser of the annual Festival of Punning in Austin, Texas.

2007043020070501

This special edition comes from America and features Seattle-based lexophile Anu Garg, a pundit poet known as Sparrow, a woman who has used a computer programme to study Jane Austen's use of words, and the organiser of the annual Festival of Punning in Austin, Texas.

20070501

Michael Rosen presents the series on words, language and the way we speak.

This special edition comes from America and features Seattle-based lexophile Anu Garg, a pundit poet known as Sparrow, a woman who has used a computer programme to study Jane Austen's use of words, and the organiser of the annual Festival of Punning in Austin, Texas.

20070507

Michael Rosen presents the series on words, language and the way we speak.

He visits Circomedia, the circus training school in Bristol, to learn about the special language used by clowns, jugglers and acrobats.

Lindsay Camp, who has written a book on the language of persuasion, has hints on how to get one's own way; Philipa Stephenson explores how to make people in photos look as though they are happy and Craig Brown chooses the winners of the competition to invent a proverb.

2007050720070508

He visits Circomedia, the circus training school in Bristol, to learn about the special language used by clowns, jugglers and acrobats.

Lindsay Camp, who has written a book on the language of persuasion, has hints on how to get one's own way; Philipa Stephenson explores how to make people in photos look as though they are happy and Craig Brown chooses the winners of the competition to invent a proverb.

2007050720070508

He visits Circomedia, the circus training school in Bristol, to learn about the special language used by clowns, jugglers and acrobats.

Lindsay Camp, who has written a book on the language of persuasion, has hints on how to get one's own way; Philipa Stephenson explores how to make people in photos look as though they are happy and Craig Brown chooses the winners of the competition to invent a proverb.

20070508

Michael Rosen presents the series on words, language and the way we speak.

He visits Circomedia, the circus training school in Bristol, to learn about the special language used by clowns, jugglers and acrobats.

Lindsay Camp, who has written a book on the language of persuasion, has hints on how to get one's own way; Philipa Stephenson explores how to make people in photos look as though they are happy and Craig Brown chooses the winners of the competition to invent a proverb.

20070806

Michael Rosen presents the series on words, language and the way we speak.

1/6. He explores teenspeak with a father and son team who have compiled a dictionary on the subject.

Writer Louise Rennison and psychologist Dorothy Rowe join him in front of an audience at the Dartington Ways with Words festival.

20070807

Michael Rosen presents the series on words, language and the way we speak.

1/6. He explores teenspeak with a father and son team who have compiled a dictionary on the subject.

Writer Louise Rennison and psychologist Dorothy Rowe join him in front of an audience at the Dartington Ways with Words festival.

20070813

2/6. Recorded in front of an audience at the Dartington Ways with Words festival, Michael Rosen debates the language of power and authority with the help of journalists Michael Buerk, Peter Godwin and Peter Stanford, and philosopher John Gray.

20070820

3/6. Guest presenter John Lloyd continues the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

20070821

3/6. Guest presenter John Lloyd continues the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

20070827

4/6. Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

Featuring Stuttering and Cluttering, with Rosemarie Hayhow; why should English be the dominant language of science, with Stefan Klein; and the language of meditation, with Vishvapani.

20070828

4/6. Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

Featuring Stuttering and Cluttering, with Rosemarie Hayhow; why should English be the dominant language of science, with Stefan Klein; and the language of meditation, with Vishvapani.

20070903

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

Graham Fraser, Dennis Baron, Chris Bryant, Rob Dunbar and Janet Muller discuss bilingualism.

Cricket correspondents Ian Robertson and Vic Marks talk about the effects of pitchside microphones.

20070904

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

Graham Fraser, Dennis Baron, Chris Bryant, Rob Dunbar and Janet Muller discuss bilingualism.

Cricket correspondents Ian Robertson and Vic Marks talk about the effects of pitchside microphones.

20070910

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

20070911

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

20070918

Recorded in front of an audience at the Dartington Ways with Words festival, Michael Rosen debates the language of power and authority with the help of journalists Michael Buerk, Peter Godwin and Peter Stanford, and philosopher John Gray.

20070918

Recorded in front of an audience at the Dartington Ways with Words festival, Michael Rosen debates the language of power and authority with the help of journalists Michael Buerk, Peter Godwin and Peter Stanford, and philosopher John Gray.

20070918

Recorded in front of an audience at the Dartington Ways with Words festival, Michael Rosen debates the language of power and authority with the help of journalists Michael Buerk, Peter Godwin and Peter Stanford, and philosopher John Gray.

20071120

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

20071126

2/6. Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

Including Sonja Elen Kisa on inventing one's own language and Neil Taylor on inventing names for companies and products.

20071127

2/6. Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

Including Sonja Elen Kisa on inventing one's own language and Neil Taylor on inventing names for companies and products.

20071203

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

This special edition is devoted to children's nursey rhymes with Dan Jones.

20071204

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

This special edition is devoted to children's nursey rhymes with Dan Jones.

20071210

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

Including word-based teaching in classrooms with Phil Davis from Picture the Music, The Partridge Dictionary of Slang with Terry Victor and Urban Dictionary creator Aaron Peckham, and how the Police name their operations with Dylan Winter.

20071211

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

Including word-based teaching in classrooms with Phil Davis from Picture the Music, The Partridge Dictionary of Slang with Terry Victor and Urban Dictionary creator Aaron Peckham, and how the Police name their operations with Dylan Winter.

20071217

Belgium's Word Wars

In a special edition of the programme Michael Rosen visits the front line of the linguistic war zone that is today's Belgium. The stand-off between French-speaking Walloons in the south of the country and the northern Flemings whose language is Dutch now threatens the future of Belgium as a nation state. Michael talks to linguist Jeanine Treffers-Daller to find out why the divisions run so deep.

20071218

Belgium's Word Wars

In a special edition of the programme Michael Rosen visits the front line of the linguistic war zone that is today's Belgium. The stand-off between French-speaking Walloons in the south of the country and the northern Flemings whose language is Dutch now threatens the future of Belgium as a nation state. Michael talks to linguist Jeanine Treffers-Daller to find out why the divisions run so deep.

20071224

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

Incuding the changing language of the Queen with Jan Ravens, proverbs with Geoff Rolls, rebranding foods with Kate Colquhoun and island languages with Alice Buffet.

20080101

Guest presenter John Lloyd continues the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

Including stickability of words with Allan Metcalf, Steven Pinker and Fiona MacPherson, words in advertising with John Hegarty and football chants with Pete Boyle and Rogan Taylor.

20080401

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

1/8. He examines the concept of bad language - why we swear, what makes a particular word taboo in polite company and why swearing is on the increase among young people.

20080408

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

2/8. He investigates why we sometimes find it hard to say what we mean or mean what we say.

20080415

Peggy Reynolds presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them (3/8).

20080422

John Lloyd presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

20080429

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

20080506

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

20080513

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

20080520

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

20080714

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

He examines the concept of bad language - why we swear, what makes a particular word taboo in polite company and why swearing is on the increase among young people.

20080721

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

2/8. He investigates why we sometimes find it hard to say what we mean or mean what we say.

20080728

Peggy Reynolds presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

20080804

John Lloyd presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

20080805

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. He looks at the language of apologies and insults. Guests are Quentin Letts and Janey Godley. American academic Nick Smith explains why he believes that many apologies are simply lies.

20080811

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. He looks at the language of apologies and insults. Guests are Quentin Letts and Janey Godley. American academic Nick Smith explains why he believes that many apologies are simply lies.

20080812

Peggy Reynolds takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

She investigates vocal pitch. Is it true that to get on the radio a woman has to sound like a man? Why is it that, according to scientists, attractive women have attractive voices? And why is there such a difference in intonation between women of different nationalities?

20080818

Peggy Reynolds takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

She investigates vocal pitch. Is it true that to get on the radio a woman has to sound like a man? Why is it that, according to scientists, attractive women have attractive voices? And why is there such a difference in intonation between women of different nationalities?

20080819

Another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

Peggy Reynolds investigates the world of language guardians and explores the battles raging on the internet blogs that have superseded the letters once written to newspapers. And while we might ask for a hotel room with an 'en suite', the French would never use the phrase in that context. So which other French words and phases are we misusing?

20080825

Another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

Peggy Reynolds investigates the world of language guardians and explores the battles raging on the internet blogs that have superseded the letters once written to newspapers. And while we might ask for a hotel room with an 'en suite', the French would never use the phrase in that context. So which other French words and phases are we misusing?

20080826

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20080901
20080901

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20080901

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20080902
20080902

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20080902

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20080908
20080908

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20080908

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20080909
20080909

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20080909

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20080915
20080915

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20080916
20080916

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20080922

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

20080929
20080929
20080929

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

20081006

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

20081006

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

20081006

Michael Rosen presents the series that takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

20081125

Michael is joined by Leonard, an African Grey parrot, to talk about animal communication.

20081125

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. He is joined by Leonard, an African Grey parrot, to talk about animal communication.

2008112520081201

Michael is joined by Leonard, an African Grey parrot, to talk about animal communication.

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

He is joined by Leonard, an African Grey parrot, to talk about animal communication.

2008112520081201

Michael is joined by Leonard, an African Grey parrot, to talk about animal communication.

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

He is joined by Leonard, an African Grey parrot, to talk about animal communication.

20081202

Michael Rosen investigates what happens when our ability to communicate breaks down.

2008120220081208

Michael Rosen investigates what happens when our ability to communicate breaks down.

2008120220081208

Michael Rosen investigates what happens when our ability to communicate breaks down.

20081209
2008120920081215
2008120920081215
20081216
20081223

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak

20081230

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak

2008123020090105
2008123020090105
20090106

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak

2009010620090112
2009010620090112
20090113

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak

2009011320090119
2009011320090119
20090407
20090414
20090421
20090428
20090505
20090512
20090714
20090721
20090728
20090804
20090811
20090818
20091117
20091124
2009112420091130

Michael Rosen investigates coded language.

2009112420091130

Michael Rosen investigates coded language.

20091201
20091208
2009120820091214

Michael Rosen meets the consultants who will teach you how to speak more clearly, write more grammatically and even become a published author - at a price.

Michael Rosen meets the consultants who will teach you how to speak more clearly.

2009120820091214

Michael Rosen meets the consultants who will teach you how to speak more clearly, write more grammatically and even become a published author - at a price.

Michael Rosen meets the consultants who will teach you how to speak more clearly.

20091215
20091222
20091229
2009122920100104

2009122920100104

A sweet relief for some and painfully uncomfortable for others, silence can be one of the most powerful tools in speech. From school classrooms to sports grounds, Michael Rosen investigates the times when staying silent can speak volumes.

20100105
20100105

20100105

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

2010010520100111

2010010520100111

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak

20100112
20100112

20100112

Michael Rosen investigates lying. Does the sound of our voice change when we are trying to deceive, and do we use different words?

2010011220100118

2010011220100118

Michael Rosen investigates lying. Does our voice change when we are trying to deceive?

Michael Rosen investigates lying. Does the sound of our voice change when we are trying to deceive, and do we use different words?

Michael Rosen investigates lying.

Does the sound of our voice change when we are trying to deceive, and do we use different words?

Does our voice change when we are trying to deceive?

2010011220100118

Michael Rosen investigates lying. Does our voice change when we are trying to deceive?

2010011220100118

Michael Rosen investigates lying.

Does the sound of our voice change when we are trying to deceive, and do we use different words?

Does our voice change when we are trying to deceive?

20100323
20100330
2010033020100405

Why do people always want to improve" your English? Michael Rosen investigates the phenomenon of the "style guide" and asks whether all the advice that's given is helpful or accurate.

He asks why some people take a strong dislike to adjectives and adverbs, and wonders whether, as Reader's Digest says, it really does pay to enrich your word power.

(Or should that be "Readers' Digest?").

Why do people always want to 'improve' your English? Michael Rosen investigates."

2010033020100405

Why do people always want to improve" your English? Michael Rosen investigates the phenomenon of the "style guide" and asks whether all the advice that's given is helpful or accurate.

He asks why some people take a strong dislike to adjectives and adverbs, and wonders whether, as Reader's Digest says, it really does pay to enrich your word power.

(Or should that be "Readers' Digest?").

Why do people always want to 'improve' your English? Michael Rosen investigates."

20100406
2010040620120528

In this week's edition of Word of Mouth Michael Rosen explores the language of the natural world asking if words are up to the job of conveying the complexities of nature. He also finds out how some British birds got their names and hears the story of a mushroom whose hallucinogenic qualities are used to capture flies. So join Word of Mouth, gathered around the nature table, this afternoon at four o'clock.

In this week's edition of Word of Mouth Michael Rosen explores the language of the natural world asking if words are up to the job of conveying the complexities of nature.

He also finds out how some British birds got their names and hears the story of a mushroom whose hallucinogenic qualities are used to capture flies.

So join Word of Mouth, gathered around the nature table, this afternoon at four o'clock.

Michael Rosen investigates the language of the natural world.

2010040620120528

In this week's edition of Word of Mouth Michael Rosen explores the language of the natural world asking if words are up to the job of conveying the complexities of nature. He also finds out how some British birds got their names and hears the story of a mushroom whose hallucinogenic qualities are used to capture flies. So join Word of Mouth, gathered around the nature table, this afternoon at four o'clock.

2010040620120528

In this week's edition of Word of Mouth Michael Rosen explores the language of the natural world asking if words are up to the job of conveying the complexities of nature. He also finds out how some British birds got their names and hears the story of a mushroom whose hallucinogenic qualities are used to capture flies. So join Word of Mouth, gathered around the nature table, this afternoon at four o'clock.

In this week's edition of Word of Mouth Michael Rosen explores the language of the natural world asking if words are up to the job of conveying the complexities of nature.

He also finds out how some British birds got their names and hears the story of a mushroom whose hallucinogenic qualities are used to capture flies.

So join Word of Mouth, gathered around the nature table, this afternoon at four o'clock.

Michael Rosen investigates the language of the natural world.

20100413
2010041320100524

Chris Ledgard goes to Soho to meet the people that work in voiceoverland.

He hears the American actor Kerry Shale dubbing over Peter Kay's voice for a cartoon about to be exported to the States.

He talks to the people who produce the messages that we hear when we 'phone our banks.

He asks a voiceover talent agent (whose own voice people who watch The Weakest Link will recognise) about the changes that have occurred in the industry over the years and he explores what it is that makes a particular voice grab our attention.

Producer Sarah Langan.

2010041320100524

Chris Ledgard goes to Soho to meet the people that work in voiceoverland.

He hears the American actor Kerry Shale dubbing over Peter Kay's voice for a cartoon about to be exported to the States.

He talks to the people who produce the messages that we hear when we 'phone our banks.

He asks a voiceover talent agent (whose own voice people who watch The Weakest Link will recognise) about the changes that have occurred in the industry over the years and he explores what it is that makes a particular voice grab our attention.

Producer Sarah Langan.

20100420
2010042020100531

Chris Ledgard looks at the Chinese and English languages, and the meeting point between the two.

Will the Chinese language be affected by the growing influence of English? Pinyin is the Chinese method of writing Chinese characters in the latin alphabet.

It produces a simplified version of Chinese for children to learn, and is also used for texting, slang and to make it possible to type on a keyboard.

It can be used to evade the censors.

It also helps the rest of the world to understand Chinese words.

Beijing is a pinyin word, for example.

Will the use of Chinese characters eventually die out as the influence of English is felt there? Has globalisation affected the way Chinese is spoken and written in China? And we hear about the language war raging in Singapore, the only country in Asia with English as its first language, between standard English and Singlish, the local variant.

Contributors include William Zhou, Pinyin Joe"- Joe Katz, Victor Mair and Singaporean blogger extraordinaire "mr brown", aka Lee Kin Mun.

Looking at the Chinese and English languages, and the meeting point between the two."

Will the Chinese language be affected by the growing influence of English? Pinyin is the Chinese method of writing Chinese characters in our alphabet.

Will the use of Chinese characters eventually die out as the influence of pinyin and English is felt there? And we hear about the language war raging in Singapore, the only country in Asia with English as its first language, between standard English and Singlish, the local variant.

Contributors include William Zhou, Chen Cathy" Liu,"Pinyin Joe"- Joe Katz, Victor Mair and Singaporean podcaster extraordinaire "mr brown", aka Kin Mun Lee.

2010042020100531

Chris Ledgard looks at the Chinese and English languages, and the meeting point between the two.

Will the Chinese language be affected by the growing influence of English? Pinyin is the Chinese method of writing Chinese characters in the latin alphabet.

It produces a simplified version of Chinese for children to learn, and is also used for texting, slang and to make it possible to type on a keyboard.

It can be used to evade the censors.

It also helps the rest of the world to understand Chinese words.

Beijing is a pinyin word, for example.

Will the use of Chinese characters eventually die out as the influence of English is felt there? Has globalisation affected the way Chinese is spoken and written in China? And we hear about the language war raging in Singapore, the only country in Asia with English as its first language, between standard English and Singlish, the local variant.

Contributors include William Zhou, Pinyin Joe"- Joe Katz, Victor Mair and Singaporean blogger extraordinaire "mr brown", aka Lee Kin Mun.

Looking at the Chinese and English languages, and the meeting point between the two."

Will the Chinese language be affected by the growing influence of English? Pinyin is the Chinese method of writing Chinese characters in our alphabet.

Will the use of Chinese characters eventually die out as the influence of pinyin and English is felt there? And we hear about the language war raging in Singapore, the only country in Asia with English as its first language, between standard English and Singlish, the local variant.

Contributors include William Zhou, Chen Cathy" Liu,"Pinyin Joe"- Joe Katz, Victor Mair and Singaporean podcaster extraordinaire "mr brown", aka Kin Mun Lee.

20100427
2010042720120521

Michael Rosen on the language used by and about disabled people, and the modern trend in humour of using disability to produce laughs.

With Victoria Wright, Francesca Martinez and Colin Barnes. Also Louise Wallis and Jackie Ryan from the campaign against the "R-word".

Producer Beth O'Dea.

With Victoria Wright, Francesca Martinez and Colin Barnes.

Michael Rosen on the language used by and about disabled people.

2010042720120521

Michael Rosen on the language used by and about disabled people, and the modern trend in humour of using disability to produce laughs.

With Victoria Wright, Francesca Martinez and Colin Barnes. Also Louise Wallis and Jackie Ryan from the campaign against the "R-word".

Producer Beth O'Dea.

With Victoria Wright, Francesca Martinez and Colin Barnes.

Michael Rosen on the language used by and about disabled people.

2010042720120521

Michael Rosen on the language used by and about disabled people, and the modern trend in humour of using disability to produce laughs.

With Victoria Wright, Francesca Martinez and Colin Barnes. Also Louise Wallis and Jackie Ryan from the campaign against the "R-word".

Producer Beth O'Dea.

20100504
2010050420100510

Michael Rosen enters the world of flavour, examining how what goes in to our mouths corresponds with the words which come out of them.

Visiting the lab of a flavourist, he finds out how language is used to create tastes that don't exist yet.

Food historian Ivan Day demonstrates how words have been imported alongside the food they describe.

Michael's also joined in the studio by food critic for the Guardian, Jay Rayner, to discuss what makes a great menu.

Michael Rosen looks at the words used to describe flavour and taste.

2010050420100510

Michael Rosen enters the world of flavour, examining how what goes in to our mouths corresponds with the words which come out of them.

Visiting the lab of a flavourist, he finds out how language is used to create tastes that don't exist yet.

Food historian Ivan Day demonstrates how words have been imported alongside the food they describe.

