Unforgettable

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01David Temple/Derek Jarman20160822

01David Temple/derek Jarman20160822

David Temple has an imagined conversation with his late brother-in-law, Derek Jarman. The two differ in many ways but their mutual affection, and a similar sense of humour, shine across the 22 years since Derek's death, as they share impressions of Jarman's films.

There is much laughter in the exchange between the living and the deceased as David and Derek recount stories of film premieres and family Christmases. There is sadness also as Jarman talks of the death of his mother from cancer. Temple tells Jarman of a death, also from cancer, that he did not live long enough to know of, that of Derek's sister, David's wife. Derek's own HIV-related death is a constant backdrop to the dialogue.

At times it's easy to suspend disbelief and to imagine these two men are actually in the same room together, catching up after more than two decades apart, such is the spontaneity and quiet energy of their conversation.

In 1991 Natalie Cole sang a duet with her long dead father, Nat King Cole - the result was Unforgettable. This is the radio equivalent. In each edition of the series, a different guest is invited to interact with someone, now dead, with whom they have, or have wanted to have, a connection. Using technology designed for musicians and DJs to spontaneously play out short musical clips, producer Adam Fowler facilitates a real-time conversation between the two participants, using conversational snippets of the deceased from past recordings.

The guest has no advance knowledge of the excerpts, and the conversation can take unexpected turns, occasionally leading to some emotionally charged interchanges, as living voices engage with those preserved in the archive.

Research: Philippa Geering

Producer: Adam Fowler

An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4.

01David Temple/derek Jarman2016082220170314 (R4)

David Temple has an imagined conversation with his late brother-in-law, Derek Jarman. The two differ in many ways but their mutual affection, and a similar sense of humour, shine across the 22 years since Derek's death, as they share impressions of Jarman's films.

There is much laughter in the exchange between the living and the deceased as David and Derek recount stories of film premieres and family Christmases. There is sadness also as Jarman talks of the death of his mother from cancer. Temple tells Jarman of a death, also from cancer, that he did not live long enough to know of, that of Derek's sister, David's wife. Derek's own HIV-related death is a constant backdrop to the dialogue.

At times it's easy to suspend disbelief and to imagine these two men are actually in the same room together, catching up after more than two decades apart, such is the spontaneity and quiet energy of their conversation.

In 1991 Natalie Cole sang a duet with her long dead father, Nat King Cole - the result was Unforgettable. This is the radio equivalent. In each edition of the series, a different guest is invited to interact with someone, now dead, with whom they have, or have wanted to have, a connection. Using technology designed for musicians and DJs to spontaneously play out short musical clips, producer Adam Fowler facilitates a real-time conversation between the two participants, using conversational snippets of the deceased from past recordings.

The guest has no advance knowledge of the excerpts, and the conversation can take unexpected turns, occasionally leading to some emotionally charged interchanges, as living voices engage with those preserved in the archive.

Research: Philippa Geering

Producer: Adam Fowler

An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4.

02Tony Garnett/Mary Whitehouse20160823

02Tony Garnett/mary Whitehouse20160823

Filmmaker Tony Garnett has an imagined conversation with the late Mary Whitehouse. Using archive clips, they are reunited in one final debate across the political and moral divide.

Tony Garnett's productions include Cathy Come Home, Kes and This Life. He has made films investigating police corruption, and advocating abortion law reform and the abolition of the death penalty. Mary Whitehouse, alarmed at the rapid social changes of the 1960s, waged crusades against 'the permissive society' and criticised the BBC for portraying 'promiscuity as normal'.

Although diametrically opposed to her ethics and opinions, Garnett reveals a respect for Whitehouse's courage. As the conversation develops, he re-evaluates the effectiveness of his own attempts to influence public opinion, and the successes and failures of Mary Whitehouse's moral and political campaigns in the years since her death in 2001.

In 1991 Natalie Cole sang a duet with her long dead father, Nat King Cole - the result was Unforgettable. This is the radio equivalent. In each edition of the series, a different guest is invited to interact with someone, now dead, with whom they have, or have wanted to have, a connection. Using technology designed for musicians and DJs to spontaneously play out short musical clips, producer Adam Fowler facilitates a real-time conversation between the two participants, using conversational snippets of the deceased from past recordings.

The guest has no advance knowledge of the excerpts, and the conversation can take unexpected turns, occasionally leading to some emotionally charged interchanges, as living voices engage with those preserved in the archive.

Research: Philippa Geering

Producer: Adam Fowler

An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4.

02Tony Garnett/mary Whitehouse2016082320170321 (R4)

Filmmaker Tony Garnett has an imagined conversation with the late Mary Whitehouse. Using archive clips, they are reunited in one final debate across the political and moral divide.

Tony Garnett's productions include Cathy Come Home, Kes and This Life. He has made films investigating police corruption, and advocating abortion law reform and the abolition of the death penalty. Mary Whitehouse, alarmed at the rapid social changes of the 1960s, waged crusades against 'the permissive society' and criticised the BBC for portraying 'promiscuity as normal'.

Although diametrically opposed to her ethics and opinions, Garnett reveals a respect for Whitehouse's courage. As the conversation develops, he re-evaluates the effectiveness of his own attempts to influence public opinion, and the successes and failures of Mary Whitehouse's moral and political campaigns in the years since her death in 2001.

