Three Pounds In My Pocket

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeFirst
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012014030720140519

In the 1950s, tens of thousands of migrants came to Britain from the Indian subcontinent. Many arrived with no more than £3 in their pocket - the limit set by the Indian authorities. They came to work in Britain's factories, foundries, and new public services. It was a time when the country desperately needed workers from its former colonies to regenerate its post-war economy. Presenter Kavita Puri, whose own father Ravi came with just a few pounds himself, hears his and other stories of the pioneering men who arrived in the 50s. They recall their first impressions of the country that once ruled over their own: the shocking housing conditions, the curiosity of neighbours and kindness of strangers and also the memories of casual racism and animosity. These men led the way for the three million people of South Asian descent who live in Britain today.

Producer Smita Patel

Editor Bridget Harney.

012014030720140519

In the 1950s, tens of thousands of migrants came to Britain from the Indian subcontinent. Many arrived with no more than £3 in their pocket - the limit set by the Indian authorities. They came to work in Britain's factories, foundries, and new public services. It was a time when the country desperately needed workers from its former colonies to regenerate its post-war economy. Presenter Kavita Puri, whose own father Ravi came with just a few pounds himself, hears his and other stories of the pioneering men who arrived in the 50s. They recall their first impressions of the country that once ruled over their own: the shocking housing conditions, the curiosity of neighbours and kindness of strangers and also the memories of casual racism and animosity. These men led the way for the three million people of South Asian descent who live in Britain today.

Producer Smita Patel

Editor Bridget Harney.

In the 1950s, tens of thousands of migrants came to Britain from the Indian subcontinent. Many arrived with no more than £3 in their pocket - the limit set by the Indian authorities. They came to work in Britain's factories, foundries, and new public services. It was a time when the country desperately needed workers from its former colonies to regenerate its post-war economy. Presenter Kavita Puri, whose own father Ravi came with just a few pounds himself, hears his and other stories of the pioneering men who arrived in the 50s. They recall their first impressions of the country that once ruled over their own: the shocking housing conditions, the curiosity of neighbours and kindness of strangers and also the memories of casual racism and animosity. These men led the way for the three million people of South Asian descent who live in Britain today.

Producer Smita Patel

Editor Bridget Harney.

022014031420140520

We tell the untold story of the women and children from the Indian subcontinent who came to Britain in the 1950s and 1960s. Many remember arriving with little more than £3 in their pockets because of currency restrictions imposed by their governments back home. Kavita Puri hears the story of the pioneer women of this three-pound generation: their first impressions of Britain, the unlikely friendships, and their struggles at work. And we learn how in 1966 when England won the World Cup, these women were more excited by Miss India winning Miss World; which they said, put Indian women on the map!

Producer Smita Patel

Editor Bridget Harney.

022014031420140520

We tell the untold story of the women and children from the Indian subcontinent who came to Britain in the 1950s and 1960s. Many remember arriving with little more than £3 in their pockets because of currency restrictions imposed by their governments back home. Kavita Puri hears the story of the pioneer women of this three-pound generation: their first impressions of Britain, the unlikely friendships, and their struggles at work. And we learn how in 1966 when England won the World Cup, these women were more excited by Miss India winning Miss World; which they said, put Indian women on the map!

Producer Smita Patel

Editor Bridget Harney.

We tell the untold story of the women and children from the Indian subcontinent who came to Britain in the 1950s and 1960s. Many remember arriving with little more than £3 in their pockets because of currency restrictions imposed by their governments back home. Kavita Puri hears the story of the pioneer women of this three-pound generation: their first impressions of Britain, the unlikely friendships, and their struggles at work. And we learn how in 1966 when England won the World Cup, these women were more excited by Miss India winning Miss World; which they said, put Indian women on the map!

Producer Smita Patel

Editor Bridget Harney.

