Who's Left Holding The Baby? [world Service]

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
Comments
01The Documentary20131029
01The Documentary20131029
01The Documentary20131029
01The Documentary20131029
01The Documentary20131029
01The Documentary20131029
01The Documentary20131029

Alternative childcare: In Fiji childcare is shared between the extended family

01The Documentary20131029

With more and more women going back to work after having children, childcare - its costs and its developmental implications - has become one of the most vexed issues for new parents. Parents are faced with many questions; nursery or nanny? Stay at home longer or go back to work? Move closer to grandparents or muddle through without?

It was a dilemma reporter Madeleine Morris faced when returning to work in Australia after having her daughter Scarlett, now two years old. Burdened with endless theories about what is best for baby, like so many parents in developed countries, she now pays a large proportion of her salary to keep her child in nursery. She is constantly rushing to pick up, drop off and get home for bath time, feeling guilty all the while.

In Who's Holding the Baby? Madeleine will be asking if this is the only way. She and Scarlett set out to discover two vastly different approaches to caring for children, as found in Fiji and China, and the social politics and emotions that go with them.

In Fiji they experience a society where childcare is shared amongst the extended family, and everyone from young to old plays a role.

Along the way they ask what our childcare choices say about our values as a society, and what we might learn from others.

Picture Madeleine Morris and Scarlett

02The Documentary20131105
02The Documentary20131105
02The Documentary20131105
02The Documentary20131105
02The Documentary20131105

Alternative childcare: In China children as young as two are educated away from home

02The Documentary20131105

Madeleine Morris looks around the world at alternative approaches to childcare. In the.

02The Documentary20131105

Madeleine Morris set out to discover two vastly different approaches to caring for children, as found in Fiji and China, and the social politics and emotions that go with them.

In the second of two programmes investigating alternative childcare, Madeleine travels to China with her daughter Scarlett and visits a boarding school where children as young as two are educated away from their parents. Along the way they ask what our childcare choices say about our values as a society, and what we might learn from others.

Picture: Chinese children eating. Credit: Madeleine Morris

02 LASTThe Documentary20141118
02 LASTThe Documentary20141118
02 LASTThe Documentary20141118

What our childcare choices say about our values as a society and are there alternatives?

02 LASTThe Documentary20141118

With more and more women going back to work after having children, childcare - its costs and its developmental implications - has become one of the most vexed issues for new parents. Parents are faced with many questions - Nursery or nanny? Stay at home longer or go back to work? Move closer to grandparents or muddle through without?

It was a dilemma reporter Madeleine Morris faced when returning to work in Australia after having her daughter Scarlett, now two years old. Burdened with endless theories about what is best for baby, like so many parents in developed countries, she now pays a large proportion of her salary to keep her child in nursery. She is constantly rushing to pick up, drop off and get home for bath time, feeling guilty all the while.

In Who's Holding the Baby? Madeleine will be asking if this is the only way. She and Scarlett set out to discover two vastly different approaches to caring for children, as found in Fiji and China, and the social politics and emotions that go with them.

In China, they visit a boarding school where children as young as two are educated away from their parents and in Fiji they experience a society where childcare is shared amongst the extended family, everyone from young to old plays a role.

Along the way they ask what our childcare choices say about our values as a society, and what we might learn from others.