Michael's also joined in the studio by food critic for the Guardian, Jay Rayner, to discuss what makes a great menu.

Michael Rosen looks at the words used to describe flavour and taste.

20100511
2010051120100517

Michael Rosen on the world of words and the way we use them.

This week, the language of football.

As the World Cup approaches, has football chatter become more important than the sport itself?

Produced by Beatrice Fenton.

Michael Rosen explores the language of football.

2010051120100517

Michael Rosen on the world of words and the way we use them.

This week, the language of football.

As the World Cup approaches, has football chatter become more important than the sport itself?

Produced by Beatrice Fenton.

Michael Rosen explores the language of football.

20100517
20100727

Chris Ledgard investigates the world of the inner monologue to find out how we talk to ourselves. Are the words we use internally the same as when we speak. Contributors include the author Tim Parks, whose books - such as Europa - often read like an internal discussion. His latest book recounts his efforts to overcome a debilitating illness, which he discovered was caused by too many words.

Chris Ledgard investigates the world of the inner monologue.

20100803

Chris Ledgard travels to a three day celebration of storytelling, Festival at the Edge in Shropshire, one of many storytelling festivals now held globally. Here he meets storytellers from all over the world, and the audiences who have come to hear them, to try and discover why in a digital age there has been such a resurgence of interest what is after all, an ancient method of communication. Producer Paul Dodgson.

Chris Ledgard on the rise in popularity of storytelling at the Festival at the Edge.

20100810

Every August exam results are published, and every August newspaper headlines are filled with comments about dumbing down. But how much thought lies behind modern examination questions, and who decides the language that is used ? In Word of Mouth we hear from Edexcel's chair of history examiners Angela Leonard, and her managing director Ziggy Liaquat. The key word is accessibility, and enabling students to understand the questions they have been set. It all seems a brave new world for our presenter Chris Ledgard, who recalls stumbling through an A Level question about Bismarck's expediency, not knowing what expediency meant. Also the American critic Joe Queenan attacks the editors who insist on the use of simpler words in his books. "People who don't enjoy words should just shut up," he says. The producer is Miles Warde.

Word of Mouth explores the value of dumbing down.

20100824

With just two years remaining until London's Olympic Games start, the search for volunteers with language skills has begun. Presenter Chris Ledgard travels to St Pancras station to meet Seb Coe, Boris Johnson and LOCOG chief executive Paul Deighton to hear about the two schemes - Games Makers and Ambassadors for London. "You don't need a degree in Mandarin" says Boris Johnson, but what language skills are required ? Chris also talks to gold medal winner Sally Gunnell about the need for translators in previous games, and also to Professor Joe Lo Bianco in Australia. Joe was heavily involved in the planning for the Sydney Olympics, which set a benchmark in getting language requirements correct. Does Joe think the London organisers have left enough time to get everything in place ?

Chris Ledgard investigates the search for translators for London 2012.

20100831

Every two weeks another language becomes extinct and, according to UNESCO, more than 2400 languages spoken today are endangered and will probably vanish by the end of the century. In this edition of Word of Mouth Chris Ledgard meets some of those who are dedicating their lives to maintaining global linguistic diversity. These include Dr Mark Turin, the founder of the Oral Literature Project in Cambridge who works with Thangmi speakers in a remote region of Nepal; Dr Stephen Leonard who is preparing to spend a year in Northern Greenland with a community whose language is threatened as an indirect consequence of global warming; and Dr Julia Sallabank who is working to preserve Guernesiais, a language unique to the island of Guernsey. According to the 2001 census, it was spoken by just 2% of the population. Producer Paul Dodgson.

Chris Ledgard meets some of those trying to stop the death of languages around the world.

20101221

Michael Rosen begins a new series by exploring the British Library's first ever exhibition on the history of English. The exhibition is called "Evolving English", and Michael's guests include David Crystal, the author of the book of the same name. Comics, adverts, text messages and trading records have all been used by the British Library to chart the development of English from a language spoken on a small island to the global language we know today. The curators explain how they chose the exhibits, including the earliest surviving copy of Beowulf, the King James Bible, and the poem "Essay to Miss Catharine Jay", which contains the phrase "I wrote 2 U B 4", printed well over a hundred years before the advent of text messaging.

Michael Rosen explores the first history of English exhibition at the British Library.

20101221

20101228

Christmas is over and now the TV ads are all about holidays. Michael Rosen considers the language of travel and tourism.

At the World Travel Market he collects the adjectives that are used to sell holidays, then discusses them with a professor of linguistics who specialises in the subject. Travel journalist Simon Calder adds some travel trade jargon.

Producer: Peter Everett.

Michael Rosen considers the language of travel and tourism.

20101228

20110104

In January 1961 in New York's Greenwich Village, Bob Dylan was beginning a career that would revolutionise song-writing. Michael Rosen lends an ear to the last fifty years of the song-lyric.

Dylanologist Michael Gray explains why Bob matters. A sceptical David Quantick argues that Dylan's influence was not entirely helpful to rock music. And singer-songwriter KT Tunstall pays tribute to one of her biggest influences.

Producer: Peter Everett.

Michael Rosen lends an ear to the last fifty years of the song-lyric.

20110104

20110111

In 1861, Johann P. Reis announced that he'd invented the microphone. To celebrate 150 noisy years, Michael Rosen is joined by John Liffen, Curator of Communications at the Science Museum, the social historian, Clare Langhamer, and 'digital futurologist', Peter Cochrane.

Steve Punt, meanwhile, reports from an alternative universe where the microphone was never invented.

Producer: Peter Everett.

Michael Rosen celebrates the life of the microphone.

20110111

20110125

Between the newspaper reporter and the readers sits a shadowy figure - the sub-editor. It's the sub who thinks up the punning headline and crafts the catchy intro. Michael Rosen joins the 'back bench' as the presses get ready to roll.

Producer: Peter Everett.

Michael Rosen explores the world of language and communication.

20110125

20110322

First of a new series. Michael Rosen looks at languages in the UK today - who speaks English and who doesn't? If you live in the UK should you speak English - and if so, what will be the effect of cutting the funding for English language classes?

Producer: Beth O'Dea.

Michael Rosen looks at languages in the UK today - who speaks English and who doesn't?

20110322

20110329

Michael Rosen looks at the world of words.

Michael Rosen looks at the world of words.

20110329

20110405

Michael Rosen explores the complex relationship between language and sport, and asks "If sport is so unpredictable, why is it that sports punditry is so predictably cliche-ridden?"

Michael talks to commentators, athletes, and athletes-turned-commentators to see if the arrival of the Olympics on British soil is likely to herald a new era of hyperbole and inarticulate over-excitement.

Producer: John Byrne.

Michael Rosen explores the complex and difficult relationship between language and sport.

20110405

20110503

We do it at college, at work, and even in pursuit of happiness. But what are the rules of engagement for an interview? Michael Rosen finds out how to get into university; how to keep your job or get a better one, and how to impress the love of your life.

Getting a place at university is more competitive than ever. So just how level is the university playing field? Does the process reward the most intelligent or the most articulate? And are the skills developed for the college interview ones that will come in handy later on....down the pub?

Producer: John Byrne.

Michael Rosen tackles the art of the interview; at college, at work and in pursuit of love

20110510

Michael Rosen takes a look at the history and usefulness of the mysterious art of shorthand, with a look at its uses in Ancient Rome, Elizabethan England and the present day. There's a trip to Bath to hear from Sir Isaac Pitman himself, recorded in 1891, and a visit to the University of Sheffield's Journalism department.

Producer Luke Hollands.

Michael Rosen looks at the mysterious art of shorthand.

20110719

Students are no longer choosing to study modern foreign languages. In the first of a new series of Word of Mouth, Chris Ledgard asks how much this matters.

In 2001, 78% of pupils in England did a language GCSE. By last year that had fallen to just 43%. Chris Ledgard talks to Andy Burnham, Shadow Secretary of State for Education; Vivienne Hurley of the British Academy; Professor Andrew Hussey of the University of London Institute in Paris; John Rushforth, Deputy Vice Chancellor of UWE; Swansea University language student Catherine Rendle; Luke Young, President of the NUS in Wales and Glyn Hambrook, a former language lecturer, to find out the true picture and ask if it really matters.

Students are no longer choosing to study foreign languages. What will be the impact?

20110726

What's in a name? Chris Ledgard looks at where our names come from and what they mean.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

What's in a name? Chris Ledgard looks at where our names come from and what they mean.

20110802

Tired of living next to his noisy neighbours, Les Barker opted out of urban Manchester and moved to North Wales. "Although I'd spent half a lifetime an hour's drive away, I'd never heard of Hedd Wyn. Or any other major figure in Welsh history or literature, apart from Max Boyce and Dylan Thomas." So Les began to learn...and learn...and learn.....

"After toying briefly with 'Teach Yourself Welsh', I went on a four-day course in Denbigh; Craig Jones was the tutor. Over the summer I did a couple of week-long courses in Denbigh, initially with another Mr Jones, but he went off sick and was replaced by a Mrs Jones. Wales is full of them."

"Being a beginner is frustrating. After a lifetime of being fluent, I suddenly had the vocabulary and grammar of a three-year-old." But Les persevered, and is now a serious performer on the Welsh poetry scene, and one of the organisers of this summer's Eisteddfod. Chris Ledgard meets Les as he makes last minute preparations for the festival.

Chris Ledgard meets Les Barker, a Mancunian who's fallen in love with the Welsh language.

20110809

In the programme exploring the world of words and the ways in which we use them, Chris Ledgard examines the production of talking newspapers for the blind. From cassette distribution to downloads, the daily newspaper can be as up-to-date for blind people as it is for their sighted neighbours. But how do you "voice up" both the Daily Star and the Telegraph? And what does it take to be the "reader" on FHM or Private Eye?

Chris Ledgard discovers the art and science of producing talking newspapers for the blind.

20111220

Bonds and Bailouts - the language of the financial markets. Michael Rosen returns for a new series on words and the way we use them.

The ups and downs of the banking world have moved from the financial news to the front pages. We are, we're told, witnessing momentous events with far-reaching consequences. But how well do we understand the language of global economic turmoil? Does financial jargon explain or obscure the picture? Michael Rosen talks to money makers, anti-capitalists and commentators.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

The language of the financial markets. Michael Rosen returns for a new series on words.

20120320

Michael Rosen and guests celebrate nonsense at an event recorded at Radio 4's More The Words festival in Bristol. Michael's guests include the children's writer Philip Ardagh, the actor Paul Nicholson, and nonsense experts Anna Barton and James Williams. With help from an audience of adults and children at Bristol Central Library, Michael will be filling a cauldron with nonsense poems, prose, limericks and tongue twisters, with a few nonsense sounds thrown in to bring out the flavour. And the programme will mark the 200th anniversary of Edward Lear's birth with discussion of the writer's life and work.

Michael Rosen and guests celebrate nonsense at Radio 4's More Than Words Festival.

20120403

In Diamond Jubilee year, Michael Rosen looks at royal language. How has the way the Queen speaks changed over the years, and how about her grandchildren? What is the Queen's English, and does she speak it?

Voice coach Penny Dyer demonstrates how she helped Helen Mirren to transform the way she talked, for the film 'The Queen'.

Jonathan Harrington has studied the Queen's Speech over 50 years and traces the ways in which she has come to sound more like her people.

And we uncover the rather surprising original meaning of the word jubilee.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

In Diamond Jubilee year, Michael Rosen looks at royal language.

20120410

Chris Ledgard meets the academics doing stand-up comedy in a London pub; asks why foreign languages have to be so difficult, and discovers that jokes reach parts of the brain that other words cannot reach.

Chris Ledgard meets the academics doing stand-up, and asks why jokes get the brain going.

2012041020120416

Chris Ledgard meets the academics doing stand-up comedy in a London pub; asks why foreign languages have to be so difficult, and discovers that jokes reach parts of the brain that other words cannot reach.

Chris Ledgard meets the academics doing stand-up, and asks why jokes get the brain going.

2012041020120416

Chris Ledgard meets the academics doing stand-up comedy in a London pub; asks why foreign languages have to be so difficult, and discovers that jokes reach parts of the brain that other words cannot reach.

Chris Ledgard meets the academics doing stand-up, and asks why jokes get the brain going.

20120417

As the 100-day countdown to the Olympics begins, Chris Ledgard examines how trademark law can control the language of the games, and asks if word use can ever be effectively contained and controlled. He meets historians charting usage of the term "olympic" over centuries; talks to comedy producer Jon Plowman about the BBC mockumentary "Twenty Twelve", and discovers that one American university wants some words banned altogether.

Chris Ledgard examines how trademark law can control the language of the Olympic games.

2012041720120423

As the 100-day countdown to the Olympics begins, Chris Ledgard examines how trademark law can control the language of the games, and asks if word use can ever be effectively contained and controlled. He meets historians charting usage of the term "olympic" over centuries; talks to comedy producer Jon Plowman about the BBC mockumentary "Twenty Twelve", and discovers that one American university wants some words banned altogether.

Chris Ledgard examines how trademark law can control the language of the Olympic games.

2012041720120423

As the 100-day countdown to the Olympics begins, Chris Ledgard examines how trademark law can control the language of the games, and asks if word use can ever be effectively contained and controlled. He meets historians charting usage of the term "olympic" over centuries; talks to comedy producer Jon Plowman about the BBC mockumentary "Twenty Twelve", and discovers that one American university wants some words banned altogether.

Chris Ledgard examines how trademark law can control the language of the Olympic games.

20120807

Chris Ledgard visits Brussels, a melting pot of European languages. He meets interpreters, language planners and voice coaches to discover how the European Commission operates "interpreting on an industrial scale." We find out why officials fear a looming shortage of interpreters, and we meet the man who teaches people how to speak and behave in a multilingual setting.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

20120821

Chris Ledgard endures bars, clubs and flight paths to listen to speech through noise.

20120821

Chris Ledgard examines how we hear speech through background sound, and discovers that his own inability to hear voices in a crowd may be due to a little-known condition called King-Kopetzky syndrome.

Beginning with bar staff in Cardiff who use earplugs on a busy night, Chris discovers that we humans are surprisingly adept at grabbing small lumps of speech and filling in the gaps. He also discovers how room acoustics contribute to what scientists call the "cocktail party problem"; asks if exposure to aircraft noise can affect schooling, and discovers how the right mood music can make a policemans life easier on a Saturday night in Brighton.

2012082120120827

Chris Ledgard endures bars, clubs and flight paths to listen to speech through noise.

2012082120120827

Chris Ledgard endures bars, clubs and flight paths to listen to speech through noise.

Chris Ledgard examines how we hear speech through background sound, and discovers that his own inability to hear voices in a crowd may be due to a little-known condition called King-Kopetzky syndrome.

Beginning with bar staff in Cardiff who use earplugs on a busy night, Chris discovers that we humans are surprisingly adept at grabbing small lumps of speech and filling in the gaps. He also discovers how room acoustics contribute to what scientists call the "cocktail party problem"; asks if exposure to aircraft noise can affect schooling, and discovers how the right mood music can make a policemans life easier on a Saturday night in Brighton.

2012082120120827

Chris Ledgard endures bars, clubs and flight paths to listen to speech through noise.

Chris Ledgard examines how we hear speech through background sound, and discovers that his own inability to hear voices in a crowd may be due to a little-known condition called King-Kopetzky syndrome.

Beginning with bar staff in Cardiff who use earplugs on a busy night, Chris discovers that we humans are surprisingly adept at grabbing small lumps of speech and filling in the gaps. He also discovers how room acoustics contribute to what scientists call the "cocktail party problem"; asks if exposure to aircraft noise can affect schooling, and discovers how the right mood music can make a policemans life easier on a Saturday night in Brighton.

2012082120120827

Chris Ledgard examines how we hear speech through background sound, and discovers that his own inability to hear voices in a crowd may be due to a little-known condition called King-Kopetzky syndrome.

Beginning with bar staff in Cardiff who use earplugs on a busy night, Chris discovers that we humans are surprisingly adept at grabbing small lumps of speech and filling in the gaps. He also discovers how room acoustics contribute to what scientists call the "cocktail party problem"; asks if exposure to aircraft noise can affect schooling, and discovers how the right mood music can make a policemans life easier on a Saturday night in Brighton.

20121225

Michael Rosen discovers that the giving and receiving of compliments is a tricky business.

20121225

Michael Rosen meets linguists, historians, students and sequence dancers to find out why the giving and receiving of compliments can be a complex and dangerous business. He meets language students in Cheltenham and sequence dancers in North London, who each have very different responses to people saying nice things to them. He talks to a personal development tutor and an etiquette coach about the do's and dont's of positive feedback. And he talks to the Swansea linguist studying why people feel uncomfortable with compliments. The difficulty is not the compliment, it's the response. How do you reply positively and politely without sounding arrogant? Michael discovers that our tendency towards post-modern irony makes a sincere compliment a difficult manoeuvre to complete - so even if you can say something nice, it may still be best to say nothing at all.

Producer: John Byrne.

2012122520121231

Michael Rosen meets linguists, historians, students and sequence dancers to find out why the giving and receiving of compliments can be a complex and dangerous business. He meets language students in Cheltenham and sequence dancers in North London, who each have very different responses to people saying nice things to them. He talks to a personal development tutor and an etiquette coach about the do's and dont's of positive feedback. And he talks to the Swansea linguist studying why people feel uncomfortable with compliments. The difficulty is not the compliment, it's the response. How do you reply positively and politely without sounding arrogant? Michael discovers that our tendency towards post-modern irony makes a sincere compliment a difficult manoeuvre to complete - so even if you can say something nice, it may still be best to say nothing at all.

Producer: John Byrne.

2012122520121231

Michael Rosen meets linguists, historians, students and sequence dancers to find out why the giving and receiving of compliments can be a complex and dangerous business. He meets language students in Cheltenham and sequence dancers in North London, who each have very different responses to people saying nice things to them. He talks to a personal development tutor and an etiquette coach about the do's and dont's of positive feedback. And he talks to the Swansea linguist studying why people feel uncomfortable with compliments. The difficulty is not the compliment, it's the response. How do you reply positively and politely without sounding arrogant? Michael discovers that our tendency towards post-modern irony makes a sincere compliment a difficult manoeuvre to complete - so even if you can say something nice, it may still be best to say nothing at all.

Producer: John Byrne.

Michael Rosen discovers that the giving and receiving of compliments is a tricky business.

2012122520121231

Michael Rosen meets linguists, historians, students and sequence dancers to find out why the giving and receiving of compliments can be a complex and dangerous business. He meets language students in Cheltenham and sequence dancers in North London, who each have very different responses to people saying nice things to them. He talks to a personal development tutor and an etiquette coach about the do's and dont's of positive feedback. And he talks to the Swansea linguist studying why people feel uncomfortable with compliments. The difficulty is not the compliment, it's the response. How do you reply positively and politely without sounding arrogant? Michael discovers that our tendency towards post-modern irony makes a sincere compliment a difficult manoeuvre to complete - so even if you can say something nice, it may still be best to say nothing at all.

Producer: John Byrne.

Michael Rosen discovers that the giving and receiving of compliments is a tricky business.

20130108

The language of bereavement and grief are explored by writer Michael Rosen, as he talks to psychologists, teachers, hospice workers, childrens charities, and visits a Death Cafe.

Winstons Wish is a charity for children who have lost a parent, brother or sister. Michael sits in on a training session for teachers and carers in Cheltenham, and discovers how the language we use can either confuse or comfort young children. He talks to psychologist Colin Murray Parkes about the stages of grieving and the psychological complexity of dealing with loss. And he visits a Death Cafe, where like-minded people come together to discuss anything and everything about death and dying, whilst enjoying tea and cake.

