Tracing Your Roots

Sally Magnusson presents a series exploring the practice of researching family history, one of the UK's most rapidly growing pastimes.

Meeting both experts and amateur genealogists, she discovers the huge range of resources available, and the detective work and lateral thinking sometimes needed to make the most of them.

With the right tools, we can not only construct our family trees but also find out how and where our ancestors lived, what they did, and sometimes even how they looked.

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20080820

Sally Magnusson presents a series exploring the practice of researching family history, one of the UK's most rapidly growing pastimes.

With genealogist Nick Barratt, she explores how to find out what our ancestors did for a living and how to use this information to discover more about what their lives were like and perhaps even what sort of people they were.

They tackle the subject of illegitimacy, which has been common in every century and in every social class.

20080827

Sally Magnusson presents a series exploring the practice of researching family history, one of the UK's most rapidly growing pastimes.

With genealogist Nick Barratt, she explores Jewish immigration.

20080903

Sally Magnusson presents a series exploring the practice of researching family history, one of the UK's most rapidly growing pastimes.

With genealogist Nick Barratt, she looks at how to unravel the secrets of wartime.

She discovers untold tales of military intelligence, undercover missions and unsung heroes.

20080910

Sally Magnusson presents a series exploring the practice of researching family history, one of the UK's most rapidly growing pastimes.

With genealogist Nick Barratt, she looks at some myths surrounding Irish family history research.

20080917

Sally Magnusson presents a series exploring the practice of researching family history, one of the UK's most rapidly growing pastimes.

With genealogist Nick Barratt, she looks at how stories handed down through generations can offer a whole new slant on history.

They investigate how private diaries and oral history accounts can be made available to a wider audience.

20080924

With genealogist Nick Barratt, she looks at how the manner of an ancestor's death can offer clues to the life they led and open up new avenues for the amateur sleuth to explore.

20110320

In this Tracing Your Roots Census Special, Sally Magnusson visits Fox Lane in Leyland.

With the help of genealogist Nick Barratt, she explores how, through the Census, we can piece together a street's changing history and also uncover secrets about our own family's past.

The first census records date back to the early 1800s.

At this time, Leyland was a small village which became a small town over the nineteenth century.

Sally visits one of the original weaver's cottages where the owners are intrigued to find out more about the original residents and the identity of a rumoured ghost! Through the census records we build up a picture of how the weaving industry declined in the 1830's, with the weavers required to sub-let their cellars to poorer families.

As the Industrial Revolution progresses we can see in the occupations listed in the census how the town evolves through to the beginnings of its famous motor industry.

Plus Sally and Nick are joined by Peter Christian, author of The Online Genealogist, and The Expert Guide to the Census.

They'll discuss how having the Census available online has transformed family history research and imagine what it would be like for future family historians if the Census is abolished.

With the explosion of information available online through social media etc, it might seem that we'll not be short of information about our ancestors in the future - Peter has a different view!

And we convince one Fox Lane resident to fill out a form for the first time, by illustrating what they can learn about their own family's past from previous census records.

Through the Census, Sally Magnusson reveals one British street's family histories.

*20090802

In Scotland's first Homecoming Year, Sally Magnusson discovers why people with Scottish ancestry feel so passionate about pursuing their family history.

Find out what they are looking for in a special edition, recorded at the Strathclyde University International Genealogy Festival in Glasgow.

Sally Magnusson discovers why Scottish genealogy records are some of the best in the world

010120070312

Sally Magnusson presents a series exploring the practice of researching family history, one of the UK's most rapidly growing pastimes.

Meeting both experts and amateur genealogists, she discovers the huge range of resources available, and the detective work and lateral thinking sometimes needed to make the most of them.

With the right tools, we can not only construct our family trees but also find out how and where our ancestors lived, what they did, and sometimes even how they looked.

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010520070409

This programme looks at clues that can be gleaned from old photographs.

0106 LAST20070416

This programme looks at clues that can be gleaned from DNA analysis.

020120070804
020220070811

Sally Magnusson presents a series exploring the practice of researching family history, one of the UK's most rapidly growing pastimes.

Meeting both experts and amateur genealogists, she discovers the huge range of resources available, and the detective work and lateral thinking sometimes needed to make the most of them.

With the right tools, we can not only construct our family trees but also find out how and where our ancestors lived, what they did and, sometimes, even how they looked.

