Tv Dinners To Roadside Diners

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
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01Adam Gopnick20121119

In the week of Thanksgiving, when Americans travel great distances to come together to feast at the family table, five leading American writers write about the cultural history of their favourite comfort food. Far from haute cuisine, these choices are a cake, a snack, and a dish in a box, a hearty homemade dessert and a thick gooey ubiquitous spread. The writers explore with delight and authority how these foods became American, they explain why they continue to be iconic and popular and compare regional preferences.

In this edition, New Yorker writer Adam Gopnick makes his mother's Cheesecase.

Later in the series are Joyce Maynard on popcorn, novelist Michael Cunningham on Mac n Cheese, Simon Winchester on pies and Alice Sebold on peanut butter.

Some of these foods are served at roadside diners and others are best eaten in front of the TV, curled up on the coach. Each author has a story about why his or her choice has a strong personal connection. Most were introduced to their comfort food in childhood and now they share them with their families. None of these foods are good for the waistline but each is so loved that there is little guilt about indulging in traditional mouthfuls of pure heaven.

01Adam Gopnik2012111920140512

Five leading American writers write about the cultural history of their favourite comfort food. Far from haute cuisine, these choices are a cake, a snack, and a dish in a box, a hearty homemade dessert and a thick gooey ubiquitous spread. The writers explore with delight and authority how these foods became American, they explain why they continue to be iconic and popular and compare regional preferences.

In this edition, New Yorker writer Adam Gopnik makes his mother's Cheesecake.

Later in the series are Joyce Maynard on popcorn, novelist Michael Cunningham on Mac n Cheese, Simon Winchester on pies and Alice Sebold on peanut butter.

Some of these foods are served at roadside diners and others are best eaten in front of the TV, curled up on the coach. Each author has a story about why his or her choice has a strong personal connection. Most were introduced to their comfort food in childhood and now they share them with their families. None of these foods are good for the waistline but each is so loved that there is little guilt about indulging in traditional mouthfuls of pure heaven.

02Joyce Maynard2012112020140513

Five leading American writers write about the cultural history of their favourite comfort food. Far from haute cuisine, these choices are a cake, a snack, and a dish in a box, a hearty homemade dessert and a thick gooey ubiquitous spread. The writers explore with delight and authority how these foods became American, they explain why they continue to be iconic and popular and compare regional preferences. None of these foods are good for the waistline but each is so loved that there is little guilt about indulging in traditional mouthfuls of pure heaven.

In this edition, author Joyce Maynard writes lovingly about how she curled up with her family during the gales of winter at their rural home, sharing bowls of popcorn.

In the week of Thanksgiving when Americans travel great distances to come together to feast at the family table, five leading American writers write about the cultural history of their favourite comfort food. Far from haute cuisine, these choices are a cake, a snack, and a dish in a box, a hearty homemade dessert and a thick gooey ubiquitous spread. The writers explore with delight and authority how these foods became American, they explain why they continue to be iconic and popular and compare regional preferences. None of these foods are good for the waistlinenbut each is so loved that there is little guilt about indulging in traditional mouthfuls of pure heaven.

In this edition, Joyce Maynard writes lovingly about how she curled up with her family during the gales of winter at their rural home, sharing bowls of popcorn.

03Michael Cunningham2012112120140514

Five American writers write about the cultural history of their favourite comfort food. Far from haute cuisine, these choices are a cake, a snack, and a dish in a box, a hearty homemade dessert and a thick gooey ubiquitous spread. The writers explore with delight and authority how these foods became American, they explain why they continue to be iconic and popular and compare regional preferences. None of these foods are good for the waistline but each is so loved that there is little guilt about indulging in traditional mouthfuls of pure heaven.

Novelist Michael Cunningham, best known for his novel The Hours, wonders why he was so more attached to the macaroni and cheese that came in a box, than his mother's cooking. And he's struck by the promise that this instant food conjured up a space age world of endless leisure. He despairs that this humble dish has become an unrecognisable gourmet food in some restaurants.

In the week of Thanksgiving when Americans travel great distances to come together to feast at the family table, five American writers write about the cultural history of their favourite comfort food. Far from haute cuisine, these choices are a cake, a snack, and a dish in a box, a hearty homemade dessert and a thick gooey ubiquitous spread. The writers explore with delight and authority how these foods became American, they explain why they continue to be iconic and popular and compare regional preferences. None of these foods are good for the waistlinenbut each is so loved that there is little guilt about indulging in traditional mouthfuls of pure heaven.

Novelist Michael Cunningham, best known for his novel The Hours, wonders why he was so more attached to the macaroni and cheese that came in a box, than his mother's cooking. And he's struck by the promise that this instant food conjured up a space age world of endless leisure. He despairs that this humble dish has become an unrecognizable gourmet food in some restaurants.

04Simon Winchester2012112220140515

Five American writers write about the cultural history of their favourite comfort food. Far from haute cuisine, these choices are a cake, a snack, and a dish in a box, a hearty homemade dessert and a thick gooey ubiquitous spread. The writers explore with delight and authority how these foods became American, they explain why they continue to be iconic and popular and compare regional preferences. None of these foods are good for the waistline but each is so loved that there is little guilt about indulging in traditional mouthfuls of pure heaven.

Simon Winchester makes different pies during the year on his farm in New England. He travels America in search of the best shoofly, huckleberry and pumpkin pie. His story begins with one slice of blueberry pie at a roadside diner that turned him into a slave to pies.

In the week of Thanksgiving when Americans travel great distances to come together to feast at the family table, five American writers write about the cultural history of their favourite comfort food. Far from haute cuisine, these choices are a cake, a snack, and a dish in a box, a hearty homemade dessert and a thick gooey ubiquitous spread. The writers explore with delight and authority how these foods became American, they explain why they continue to be iconic and popular and compare regional preferences. None of these foods are good for the waistline but each is so loved that there is little guilt about indulging in traditional mouthfuls of pure heaven.

In this edition, Simon Winchester makes different pies during the year on his farm in New England. He travels America in search of the best shoofly, huckleberry and pumpkin pie. His story begins with one slice of blueberry pie at a roadside diner that turned him into a slave to pies.

05 LASTAlice Sebold2012112320140516

Five American writers write about the cultural history of their favourite comfort food. Far from haute cuisine, these choices are a cake, a snack, and a dish in a box, a hearty homemade dessert and a thick gooey ubiquitous spread. The writers explore with delight and authority how these foods became American, they explain why they continue to be iconic and popular and compare regional preferences. None of these foods are good for the waistline but each is so loved that there is little guilt about indulging in traditional mouthfuls of pure heaven.

Alice Sebold, author of the best-selling The Lovely Bones, explains her ultimate obsession: peanut butter.

In the week of Thanksgiving when Americans travel great distances to come together to feast at the family table, five American writers write about the cultural history of their favourite comfort food. Far from haute cuisine, these choices are a cake, a snack, and a dish in a box, a hearty homemade dessert and a thick gooey ubiquitous spread. The writers explore with delight and authority how these foods became American, they explain why they continue to be iconic and popular and compare regional preferences. None of these foods are good for the waistline but each is so loved that there is little guilt about indulging in traditional mouthfuls of pure heaven.

In this edition, Alice Sebold, author of the best-selling "The Lovely Bones", explains her ultimate obsession: peanut butter.