20130108

The language of bereavement and grief are explored by writer Michael Rosen, as he talks to psychologists, teachers, hospice workers, childrens charities, and visits a Death Cafe.

Winstons Wish is a charity for children who have lost a parent, brother or sister. Michael sits in on a training session for teachers and carers in Cheltenham, and discovers how the language we use can either confuse or comfort young children. He talks to psychologist Colin Murray Parkes about the stages of grieving and the psychological complexity of dealing with loss. And he visits a Death Cafe, where like-minded people come together to discuss anything and everything about death and dying, whilst enjoying tea and cake.

2013010820130114

The language of bereavement and grief are explored by writer Michael Rosen, as he talks to psychologists, teachers, hospice workers, childrens charities, and visits a Death Cafe.

Winstons Wish is a charity for children who have lost a parent, brother or sister. Michael sits in on a training session for teachers and carers in Cheltenham, and discovers how the language we use can either confuse or comfort young children. He talks to psychologist Colin Murray Parkes about the stages of grieving and the psychological complexity of dealing with loss. And he visits a Death Cafe, where like-minded people come together to discuss anything and everything about death and dying, whilst enjoying tea and cake.

20130115

Michael Rosen meets parents, researchers and carers to explore the ways we communicate with people with autism or profound learning disabilities. Phoebe Caldwell talks about the principles of "intensive interaction", and why listening and non verbal communication are central to her work. Researchers at the Norah Fry Research Centre in Bristol explain why changing the way we communicate with people with disabilities can challenge preconceptions, and make relationships more open, friendly and equal. And Ruth Hendery, the head teacher at St Crispin's special school in Edinburgh, explains how communication works in her school, and why it's so important to get it right.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

20130122

Writer Michael Rosen charts the rise and rise of the audiobook. From its beginnings as a way for blind war veterans to enjoy literature, to the blockbusters and autobiographies of today, Michael discovers that the audiobook has a curious history. Subject to suspicion and occasional derision, the audiobook was long the poor relation of "proper" reading and has only recently received more serious scholarly attention. Michael visits the sound studios to hear audiobooks in production, and talks to writers, sound engineers, directors and actors about the art of the successful audiobook.

20130402

Michael Rosen talks to himself - and other people as well - to find out why it is that many of us habitually talk to ourselves. It can be for reassurance or exhortation; It's cited as evidence of a psychological disorder but can also help to unclutter and order the mind. People use it as an aid to prayer and a way to enjoy our own company.

Most people will admit to talking to themselves every now and then. We do it to steel ourselves to do a difficult task or it can help to organise our thoughts. Some people think through past dilemmas aloud testing out different points of view and many berate themselves for mistakes. Some use it to say all the things they wish they'd said but didn't.

But what does this self talk do to the individual? Is it healthy and to what extent are our perceptions of it damaged by the old adage that talking to yourself is the first sign of madness? After all, therapy encourages us to ask questions of ourselves rather than seek external solutions. And to what extent does self talk play a part in prayer and confession? Michael talks to psychologists, priests, actors, stand ups and writers to find out.

Producer Sarah Langan.

20130409

More than a billion people, twenty two scheduled languages, and dozens more mother tongues: In the first part of two programmes, Chris Ledgard explores the complex and passionate politics of language in India. In Delhi and Jaipur, we visit schools, business and newspaper offices to ask - how do the languages you speak, read and write in India influence your life?

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

20130507

With a royal baby imminent, Michael Rosen investigates names. From rare surnames which have all but died out in this country, to countries which tightly control first names given to children. He meets expectant mothers at an ante-natal class and finds out about the names they're thinking of for their offspring, and talks to an historian about royal names- are we ever likely to have a Prince Kevin or a Princess Tracey? Produced in Bristol by Melvin Rickarby.

2013050720130513

With a royal baby imminent, Michael Rosen investigates names. From rare surnames which have all but died out in this country, to countries which tightly control first names given to children. He meets expectant mothers at an ante-natal class and finds out about the names they're thinking of for their offspring, and talks to an historian about royal names- are we ever likely to have a Prince Kevin or a Princess Tracey? Produced in Bristol by Melvin Rickarby.

2013050720130513

With a royal baby imminent, Michael Rosen investigates names. From rare surnames which have all but died out in this country, to countries which tightly control first names given to children. He meets expectant mothers at an ante-natal class and finds out about the names they're thinking of for their offspring, and talks to an historian about royal names- are we ever likely to have a Prince Kevin or a Princess Tracey? Produced in Bristol by Melvin Rickarby.

20130827

What are we allowed to say to each other? Chris Ledgard looks at the laws surrounding language use, from libel to blasphemy.

Barristers Nicola Cain and Christina Michalos explain defamation law. Professor Laura Gowing from King's College London takes us back to a time when seditious language could land you in the pillory. And barrister Diane Chanteau explains how critical the use of exact language is in court.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.

2014040820140414

2014040820140414

Michael Rosen on the necessary evil of journalistic cliché.

20150414

2015041420150420 (R4)

What is a pedant, and where does pedantry come from? Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright discuss with Times writer Oliver Kamm, who describes himself as a "reformed pedant".

Producer Beth O'Dea.

20160927

2016092720161003 (R4)

Pointless chit chat or vital social lubricant? Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright talk small talk with psychotherapist and writer Philippa Perry, author of 'How to Stay Sane'. Why do we bother with small talk? What are the rules of banter? And what are we really talking about when we talk about the weather?

Producer: Mair Bosworth.

*20080922

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

*20080922

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

*2008121620081222

Michael Rosen hears how singing might make it easier to learn a second language.

*2008121620081222

Michael Rosen hears how singing might make it easier to learn a second language.

*2008122320081229
*2008122320081229
*2009111720091123

In a special edition of the programme for Radio 4's 1989 season, Michael Rosen talks to playwright David Edgar about the rise and fall of the language that became synonymous with communism - from the hyperbole of Ceaucescu's Romania ('General Secretary, President, President of the State Council, Chairman of the National Defence Council, Chairman of the Supreme Council for Socio-Economic Development' was his own job description) to phrases that have passed into the very definition of the Marxist-Leninist dialectic.

The demolition of the Berlin Wall led to dramatic changes not only in the political and economic lives of those living in the former Eastern Bloc, but also to the language of those countries too, as they tried to shed the years of euphemism built up within a strongly ideological political system.

Also, political journalist Anne Mcelvoy tells of her lingustic adventures in East Germany both before and after 1989, and Dr Zoran Milutinovic examines how Serbo-Croat has changed since the break-up of the former Yugoslavia.

Michael Rosen and playwright David Edgar on the rise and fall of the communist 'dialect'.

*2009111720091123

In a special edition of the programme for Radio 4's 1989 season, Michael Rosen talks to playwright David Edgar about the rise and fall of the language that became synonymous with communism - from the hyperbole of Ceaucescu's Romania ('General Secretary, President, President of the State Council, Chairman of the National Defence Council, Chairman of the Supreme Council for Socio-Economic Development' was his own job description) to phrases that have passed into the very definition of the Marxist-Leninist dialectic.

The demolition of the Berlin Wall led to dramatic changes not only in the political and economic lives of those living in the former Eastern Bloc, but also to the language of those countries too, as they tried to shed the years of euphemism built up within a strongly ideological political system.

Also, political journalist Anne Mcelvoy tells of her lingustic adventures in East Germany both before and after 1989, and Dr Zoran Milutinovic examines how Serbo-Croat has changed since the break-up of the former Yugoslavia.

Michael Rosen and playwright David Edgar on the rise and fall of the communist 'dialect'.

*2009120120091207

Michael Rosen asks whether English is one language or a thousand.

*2009120120091207

Michael Rosen asks whether English is one language or a thousand.

*2009122220091228

Michael Rosen takes apart some jokes to try to find out why they're funny.

After he puts them back together, they don't seem to work very well.

*2009122220091228

Michael Rosen takes apart some jokes to try to find out why they're funny.

After he puts them back together, they don't seem to work very well.

*2010010520100111
*2010010520100111

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak

* *2007080020080101

Guest presenter John Lloyd continues the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

Including stickability of words with Allan Metcalf, Steven Pinker and Fiona MacPherson, words in advertising with John Hegarty and football chants with Pete Boyle and Rogan Taylor.

* *2007080020080101

Guest presenter John Lloyd continues the series which takes a close look at the words we use, where they come from and how we play with them.

Including stickability of words with Allan Metcalf, Steven Pinker and Fiona MacPherson, words in advertising with John Hegarty and football chants with Pete Boyle and Rogan Taylor.

* *2009040720090413

Michael Rosen examines spelling.

With a revival of interest in spelling bees, the ability to spell 'properly' is again becoming synonymous with having a good education.

But do spelling reformers have a point when they say that irregular spelling is responsible for anything from teenage pregnancy to the high prison population?

Michael also considers the politics of spelling and why computer spell-checkers do not seem to help people with dyslexia.

* *2009040720090413

Michael Rosen examines spelling.

With a revival of interest in spelling bees, the ability to spell 'properly' is again becoming synonymous with having a good education.

But do spelling reformers have a point when they say that irregular spelling is responsible for anything from teenage pregnancy to the high prison population?

Michael also considers the politics of spelling and why computer spell-checkers do not seem to help people with dyslexia.

* *2009041420090420

Everyone accepts that it is important for parents to read to their children, but, thanks partly to school literacy targets, many children actually spend more time reading to their parents.

Furthermore, some parents suffer from 'performance anxiety' over their inability to 'do the voices' in stories, so, in these cases, what can be done to help keep storytelling alive?

* *2009041420090420

Everyone accepts that it is important for parents to read to their children, but, thanks partly to school literacy targets, many children actually spend more time reading to their parents.

Furthermore, some parents suffer from 'performance anxiety' over their inability to 'do the voices' in stories, so, in these cases, what can be done to help keep storytelling alive?

* *2009042120090427

Michael Rosen explores the teenage use and abuse of the word 'like', finds out why latin lessons are making a comeback and listens in as a school teaches literacy by giving pupils the chance to run their own radio station.

* *2009042120090427

Michael Rosen explores the teenage use and abuse of the word 'like', finds out why latin lessons are making a comeback and listens in as a school teaches literacy by giving pupils the chance to run their own radio station.

* *2009042820090504
* *2009042820090504
* *2009050520090511
* *2009050520090511
* *2009051220090518
* *2009051220090518
* *2009071420090720

Chris Ledgard explores the words we use to talk about music.

What are 'acid house' and 'grime', and how did the terms come about? The word 'jazz', too, carries an illuminating and largely unknown story.

And how do artists feel about the categories to which they are assigned in music stores, on radio stations and on the web?

Chris Ledgard looks into the words we use to talk about music.

Is it even possible to pin music down in language? Stuart Maconie thinks we should try, and he talks us through the various genres into which music is categorised.

Where did the word 'jazz' come from? What exactly is 'garage', and how has the meaning of R&B changed so dramatically?

We go to a recording studio to sit in with a band in session, and hear how they communicate their ideas.

Chris also talks to Norman Lebrecht about the art of describing classical music.

Neuroscientist Daniel Levitin, author of This is Your Brain on Music, talks about his years as a record producer, working with Stevie Wonder and Carlos Santana - who wanted his guitar to sound 'more orange'.

* *2009071420090720

Chris Ledgard explores the words we use to talk about music.

What are 'acid house' and 'grime', and how did the terms come about? The word 'jazz', too, carries an illuminating and largely unknown story.

And how do artists feel about the categories to which they are assigned in music stores, on radio stations and on the web?

Chris Ledgard looks into the words we use to talk about music.

Is it even possible to pin music down in language? Stuart Maconie thinks we should try, and he talks us through the various genres into which music is categorised.

Where did the word 'jazz' come from? What exactly is 'garage', and how has the meaning of R&B changed so dramatically?

We go to a recording studio to sit in with a band in session, and hear how they communicate their ideas.

Chris also talks to Norman Lebrecht about the art of describing classical music.

Neuroscientist Daniel Levitin, author of This is Your Brain on Music, talks about his years as a record producer, working with Stevie Wonder and Carlos Santana - who wanted his guitar to sound 'more orange'.

* *2009072120090727

Chris Ledgard considers the use of words to control minds, exploring hypnosis, brainwashing and the recruiting language of cults to find out just how influenced we are by language.

Chris is put into an altered state of consciousness by the soothing words of a hypnotherapist, to find out what kind of words are used to do this and how.

Some in the medical profession are calling for hypnosis to be used for pain relief during medical procedures such as bone marrow transplantation and cancer treatment.

They say that as hypnosis has no side effects it makes the operation quicker, the recovery faster and the cost less than with the use conventional anaesthetic.

But does it really work, and if so, how? Chris talks to the scientists currently working on a systematic review to find out.

Can talk also be used to control and manipulate us into doing things that we would otherwise not do? Stories of people being indoctrinated into cults usually involve descriptions of brainwashing, corruption and manipulation.

But are words really powerful enough to control the mind? Chris talks to an ex-cult member turned rhetorical theorist about how language is used.

Chris Ledgard considers the use of words to control minds.

* *2009072120090727

Chris Ledgard considers the use of words to control minds, exploring hypnosis, brainwashing and the recruiting language of cults to find out just how influenced we are by language.

Chris is put into an altered state of consciousness by the soothing words of a hypnotherapist, to find out what kind of words are used to do this and how.

Some in the medical profession are calling for hypnosis to be used for pain relief during medical procedures such as bone marrow transplantation and cancer treatment.

They say that as hypnosis has no side effects it makes the operation quicker, the recovery faster and the cost less than with the use conventional anaesthetic.

But does it really work, and if so, how? Chris talks to the scientists currently working on a systematic review to find out.

Can talk also be used to control and manipulate us into doing things that we would otherwise not do? Stories of people being indoctrinated into cults usually involve descriptions of brainwashing, corruption and manipulation.

But are words really powerful enough to control the mind? Chris talks to an ex-cult member turned rhetorical theorist about how language is used.

Chris Ledgard considers the use of words to control minds.

* *2009072820090803

Chris Ledgard explores the idea that the language we speak shapes the way we are and the way we see the world: that we really are different in different languages.

The programme visits a group of Asian women at home to hear about all the languages they speak, and how they manage to switch effortlessly between them.

We talk to the professor who is leading research into the idea that the actual structure of our language makes a difference to the way we think.

And we hear from an Australian expert who believes that the difficulty of the English system of numbers puts English-speaking children at a disadvantage when it comes to learning to count.

Chris Ledgard looks at research showing we really are different when it comes to languages

* *2009072820090803

Chris Ledgard explores the idea that the language we speak shapes the way we are and the way we see the world: that we really are different in different languages.

The programme visits a group of Asian women at home to hear about all the languages they speak, and how they manage to switch effortlessly between them.

We talk to the professor who is leading research into the idea that the actual structure of our language makes a difference to the way we think.

And we hear from an Australian expert who believes that the difficulty of the English system of numbers puts English-speaking children at a disadvantage when it comes to learning to count.

Chris Ledgard looks at research showing we really are different when it comes to languages

* *2009080420090810

Chris Ledgard takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

'Giving a presentation' has become an ordeal that many people dread.

But why has this business practice spread into so many parts of modern life, from primary school to the armed forces? And does the pre-eminent presentation software package, PowerPoint, force us to think and speak in certain ways?

* *2009080420090810

Chris Ledgard takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

'Giving a presentation' has become an ordeal that many people dread.

But why has this business practice spread into so many parts of modern life, from primary school to the armed forces? And does the pre-eminent presentation software package, PowerPoint, force us to think and speak in certain ways?

* *2009081120090817

The dentist's chair, the taxi rear seat, the hairdresser's salon; just what are the rules of conversational engagement for these everyday encounters? Chris Ledgard goes for a ride, a trim and a filling to find out.

* *2009081120090817

The dentist's chair, the taxi rear seat, the hairdresser's salon; just what are the rules of conversational engagement for these everyday encounters? Chris Ledgard goes for a ride, a trim and a filling to find out.

* *2009081820090824

The Plain English Campaign is 30 years old this summer, but are they champions of common sense and clarity, or a self-appointed censor? Chris Ledgard talks to their founder and gets some lessons in language.

* *2009081820090824

The Plain English Campaign is 30 years old this summer, but are they champions of common sense and clarity, or a self-appointed censor? Chris Ledgard talks to their founder and gets some lessons in language.

* *2009121520091221

George Orwell left us a set of rules for writing about politics and public affairs - do they still apply? Michael Rosen and a panel of critics offer an Orwellian perspective on just one day in the discourse of the nation.

Michael Rosen and critics test George Orwell's rules for writing about politics.

* *2009121520091221

George Orwell left us a set of rules for writing about politics and public affairs - do they still apply? Michael Rosen and a panel of critics offer an Orwellian perspective on just one day in the discourse of the nation.

Michael Rosen and critics test George Orwell's rules for writing about politics.

* *2010032320100329
* *2010032320100329
* * *2009122920100104

A sweet relief for some and painfully uncomfortable for others, silence can be one of the most powerful tools in speech.

From school classrooms to sports grounds, Michael Rosen investigates the times when staying silent can speak volumes.

From school classrooms to sports grounds, Michael Rosen investigates silence.

* * *2009122920100104

A sweet relief for some and painfully uncomfortable for others, silence can be one of the most powerful tools in speech.

From school classrooms to sports grounds, Michael Rosen investigates the times when staying silent can speak volumes.

From school classrooms to sports grounds, Michael Rosen investigates silence.

A sweet relief for some and painfully uncomfortable for others, silence can be one of the most powerful tools in speech. From school classrooms to sports grounds, Michael Rosen investigates the times when staying silent can speak volumes.

01/12/200920091207

Michael Rosen asks whether English is one language or a thousand.

03/05/201120110509

Michael Rosen tackles the art of the interview; at college, at work and in pursuit of love

03/08/201020100809

Chrs Ledgard travels to a three day celebration of storytelling, Festival at the Edge in Shropshire, one of many storytelling festivals now held globally. Here he meets storytellers from all over the world, and the audiences who have come to hear them, to try and discover why in a digital age there has been such a resurgence of interest what is after all, an ancient method of communication. Producer Paul Dodgson.

Chris Ledgard considers the rise in popularity of storytelling at the Festival at the Edge

04/01/2011

04/01/201120110110

In January 1961 in New York's Greenwich Village, Bob Dylan was beginning a career that would revolutionise song-writing. Michael Rosen lends an ear to the last fifty years of the song-lyric.

Dylanologist Michael Gray explains why Bob matters. A sceptical David Quantick argues that Dylan's influence was not entirely helpful to rock music. And singer-songwriter KT Tunstall pays tribute to one of her biggest influences.

Producer: Peter Everett.

Michael Rosen lends an ear to the last fifty years of the song-lyric.

04/05/201020100510
04/08/200920090810
05/01/201020100111
05/04/2011

05/04/201120110411

Michael Rosen explores the complex relationship between language and sport, and asks "If sport is so unpredictable, why is it that sports punditry is so predictably cliche-ridden?"

Michael talks to commentators, athletes, and athletes-turned-commentators to see if the arrival of the Olympics on British soil is likely to herald a new era of hyperbole and inarticulate over-excitement.

Producer: John Byrne.

Michael Rosen explores the complex and difficult relationship between language and sport.