020320070818

3/6.

Sally Magnusson presents a series exploring the practice of researching family history, one of the UK's most rapidly growing pastimes.

Meeting both experts and amateur genealogists, she discovers the huge range of resources available, and the detective work and lateral thinking sometimes needed to make the most of them.

With the right tools, we can not only construct our family trees but also find out how and where our ancestors lived, what they did, and sometimes even how they looked.

020420070825

4/6.

Sally Magnusson presents a series exploring the practice of researching family history, one of the UK's most rapidly growing pastimes.

Meeting both experts and amateur genealogists, she discovers the huge range of resources available, and the detective work and lateral thinking sometimes needed to make the most of them.

With the right tools, we can not only construct our family trees but also find out how and where our ancestors lived, what they did, and sometimes even how they looked.

020520070901

This programme looks at clues that can be gleaned from old photographs.

020620070908

This programme looks at clues that can be gleaned from DNA analysis.

030120071024

Sally Magnusson presents a series exploring the practice of researching family history, one of the UK's most rapidly growing pastimes.

With genealogist Nick Barratt, she explores how to find out what our ancestors did for a living and how to use this information to discover more about what their lives were like and perhaps even what sort of people they were.

030220071031
030320071107
030420071114

4/6.

Sally Magnusson presents a series exploring the practice of researching family history, one of the UK's most rapidly growing pastimes.

Resident genealogist Nick Barratt offers insider tips and ideas for getting the most out of our historical resources.

030520071121

5/6.

Sally Magnusson presents a series exploring the practice of researching family history, one of the UK's most rapidly growing pastimes.

Resident genealogist Nick Barratt offers insider tips and ideas for getting the most out of our historical resources.

030620071128

6/6.

Sally Magnusson presents a series exploring the practice of researching family history, one of the UK's most rapidly growing pastimes.

Resident genealogist Nick Barratt offers insider tips and ideas for getting the most out of our historical resources.

040120071229

1/4.

Sally Magnusson presents a series exploring the practice of researching family history, one of the UK's most rapidly growing pastimes.

With genealogist Nick Barratt, she explores how to find out what our ancestors did for a living and how to use this information to discover more about what their lives were like and perhaps even what sort of people they were.

0402
040220080105

She meets a few families' skeletons in the closet and finds out why such shady characters are good news for family history hunters.

040320080112

Sally Magnusson presents a series exploring the practice of researching family history, one of the UK's most rapidly growing pastimes.

3/4.

She meets listeners who have uncovered stories of smuggling, exploration and nautical adventure in their family tree and finds out the best sources for researching these ocean-going ancestors.

040320090914

Sally Magnusson presents the series exploring the practice of researching family history.

Sally and resident genealogist Nick Barratt explore family roots in India.

Sam Merry's Indian great-grandmother was disowned by her family when she married a British soldier.

Moving with him to Nottinghamshire, she never spoke of her homeland again.

Now, more than a 100 years later, Sam wants to trace his family's Indian roots, and wonders what his ancestor's new life in Mansfield would have been like.

Sam Merry explores his great-grandmother's move from India to Mansfield over 100 years ago

0403Roots In India
0404
040420090921

Sally and resident genealogist Nick Barratt explore the roots of Britain's immigrant families.

John Millar's father never talked about his Lithuanian roots after starting a new life with a new name in Scotland, but family research revealed that he is still a hero in his native country.

0404 LAST20080119
0405Adoption20080126
050120080511

Sally Magnusson explores the practice of researching family history, one of the UK's most rapidly growing pastimes.

Aided by genealogist Nick Barratt, she meets professional and amateur family historians for tips and discoveries on subjects ranging from the Scottish clan system to medals, memorabilia, and how best to preserve old family films.

050120100914

In the first of a new series, Sally Magnusson goes on the trail of ancestors who vanished without trace, abandoning their families either by choice or by force of circumstance.

The mother who handed her three-day-old baby to the Foundling Hospital in London in 1758 left no clues to her own identity.

Helen Warren, the baby's direct descendant, asks Tracing Your Roots to find out more about the woman who took the mother's place, the wet nurse who ensured the baby's survival, yet whose own story has, up until now, remained untold.

Rob Lee's grandfather left the family 'to go to Australia' but only recently has Rob wondered if a move to 'Australia' was just a metaphor.