03 LAST2014032120140521

Men and women arriving from the Indian subcontinent in the 1950s and 1960s with as little as three pounds in their pockets recall their first impressions of Britain. In this final programme in the series, Kavita Puri talks to this pioneer generation who have spent most of their lives in Britain. Where is home now, she asks them, and how do you hold onto your own culture?

03 LAST2014032120140521

Men and women arriving from the Indian subcontinent in the 1950s and 1960s with as little as three pounds in their pockets recall their first impressions of Britain. In this final programme in the series, Kavita Puri talks to this pioneer generation who have spent most of their lives in Britain. Where is home now, she asks them, and how do you hold onto your own culture?

Men and women arriving from the Indian subcontinent in the 1950s and 1960s with as little as three pounds in their pockets recall their first impressions of Britain. In this final programme in the series, Kavita Puri talks to this pioneer generation who have spent most of their lives in Britain. Where is home now, she asks them, and how do you hold on to your own culture?

010320150819

Kavita Puri listens in to intimate and heartfelt conversations between the early pioneers to Britain from the Indian subcontinent and their children. They talk about what is important to carry on between the generations and discuss whether the act of migration always means loss.

Producer: Smita Patel.

010320150819

Kavita Puri listens in to intimate and heartfelt conversations between the early pioneers to Britain from the Indian subcontinent and their children. They talk about what is important to carry on between the generations and discuss whether the act of migration always means loss.

Producer: Smita Patel.

02012015080520160109 (R4)

In the second series Kavita Puri picks up the story of the early pioneers from the Indian subcontinent in 1968: the year of a significant Race Relations Act and Enoch Powell. She charts the years to 1976 when the make-up of the South Asian community in Britain was changing. Young single men came after the Second World War with as little as £3 because of strict currency exchange rules. By the 1960s family reunions had already taken place for many Sikh and Hindu families. By the 70's, as Pakistani men became more settled, their wives joined them too. Increased numbers of Bangladeshi men came over following the war of Independence in 1971, but most of their wives would not come over until the following decade. Asians also came from East Africa in the late 60's and early 70's. Against this new tide of migration, this programme charts how the three pound generation - many here for two decades - responded to the new arrivals. With increased numbers, the community became more visible. We see how the atmosphere on the street was changing towards them - in contrast to the post-war years - where many had been greeted with curiosity. Racist abuse became commonplace as immigration became a charged political issue.

Producer: Smita Patel

With help from Dr Florian Stadtler, University of Exeter.

In the second series Kavita Puri picks up the story of the early pioneers from the Indian subcontinent in 1968: the year of a significant Race Relations Act and Enoch Powell. She charts the years to 1976 when the make-up of the South Asian community in Britain was changing. Young single men came after the Second World War with as little as £3 because of strict currency exchange rules. By the 1960s family reunions had already taken place for many Sikh and Hindu families. By the 70's, as Pakistani men became more settled, their wives joined them too. Increased numbers of Bangladeshi men came over following the war of Independence in 1971, but most of their wives would not come over till the following decade. Asians also came from East Africa in the late 60's and early 70's. Against this new tide of migration, we chart how the three pound generation - many here for two decades - responded to the new arrivals. With increased numbers, the community became more visible. We see how the atmosphere on the street was changing towards them - in contrast to the post-war years - where many had been greeted with curiosity. Racist abuse became commonplace as immigration became a charged political issue.

Producer: Smita Patel

With help from Dr Florian Stadtler.

02012015080520160109 (R4)

In the second series Kavita Puri picks up the story of the early pioneers from the Indian subcontinent in 1968: the year of a significant Race Relations Act and Enoch Powell. She charts the years to 1976 when the make-up of the South Asian community in Britain was changing. Young single men came after the Second World War with as little as £3 because of strict currency exchange rules. By the 1960s family reunions had already taken place for many Sikh and Hindu families. By the 70's, as Pakistani men became more settled, their wives joined them too. Increased numbers of Bangladeshi men came over following the war of Independence in 1971, but most of their wives would not come over until the following decade. Asians also came from East Africa in the late 60's and early 70's. Against this new tide of migration, this programme charts how the three pound generation - many here for two decades - responded to the new arrivals. With increased numbers, the community became more visible. We see how the atmosphere on the street was changing towards them - in contrast to the post-war years - where many had been greeted with curiosity. Racist abuse became commonplace as immigration became a charged political issue.