05/05/200920090511
06/01/200920090112

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak

07/04/200920090413
08/12/200920091214
09/08/201120110815

In the programme exploring the world of words and the ways in which we use them, Chris Ledgard examines the production of talking newspapers for the blind. From cassette distribution to downloads, the daily newspaper can be as up-to-date for blind people as it is for their sighted neighbours. But how do you "voice up" both the Daily Star and the Telegraph? And what does it take to be the "reader" on FHM or Private Eye?

Chris Ledgard discovers the art and science of producing talking newspapers for the blind.

09/12/200820081215
10/04/201220120416

Chris Ledgard meets the academics doing stand-up, and asks why jokes get the brain going.

10/05/201120110516

Michael Rosen looks at the mysterious art of shorthand.

10/08/201020100816

Every August exam results are published, and every August newspaper headlines are filled with comments about dumbing down. But how much thought lies behind modern examination questions, and who decides the language that is used ? In Word of Mouth we hear from Edexcel's chair of history examiners Angela Leonard, and her managing director Ziggy Liaquat. The key word is accessibility, and enabling students to understand the questions they have been set. It all seems a brave new world for our presenter Chris Ledgard, who recalls stumbling through an A Level question about Bismarck's expediency, not knowing what expediency meant. Also the American critic Joe Queenan attacks the editors who insist on the use of simpler words in his books. "People who don't enjoy words should just shut up," he says. The producer is Miles Warde.

Word of Mouth explores the value of dumbing down.

11/08/200920090817
12/01/201020100118

Michael Rosen investigates lying. Does our voice change when we are trying to deceive?

12/05/200920090518
13/01/200920090119
13/04/201020100524
14/04/200920090420
14/07/200920090720
15/12/200920091221

Michael Rosen and critics test George Orwell's rules for writing about politics.

16/12/200820081222

Michael Rosen hears how singing might make it easier to learn a second language.

17/04/201220120423

As the 100-day countdown to the Olympics begins, Chris Ledgard examines how trademark law can control the language of the games, and asks if word use can ever be effectively contained and controlled. He meets historians charting usage of the term "olympic" over centuries; talks to comedy producer Jon Plowman about the BBC mockumentary "Twenty Twelve", and discovers that one American university wants some words banned altogether.

Chris Ledgard examines how trademark law can control the language of the Olympic games.

17/11/200920091123
18/01/2011

18/01/201120110124

We have thousands of words that mean 'I approve' and thousands more that mean 'I disapprove'. Michael Rosen sets out to discover why we need so many.

Producer: Peter Everett.

Michael Rosen explores the world of language and communication.

18/08/200920090824
19/07/201120110725

Students are no longer choosing to study modern foreign languages. In the first of a new series of Word of Mouth, Chris Ledgard asks how much this matters.

In 2001, 78% of pupils in England did a language GCSE. By last year that had fallen to just 43%. Chris Ledgard talks to Andy Burnham, Shadow Secretary of State for Education; Vivienne Hurley of the British Academy; Professor Andrew Hussey of the University of London Institute in Paris; John Rushforth, Deputy Vice Chancellor of UWE; Swansea University language student Catherine Rendle; Luke Young, President of the NUS in Wales and Glyn Hambrook, a former language lecturer, to find out the true picture and ask if it really matters.

Students are no longer choosing to study foreign languages. What will be the impact?

20/03/201220120326

Michael Rosen and guests celebrate nonsense at an event recorded at Radio 4's More The Words festival in Bristol. Michael's guests include the children's writer Philip Ardagh, the actor Paul Nicholson, and nonsense experts Anna Barton and James Williams. With help from an audience of adults and children at Bristol Central Library, Michael will be filling a cauldron with nonsense poems, prose, limericks and tongue twisters, with a few nonsense sounds thrown in to bring out the flavour. And the programme will mark the 200th anniversary of Edward Lear's birth with discussion of the writer's life and work.

Michael Rosen and guests celebrate nonsense at Radio 4's More Than Words Festival.

20/04/201020100531
20/07/201020100726

Chris Ledgard presents the first in a new series of Word of Mouth exploring the different ways in which deaf people communicate: sign language, lip reading and also speaking. One in seven of us in the UK is deaf or hard of hearing (according to figures produced by the Medical Research Council).

For many deaf people, English isn't their first language - they grow up speaking sign language. Chris talks to the artist and writer Louise Stern, who speaks in sign language and is the fourth generation to be born deaf in her family, via her long-time collaborator and interpreter, Oliver Pouliot.

Reporter Sally Heaven visits the University of Bristol Centre for Deaf Studies - the only one in the UK - to find out more about the intricacies of British Sign Language from Linda Day and Rachel Sutton-Spence.

And Chris meets Charlie Swinbourne, a deaf journalist and scriptwriter who grew up in a deaf family and describes himself as "hard of hearing". He speaks and uses sign language, and so he moves between both the deaf and hearing worlds.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Exploring the different ways in which deaf people communicate. First of new series.

20/12/201120111226

Bonds and Bailouts - the language of the financial markets. Michael Rosen returns for a new series on words and the way we use them.

The ups and downs of the banking world have moved from the financial news to the front pages. We are, we're told, witnessing momentous events with far-reaching consequences. But how well do we understand the language of global economic turmoil? Does financial jargon explain or obscure the picture? Michael Rosen talks to money makers, anti-capitalists and commentators.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

The language of the financial markets. Michael Rosen returns for a new series on words.

21/04/200920090427
21/07/200920090727
21/12/2010

21/12/201020101227

Michael Rosen begins a new series by exploring the British Library's first ever exhibition on the history of English. The exhibition is called "Evolving English", and Michael's guests include David Crystal, the author of the book of the same name. Comics, adverts, text messages and trading records have all been used by the British Library to chart the development of English from a language spoken on a small island to the global language we know today. The curators explain how they chose the exhibits, including the earliest surviving copy of Beowulf, the King James Bible, and the poem "Essay to Miss Catharine Jay", which contains the phrase "I wrote 2 U B 4", printed well over a hundred years before the advent of text messaging.

Michael Rosen explores the first history of English exhibition at the British Library.

22/03/2011

22/03/201120110328

First of a new series. Michael Rosen looks at the speaking of English in the UK - who speaks English and who doesn't? If you live in the UK should you speak English - and if so, what will be the effect of cutting the funding for ESOL English language classes?

Michael meets people settled in the UK who are studying English, to find out how they learn it, and how it's paid for.

Then he chairs a discussion on the wider issues with John Eversley, Senior Lecturer in Public Health and Primary Care at City University; Douglas Murray, author and political commentator, and Director of the Centre for Social Cohesion; Sarah Mulley, Associate Director for Migration, Trade and Development at the Institute for Public Policy Research and Ceri Williams, Warden and Principal of Mary Ward Settlement and Centre.

Producer: Beth O'Dea.

Michael Rosen looks at the speaking of English in the UK - who does and who doesn't?

22/12/200920091228
23/03/201020100329
23/12/200820081229

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak

24/08/201020100830

With just two years remaining until London's Olympic Games start, the search for volunteers with language skills has begun. Presenter Chris Ledgard travels to St Pancras station to meet Seb Coe, Boris Johnson and LOCOG chief executive Paul Deighton to hear about the two schemes - Games Makers and Ambassadors for London. "You don't need a degree in Mandarin" says Boris Johnson, but what language skills are required ? Chris also talks to gold medal winner Sally Gunnell about the need for translators in previous games, and also to Professor Joe Lo Bianco in Australia. Joe was heavily involved in the planning for the Sydney Olympics, which set a benchmark in getting language requirements correct. Does Joe think the London organisers have left enough time to get everything in place ?

Chris Ledgard investigates the search for translators for London 2012.

24/11/200920091130
24/11/200920091130

Michael Rosen investigates coded language.

25/01/2011

25/01/201120110131

Between the newspaper reporter and the readers sits a shadowy figure - the sub-editor. It's the sub who thinks up the punning headline and crafts the catchy intro. Michael Rosen joins the 'back bench' as the presses get ready to roll.

Producer: Peter Everett.

Michael Rosen explores the world of language and communication.

25/11/200820081201

Michael is joined by Leonard, an African Grey parrot, to talk about animal communication.

27/07/201020100802

Chris Ledgard investigates the world of the inner monologue to find out how we talk to ourselves. Are the words we use internally the same as when we speak. Contributors include the author Tim Parks, whose books - such as Europa - often read like an internal discussion. His latest book recounts his efforts to overcome a debilitating illness, which he discovered was caused by too many words.

Chris Ledgard investigates the world of the inner monologue.

28/04/200920090504
28/07/200920090803
28/12/2010

28/12/201020110103

Christmas is over and now the TV ads are all about holidays. Michael Rosen considers the language of travel and tourism.

At the World Travel Market he collects the adjectives that are used to sell holidays, then discusses them with a professor of linguistics who specialises in the subject. Travel journalist Simon Calder adds some travel trade jargon.

Producer: Peter Everett.

Michael Rosen considers the language of travel and tourism.

29/03/2011

29/03/201120110404

Michael Rosen looks at the world of words.

Michael Rosen looks at the world of words.

29/12/200920100104

From school classrooms to sports grounds, Michael Rosen investigates silence.

30/03/201020100405
30/12/200820090105

Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak

31/08/201020100906

Every two weeks another language becomes extinct and, according to UNESCO, more than 2400 languages spoken today are endangered and will probably vanish by the end of the century. In this edition of Word of Mouth Chris Ledgard meets some of those who are dedicating their lives to maintaining global linguistic diversity. These include Dr Mark Turin, the founder of the Oral Literature Project in Cambridge who works with Thangmi speakers in a remote region of Nepal; Dr Stephen Leonard who is preparing to spend a year in Northern Greenland with a community whose language is threatened as an indirect consequence of global warming; and Dr Julia Sallabank who is working to preserve Guernesiais, a language unique to the island of Guernsey. According to the 2001 census, it was spoken by just 2% of the population. Producer Paul Dodgson.

Chris Ledgard meets some of those trying to stop the death of languages around the world.

A Language Without Words2015042120150427 (R4)

Michael Rosen asks Julian Barratt and Steve Oram about creating a language without words.

Michael Rosen and Laura Wright ask Julian Barratt of The Mighty Boosh and director Steve Oram about inventing a language for their new film, which has no dialogue but instead uses a kind of ape language.. How do you communicate without words, and how have other films and TV programmes tackled the challenge? And what does this tell us about how language works?

Producer Beth O'Dea.

A Language Without Words20150421

A Language Without Words20150421

Michael Rosen & Laura Wright ask Julian Barratt of The Mighty Boosh and director Steve Oram about inventing a language for their new film, which has no dialogue but instead uses a kind of ape language.. How do you communicate without words, and how have other films and TV programmes tackled the challenge? And what does this tell us about how language works?

Producer Beth O'Dea.

A Language Without Words2015042120150427 (R4)

Michael Rosen asks Julian Barratt and Steve Oram about creating a language without words.

Academic English20110419

Is English too dominant in academic work around the world? Chris Ledgard visits universities in Sweden to ask staff and students how much they are able to debate, write and publish in their native language.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

Chris Ledgard investigates academic English.

Academic English20110425

Is English too dominant in academic work around the world? Chris Ledgard visits universities in Sweden to ask staff and students how much they are able to debate, write and publish in their native language.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

Chris Ledgard investigates academic English.

Accents Will Happen20130430

We explore the impact accent and dialect has on life opportunities. Starting with the very young where Michael Rosen uncovers new research in babies and toddlers; going on to explore how some of us manage to retain and lose accents and why some of us simply don't like the way we speak and sound.

Presenter: Michael Rosen

Producer :Perminder Khatkar.

Accents Will Happen2013043020130506

New research at the University of Liverpool is tracking for the first time in the United Kingdom how and what words babies and toddlers are picking up or understand. According to Professor Caroline Rowland and her colleague Anna Christopher what is emerging is the need to take into account the different dialects spoken. But what's in an accent or dialect ? Should we be correcting children's accent and grammar so that they are not disadvantaged later in life and how and what influences they way we speak; for dialectologist Dr Andrew Hamer we are all products of our history. In this edition of 'Word of Mouth' Michael Rosen talks to those who love or loathe their accent; those who have managed to retain their accent and those who have changed the way they speak concluding with voice and dialect coach Charmian Hoare who works with actors and Vicky Carpenter who trains- well anyone and claims she can make you 'accent-less' but is there such a thing ? surely we all have an accent ?

Presenter: Michael Rosan

Producer :Perminder Khatkar.

Accents Will Happen2013043020130506

New research at the University of Liverpool is tracking for the first time in the United Kingdom how and what words babies and toddlers are picking up or understand. According to Professor Caroline Rowland and her colleague Anna Christopher what is emerging is the need to take into account the different dialects spoken. But what's in an accent or dialect ? Should we be correcting children's accent and grammar so that they are not disadvantaged later in life and how and what influences they way we speak; for dialectologist Dr Andrew Hamer we are all products of our history. In this edition of 'Word of Mouth' Michael Rosen talks to those who love or loathe their accent; those who have managed to retain their accent and those who have changed the way they speak concluding with voice and dialect coach Charmian Hoare who works with actors and Vicky Carpenter who trains- well anyone and claims she can make you 'accent-less' but is there such a thing ? surely we all have an accent ?

Presenter: Michael Rosan

Producer :Perminder Khatkar.

We explore the impact accent and dialect has on life opportunities. Starting with the very young where Michael Rosen uncovers new research in babies and toddlers; going on to explore how some of us manage to retain and lose accents and why some of us simply don't like the way we speak and sound.

Presenter: Michael Rosen

Andrew Graham-Dixon on the naming of art movements20160517

Andrew Graham-Dixon on the naming of art movements20160517

Michael Rosen and art critic Andrew Graham-Dixon take a tour through the naming of art movements. Surrealism, Impressionism, the Renaissance, the Pre-Raphaelites, Modern, Contemporary - how did they get their names and what does that tell us? Which terms have entered the language? With linguist Dr Laura Wright.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Andrew Graham-Dixon on the naming of art movements2016051720160815 (R4)

Michael Rosen and art critic Andrew Graham-Dixon take a tour through the naming of art movements. Surrealism, Impressionism, the Renaissance, the Pre-Raphaelites, Modern, Contemporary - how did they get their names and what does that tell us? Which terms have entered the language? With linguist Dr Laura Wright.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Andrew Graham-dixon On The Naming Of Art Movements2016051720160815 (R4)

Michael Rosen and art critic Andrew Graham-Dixon take a tour through the naming of art movements. Surrealism, Impressionism, the Renaissance, the Pre-Raphaelites, Modern, Contemporary - how did they get their names and what does that tell us? Which terms have entered the language? With linguist Dr Laura Wright.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Are we all speaking football?20170926

Lifelong Arsenal supporter Michael Rosen talks football cliches with Adam Hurrey.

Are We All Speaking Football?20171002

Lifelong Arsenal supporter Michael Rosen talks football cliches with Adam Hurrey.

Are you really Somali? Government use of language analysis to verify which country asylum seekers come from20150120

Are You Really Somali? Government Use Of Language Analysis To Verify Which Country Asylum Seekers Come From20150120

Michael Rosen examines the use of language analysis to judge asylum seekers' country of origin, when they've arrived in the UK with no documentation. Linguists can then be used to try and verify which country the person comes from, as they apply for refugee status.

With linguists Laura Wright and Peter Patrick, and Lars-Johan Lundberg of Verified, the Swedish company that the Government uses to carry out the analysis.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Are you really Somali? Government use of language analysis to verify which country asylum seekers come from20150120

Michael Rosen examines the use of language analysis to judge asylum seekers' country of origin, when they've arrived in the UK with no documentation. Linguists can then be used to try and verify which country the person comes from, as they apply for refugee status.

With linguists Laura Wright and Peter Patrick, and Lars-Johan Lundberg of Verified, the Swedish company that the Government uses to carry out the analysis.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Are you really Somali? Using language to determine country of origin20150120

Are You Really Somali? Using Language To Determine Country Of Origin20150120

Michael Rosen examines the use of language analysis to judge asylum seekers' country of origin, when they've arrived in the UK with no documentation. Linguists can then be used to try and verify which country the person comes from, as they apply for refugee status. With linguists Laura Wright and Peter Patrick, and Lars-Johan Lundberg of Verified, the Swedish company that the Government uses to carry out the analysis.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Are you really Somali? Using language to determine country of origin20150120

Are you really Somali? Using language to determine country of origin20150120

Michael Rosen examines the use of language analysis to judge asylum seekers' country of origin, when they've arrived in the UK with no documentation. Linguists can then be used to try and verify which country the person comes from, as they apply for refugee status. With linguists Laura Wright and Peter Patrick, and Lars-Johan Lundberg of Verified, the Swedish company that the Government uses to carry out the analysis.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Are you really Somali? Using language to determine country of origin2015012020150126 (R4)

Michael Rosen examines the use of language analysis to judge asylum seekers' country of origin, when they've arrived in the UK with no documentation. Linguists can then be used to try and verify which country the person comes from, as they apply for refugee status. With linguists Laura Wright and Peter Patrick, and Lars-Johan Lundberg of Verified, the Swedish company that the Government uses to carry out the analysis.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Are you really Somali? Using language to determine country of origin2015012020150126 (R4)

Michael Rosen on the use of language analysis to judge asylum seekers' country of origin.

Asking the Right Question20120717

As Scotland grapples with the wording of a possible referendum on independence, Chris Ledgard takes a look at the art of asking the right question. Whether in a referendum, survey or in a court room, how do you avoid writing an incomprehensible question or - perhaps worse - a leading question?

Experts in linguistics, law, politics and psychology as well as politicians themselves explain the importance of getting the wording of a question right.

Producer: Polly Procter.

Asking the Right Question2012071720120723

As Scotland grapples with the wording of a possible referendum on independence, Chris Ledgard takes a look at the art of asking the right question. Whether in a referendum, survey or in a court room, how do you avoid writing an incomprehensible question or - perhaps worse - a leading question?

Experts in linguistics, law, politics and psychology as well as politicians themselves explain the importance of getting the wording of a question right.

Contributors:

Pupils from St Katherine's School in North Somerset

Joan McAlpine, Scottish National Party MSP

Willie Rennie, Leader of the Scottish Liberal Democrats

Professor John Curtice, University of Strathclyde

Professor John Joseph, University of Edinburgh

Amanda Pinto QC, Criminal Barrister

Professor Robert Cialdini, Arizona State University

Craig Ranapia, New Zealand based blogger and broadcaster

Producer: Polly Procter.

Asking the Right Question2012071720120723

Chris Ledgard looks at referendums and the art of asking the right question.

Asking The Right Question2012071720120723

Chris Ledgard looks at referendums and the art of asking the right question.

As Scotland grapples with the wording of a possible referendum on independence, Chris Ledgard takes a look at the art of asking the right question. Whether in a referendum, survey or in a court room, how do you avoid writing an incomprehensible question or - perhaps worse - a leading question?

Experts in linguistics, law, politics and psychology as well as politicians themselves explain the importance of getting the wording of a question right.

Contributors:

Pupils from St Katherine's School in North Somerset

Joan McAlpine, Scottish National Party MSP

Willie Rennie, Leader of the Scottish Liberal Democrats

Professor John Curtice, University of Strathclyde

Professor John Joseph, University of Edinburgh

Amanda Pinto QC, Criminal Barrister

Professor Robert Cialdini, Arizona State University

Craig Ranapia, New Zealand based blogger and broadcaster

Producer: Polly Procter.

Asking The Right Question2012071720120723

Chris Ledgard looks at referendums and the art of asking the right question.

As Scotland grapples with the wording of a possible referendum on independence, Chris Ledgard takes a look at the art of asking the right question. Whether in a referendum, survey or in a court room, how do you avoid writing an incomprehensible question or - perhaps worse - a leading question?