Was Rob's grandfather really thousands of miles away, or had he simply cut off all contact with his children? Tracing Your Roots discovers the truth behind the family legend.

And Debbie Martindale wrote to ask what became of her great uncle, a brother separated from the rest of his family as a child and never reunited.

Did he go on to have children of his own, and can Tracing Your Roots reunite the family? Sally Magnusson and Nick Barratt fill some of the gaps on Debbie's family tree.

Sally Magnusson goes on the trail of ancestors who vanished without trace.

050220100921

Tracing the roots of rootless ancestors might seem an impossible task, yet in this second programme of the series, Sally Magnusson and Nick Barratt attempt to do just that.

Mark Lorch is descended from a troupe of German Jewish acrobats, at one time the highest-paid circus act in the world. Mark wants to know more about their service in World War One and about a UK tour undertaken shortly before its outbreak. For a glimpse into the world of the circus and of the Lorch family, Sally visits the theatre archive of London's Victoria and Albert Museum.

Theresa Mitchell has asked for expert advice on how to explore her family's Romany heritage. Census records have told her that her family gave up their itinerant lifestyle at around the turn of the 20th century, but what prompted their move to houses when they had been travellers for generations?

And Carol Hudson's mother came from a community who spent their summers in huts and their winters in caves in the west of Scotland. She never saw them again after leaving at the age of 14 to become a farm labourer, and World War Two brought her a marriage and a complete change of lifestyle. What, though, happened to the brothers and sisters she left behind? Nick has checked the archives and has the answers for Carol.

How do you trace the roots of rootless people? Sally Magnusson gets on the trail.

Tracing the roots of rootless ancestors might seem an impossible task, yet in this second programme of the series, Sally Magnusson and Nick Barratt attempt to do just that.

Mark Lorch is descended from a troupe of German Jewish acrobats, at one time the highest-paid circus act in the world.

Mark wants to know more about their service in World War One and about a UK tour undertaken shortly before its outbreak.

For a glimpse into the world of the circus and of the Lorch family, Sally visits the theatre archive of London's Victoria and Albert Museum.

Theresa Mitchell has asked for expert advice on how to explore her family's Romany heritage.

Census records have told her that her family gave up their itinerant lifestyle at around the turn of the 20th century, but what prompted their move to houses when they had been travellers for generations?

And Carol Hudson's mother came from a community who spent their summers in huts and their winters in caves in the west of Scotland.

She never saw them again after leaving at the age of 14 to become a farm labourer, and World War Two brought her a marriage and a complete change of lifestyle.

What, though, happened to the brothers and sisters she left behind? Nick has checked the archives and has the answers for Carol.

How do you trace the roots of rootless people? Sally Magnusson gets on the trail.

050320100928

This week the popular Radio 4 genealogy show presented by Sally Magnusson features listeners whose ancestors may have been involved in revolution or radical actions.

Trying to find records pertaining to revolutions is always tricky, since by their nature revolutions are fraught with chaos and upheaval.

Files tend to be mislaid or destroyed, or too secret to have been placed in national archives.

However, when an ancestor gets involved with revolution as well as high profile legal wrangling, there's a much better chance of striking gold.

In this week's programme, Listener Anne Induni finds out the true story of her ancestor's arrest, for killing a politician in a 19th century Swiss revolution, and there are a whole lot more eye popping revelations about his activities.

When Judy Thompson wrote into the programme wanting to find out about her French ancestor's activities in the Paris Commune of 1871, she was hoping to track down more details from French archives, but found getting access and information baffling for a non gallic speaker.

Author Gavin Dowd has been through the process and joins the team to dispense advice.

And another listener is keen to verify if she really is the great great great granddaughter of the assassin of a British 19th century Prime Minister.

The first and only successful attempt in British history didn't quite spark a revolution, but has left a legacy in the modern House of Commons.

And regular studio guest Dr Nick Barratt is on hand to dispense advice and tips on how to trace revolutionaries in your family tree.

Sally Magnusson and genealogist Nick Barratt return to solve more family mysteries.

050420101005

October is Black History Month and this week Tracing Your Roots hears from listeners with family ties to the Caribbean.

We follow Monica Brown Johnson, whose family come from Jamaica, as she makes an emotional trip to Zanzibar, visiting the underground chamber where slaves - including, she believes, her ancestors - were kept in horrific conditions before being sold.

