When Opportunity Knocked

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020220040613

1/2.

Mark Radcliffe presents the first in a two-part series exploring the chequered history of talent shows.

Legend has it that the talent show was born when radio host, Carroll Levis, invited a youngster from the audience to sing live on his show during an unforeseen break in the broadcast.

The impromptu performance was so popular that Levis introduced the amateur talent contest as a regular feature.

The grand-daddy of all talent contests was 'Opportunity Knocks', hosted by Hughie Green.

Premiered on the BBC and Radio Luxembourg, it transferred to ITV in 1956 and quickly became an unmissable fixture of Saturday night tv viewing.

In this first part of the series, Mark Radcliffe relates the early history of the talent show.

01010120030902

Mark Radcliffe presents the first in a two-part series exploring the chequered history of talent shows.

Legend has it that the talent show was born when radio host, Carroll Levis, invited a youngster from the audience to sing live on his show during an unforeseen break in the broadcast.

The impromptu performance was so popular that Levis introduced the amateur talent contest as a regular feature.

The grand-daddy of all talent contests was 'Opportunity Knocks', hosted by Hughie Green.

Premiered on the BBC and Radio Luxembourg, it transferred to ITV in 1956 and quickly became an unmissable fixture of Saturday night tv viewing.

In this first part of the series, Mark Radcliffe relates the early history of the talent show.

Today looking at the early history.

01010120040606

Mark Radcliffe presents the first in a two-part series exploring the chequered history of talent shows.

Legend has it that the talent show was born when radio host, Carroll Levis, invited a youngster from the audience to sing live on his show during an unforeseen break in the broadcast.

The impromptu performance was so popular that Levis introduced the amateur talent contest as a regular feature.

The grand-daddy of all talent contests was 'Opportunity Knocks', hosted by Hughie Green.

Premiered on the BBC and Radio Luxembourg, it transferred to ITV in 1956 and quickly became an unmissable fixture of Saturday night tv viewing.

In this first part of the series, Mark Radcliffe relates the early history of the talent show.

Today looking at the early history.

0102 LAST02 Last20030909

Mark Radcliffe presents the final part of this two part series about the history of the TV talent show.

In 1978 came the demise of the first generation of talent contests, Opportunity Knocks and New Faces.

But it wasn't long before a new, and rather sillier, breed was launched on to our screens, with innumerable talented dogs and precocious children vying for votes.

Also, the talent-spotting trend continues with the aspiring Pop Idols and Fame Academicians of our own day.

From Opportunity Knocks to Pop Idol, this is the story of radio and TV talent shows, from the people who found fame by appearing on them to the hopefuls who were rejected and later found fame elsewhere.

Presented by Mark Radcliffe.

2/2 Mark looks at the changing nature of the talent show - the growth of prize money and other inducements, and the increasingly outlandish attempts to broaden the genre.

0102 LAST02 Last20040620

In 1978 came the demise of the first generation of talent contests, Opportunity Knocks and New Faces.

But it wasn't long before a new, and rather sillier, breed was launched on to our screens, with innumerable talented dogs and precocious children vying for votes.

Also, the talent-spotting trend continues with the aspiring Pop Idols and Fame Academicians of our own day.

From Opportunity Knocks to Pop Idol, this is the story of radio and TV talent shows, from the people who found fame by appearing on them to the hopefuls who were rejected and later found fame elsewhere.

Presented by Mark Radcliffe.

2/2 Mark looks at the changing nature of the talent show - the growth of prize money and other inducements, and the increasingly outlandish attempts to broaden the genre.