Experts in linguistics, law, politics and psychology as well as politicians themselves explain the importance of getting the wording of a question right.

Contributors:

Pupils from St Katherine's School in North Somerset

Joan McAlpine, Scottish National Party MSP

Willie Rennie, Leader of the Scottish Liberal Democrats

Professor John Curtice, University of Strathclyde

Professor John Joseph, University of Edinburgh

Amanda Pinto QC, Criminal Barrister

Professor Robert Cialdini, Arizona State University

Craig Ranapia, New Zealand based blogger and broadcaster

Producer: Polly Procter.

Audio Books20130122

Audio Books2013012220130128

Audio Books2013012220130128

Audio Books2013012220130128

Writer Michael Rosen charts the rise and rise of the audiobook. From its beginnings as a way for blind war veterans to enjoy literature, to the blockbusters and autobiographies of today, Michael discovers that the audiobook has a curious history. Subject to suspicion and occasional derision, the audiobook was long the poor relation of "proper" reading and has only recently received more serious scholarly attention. Michael visits the sound studios to hear audiobooks in production, and talks to writers, sound engineers, directors and actors about the art of the successful audiobook.

Audiobooks2013012220130128

Writer Michael Rosen charts the rise and rise of the audiobook. From its beginnings as a way for blind war veterans to enjoy literature, to the blockbusters and autobiographies of today, Michael discovers that the audiobook has a curious history. Subject to suspicion and occasional derision, the audiobook was long the poor relation of "proper" reading and has only recently received more serious scholarly attention. Michael visits the sound studios to hear audiobooks in production, and talks to writers, sound engineers, directors and actors about the art of the successful audiobook.

Autism And Communication20171003
Autism And Communication20171009
Autism And Communication20171009

Michael Rosen finds out what can be learnt about communication from people with autism.

Autism and Learning Difficulties20130115

Autism and Learning Difficulties2013011520130121

Autism And Learning Difficulties2013011520130121

Michael Rosen meets parents, researchers and carers to explore the ways we communicate with people with autism or profound learning disabilities. Phoebe Caldwell talks about the principles of "intensive interaction", and why listening and non verbal communication are central to her work. Researchers at the Norah Fry Research Centre in Bristol explain why changing the way we communicate with people with disabilities can challenge preconceptions, and make relationships more open, friendly and equal. And Ruth Hendery, the head teacher at St Crispin's special school in Edinburgh, explains how communication works in her school, and why it's so important to get it right.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

Autism and Learning Difficulties2013011520130121

Michael Rosen meets parents, researchers and carers to explore the ways we communicate with people with autism or profound learning disabilities. Phoebe Caldwell talks about the principles of "intensive interaction", and why listening and non verbal communication are central to her work. Researchers at the Norah Fry Research Centre in Bristol explain why changing the way we communicate with people with disabilities can challenge preconceptions, and make relationships more open, friendly and equal. And Ruth Hendery, the head teacher at St Crispin's special school in Edinburgh, explains how communication works in her school, and why it's so important to get it right.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

Babel20130723

"...confound their language, that they may not understand one another's speech." The Babel story is one of best known in the Bible, the splintering of one global language into thousands of tongues. Chris Ledgard takes a linguistic look at the first nine verses of Genesis chapter 11, exploring the story itself, the idea of original languages and how we are able to reconstruct them, and the Babel theme of language, division and conflict.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

Babel2013072320130729

"...confound their language, that they may not understand one another's speech." The Babel story is one of best known in the Bible, the splintering of one global language into thousands of tongues. Chris Ledgard takes a linguistic look at the first nine verses of Genesis chapter 11, exploring the story itself, the idea of original languages and how we are able to reconstruct them, and the Babel theme of language, division and conflict.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

Babel2013072320130729

"...confound their language, that they may not understand one another's speech." The Babel story is one of best known in the Bible, the splintering of one global language into thousands of tongues. Chris Ledgard takes a linguistic look at the first nine verses of Genesis chapter 11, exploring the story itself, the idea of original languages and how we are able to reconstruct them, and the Babel theme of language, division and conflict.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

Baby Talk20131231

Baby Talk20131231

Baby Talk20131231

Michael Rosen looks at language and communication. This week we're talking baby talk, or 'Infant Directed Speech'. He asks if the cooing parentese is a natural phenomenon or is it simply a culturally learnt trait. Does it benefit or hinder language development, and do animals use it? Michael also discovers some interesting examples of baby talk in letters that Jonathan Swift wrote to two lady friends.

Baby Talk2013123120140106

Baby Talk2013123120140106

Michael Rosen looks at language and communication. This week we're talking baby talk, or 'Infant Directed Speech'. He asks if the cooing parentese is a natural phenomenon or is it simply a culturally learnt trait. Does it benefit or hinder language development, and do animals use it? Michael also discovers some interesting examples of baby talk in letters that Jonathan Swift wrote to two lady friends.

Baby Talk2013123120140106

Michael Rosen looks at language and communication. This week we're talking baby talk, or 'Infant Directed Speech'. He asks if the cooing parentese is a natural phenomenon or is it simply a culturally learnt trait. Does it benefit or hinder language development, and do animals use it? Michael also discovers some interesting examples of baby talk in letters that Jonathan Swift wrote to two lady friends.

Being overheard20110906

From Manchester Piccadilly station to a supermarket checkout via an Irish bar in New York, modern writers discuss how they are inspired by the overheard.

We're surrounded by other people's conversations, and many of us try to block them out. But for Lavinia Greenlaw, David Calcutt and Craig Taylor, fragments of overheard talk have been a valuable source of material. In New York, Marilyn Horowitz recalls how a conversation at a neighbouring pub table helped her get over a case of writer's block.

Chris Ledgard presents.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

Four writers discuss how they are inspired by the words they overhear.

Being overheard20110912

From Manchester Piccadilly station to a supermarket checkout via an Irish bar in New York, modern writers discuss how they are inspired by the overheard.

We're surrounded by other people's conversations, and many of us try to block them out. But for Lavinia Greenlaw, David Calcutt and Craig Taylor, fragments of overheard talk have been a valuable source of material. In New York, Marilyn Horowitz recalls how a conversation at a neighbouring pub table helped her get over a case of writer's block.

Chris Ledgard presents.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

Four writers discuss how they are inspired by the words they overhear.

Body Language

Body Language20100817

How important is body language in the way we communicate? Are some people much better at it than others? Can good body language be taught? Chris Ledgard investigates.

Chris visits Dr Harry Witchel for some body language training, looks into some body language myths, and talks to impressionist Kate Robbins about the way she uses her face and gestures when mimicking people.

Produced by Beatrice Fenton.

Chris Ledgard considers the importance of body language in communication.

Body Language20100823

How important is body language in the way we communicate? Are some people much better at it than others? Can good body language be taught? Chris Ledgard investigates.

Chris visits Dr Harry Witchel for some body language training, looks into some body language myths, and talks to impressionist Kate Robbins about the way she uses her face and gestures when mimicking people.

Produced by Beatrice Fenton.

Chris Ledgard considers the importance of body language in communication.

Break Ups and Brexit20160906

Break Ups and Brexit20160906

How do you find the right words to make- or break- a personal relationship? Or to leave a political union, for that matter? To consider the clichés and coinages used to negotiate matters of the heart by everyone from novelist Edith Wharton to actress Gwyneth Paltrow, Michael Rosen & linguist Dr. Laura Wright are joined by Zoe Strimpel of the University of Sussex. Also, in the aftermath of the UK's EU Referendum, author & journalist Sam Leith riffs on the term 'Brexit' and the infectious wordplay it spawned. Producer Kirsty McQuire.

Break Ups And Brexit2016090620160912 (R4)

The language of making and breaking relationships.

How do you find the right words to make- or break- a personal relationship? Or to leave a political union, for that matter? To consider the clichés and coinages used to negotiate matters of the heart by everyone from novelist Edith Wharton to actress Gwyneth Paltrow, Michael Rosen and linguist Dr. Laura Wright are joined by Zoe Strimpel of the University of Sussex. Also, in the aftermath of the UK's EU Referendum, author and journalist Sam Leith riffs on the term 'Brexit' and the infectious wordplay it spawned. Producer Kirsty McQuire.

Break Ups and Brexit2016090620160912 (R4)

The language of making and breaking relationships.

Brussels - A Language Story20120807

Chris Ledgard visits Brussels, a melting pot of European languages.

Brussels - A Language Story20120807

Chris Ledgard visits Brussels, a melting pot of European languages. He meets interpreters, language planners and voice coaches to discover how the European Commission operates "interpreting on an industrial scale." We find out why officials fear a looming shortage of interpreters, and we meet the man who teaches people how to speak and behave in a multilingual setting.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

Brussels - A Language Story2012080720120813

Chris Ledgard visits Brussels, a melting pot of European languages.

Brussels - A Language Story2012080720120813

Chris Ledgard visits Brussels, a melting pot of European languages. He meets interpreters, language planners and voice coaches to discover how the European Commission operates "interpreting on an industrial scale." We find out why officials fear a looming shortage of interpreters, and we meet the man who teaches people how to speak and behave in a multilingual setting.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

Brussels - A Language Story2012080720120813

Chris Ledgard visits Brussels, a melting pot of European languages.

Chris Ledgard visits Brussels, a melting pot of European languages. He meets interpreters, language planners and voice coaches to discover how the European Commission operates "interpreting on an industrial scale." We find out why officials fear a looming shortage of interpreters, and we meet the man who teaches people how to speak and behave in a multilingual setting.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

Brussels - A Language Story2012080720120813

Chris Ledgard visits Brussels, a melting pot of European languages.

Chris Ledgard visits Brussels, a melting pot of European languages. He meets interpreters, language planners and voice coaches to discover how the European Commission operates "interpreting on an industrial scale." We find out why officials fear a looming shortage of interpreters, and we meet the man who teaches people how to speak and behave in a multilingual setting.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

But I've Got a Degree!20111227

But I've Got A Degree! Michael Rosen discusses the letters we put before and after our names. Are you a BA, MA, Dr or Dame - or "just a plain Mister"? And does it matter?

Michael Rosen examines letters we use before and after our names.

But I've Got a Degree!20120102

But I've Got A Degree! Michael Rosen discusses the letters we put before and after our names. Are you a BA, MA, Dr or Dame - or "just a plain Mister"? And does it matter?

Michael Rosen examines letters we use before and after our names.

Chimps and Language20140107

Chimps and Language20140107

Chimps and Language20140107

What distinguishes humans from our closest relatives, the chimps? It long used to be thought that we were set apart as 'Man the Tool-Maker', but 50 years ago the primatologist Jane Goodall demonstrated that chimps make them too. This left mankind distinguished from animals by the way in which we inhabit the realm of language, our use and understanding of grammar representing a key attribute of being human. But this, too, is having to be reassessed, not least because of the accomplished way in which, for example, the famous bonobo chimp Kanzi communicates with his human keepers.

Michael Rosen speaks to Dr Catherine Crockford of the Max Planck Institute in Leipzig - who studies chimp communication in Uganda's forests - and psycholinguist Martin Edwardes to assess whether the utterances of chimps constitute words, and whether their combination of them represents syntax and grammar. Michael also meets the actor Peter Elliott, whose career has been spent playing the parts of chimps in films. He even appears in Kanzi's favourite film, 'Greystoke', about the childhood of Tarzan.

Producer: Mark Smalley.

Chimps and Language2014010720140113

Chimps And Language2014010720140113

What distinguishes humans from our closest relatives, the chimps? It long used to be thought that we were set apart as 'Man the Tool-Maker', but 50 years ago the primatologist Jane Goodall demonstrated that chimps make them too. This left mankind distinguished from animals by the way in which we inhabit the realm of language, our use and understanding of grammar representing a key attribute of being human. But this, too, is having to be reassessed, not least because of the accomplished way in which, for example, the famous bonobo chimp Kanzi communicates with his human keepers.

Michael Rosen speaks to Dr Catherine Crockford of the Max Planck Institute in Leipzig - who studies chimp communication in Uganda's forests - and psycholinguist Martin Edwardes to assess whether the utterances of chimps constitute words, and whether their combination of them represents syntax and grammar. Michael also meets the actor Peter Elliott, whose career has been spent playing the parts of chimps in films. He even appears in Kanzi's favourite film, 'Greystoke', about the childhood of Tarzan.

Producer: Mark Smalley

Chimps and Language2014010720140113

What distinguishes humans from our closest relatives, the chimps? It long used to be thought that we were set apart as 'Man the Tool-Maker', but 50 years ago the primatologist Jane Goodall demonstrated that chimps make them too. This left mankind distinguished from animals by the way in which we inhabit the realm of language, our use and understanding of grammar representing a key attribute of being human. But this, too, is having to be reassessed, not least because of the accomplished way in which, for example, the famous bonobo chimp Kanzi communicates with his human keepers.

Michael Rosen speaks to Dr Catherine Crockford of the Max Planck Institute in Leipzig - who studies chimp communication in Uganda's forests - and psycholinguist Martin Edwardes to assess whether the utterances of chimps constitute words, and whether their combination of them represents syntax and grammar. Michael also meets the actor Peter Elliott, whose career has been spent playing the parts of chimps in films. He even appears in Kanzi's favourite film, 'Greystoke', about the childhood of Tarzan.

Producer: Mark Smalley.

Chugger Chat20120508

Michael Rosen investigates the language of chuggers and street vendors. If you stop people in the street to ask them to donate to your charity, come to your show or buy your goods, which words work best? The word "chugging" was coined by a journalist ten years ago to describe what some charities would rather call "face to face fundraising". But, as Michael discovers, others in the charity world have decided to embrace the "ch" word and give it a positive spin.

Chugger Chat20120508

Michael Rosen investigates the language of chuggers and street vendors. If you stop people in the street to ask them to donate to your charity, come to your show or buy your goods, which words work best? The word "chugging" was coined by a journalist ten years ago to describe what some charities would rather call "face to face fundraising". But, as Michael discovers, others in the charity world have decided to embrace the "ch" word and give it a positive spin.

Michael Rosen tackles the language of chuggers and street vendors. Which words work best?

Chugger Chat2012050820120514

Michael Rosen tackles the language of chuggers and street vendors. Which words work best?

Chugger Chat2012050820120514

Michael Rosen tackles the language of chuggers and street vendors. Which words work best?

Michael Rosen investigates the language of chuggers and street vendors. If you stop people in the street to ask them to donate to your charity, come to your show or buy your goods, which words work best? The word "chugging" was coined by a journalist ten years ago to describe what some charities would rather call "face to face fundraising". But, as Michael discovers, others in the charity world have decided to embrace the "ch" word and give it a positive spin.

Michael Rosen investigates the language of chuggers and street vendors. If you stop people in the street to ask them to donate to your charity, come to your show or buy your goods, which words work best? The word "chugging" was coined by a journalist ten years ago to describe what some charities would rather call "face to face fundraising". But, as Michael discovers, others in the charity world have decided to embrace the "ch" word and give it a positive spin.

Chugger Chat2012050820120514

Michael Rosen tackles the language of chuggers and street vendors. Which words work best?

Michael Rosen investigates the language of chuggers and street vendors. If you stop people in the street to ask them to donate to your charity, come to your show or buy your goods, which words work best? The word "chugging" was coined by a journalist ten years ago to describe what some charities would rather call "face to face fundraising". But, as Michael discovers, others in the charity world have decided to embrace the "ch" word and give it a positive spin.

Michael Rosen investigates the language of chuggers and street vendors. If you stop people in the street to ask them to donate to your charity, come to your show or buy your goods, which words work best? The word "chugging" was coined by a journalist ten years ago to describe what some charities would rather call "face to face fundraising". But, as Michael discovers, others in the charity world have decided to embrace the "ch" word and give it a positive spin.

Colour Words20150505

Colour Words20150505

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright talk to Dr Carole Biggam about colour words. Where do they come from and how do they vary between cultures and change meanings through time? How can it be that pink used to mean yellow..

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Colour Words2015050520150511 (R4)

Michael Rosen and Laura Wright on colour words, how they vary and how they have changed.

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright talk to Dr Carole Biggam about colour words. Where do they come from and how do they vary between cultures and change meanings through time? How can it be that pink used to mean yellow..

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Colour Words2015050520150511 (R4)

Michael Rosen and Laura Wright on colour words, how they vary and how they have changed.

Comparing the way we bring up children and train dogs20120103

Do dog training techniques work just as well on children? Michael Rosen investigates, comparing the way we bring up our children and train our dogs. Taking part are Victoria Stilwell of TV's It's Me or the Dog, John Bradshaw, Jez Rose, Steven Rose and parents who have strong views on the subject..

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Michael Rosen compares the way we bring up children and train dogs.

Comparing the way we bring up children and train dogs20120109

Do dog training techniques work just as well on children? Michael Rosen investigates, comparing the way we bring up our children and train our dogs. Taking part are Victoria Stilwell of TV's It's Me or the Dog, John Bradshaw, Jez Rose, Steven Rose and parents who have strong views on the subject..

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Michael Rosen compares the way we bring up children and train dogs.

Conflict Resolution20120904

Chris Ledgard examines how language plays a critical role in resolving conflict. From hostage negotiation to bouncers working on the door, to Relate helping families work through problems; the words used are all-important in defusing difficult situations and bringing calm and reconciliation.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Conflict Resolution20120904

Chris Ledgard examines how the words we use play a critical role in resolving conflict.

Conflict Resolution20120904

Chris Ledgard examines how the words we use play a critical role in resolving conflicts. From hostage negotiations to relationship counselling to dealing with difficult neighbours or pupils in school, the language we use is all-important in defusing arguments and bringing calm and reconciliation.

Contributors:

Chris White, retired police hostage negotiator, now communications trainer

Matt Overd, Director of Programme Development - Dfuse

Barbara Bloomfield, Relate trainer and counsellor

Stephen Drew, Headteacher, Brentwood County High School

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Conflict Resolution2012090420120910

Chris Ledgard examines how the words we use play a critical role in resolving conflict.

Conflict Resolution2012090420120910

Chris Ledgard examines how the words we use play a critical role in resolving conflict.

Chris Ledgard examines how the words we use play a critical role in resolving conflicts. From hostage negotiations to relationship counselling to dealing with difficult neighbours or pupils in school, the language we use is all-important in defusing arguments and bringing calm and reconciliation.

Contributors:

Chris White, retired police hostage negotiator, now communications trainer

Matt Overd, Director of Programme Development - Dfuse

Barbara Bloomfield, Relate trainer and counsellor

Stephen Drew, Headteacher, Brentwood County High School

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Chris Ledgard examines how language plays a critical role in resolving conflict. From hostage negotiation to bouncers working on the door, to Relate helping families work through problems; the words used are all-important in defusing difficult situations and bringing calm and reconciliation.

Conflict Resolution2012090420120910

Chris Ledgard examines how the words we use play a critical role in resolving conflict.

Chris Ledgard examines how the words we use play a critical role in resolving conflicts. From hostage negotiations to relationship counselling to dealing with difficult neighbours or pupils in school, the language we use is all-important in defusing arguments and bringing calm and reconciliation.

Contributors:

Chris White, retired police hostage negotiator, now communications trainer

Matt Overd, Director of Programme Development - Dfuse

Barbara Bloomfield, Relate trainer and counsellor

Stephen Drew, Headteacher, Brentwood County High School

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Chris Ledgard examines how language plays a critical role in resolving conflict. From hostage negotiation to bouncers working on the door, to Relate helping families work through problems; the words used are all-important in defusing difficult situations and bringing calm and reconciliation.