In 1991 Natalie Cole sang a duet with her long dead father, Nat King Cole - the result was Unforgettable. This is the radio equivalent. In each edition of the series, a different guest is invited to interact with someone, now dead, with whom they have, or have wanted to have, a connection. Using technology designed for musicians and DJs to spontaneously play out short musical clips, producer Adam Fowler facilitates a real-time conversation between the two participants, using conversational snippets of the deceased from past recordings.

The guest has no advance knowledge of the excerpts, and the conversation can take unexpected turns, occasionally leading to some emotionally charged interchanges, as living voices engage with those preserved in the archive.

Research: Philippa Geering

Producer: Adam Fowler

An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4.

03Colin Johnson/maya Angelou20160824

Colin Johnson has an imagined conversation with his late Grandmother, Maya Angelou, and asks for her blessing on the many ways in which he seeks to continue her legacy.

Angelou's faith, her intellect and her boundless love envelop Johnson as he reminisces with her about family and professional life. His obvious affection and respect for his Grandmother add an intimate dimension to our knowledge of a public figure who died as recently as 2014. And Maya Angelou has some words of advice for her Grandson, spoken from the archive but affecting Colin as if she was there in person.

In 1991 Natalie Cole sang a duet with her long dead father, Nat King Cole - the result was Unforgettable. This is the radio equivalent. In each edition of the series, a different guest is invited to interact with someone, now dead, with whom they have, or have wanted to have, a connection. Using technology designed for musicians and DJs to spontaneously play out short musical clips, producer Adam Fowler facilitates a real-time conversation between the two participants, using conversational snippets of the deceased from past recordings.

The guest has no advance knowledge of the excerpts, and the conversation can take unexpected turns, occasionally leading to some emotionally charged interchanges, as living voices engage with those preserved in the archive.

Research: Philippa Geering

Producer: Adam Fowler

An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4.

04Robbie Stamp/douglas Adams20160825

Robbie Stamp has an imagined conversation with his late business partner and friend, Douglas Adams.

The last time Robbie talked with Douglas for real was the day before the author's sudden and unexpected death in 2001. He admits to constantly chatting to Douglas in his head since then - but this edition of Unforgettable is the first time he hears Adams respond in his own words.

In a moving interaction between the living and the archive, the subjects range from the new internet, via the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, to the benefits of seeing the world from the point of view of someone else, or even a different species.

Robbie explains how interested Douglas Adams would have been in the technological hardware and software which allows this new conversation to happen, and imagines the fun he would have had with it.

In 1991 Natalie Cole sang a duet with her long dead father, Nat King Cole - the result was Unforgettable. This is the radio equivalent. In each edition of the series, a different guest is invited to interact with someone, now dead, with whom they have, or have wanted to have, a connection. Using technology designed for musicians and DJs to spontaneously play out short musical clips, producer Adam Fowler facilitates a real-time conversation between the two participants, using conversational snippets of the deceased from past recordings.

The guest has no advance knowledge of the excerpts, and the conversation can take unexpected turns, occasionally leading to some emotionally charged interchanges, as living voices engage with those preserved in the archive.

Research: Philippa Geering

Producer: Adam Fowler

An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4.

05Rodnell Collins/malcolm X20160826

Rodnell Collins has an imagined conversation with his late uncle, Malcolm X. Using archive clips, they are reunited in the Boston home they used to share.

As a young boy, Rodnell would sit in the living room of the house listening to the adults talk into the small hours, under strict instructions from his mother Ella to be seen and not heard.

Now he takes the opportunity to bring his own opinions to the table and to interact with Malcolm X's words as spoken before his assassination in February 1965. The dialogue is infused with irony as Rodnell compares his own experience of being a black Muslim in America today with that of his uncle's fight for civil and human rights in the early 1960s.

In 1991 Natalie Cole sang a duet with her long dead father, Nat King Cole - the result was Unforgettable. This is the radio equivalent. In each edition of the series, a different guest is invited to interact with someone, now dead, with whom they have, or have wanted to have, a connection. Using technology designed for musicians and DJs to spontaneously play out short musical clips, producer Adam Fowler facilitates a real-time conversation between the two participants, using conversational snippets of the deceased from past recordings.

The guest has no advance knowledge of the excerpts, and the conversation can take unexpected turns, occasionally leading to some emotionally charged interchanges, as living voices engage with those preserved in the archive.

Research: Philippa Geering

Producer: Adam Fowler

An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4.

01Have You Heard The Music Man?19980827

First of three plays about memory by David Napthine.

Ex-trombonist George cannot remember his son's name, but put on some music and it's remarkable how he recalls his days on the road - and in what intimate detail...

With Windsor Davies, Carol McGuigan and Jack McBride.

Director Jonquil Panting

02Eraser19980903

Recovering from a head injury, Terri has to keep notes to help her damaged memory.

Then her notebooks begin to contradict each other.

With Jo-Anne Horan, John Lloyd Fillingham, Sharon Percy and Sonia Beinroth.

Director Jonquil Panting

03 LASTMay All Your Wishes Come True19980910

A play about memory by David Napthine.

Billy is found wandering the streets of Newcastle with no idea of his past.

Until his memory returns, the only thing to do is wait - or is it? With Derek Walmsley, Charlie Hardwick, Phillip King and Terence Mann.

Director Jonquil Panting