She wants to know more about her east African heritage.

Rosemarie Barnes also has slavery on her family tree, or so she thinks.

Her great great great grandfather (who lived in Essex in the mid-nineteenth century) shares the name of a man who appears on the Jamaican slave register.

Were they one and the same person? And if so, how did Edward Andrews get to England?

Soldiers from the Caribbean played their part in World War One, but how were they treated in comparison with their white counterparts? And were false promises made to them to induce them to head for Europe? Valerie Vaughan-Dick and Sheena Simpson ask what their ancestors did in the war, and what greeted them on their return home.

Sally Magnusson and Nick Barratt help listeners investigate their Caribbean roots.

0505 LAST20101012

The last programme of the series ties in with the History of the World in 100 Objects.

Sally Magnusson and resident genealogist Nick Barratt track down the stories behind fascinating objects and family heirlooms.

All the objects featured in the programme are also featured on the History of the World website, where listeners are also encouraged to upload their own treasured heirloom.

When listener Sarah Bailey inherited a pearl necklace and a letter written at the time of Marie Antoinette, she contacted the History of the World Website.

Now she'd like to know which of her ancestors was at the French court and how she came to be there.

There's a very personal heirloom in the shape of a beautiful hand drawn book created by an illustrator, Carrie Solomon, whose baby was born when her husband was away fighting in WWI.

She kept a daily record of their baby growing and developing and gave it to him on his return.

Now her descendants hope to find examples of her professional work as an illustrator of children's books.

WWII soldier Kenneth Curley sent audio discs back to his family while he was away fighting, and his great granddaughter Becky Rowe has inherited some of them.

She and her family would dearly love to hear what's on the discs, but no-one can play them.

That is until they got in touch with the Tracing Your Roots team.

Sally Magnusson and genealogist Nick Barratt help listeners trace objects and heirlooms.

0601Tracing Your Roots - Wartime Losses20090831

Sally Magnusson presents the series exploring the practice of researching family history.

For 60 years, Stella Collis has only known her German PoW father's name, but now she is united with her father's military records.

This is just one of many wartime stories that Sally explores, in a programme marking the 70th anniversary of the outbreak of the Second World War.

Stella Collis is united with her German PoW father's military records.

0601What's In A Name?20110913

Sally Magnusson is back with more genealogical mysteries for Nick Barratt to sink his teeth into.

Today, they all involve name changes, and we reveal the stories behind them.

And how can you let future generations looking into your family history know that you've changed name and gender? Nick tackles that question.

Produced by Lucy Lloyd.

What's in a name change? Sally Magnusson finds out for several families.

0602*20090907

Lucille White has been trying to get to the bottom of a family that her great, great-grandmother may have been the illegitimate daughter of Louis XVI, but stories handed down from one generation to the next are often history as the teller would like it to have been, not as it really was.

Birth, marriage and death certificates may not tell the whole story, so Sally and Nick investigate how to widen the search in order to disentangle myth from truth.

0602Life In Confinement20110920

What happened to all those ancestors who were "disappeared" into institutions because society couldn't cope with them or deemed their behaviour unacceptable? Sally and Nick answer listeners questions about life in confinement.

And what if your ancestor was locked away indefinitely on the Queen's say-so? Sally visits the Tower of London looking for traces of a suspected traitor.

Produced by Liza Greig.

Some ancestors spent their lives in confinement: Sally finds out why.

0603Follow The Money20110927

The uncle who lost millions, and the family legend of a pile of cash just waiting to be released from chancery....Sally and Nick attempt to trace what happened to the money.

Delving into the debtors' prison system- how to land in there, how to earn your way out, and whether there really are millions stuck in chancery just waiting to be released to families today.

Produced by Lucy Lloyd.

Where did money appear from, or disappear to in a family history?

0604 LASTWhat Happens Next20111004

Sally Magnusson and Nick Barratt catch up with listeners whose captivating stories left them intrigued to find out what happened next on their genealogical journeys.

Sally and Nick follow up on their favourite Tracing Your Roots stories.

0605 LASTWhat Happens Next: Part 220111011

Sally Magnusson and Nick Barratt continue their look back at previous stories, and are amazed to hear what listeners did next.

Sally and Nick return with more of their favourite family history items from past series.