Conflict Resolution2012090420120910

Chris Ledgard examines how the words we use play a critical role in resolving conflicts. From hostage negotiations to relationship counselling to dealing with difficult neighbours or pupils in school, the language we use is all-important in defusing arguments and bringing calm and reconciliation.

Contributors:

Chris White, retired police hostage negotiator, now communications trainer

Matt Overd, Director of Programme Development - Dfuse

Barbara Bloomfield, Relate trainer and counsellor

Stephen Drew, Headteacher, Brentwood County High School

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Counting Word Incidences20110823

Chris Ledgard looks at the ways of counting incidences of words and what that can tell us.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Chris Ledgard looks at the ways of counting incidences of words and what that can tell us.

Counting Word Incidences20110829

Chris Ledgard looks at what counting the incidences of words can tell us - from whether a writer has Alzheimer's, to who really wrote Macbeth and even how to read the mood of the country. With the advent of computers it's possible to find patterns in texts, and to use that information for applications like web translation and anti-plagiarism software. And David Quantick rounds things off with a more human analysis of the most frequently used words in pop music.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Chris Ledgard looks at the ways of counting incidences of words and what that can tell us.

Creating Characters20140401

Creating Characters20140401

Michael Rosen gathers a gaggle of writers, actors and directors to discuss what makes a great character in a book, on the stage and on the radio. Recorded in front of an audience at the Arnolfini gallery in Bristol, as part of Radio 4 Character Invasion Day.

Contributors: Andrew Hilton, Founder & Artistic Director of Shakespeare at the Tobacco Factory, who's also acted in radio, theatre, TV and films.

Helen Cross, author of radio plays, novels, stories and screenplays. Her first novel, My Summer of Love, became a BAFTA award winning feature film.

Paul Dodgson, actor in and writer of radio dramas, and also a composer and teacher.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Creating Characters2014040120140407

Creating Characters2014040120140407

Michael Rosen talks to actors and writers about how character is created through language.

Michael Rosen gathers a gaggle of writers, actors and directors to discuss what makes a great character in a book, on the stage and on the radio. Recorded in front of an audience at the Arnolfini gallery in Bristol, as part of Radio 4 Character Invasion Day.

Contributors: Andrew Hilton, Founder and Artistic Director of Shakespeare at the Tobacco Factory, who's also acted in radio, theatre, TV and films.

Helen Cross, author of radio plays, novels, stories and screenplays. Her first novel, My Summer of Love, became a BAFTA award winning feature film.

Paul Dodgson, actor in and writer of radio dramas, and also a composer and teacher.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Creating Characters2014040120140407

Michael Rosen talks to actors and writers about how character is created through language.

Cucks, snowflakes and virtue signalling: the new US political lexicon20170502

Michael Rosen asks George Lakoff about the new political words coming out of the US now.

Cucks, snowflakes and virtue signalling: the new US political lexicon20170502

Michael Rosen asks George Lakoff about the new political words coming out of the US now.

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright interview the eminent US linguist George Lakoff about the new political words coming out of the US right now, mainly from the alt-right, and the effectiveness of Trump's use of language. George Lakoff is the former Distinguished Professor of Cognitive Science and Linguistics at the University of California at Berkeley. His thesis is that people's lives are significantly influenced by the central metaphors they use, whatever their political beliefs, and that how information is framed is crucial in how it is received.
Producer Beth O'Dea.

Cucks, snowflakes and virtue signalling: the new US political lexicon20170508

Michael Rosen asks George Lakoff about the new political words coming out of the US now.

Cucks, snowflakes and virtue signalling: the new US political lexicon20170508

Michael Rosen asks George Lakoff about the new political words coming out of the US now.

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright interview the eminent US linguist George Lakoff about the new political words coming out of the US right now, mainly from the alt-right, and the effectiveness of Trump's use of language. George Lakoff is the former Distinguished Professor of Cognitive Science and Linguistics at the University of California at Berkeley. His thesis is that people's lives are significantly influenced by the central metaphors they use, whatever their political beliefs, and that how information is framed is crucial in how it is received.
Producer Beth O'Dea.

Cucks, Snowflakes And Virtue Signalling: The New Us Political Lexicon20170508

Michael Rosen asks George Lakoff about the new political words coming out of the US now.

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright interview the eminent US linguist George Lakoff about the new political words coming out of the US right now, mainly from the alt-right, and the effectiveness of Trump's use of language. George Lakoff is the former Distinguished Professor of Cognitive Science and Linguistics at the University of California at Berkeley. His thesis is that people's lives are significantly influenced by the central metaphors they use, whatever their political beliefs, and that how information is framed is crucial in how it is received.
Producer Beth O'Dea.

D is for Dictionary20130730

Since 1879, the Oxford English Dictionary has had only seven Chief Editors. As the current incumbent, John Simpson, prepares to retire later this year, Chris Ledgard pays him a visit. They look back at the challenges and the high points of his tenure; the controversies, the characters and the great weight of responsibility that the post carries. With archive of previous editors and staff, Chris and John consider what the future holds for this beloved institution.

Producer: Sarah Langan.

D is for Dictionary2013073020130805

Since 1879, the Oxford English Dictionary has had only seven Chief Editors. As the current incumbent, John Simpson, prepares to retire later this year, Chris Ledgard pays him a visit. They look back at the challenges and the high points of his tenure; the controversies, the characters and the great weight of responsibility that the post carries. With archive of previous editors and staff, Chris and John consider what the future holds for this beloved institution.

Producer: Sarah Langan.

D Is For Dictionary2013073020130805

Since 1879, the Oxford English Dictionary has had only seven Chief Editors. As the current incumbent, John Simpson, prepares to retire later this year, Chris Ledgard pays him a visit. They look back at the challenges and the high points of his tenure; the controversies, the characters and the great weight of responsibility that the post carries. With archive of previous editors and staff, Chris and John consider what the future holds for this beloved institution.

Producer: Sarah Langan.

David Walliams Special20170523

David Walliams talks to Michael Rosen about writing both children's books and comedy.

David Walliams talks in depth to Michael Rosen about how he writes his children's books like Mr Stink and The Boy In The Dress and how he switches modes to write comedy like Little Britain. His acute awareness of language developed from a young age, and he was influenced by the books he read then, from Roald Dahl to James Bond, and the comedy scripts he studied, from Monty Python and Rowan Atkinson. He talks about the real-life conversation that inspired Carol Beer, the "computer says no" character from Little Britain, how The Shining was the surprising model for Awful Auntie, and about the boy who originally gave him the idea to start writing for children..
Producer Beth O'Dea.

David Walliams Special20170529

David Walliams talks to Michael Rosen about writing both children's books and comedy.

David Walliams talks in depth to Michael Rosen about how he writes his children's books like Mr Stink and The Boy In The Dress and how he switches modes to write comedy like Little Britain. His acute awareness of language developed from a young age, and he was influenced by the books he read then, from Roald Dahl to James Bond, and the comedy scripts he studied, from Monty Python and Rowan Atkinson. He talks about the real-life conversation that inspired Carol Beer, the "computer says no" character from Little Britain, how The Shining was the surprising model for Awful Auntie, and about the boy who originally gave him the idea to start writing for children..
Producer Beth O'Dea.

Directions: North South East And West20160920

Michael Rosen and Laura Wright discover how different ways of talking about directions in other languages show differences in ways of thinking. Professor Lera Boroditsky explains how in some languages, you might be asked to move your chair a bit to the north, or to put the socks in the east drawer... And the past may be conceived of as in front of you, rather than behind. How do the languages we speak shape the ways we think?

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Directions: North South East and West20160920

Directions: North South East and West20160920

Michael Rosen & Laura Wright discover how different ways of talking about directions in other languages show differences in ways of thinking. Professor Lera Boroditsky explains how in some languages, you might be asked to move your chair a bit to the north, or to put the socks in the east drawer... And the past may be conceived of as in front of you, rather than behind. How do the languages we speak shape the ways we think?

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Directions: North South East and West2016092020160926 (R4)

Michael Rosen & Laura Wright discover how different ways of talking about directions in other languages show differences in ways of thinking. Professor Lera Boroditsky explains how in some languages, you might be asked to move your chair a bit to the north, or to put the socks in the east drawer... And the past may be conceived of as in front of you, rather than behind. How do the languages we speak shape the ways we think?

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Eat My Words: How to Describe Food Flavours20170912

Michael Rosen asks Andi Oliver and Niki Segnit how they describe the flavours of food.

Michael Rosen and Laura Wright ask Great British Menu judge Andi Oliver and author of The Flavour Thesaurus Niki Segnit how they describe the flavours of food. Niki describes coriander and lime as "the wooh woohs in 'Sympathy for the Devil' - completely and utterly indispensable". But grapefruit, on the other hand, is "standoffish".. She brings a cheese and a mystery item into the studio for Michael and Laura to taste and then try to put into words.
Simile and metaphor, comparision, classification, memory, humour, disgust - all of these help in the tricky but satisfying task of pinning down the unpindownable.
Producer Beth O'Dea.

Eat My Words: How to Describe Food Flavours20170918

Michael Rosen asks Andi Oliver and Niki Segnit how they describe the flavours of food.

Michael Rosen and Laura Wright ask Great British Menu judge Andi Oliver and author of The Flavour Thesaurus Niki Segnit how they describe the flavours of food. Niki describes coriander and lime as "the wooh woohs in 'Sympathy for the Devil' - completely and utterly indispensable". But grapefruit, on the other hand, is "standoffish".. She brings a cheese and a mystery item into the studio for Michael and Laura to taste and then try to put into words.
Simile and metaphor, comparision, classification, memory, humour, disgust - all of these help in the tricky but satisfying task of pinning down the unpindownable.
Producer Beth O'Dea.

Eat My Words: How To Describe Food Flavours20170918

Michael Rosen asks Andi Oliver and Niki Segnit how they describe the flavours of food.

Michael Rosen and Laura Wright ask Great British Menu judge Andi Oliver and author of The Flavour Thesaurus Niki Segnit how they describe the flavours of food. Niki describes coriander and lime as "the wooh woohs in 'Sympathy for the Devil' - completely and utterly indispensable". But grapefruit, on the other hand, is "standoffish".. She brings a cheese and a mystery item into the studio for Michael and Laura to taste and then try to put into words.
Simile and metaphor, comparision, classification, memory, humour, disgust - all of these help in the tricky but satisfying task of pinning down the unpindownable.
Producer Beth O'Dea.

Ebola: How should we talk about it?20141223

Ebola: How should we talk about it?20141223

Michael Rosen talks to Oxfam's media officer on Ebola, Ian Bray, about the language we use about the disease, both in this country and in Liberia, where he's been based. Michael also asks linguists Louise Sylvester and Laura Wright about the words we've used though history to describe disease and plague, and what they tell us about changing attitudes to sickness.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Ebola: How should we talk about it?2014122320141229 (R4)

Michael Rosen talks to Oxfam's media officer on Ebola, Ian Bray, about the language we use about the disease, both in this country and in Liberia, where he's been based. Michael also asks linguists Louise Sylvester and Laura Wright about the words we've used though history to describe disease and plague, and what they tell us about changing attitudes to sickness.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Ebola: How Should We Talk About It?2014122320141229 (R4)

Michael Rosen talks to Oxfam's media officer on Ebola, Ian Bray, about the language we use about the disease, both in this country and in Liberia, where he's been based. Michael also asks linguists Louise Sylvester and Laura Wright about the words we've used though history to describe disease and plague, and what they tell us about changing attitudes to sickness.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Eisteddfod20110808

Tired of living next to his noisy neighbours, Les Barker opted out of urban Manchester and moved to North Wales. "Although I'd spent half a lifetime an hour's drive away, I'd never heard of Hedd Wyn. Or any other major figure in Welsh history or literature, apart from Max Boyce and Dylan Thomas." So Les began to learn...and learn...and learn.....

"After toying briefly with 'Teach Yourself Welsh', I went on a four-day course in Denbigh; Craig Jones was the tutor. Over the summer I did a couple of week-long courses in Denbigh, initially with another Mr Jones, but he went off sick and was replaced by a Mrs Jones. Wales is full of them."

"Being a beginner is frustrating. After a lifetime of being fluent, I suddenly had the vocabulary and grammar of a three-year-old." But Les persevered, and is now a serious performer on the Welsh poetry scene, and one of the organisers of this summer's Eisteddfod. Chris Ledgard meets Les as he makes last minute preparations for the festival.

Producer John Byrne.

Chris Ledgard meets Les Barker, a Mancunian who's fallen in love with the Welsh language.

Emoji: The Future of Language?20170221

Emoji: The Future of Language?20170221

Is emoji really the world's fastest growing language? (And can it really be said to be a language at all?) Who gets to decide which pictograms get added to the official set of emoji? Do they clarify the meaning of written language or are they dangerously open to misinterpretation? And why did the aubergine emoji get banned from some social media platforms?

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright are joined by Professor Vyv Evans to talk all things emoji.

Producer: Mair Bosworth.

Emoji: The Future of Language?2017022120170227 (R4)

Is emoji really the world's fastest growing language? (And can it really be said to be a language at all?) Who gets to decide which pictograms get added to the official set of emoji? Do they clarify the meaning of written language or are they dangerously open to misinterpretation? And why did the aubergine emoji get banned from some social media platforms?

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright are joined by Professor Vyv Evans to talk all things emoji.

Producer: Mair Bosworth.

English and German20130514

At the Brighton Festival, Michael Rosen explores our linguistic links with Germany. Michael and his guests discuss our shared Anglo Saxon heritage, cultural influences from the Romantics to the Weimar Republic, and how the two languages relate to each other in the modern era. And we hear from other writers and artists having fun with words on stage in Brighton - oratory and story-telling are strong themes at this month-long festival.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

English And German2013051420130520

At the Brighton Festival, Michael Rosen explores our linguistic links with Germany. Michael and his guests discuss our shared Anglo Saxon heritage, cultural influences from the Romantics to the Weimar Republic, and how the two languages relate to each other in the modern era. And we hear from other writers and artists having fun with words on stage in Brighton - oratory and story-telling are strong themes at this month-long festival.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

English and German2013051420130520

At the Brighton Festival, Michael Rosen explores our linguistic links with Germany. Michael and his guests discuss our shared Anglo Saxon heritage, cultural influences from the Romantics to the Weimar Republic, and how the two languages relate to each other in the modern era. And we hear from other writers and artists having fun with words on stage in Brighton - oratory and story-telling are strong themes at this month-long festival.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

English As a Lingua Franca20110830

Most conversations in English are among people who aren't native speakers of the language. In universities around the world, vast voice banks are being compiled by researchers who are examining the use of English as a contact language in a globalized world. They believe their work has implications for the way in which English is taught: for too long, they say, students have been given native speaker standards of correctness as their model. But is there really such a thing as English as a Lingua Franca? Chris Ledgard investigates.

What kind of English is being used among non-native speakers?

English As a Lingua Franca20110905

Most conversations in English are among people who aren't native speakers of the language. In universities around the world, vast voice banks are being compiled by researchers who are examining the use of English as a contact language in a globalized world. They believe their work has implications for the way in which English is taught: for too long, they say, students have been given native speaker standards of correctness as their model. But is there really such a thing as English as a Lingua Franca? Chris Ledgard investigates.

What kind of English is being used among non-native speakers?

Fashion20130813

An exploration of spoken language and communication in the 21st century, presented by Chris Ledgard. This week: Fashion. Topics include how we talk about scents, slogans on t-shirts and fashion lingo.

Katie Puckrik tells how she, a self confessed 'fume head' talks and thinks about perfumes. Chris and fashion writer Stephanie Talbot walk the streets of Bristol, on the look out for the latest t-shirt slogans, and Chris gets the lowdown on the fashionista jargon from trend forecaster, Lucy Norris.

Producer: Sarah Langan.

Fashion20130813

An exploration of spoken language and communication in the 21st century, presented by Chris Ledgard. This week: Fashion. Topics include how we talk about scents, slogans on t-shirts and fashion lingo.

Katie Puckrik tells how she, a self confessed 'fume head' talks and thinks about perfumes. Chris and fashion writer Stephanie Talbot walk the streets of Bristol, on the look out for the latest t-shirt slogans, and Chris gets the lowdown on the fashionista jargon from trend forecaster, Lucy Norris.

Producer: Sarah Langan.

First Words: How Do Children Develop Language?2014121620141225 (R4)

Michael Rosen finds out about the first sounds, words and phrases that babies recognise and learn to say. He talks to author Tom Chatfield and his 15-month-old son, and to linguists Laura Wright and Kriszta Szendroi.

Producer: Beth O'Dea.

First Words: How do children develop language?20141216

Michael Rosen finds out about the first sounds, words and phrases that babies recognise and learn to say. He talks to author Tom Chatfield and his 15-month-old son, and to linguists Laura Wright and Kriszta Szendroi.

Producer: Beth O'Dea.

First Words: How do children develop language?2014121620141225 (R4)

Michael Rosen finds out about the first sounds, words and phrases that babies recognise and learn to say. He talks to author Tom Chatfield and his 15-month-old son, and to linguists Laura Wright and Kriszta Szendroi.

Producer: Beth O'Dea.

Food Connections Festival20150519

Food Connections Festival2015051920150525 (R4)

Michael Rosen and guests perform songs, poems and stories about food. With Writer Tania Hershman, singer Simon Panrucker and Cook Barny Haughton. All in front of a family audience at the Food Connections Festival in Bristol.

Have you ever wondered what the words raspberry, syllabub or toffee have in common? Did you know that pickle is a Dutch word but tomato, chocolate and chilli come from the Aztecs?

Join broadcaster and children's writer Michael Rosen on an adventure into language and food as he discovers how our favourite (and least favourite) dishes got their names in Radio 4's Word of Mouth programme. He'll be joined onstage by writers and singers to entertain us with poems, songs and stories and he'll be working with local schools to find out what makes the children of Bristol go 'yum' and 'yuk'.

Food Connections Festival20150519

Michael Rosen and guests perform songs, poems and stories about food. With Writer Tania Hershman, singer Simon Panrucker and Cook Barny Haughton. All in front of a family audience at the Food Connections Festival in Bristol.

Have you ever wondered what the words raspberry, syllabub or toffee have in common? Did you know that pickle is a Dutch word but tomato, chocolate and chilli come from the Aztecs?

Join broadcaster and children's writer Michael Rosen on an adventure into language and food as he discovers how our favourite (and least favourite) dishes got their names in Radio 4's Word of Mouth programme. He'll be joined onstage by writers and singers to entertain us with poems, songs and stories and he'll be working with local schools to find out what makes the children of Bristol go 'yum' and 'yuk'.

Food Connections Festival2015051920150525 (R4)

Michael Rosen and guests perform songs, poems and stories about food. With Writer Tania Hershman, singer Simon Panrucker and Cook Barny Haughton. All in front of a family audience at the Food Connections Festival in Bristol.

Have you ever wondered what the words raspberry, syllabub or toffee have in common? Did you know that pickle is a Dutch word but tomato, chocolate and chilli come from the Aztecs?

Join broadcaster and children's writer Michael Rosen on an adventure into language and food as he discovers how our favourite (and least favourite) dishes got their names in Radio 4's Word of Mouth programme. He'll be joined onstage by writers and singers to entertain us with poems, songs and stories and he'll be working with local schools to find out what makes the children of Bristol go 'yum' and 'yuk'.

