Trench Warfare

Malcolm Billings lifts the lid on the politics of archaeology and explores areas where archaeologists find themselves digging in dangerous ground.

Episodes

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20060419

Malcolm Billings lifts the lid on the politics of archaeology and explores areas where archaeologists find themselves digging in dangerous ground.

1/3 Identity and Belonging

From the 19th century, when an interest in excavating the past moved beyond the preserve of the gentleman enthusiast, archaeology has always been bound up with politics. This programme looks at how archaeology has been used to prove ownership, to promote nationalism or to assert religious or racial superiority or the concept of separateness.

In locations as far apart as the Balkans and Belfast, the work of archaeologists is closely followed and subjected to different readings - nationalist ambition combined with insecurity can make archaeology a very loaded process. In Northern Ireland, an extended Iron Age embankment, the Black Pigs Dyke, provides a further divide between nationalists and unionists.

Malcolm explores this overgrown part of the border and its controversial past - and present - with two leading archaeologists.

20060426

Malcolm Billings lifts the lid on the politics of archaeology and explores areas where archaeologists find themselves digging in dangerous ground.

2/3.

The Stones Cry Out

Politics and archaeology are rarely more entwined than in Israel and Palestinian territories.

Malcolm reports from archaeological sites in Jerusalem and Jericho, and on the impact of the new Israeli security wall that is being built across the occupied territories.

He also examines archaeological evidence that conflicts with the need of various religious and political groups to prove the literal truth of the Bible.

20060426

Malcolm Billings lifts the lid on the politics of archaeology and explores areas where archaeologists find themselves digging in dangerous ground.

2/3. The Stones Cry Out

Politics and archaeology are rarely more entwined than in Israel and Palestinian territories. Malcolm reports from archaeological sites in Jerusalem and Jericho, and on the impact of the new Israeli security wall that is being built across the occupied territories. He also examines archaeological evidence that conflicts with the need of various religious and political groups to prove the literal truth of the Bible.

2/3.

The Stones Cry Out

Politics and archaeology are rarely more entwined than in Israel and Palestinian territories.

Malcolm reports from archaeological sites in Jerusalem and Jericho, and on the impact of the new Israeli security wall that is being built across the occupied territories.

He also examines archaeological evidence that conflicts with the need of various religious and political groups to prove the literal truth of the Bible.

20060503

Malcolm Billings lifts the lid on the politics of archaeology and explores areas where archaeologists find themselves digging in dangerous ground.

3/3.

Who Owns the Bones?

One of the most intense debates about archaeology concerns the digging up and treatment in museum collections of human remains - whether they are the Aboriginal people of Australasia, Black slaves excavated during the construction of a Manhattan office block, or 7th Century monks washed up on the shores of Ireland.

Malcolm asks how the needs of science can be reconciled with respect for human dignity and cultural and political sensitivities.

20060503

Malcolm Billings lifts the lid on the politics of archaeology and explores areas where archaeologists find themselves digging in dangerous ground.

3/3. Who Owns the Bones?

One of the most intense debates about archaeology concerns the digging up and treatment in museum collections of human remains - whether they are the Aboriginal people of Australasia, Black slaves excavated during the construction of a Manhattan office block, or 7th Century monks washed up on the shores of Ireland.

Malcolm asks how the needs of science can be reconciled with respect for human dignity and cultural and political sensitivities.

3/3.

Who Owns the Bones?

0101Identity And Belonging20060419

From the 19th century, when an interest in excavating the past moved beyond the preserve of the gentleman enthusiast, archaeology has always been bound up with politics.

This programme looks at how archaeology has been used to prove ownership, to promote nationalism or to assert religious or racial superiority or the concept of separateness.

In locations as far apart as the Balkans and Belfast, the work of archaeologists is closely followed and subjected to different readings - nationalist ambition combined with insecurity can make archaeology a very loaded process.

In Northern Ireland, an extended Iron Age embankment, the Black Pigs Dyke, provides a further divide between nationalists and unionists.

Malcolm explores this overgrown part of the border and its controversial past - and present - with two leading archaeologists.

0101Identity And Belonging20060419

From the 19th century, when an interest in excavating the past moved beyond the preserve of the gentleman enthusiast, archaeology has always been bound up with politics.

This programme looks at how archaeology has been used to prove ownership, to promote nationalism or to assert religious or racial superiority or the concept of separateness.

In locations as far apart as the Balkans and Belfast, the work of archaeologists is closely followed and subjected to different readings - nationalist ambition combined with insecurity can make archaeology a very loaded process.

In Northern Ireland, an extended Iron Age embankment, the Black Pigs Dyke, provides a further divide between nationalists and unionists.

Malcolm explores this overgrown part of the border and its controversial past - and present - with two leading archaeologists.