Frenchified: The Influence of French on English20170411

Frenchified: The Influence of French on English20170411

Michael Rosen & Dr Laura Wright find out how much of our language comes from French roots, from Anglo-Norman onwards. A Sunday lunch menu from The Ritz is food for thought, and Dr Richard Ashdowne explains the surprising history behind many words we think of as English, with the help of Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Frenchified: The Influence of French on English2017041120170417 (R4)

Michael Rosen & Dr Laura Wright find out how much of our language comes from French roots, from Anglo-Norman onwards. A Sunday lunch menu from The Ritz is food for thought, and Dr Richard Ashdowne explains the surprising history behind many words we think of as English, with the help of Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Frenchified: The Influence of French on English20170417

Michael Rosen and Laura Wright find out how much of English comes from French roots.

Frenchified: The Influence of French on English20170417

Michael Rosen and Laura Wright find out how much of English comes from French roots.

Michael Rosen & Dr Laura Wright find out how much of our language comes from French roots, from Anglo-Norman onwards. A Sunday lunch menu from The Ritz is food for thought, and Dr Richard Ashdowne explains the surprising history behind many words we think of as English, with the help of Buffy the Vampire Slayer.
Producer Beth O'Dea.

Game On: The Language of Video Games20170522

Michael Rosen and Laura Wright find out how video games influence language.

With 99% of 8-15 year olds playing video games, Michael Rosen & Dr Laura Wright explore how gaming is influencing language and storytelling. From terms like 'epic fail' and 'levelling up' entering education and politics to sophisticated developments in interactive storytelling taking on the cinema and film industry. Narrative paramedic, Rhianna Pratchett and Associate Professor in Games Research, Esther MacCallum Stewart guide us through the world and language of gamers. There will be zombies...

Producer: Sarah Addezio.

Game On: The Language Of Video Games20170522

Michael Rosen and Laura Wright find out how video games influence language.

With 99% of 8-15 year olds playing video games, Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright explore how gaming is influencing language and storytelling. From terms like 'epic fail' and 'levelling up' entering education and politics to sophisticated developments in interactive storytelling taking on the cinema and film industry. Narrative paramedic, Rhianna Pratchett and Associate Professor in Games Research, Esther MacCallum Stewart guide us through the world and language of gamers. There will be zombies...

Producer: Sarah Addezio.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920707]

Frank Delaney explores the punch and the poetry of the way we speak now. Including: is it Sweet Clarity or Breakneck Pace to win the sports commentary steeplechase? Plus: Andrew Motion reading his specially commissioned work Friendly Fires. Producer Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920707]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Unknown: Andrew Motion

Producer: Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921109]

Frank Delaney is back with the programme that is what it says, featuring English as she is spoke... and sometimes as she isn't. This week: Does size matter? Shakespeare called upon thousands of words, but how many can you command?

Producer Simon Elmes. Stereo

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921109]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921116]

with Frank Delaney.

This week: Making an impression. What do the political takers-off know that we don't about the words their victims use? Producer Simon Elmes. Stereo

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921116]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Simon Elmes.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921123]

Frank Delaney presents the programme about English that is what it says. This week: Verbal bankruptcy. How the recession is biting deep... into the language. Producer Simon Elmes Stereo

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921123]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921130]

with Frank Delaney.

This week: Winter Words.

Some seasonable suggestions for filling the frosty silence.

Producer Simon Elmes. Stereo

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921130]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921207]

Frank Delaney presents the programme that is what it says.

This week: C'mon Let's Party.... Celebrate...

Carouse... Raise a Glass... Be of Good Cheer: a timely look at fest-speak. Producer Simon Elmes. Stereo

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921207]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921214]

Frank Delaney presents the last programme in the series about English that is what it says.

This week: Tools or Technobabble? The jargoners fight it out. Producer Simon Elmes

Stereo

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921214]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930103]

with Frank Delaney.

English as she is spoke.... and sometimes as she isn't. Producer Simon Elmes.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930103]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930110]

with Frank Delaney.

Making an Impression What do the political takers-off know that we don't about the words their victims use?

Producer Simon Elmes.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930110]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930117]

with Frank Delaney. This week: verbal bankruptcy. How the recession is biting deep.... into our language.

Producer Simon Elmes.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930117]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930124]

with Frank Delaney.

Length, Grip and Nerve the wise words of wine; plus an expert view of "bad" grammar.

Producer Simon Elmes.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930124]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930131]

with Frank Delaney.

This week: A look at "festspeak".

Producer Simon Elmes.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930131]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930207]

with Frank Delaney.

In the last programme of the series: Tools or technobabble? The jargoneers fight it out.

Producer Simon Elmes.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930207]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930615]

Frank Delaney returns with a new series of the programme about language that is what it says.

This week: The War of the Words. The search is on for Britain's best, and worst, Public wordsmith. Also, regular features including Word of the Week. Producer Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930615]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930622]

Frank Delaney with the programme about language that is what it says.

2: Summer Cocktail. Featuring a few fantastic philological facts in Delaney's Believe It or Not. Producer Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930622]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930629]

Frank Delaney with the programme about language that is what it says. 3: What's In a Name? Producer Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930629]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930706]

with Frank Delaney.

4: Buy This. From street hawking t( political propaganda -the language o persuasion.

Producer Liz Jensen

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930706]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Liz Jensen

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930713]

Frank Delaney with the programme about language that is what it says.

5: Truly Economical - The Language of Lying

Producer Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930713]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930720]

Frank Delaney with the programme about language that is what it says.

6: Play it again and again, Sam. Must familiarity breed contempt? A celebration of the tired old cliche and its offspring. Producer Liz Jensen

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930720]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Liz Jensen

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930727]

Frank Delaney with the programme about language that is what it says. 7: A Drop of the Irish. Producer Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930727]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930803]

Frank Delaney with the last in the series on language that is what it says.

Eloquent, Elegant and Expressive. The results of the Word of Mouth competition to find Britain's best user of spoken English.

Producer Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930803]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931110]

Frank Delaney returns with the programme about language that is what it says. This week: Patsy and the Hot Banana. Jargon from Belfast to Bruges.

Producer Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931110]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931117]

with Frank Delaney.

2: Tango, Foxtrot and Good Karma. A cocktail of summer words for the dark days of the year.

Producer Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931117]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931124]

Frank Delaney presents the programme about language that is what it says.

3: Runners and Riders Basically, Brian. Sportspeak and how English was sold down the Estuary.

Producer Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931124]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931201]

4: Buy This. From street hawking to political propaganda - Frank Delaney looks at the language of persuasion. Producer Liz Jensen

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931201]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931208]

Frank Delaney presents the programme about words that is what it says.

5: Truly Economical. A look at the language of lying.

Producer Simon Elmes

FACE BEHIND THE VOICE page 15

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931208]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931215]

6: Play It Again and Again, Sam. Must familiarity breed contempt? Frank Delaney celebrates the tired old cliche. Producer Liz Jensen

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931215]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931222]

Frank Delaney on language that is what it says.

7: A Drop of the Irish. Producer Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931222]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931229]

Last of the series with Frank Delaney.

8: Floquent, Elegant and Expressive. The results of the Word of Mouth competition to find Britain'sbest user of spoken English. Producer Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931229]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19941004]

Frank Delaney presents the programme about language.

3: Zap! Pow! Kerrang! The wonderful world of onomatopoeia; plus, from our own linguistic correspondent, how other people use English around the world. Producer Caroline Sarll

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941004]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Caroline Sarll

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941011]

Frank Delaney presents the programme about language.

4: Your Big Mouth. How do yourtongue, teeth, lips and lungs ever get it together to produce a string of words? Just try this for starters: the sixth sheik's sixth sheep's sick.

Producer Tessa Watt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941011]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Tessa Watt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941018]

Frank Delaney presents the Programme about language.

5: God and Mammon. Glory be to language in the highest places - Terry Waite talks about talking to God. And the influence of money on words: the lingo of London's financial markets. Producer Rona Couper

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941018]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Talks: Terry Waite

Producer: Rona Couper

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941025]

Frank Delaney presents the final programme in the series about language.

6: Bad Words and Bons Mots. How the French are playing hard with le soft, le fax, and le hamburger. Plus the results of the competition to find the wittiest person in Britain. Producer Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941025]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Unknown: Bons Mots.

Producer: Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970218]

Six programmes in which Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak.

1: Manhattan Transfer An edition from New York with the hottest new words, a celebration of Ogden Nash , and an encounter in the park with two Snappers. Producer Simon Elmes Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970218]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Ogden Nash

Producer: Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970225]

Russell Davies with a six-part series about words and the way we speak. 2:Names Will Never Hurt Me.Annie Enright ponders the business of naming children, management guru Faith Popcorn explains why her own name is worth so much, and novelist Robert McLiam Wilson calls names across the Northern Irish barricades. Producer Noah Richler Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970225]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Robert McLiam Wilson

Producer: Noah Richler

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970304]

Russell Davies with the programme about words and the way we speak. 3: Big Worms, Little Worms and Just Worms The lingua franca of linguine, the alfabeto of spaghetti, and a new theory on the ageing of the voice. Producer Jane Ray Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970304]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Jane Ray Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970311]

Russell Davies with the programme about words and the way we speak.

4: Read All about It! A declamation of newspaper sellers, a celebration of song lyrics, and an investigation into the case of the missing tense. Producer Emma Kingsley Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970311]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Emma Kingsley

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970318]

Russell Davies with the programme about words and the way we speak.

5: The Most Super Fab Programme in the World - Ever! Super superlatives and the rise of the absolutely fabulous adjective. And how do the political parties manifest their promises? Producer Emma Kingsley Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970318]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970325]

Russell Davies with the last programme in the series about words and the way we speak.

6: Can You Hear Me, Mother?The catchphrase went out of fashion during the rise of satire, but has it made a comeback in the world of alternative comedy? And linguist Andy Martin looks at the language we use to worship from afar as he sets his sights on Brigitte Bardot. Plus, the word of the week. Producer Paul Quinn Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970325]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Andy Martin

Unknown: Brigitte Bardot.

Producer: Paul Quinn

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970401]

Six programmes in which

Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak.

1: Writes of Spring. This week dating and mating - some words for a fertile season; the subjunctive celebrated (as it were); plus a chance to put the English language right in the People's Lexicon. Producer Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970401]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970408]

Six programmes in which

Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak.

2: The Persistent PastThe novelist

AS Byatt is among those trying to account for the surprising persistence of received pronunciation, despite the preference for speech which resembles early-morning television. Actor Hugh Walters coaches some aspiring performers who want to preserve the art of speaking poetry for public entertainment, and comedian David Schneider explores the Palace of Words.

Producer Louise Greenberg

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970408]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Hugh Walters

Unknown: David Schneider

Producer: Louise Greenberg

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970415]

Six programmes in which

Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak.

3: Already, So Soon, My Life

This programme wraps up warm, takes a mouthful of chicken soup and explores the Jewish joke. And, a plague on both your houses: the art of obloquy.

Producer Emma Kingsley

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970415]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970422]

Six programmes in which

Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak.

4: The Naming of Parts

How to name something new - with Professor Steven Jones on genes and molecules - something secret - with codebreaker Meredith Gardner , who uncovered atomic spies - something sweet-smelling -with Parisian perfume - and something old - with the world of falconry. Producer Matt Thompson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970422]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Professor Steven Jones

Unknown: Meredith Gardner

Producer: Matt Thompson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970429]

Six programmes in which

Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak.

5: Did You Come Far?The big picture on small talk, the a-wop-bom-aloomop-a-lop-bam-boom of nonsense song lyrics, plus the subtle art of the threatening letter.

Producer Ekene Akalawu

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970429]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Ekene Akalawu

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970506]

Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak.

Can You Hear Me, Mother?Simon Callow talks about the challenge of Projecting the voice to the back of a theatre. Plus the People's Lexicon of English that listeners would like to see Preserved is revealed. Last in series. Producer Emma Kingsley

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970506]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Talks: Simon Callow

Producer: Emma Kingsley

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971018]

Russell Davies 's six-part exploration of language. 1: In the Mood Producer Simon Elmes Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971018]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971025]

Six programmes in which Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak. 2: The Persistent Past. Novelist AS

Byatt is among those trying to account for the surprising persistence of received pronunciation.

Producer Louise Greenberg Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971025]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Louise Greenberg

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971101]

Six programmes in which Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak. 3: Already, So Soon, My Life

An exploration of the Jewish joke. Producer Emma Kingsley Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971101]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971108]

Six programmes in which Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak. 4: The Naming of Parts. The art of naming, amongst other things, genes and molecules and perfumes. Producer Matt Thompson Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971108]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Matt Thompson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971115]

Six programmes in which Russell Davies explores words. 5: Did You

Come Far? The big picture on small talk. Producer Ekene Akalawu Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971115]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971122]

The last of six programmes in which Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak. Can You Hear Me, Mother?Simon Callow on the challenge of theatrical projection. Producer Emma Kingsley Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971122]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Simon Callow

Producer: Emma Kingsley

Genome: [r4 Bd=19981231]

Michael Rosen with a wordy, taiky lippy, mouthy edition to kick off the last year of the second millennium Producer Bella Bannerman Repeated Sunday 8 30pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19981231]

Unknown: Michael Rosen

Producer: Bella Bannerman

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19920707]

Frank Delaney explores the punch and the poetry of the way we speak now. Including: is it Sweet Clarity or Breakneck Pace to win the sports commentary steeplechase? Plus: Andrew Motion reading his specially commissioned work Friendly Fires. Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19920707]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Unknown: Andrew Motion

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19921109]

Frank Delaney is back with the programme that is what it says, featuring English as she is spoke ... and sometimes as she isn't. This week: Does size matter? Shakespeare called upon thousands of words, but how many can you command?

Producer Simon Elmes. Stereo

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19921109]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19921116]

with Frank Delaney.

This week: Making an impression. What do the political takers-off know that we don't about the words their victims use? Producer Simon Elmes. Stereo

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19921116]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Simon Elmes.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19921123]

Frank Delaney presents the programme about English that is what it says. This week: Verbal bankruptcy. How the recession is biting deep ... into the language. Producer Simon Elmes Stereo

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19921123]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19921130]

with Frank Delaney.

This week: Winter Words.

Some seasonable suggestions for filling the frosty silence.

Producer Simon Elmes. Stereo

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19921130]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Simon Elmes.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19921207]

Frank Delaney presents the programme that is what it says.

This week: C'mon Let's Party.... Celebrate ...

Carouse ... Raise a Glass ... Be of Good Cheer: a timely look at fest-speak. Producer Simon Elmes. Stereo

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19921207]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19921214]

Frank Delaney presents the last programme in the series about English that is what it says.

This week: Tools or Technobabble? The jargoners fight it out. Producer Simon Elmes

Stereo

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19921214]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930103]

with Frank Delaney.

English as she is spoke.... and sometimes as she isn't. Producer Simon Elmes.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930103]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Simon Elmes.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930110]

with Frank Delaney.

Making an Impression What do the political takers-off know that we don't about the words their victims use?

Producer Simon Elmes.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930110]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Simon Elmes.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930117]

with Frank Delaney. This week: verbal bankruptcy. How the recession is biting deep.... into our language.

Producer Simon Elmes.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930117]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Simon Elmes.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930124]

with Frank Delaney.

Length, Grip and Nerve the wise words of wine; plus an expert view of "bad" grammar.

Producer Simon Elmes.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930124]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Simon Elmes.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930131]

with Frank Delaney.

This week: A look at "festspeak".

Producer Simon Elmes.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930131]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Simon Elmes.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930207]

with Frank Delaney.

In the last programme of the series: Tools or technobabble? The jargoneers fight it out.

Producer Simon Elmes.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930207]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Simon Elmes.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930615]

Frank Delaney returns with a new series of the programme about language that is what it says.

This week: The War of the Words. The search is on for Britain's best, and worst, Public wordsmith. Also, regular features including Word of the Week. Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930615]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930622]

Frank Delaney with the programme about language that is what it says.

2: Summer Cocktail. Featuring a few fantastic philological facts in Delaney's Believe It or Not. Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930622]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930629]

Frank Delaney with the programme about language that is what it says. 3: What's In a Name? Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930629]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930706]

with Frank Delaney.

4: Buy This. From street hawking t( political propaganda -the language o persuasion.

Producer Liz Jensen

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930706]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Liz Jensen

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930713]

Frank Delaney with the programme about language that is what it says.

5: Truly Economical - The Language of Lying

Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930713]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930720]

Frank Delaney with the programme about language that is what it says.

6: Play it again and again, Sam. Must familiarity breed contempt? A celebration of the tired old cliche and its offspring. Producer Liz Jensen

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930720]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Liz Jensen

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930727]

Frank Delaney with the programme about language that is what it says. 7: A Drop of the Irish. Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930727]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930803]

Frank Delaney with the last in the series on language that is what it says.

Eloquent, Elegant and Expressive. The results of the Word of Mouth competition to find Britain's best user of spoken English.

Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19930803]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19931110]

Frank Delaney returns with the programme about language that is what it says. This week: Patsy and the Hot Banana. Jargon from Belfast to Bruges.

Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19931110]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19931117]

with Frank Delaney.

2: Tango, Foxtrot and Good Karma. A cocktail of summer words for the dark days of the year.

Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19931117]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19931124]

Frank Delaney presents the programme about language that is what it says.

3: Runners and Riders Basically, Brian. Sportspeak and how English was sold down the Estuary.

Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19931124]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19931201]

4: Buy This. From street hawking to political propaganda - Frank Delaney looks at the language of persuasion. Producer Liz Jensen

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19931201]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Liz Jensen

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19931208]

Frank Delaney presents the programme about words that is what it says.

5: Truly Economical. A look at the language of lying.

Producer Simon Elmes

FACE BEHIND THE VOICE page 15

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19931208]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19931215]

6: Play It Again and Again, Sam. Must familiarity breed contempt? Frank Delaney celebrates the tired old cliche. Producer Liz Jensen

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19931215]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Liz Jensen

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19931222]

Frank Delaney on language that is what it says.

7: A Drop of the Irish. Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19931222]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19931229]

Last of the series with Frank Delaney.

8: Floquent, Elegant and Expressive. The results of the Word of Mouth competition to find Britain'sbest user of spoken English. Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19931229]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940215]

Frank Delaney is back with the programme about language that is what it says.

1: Talk Back in Anger. Abuse, invective and put-downs, this week's programme bares its teeth for a bit of bad-mouthing. Plus dotting the i's and crossing the t's - how you can join the first British National Dictation. Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940215]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940222]

with Frank Delaney.

2: Jabberwockery. "Grewpering the pygodurths of flummish zimmings" - today's programme looks at invented words and languages. Plus the hunt is on for the nation's best speller with the launch of a nationwide dictation competition.

Producer Liz Jensen

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940222]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Liz Jensen

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940301]

Frank Delaney presents the programme about language that is what it says.

3: Colourful Language. This week he looks at the language of colours, checking paint manufacturers' shade charts. Do you go for avocado on your walls, or apple green ... or just plain magnolia? Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940301]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940308]

with Frank Delaney.

4: Girlie Talk. Do men and women really speak a different language? Plus some examples of bare-faced euphemism. Producer Liz Jensen

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940308]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Liz Jensen

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940315]

The language programme that is ... what it says.

5: Streetwise. From Bath Place to Friar's

Entry, Frank Delaney examines the origins of place names and discovers how the avenue got its appellation. Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940315]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940322]

Frank Delaney introduces the last in the present series.

Magic Spells. It's the final round in the search for the country's champion speller. And there's a look at the surprising sounds of onomatopoeia as the show goes out with a bang - and a pow! and a splat!-Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940322]

Introduces: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940618]

Another chance to hear the language series with Frank Delaney. 1: Talk Backin Anger Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940618]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940625]

The language series with Frank Delaney. 2: Jabberwockery. The creation and dissection of utter nonsense.

Producer Liz Jensen

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940625]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Liz Jensen

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940702]

with Frank Delaney. 3: Fast Talking. Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940702]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940709]

The language series with Frank Delaney. 4:Girlie Talk. Do men and women speak a different language? Plus, bare-faced euphemism.

Producer Liz Jensen

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940709]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Liz Jensen

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940716]

with Frank Delaney. 5: Streetwise Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940716]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940723]

Magic Spells. Frank Delaney introduces the last in the series about language. Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940723]

Introduces: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940920]

Frank Delaney is back with the programme that is what it says!

Fun and Games. Stephen Fry dissects the language of comedy, while hockey coach Sue Slocombe and rowing man Dan Topolski pick the right words to build a winning team. Plus, the quest to find Britain's wittiest person. Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940920]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Unknown: Stephen Fry

Unknown: Sue Slocombe

Unknown: Dan Topolski

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940927]

Frank Delaney presents the programme about language that is ... what it says.

2: Wild Child. From primeval forest to computer age: interpret the strange utterings of the enfant sauvage and visit the world's largest database of the English language. Producer Tessa Watt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940927]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Tessa Watt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941004]

Frank Delaney presents the programme about language.

3: Zap! Pow! Kerrang! The wonderful world of onomatopoeia; plus, from our own linguistic correspondent, how other people use English around the world. Producer Caroline Sarll

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941004]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Caroline Sarll

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941011]

Frank Delaney presents the programme about language.

4: Your Big Mouth. How do yourtongue, teeth, lips and lungs ever get it together to produce a string of words? Just try this for starters: the sixth sheik's sixth sheep's sick.

Producer Tessa Watt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941011]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Tessa Watt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941018]

Frank Delaney presents the Programme about language.

5: God and Mammon. Glory be to language in the highest places - Terry Waite talks about talking to God. And the influence of money on words: the lingo of London's financial markets. Producer Rona Couper

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941018]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Talks: Terry Waite

Producer: Rona Couper

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941025]

Frank Delaney presents the final programme in the series about language.

6: Bad Words and Bons Mots. How the French are playing hard with le soft, le fax, and le hamburger. Plus the results of the competition to find the wittiest person in Britain. Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941025]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Unknown: Bons Mots.

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950107]

1: Fun and Games. Frank Delaney is joined by Stephen Fry , Sue Slocombe and Dan Topolski.

Producer Simon Elmes Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950107]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Unknown: Stephen Fry

Unknown: Sue Slocombe

Unknown: Dan Topolski.

Producer: Simon Elmes Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950114]

with Frank Delaney.

2: Wild Child. A look at the progression of language from primeval forest to computer age.

Producer Tessa Watt Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950114]

Unknown: Frank Delaney.

Producer: Tessa Watt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950121]

Frank Delaney presents the programme about language.

3: Zap! Pow! KerrangIThe wonderful world of onomatopoeia. Pius,

Dr Robert Burchfield on how other people use English around the world. Producer Caroline Sarll Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950121]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Unknown: Dr Robert Burchfield

Producer: Caroline Sarll Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950128]

Frank Delaney presents the programme about language.

4: Your Big Mouth. How do your tongue, teeth, lips and lungs ever get it together to produce a string of words? Producer Tessa Watt Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950128]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Tessa Watt Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950204]

Frank Delaney presents the programme about language.

5: God and Mammon. Terry Waite talks about talking to God, and there's a look at the influence of money on words. Producer Fiona Couper

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950204]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950211]

In the last of the series Frank Delaney looks at how the French are playing hard with le soft, le fax and le hamburger. Plus the listeners' choice of the wittiest person in Britain. Producer Simon Elmes Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950211]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950307]

Frank Delaney returns with the programme about English that is what it says. 1: Language in the Dock.

English in the service of crime.... and detection. Plus, name that horse!your chance to create a hot tip in racing. Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950307]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950314]

Frank Delaney presents the series about words. 2: A Bath of Language. What lies behind those splendid facades? Was Jane Austen right, or Richard Brinsley Sheridan ?

Contributors talk about the language of England's most popular 18th-century city.

Producer Piers Plowright

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950314]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Unknown: Jane Austen

Unknown: Richard Brinsley Sheridan

Producer: Piers Plowright

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950321]

Frank Delaney looks at how the computer is learning to speak

English, everybody's English - yours, mine and the millions worldwide for whom it is the one essential foreign language. In the process can computers tell us new facts about our own language? Also, how do football chants originate?

Producer Neil Trevithick

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950321]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Neil Trevithick

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950328]

Frank Delaney presents another edition of the language programme. Producer Nigel Acheson

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950328]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Nigel Acheson

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950404]

Frank Delaney visits an anarchic, indigenous, foreign language at its democratic interface - Scots in Glasgow. Plus Scots poet N N Herbert on the politics of language; what happens when languages die? and could English all over the world be bad for our health?

Producer Neil Trevithick

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950404]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Neil Trevithick

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950411]

Frank Delaney presents the last in the current series about the way we speak. "... And it's 'Linguistic Lad' from 'Punters' Choice' ... It's a photo-finish as your thousands of suggestions for naming a 3-year-old gelding finally make it to the last furlong. Plus Delaney the great dictator throws down the gauntlet again to the country's top spellers. Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950411]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950527]

Frank Delaney presents a series about the English language.

1: Language in the Dock. English in the service of crime... and detection.

Producer Simon Elmes Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950527]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950603]

A series about the English language. 2: A Bath of Language. Frank Delaney listens to the language of England's most popular 18th-century city. Producer Piers Plowright Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950603]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Piers Plowright Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950610]

A series about the English language. 3: Machine-Speak. Frank Delaney finds a computer that understands him. Producer Neil Trevithick Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950610]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Neil Trevithick Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950617]

A series about the English language. 4: They're Speaking Our Tune. Frank Delaney looks for the tune patterns of English.

Producer Nigel Acheson Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950617]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Nigel Acheson Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950624]

A series about the English language. 5: The Scotia Bar. Frank Delaney visits an anarchic indigenous foreign language at its demotic interface ... Producer Neil Trevithick Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950624]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Neil Trevithick Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950701]

Frank Delaney presents the last in the series about the English language.

And It's Linguistic Lad from Punter's .Choice....

Producer Simon Elmes Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950701]

Unknown: Frank Delaney

Producer: Simon Elmes Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950919]

Russell Davies presents the firstin a six-part series of the magazine programme about the English language. Nanny's Dinky Hankies. The British love-affair with baby talk, plus a butch varda at the world of gayspeak down the years and language problems and triumphs for footballers, Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950919]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950926]

Russell Davies explores language, words and what lies between them.

2: Words and Music. What's in a name, where pop groups are concerned?

What is the sound of silence and why can singing in English be so difficult? Producer Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19950926]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951003]

Russell Davies presents a six-part series exploring language, words and what lies between them.

3: Word Keepers. Who "owns" language? Is it the newspaper columnists writing about English usage, or the players of Scrabble, holding thousands of words in their heads for that all-important triple-word score?

Producer Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951003]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951010]

Russell Davies presents a six-part series exploring language, words and what lies between them.

4: TerminalSpeak. As our mouse clicks its way through the icons, we surf our way across the interface between the images on our computer screens and the language we see, speak and hear.

Producer Daniel Snowman

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951010]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Daniel Snowman

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951017]

Russell Davies presents a six-part series exploring language, words and what lies between them.

5: England Expects. This week, the art of signalling ... and communication without speech.

Producer Bella Bannerman

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951017]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Bella Bannerman

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951024]

Russell Davies presents the last in the series which explores language, words and what lies between them.

Firk, Cropple and Git Minging. The secret language of public schools and the playground, plus "positively PC". Producer Edward Odim

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951024]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Edward Odim

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951118]

Russell Davies presents the first of a six-part series exploring language, words and what lies between them.

Nanny's Dinky Hankies. The British love-affair with baby-talk, and a butch vada at the world of gayspeak down the years. Producer Simon Eimes Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951118]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Simon Eimes Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951125]

Russell Davies presents six programmes exploring language. 2: Words and Music. What's in a name, especially where pop groups are concerned?

Producer Emma Kingsley Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951125]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Emma Kingsley Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951202]

Russell Davies presents six programmes exploring language. 3: Word Keepers

Producer Emma Kingsley Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951202]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Emma Kingsley Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951209]

Russell Davies presents six programmes exploring language. 4: Terminalspeak. As our mouse clicks through the icons, we surf our way across the interface between the images on our computer screens and the language we see, speak and hear. Producer Daniel Snowman Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951209]

Unknown: Russell Davies

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951216]

Russell Davies presents six programmes exploring language.

5: England Expects. Sir John Harvey -Jones on the art of signalling ... and communication without speech, plus Trevor McDonald 's English. Producer Bella Bannerman Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951216]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Sir John Harvey

Unknown: Trevor McDonald

Producer: Bella Bannerman Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951223]

Russell Davies presents the last in the series which explores language. Firk, Cropple and Git Minging Producer Edward Odim Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19951223]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Edward Odim Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960123]

Russell Davies returns with a six-part series of the programme about words and the way we speak.

Primary Colors. As America embarks on the long and winding road to the White House, this programme samples the colourful language of stateside politics. Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960123]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960130]

Russell Davies presents a six-part series of the programme about words and the way we speak.

2: Hits and Misses. What happens when the name of a product means one thing in one language and something different in another?

Russell Davies explores the world of linguistic collisions. Producer Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960130]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960206]

Russell Davies presents a six-part series about words and the way we speak. 3: Oo-er,Missus. A long hard look at the language of the double entendre. Producer Jane Ray

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960206]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Jane Ray

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960213]

Russell Davies presents a six-part series about words and the way we speak. 4:Lem, Capcom and Little EVAs.This week, Russell Davies indulges in a few linguistic docking manoeuvres with the astro-speak of the Apollo programme and the lexicon of the Final Frontier. Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960213]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960220]

Russell Davies presents a six-part series about words and the way we speak. 5: Blootered. Russell Davies samples the language of drunkeness, north and south, and Loyd Grossman reveals the winners of the menu competition. Producer Cathy Drysdale

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960220]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Cathy Drysdale

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960227]

Last in the series about words and the way we speak.

6: Street Talk. Russell Davies checks out those wicked jives from the street.

Producer Constance St Louis

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960227]

Producer: Constance St Louis

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960416]

Russell Davies returns with the programme about words and the way we speak.

1: Primary Colors. With America travelling along the long and winding road to the White House, this programme samples the colourful language of Stateside politics. Producer Simon Elmes Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960416]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Simon Elmes Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960423]

The programme about words and the way we speak.

2: Smart Talking

Russell Davies gets to grips with lipids, AHAs, moisturisers and other terms of the beauty industry. He also looks at the beauty of language itself with the linguist Professor Steven Pinker.

Producer Emma Kingsley Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960423]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Steven Pinker.

Producer: Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960430]

Russell Davies presents the programme about words and the way we speak.

3: Oo-er Missus. Ken Dodd gets his tongue around the language of double entendre.

Producer Jane Ray Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960430]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Ken Dodd

Producer: Jane Ray Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960507]

Russell Davies presents six programmes about words and the way we speak.

4: Lem, Capcom and UttleEVAs. A look at a few linguistic docking manoeuvres with the astro-speakof the Apollo programme. Producer Simon Elmes Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960507]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Simon Elmes Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960514]

Russell Davies presents six programmes about words and the way we speak.

5: Blootered. This week, he samples the language of drunkenness North and South, and Loyd Grossman reveals the winners of the menu competition. Producer Cathy Drysdale Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960514]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Loyd Grossman

Producer: Cathy Drysdale Rpt

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960521]

The last programme in the series about words and the way we speak. Street Talk. Russell Davies checks out those wicked jives from the street.

Producer Constance St Louis

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960521]

Unknown: Russell Davies

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960820]

Russell Davies returns with the programme about words and the Way we speak.

1: Manhattan Transfer. A special edition from New York with the hottest new words, a guided tour of Big Applespeak, a celebration of the language of Ogden Nash and an encounter in the park with two Snappers.

Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960820]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Ogden Nash

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960827]

Russell Davies with the programme about words and the way we speak. 2: Names Will Never Hurt Me.

Annie Enright ponders the business of naming children, management guru

Faith Popcorn explains why her own name is worth so much, and novelist Robert McLiam Wilson calls names across the Northern Irish barricades.

Producer Noah Richler

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960827]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Annie Enright

Unknown: Robert McLiam Wilson

Producer: Noah Richler

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960903]

Russell Davies with the programme about words and the way we speak. 3: Big Worms, Little Worms and Just Worms. The lingua franca of linguine or the alphabetti of spaghetti, and a new theory on the ageing of the voice. Producer Jane Ray

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960903]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Jane Ray

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960910]

Russell Davies with the programme about words and the way we speak.

4: Read All about It! A declamation of newspaper sellers, a celebration of song lyrics, and an investigation into the case of the missing tense. Producer Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960910]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960917]

Russell Davies with the programme about words and the way we speak. 5: The Most Super Fab Programme in the World - Ever! Super superlatives and the rise of the absolutely fabulous adjective. And how do the political parties manifest their promises? Producer Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960917]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960924]

Russell Davies with the last programme in the series about words and the way we speak.

6: Can You Hear Me, Mother?lhe catchphrase went out of fashion during the rise of satire, but has it made a comeback in the world of alternative comedy? Plus, linguist

Andy Martin looks at the language we use to worship from afar as he sets his sights on Brigitte Bardot ; and the word of the week.

Producer Paul Quinn

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960924]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Andy Martin

Unknown: Brigitte Bardot

Producer: Paul Quinn

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970218]

Six programmes in which Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak.

1: Manhattan Transfer An edition from New York with the hottest new words, a celebration of Ogden Nash , and an encounter in the park with two Snappers. Producer Simon Elmes Repeat

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970218]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Ogden Nash

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970225]

Russell Davies with a six-part series about words and the way we speak. 2:Names Will Never Hurt Me.Annie Enright ponders the business of naming children, management guru Faith Popcorn explains why her own name is worth so much, and novelist Robert McLiam Wilson calls names across the Northern Irish barricades. Producer Noah Richler Repeat

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970225]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Robert McLiam Wilson

Producer: Noah Richler

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970304]

Russell Davies with the programme about words and the way we speak. 3: Big Worms, Little Worms and Just Worms The lingua franca of linguine, the alfabeto of spaghetti, and a new theory on the ageing of the voice. Producer Jane Ray Repeat

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970304]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Jane Ray Repeat

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970311]

Russell Davies with the programme about words and the way we speak.

4: Read All about It! A declamation of newspaper sellers, a celebration of song lyrics, and an investigation into the case of the missing tense. Producer Emma Kingsley Repeat

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970311]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970318]

Russell Davies with the programme about words and the way we speak.

5: The Most Super Fab Programme in the World - Ever! Super superlatives and the rise of the absolutely fabulous adjective. And how do the political parties manifest their promises? Producer Emma Kingsley Repeat

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970318]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970325]

Russell Davies with the last programme in the series about words and the way we speak.

6: Can You Hear Me, Mother?The catchphrase went out of fashion during the rise of satire, but has it made a comeback in the world of alternative comedy? And linguist Andy Martin looks at the language we use to worship from afar as he sets his sights on Brigitte Bardot. Plus, the word of the week. Producer Paul Quinn Repeat

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970325]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Andy Martin

Unknown: Brigitte Bardot.

Producer: Paul Quinn

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970401]

Six programmes in which

Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak.

1: Writes of Spring. This week dating and mating - some words for a fertile season; the subjunctive celebrated (as it were); plus a chance to put the English language right in the People's Lexicon. Producer Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970401]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970408]

Six programmes in which

Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak.

2: The Persistent PastThe novelist

AS Byatt is among those trying to account for the surprising persistence of received pronunciation, despite the preference for speech which resembles early-morning television. Actor Hugh Walters coaches some aspiring performers who want to preserve the art of speaking poetry for public entertainment, and comedian David Schneider explores the Palace of Words.

Producer Louise Greenberg

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970408]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Hugh Walters

Unknown: David Schneider

Producer: Louise Greenberg

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970415]

Six programmes in which

Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak.

3: Already, So Soon, My Life

This programme wraps up warm, takes a mouthful of chicken soup and explores the Jewish joke. And, a plague on both your houses: the art of obloquy.

Producer Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970415]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970422]

Six programmes in which

Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak.

4: The Naming of Parts

How to name something new - with Professor Steven Jones on genes and molecules - something secret - with codebreaker Meredith Gardner , who uncovered atomic spies - something sweet-smelling -with Parisian perfume - and something old - with the world of falconry. Producer Matt Thompson

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970422]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Professor Steven Jones

Unknown: Meredith Gardner

Producer: Matt Thompson

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970429]

Six programmes in which

Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak.

5: Did You Come Far?The big picture on small talk, the a-wop-bom-aloomop-a-lop-bam-boom of nonsense song lyrics, plus the subtle art of the threatening letter.

Producer Ekene Akalawu

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970429]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Ekene Akalawu

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970506]

Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak.

Can You Hear Me, Mother?Simon Callow talks about the challenge of Projecting the voice to the back of a theatre. Plus the People's Lexicon of English that listeners would like to see Preserved is revealed. Last in series. Producer Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19970506]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Talks: Simon Callow

Producer: Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19971018]

Russell Davies 's six-part exploration of language. 1: In the Mood Producer Simon Elmes Repeat

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19971018]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Simon Elmes

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19971025]

Six programmes in which Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak. 2: The Persistent Past. Novelist AS

Byatt is among those trying to account for the surprising persistence of received pronunciation.

Producer Louise Greenberg Repeat

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19971025]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Louise Greenberg

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19971101]

Six programmes in which Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak. 3: Already, So Soon, My Life

An exploration of the Jewish joke. Producer Emma Kingsley Repeat

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19971101]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19971108]

Six programmes in which Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak. 4: The Naming of Parts. The art of naming, amongst other things, genes and molecules and perfumes. Producer Matt Thompson Repeat

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19971108]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Matt Thompson

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19971115]

Six programmes in which Russell Davies explores words. 5: Did You

Come Far? The big picture on small talk. Producer Ekene Akalawu Repeat

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19971115]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Producer: Ekene Akalawu

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19971122]

The last of six programmes in which Russell Davies explores words and the way we speak. Can You Hear Me, Mother?Simon Callow on the challenge of theatrical projection. Producer Emma Kingsley Repeat

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19971122]

Unknown: Russell Davies

Unknown: Simon Callow

Producer: Emma Kingsley

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19981231]

Michael Rosen with a wordy, taiky lippy, mouthy edition to kick off the last year of the second millennium Producer Bella Bannerman Repeated Sunday 8 30pm

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19981231]

Unknown: Michael Rosen

Producer: Bella Bannerman

Gorilla gorilla gorilla: Latin names for animals and plants20151020

Gorilla Gorilla Gorilla: Latin Names For Animals And Plants2015102020151026 (R4)

Michael Rosen explores the wonderful Latin names used to describe animals and plants.

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright talk to River Cottage natural forager and writer John Wright about the surprising and wonderful Latin names used to describe animals and plants, and how they came to be. What is an Aha ha?

John Wright is the author of The Naming of the Shrew: A Curious History of Latin Names.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Gorilla gorilla gorilla: Latin names for animals and plants20151020

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright talk to River Cottage natural forager and writer John Wright about the surprising and wonderful Latin names used to describe animals and plants, and how they came to be. What is an Aha ha?

John Wright is the author of The Naming of the Shrew: A Curious History of Latin Names.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Gorilla gorilla gorilla: Latin names for animals and plants2015102020151026 (R4)

Michael Rosen explores the wonderful Latin names used to describe animals and plants.