Producer: Smita Patel

With help from Dr Florian Stadtler, University of Exeter.

In the second series Kavita Puri picks up the story of the early pioneers from the Indian subcontinent in 1968: the year of a significant Race Relations Act and Enoch Powell. She charts the years to 1976 when the make-up of the South Asian community in Britain was changing. Young single men came after the Second World War with as little as £3 because of strict currency exchange rules. By the 1960s family reunions had already taken place for many Sikh and Hindu families. By the 70's, as Pakistani men became more settled, their wives joined them too. Increased numbers of Bangladeshi men came over following the war of Independence in 1971, but most of their wives would not come over till the following decade. Asians also came from East Africa in the late 60's and early 70's. Against this new tide of migration, we chart how the three pound generation - many here for two decades - responded to the new arrivals. With increased numbers, the community became more visible. We see how the atmosphere on the street was changing towards them - in contrast to the post-war years - where many had been greeted with curiosity. Racist abuse became commonplace as immigration became a charged political issue.

Producer: Smita Patel

With help from Dr Florian Stadtler.

020220150812
02022015081220160116 (R4)

Kavita Puri looks at a turbulent period for South Asians living in Britain, from 1976 to 1981. There were confrontations and street battles across the country, in largely immigrant towns, between the National Front and anti-racist organisations. Many from the first generation shied away from conflict and ignored racist abuse, but the younger generation - many born here - fought back. "We are likely to die in this country," one interviewee says, "so if it means staying and fighting that's what we will have to do, and we won't give an inch." Kavita explores this generational difference, through candid and heartfelt memories.

Producer: Smita Patel

with help from Dr Florian Stadtler.

Kavita Puri looks at a turbulent period for South Asians living in Britain, from 1976 to 1981. There were confrontations and street battles across the country, in largely immigrant towns, between the National Front and anti-racist organisations. Many from the first generation shied away from conflict and ignored racist abuse, but the younger generation - many born here - fought back. "We are likely to die in this country," one interviewee says, "so if it means staying and fighting that's what we will have to do, and we won't give an inch." Kavita explores this generational difference, through candid and heartfelt memories.

Producer: Smita Patel

With help from Dr Florian Stadtler, University of Exeter.

The programme contains archive from "Mind Your Language" written by Vince Powell for London Weekend Television.

02022015081220160116 (R4)

Kavita Puri looks at a turbulent period for South Asians living in Britain, from 1976 to 1981. There were confrontations and street battles across the country, in largely immigrant towns, between the National Front and anti-racist organisations. Many from the first generation shied away from conflict and ignored racist abuse, but the younger generation - many born here - fought back. "We are likely to die in this country," one interviewee says, "so if it means staying and fighting that's what we will have to do, and we won't give an inch." Kavita explores this generational difference, through candid and heartfelt memories.

Producer: Smita Patel

With help from Dr Florian Stadtler, University of Exeter.

The programme contains archive from "Mind Your Language" written by Vince Powell for London Weekend Television.

Kavita Puri looks at a turbulent period for South Asians living in Britain, from 1976 to 1981. There were confrontations and street battles across the country, in largely immigrant towns, between the National Front and anti-racist organisations. Many from the first generation shied away from conflict and ignored racist abuse, but the younger generation - many born here - fought back. "We are likely to die in this country," one interviewee says, "so if it means staying and fighting that's what we will have to do, and we won't give an inch." Kavita explores this generational difference, through candid and heartfelt memories.

Producer: Smita Patel

with help from Dr Florian Stadtler.

020320150819
02032015081920160123 (R4)

Kavita Puri listens in to intimate and heartfelt conversations between the early pioneers to Britain from the Indian subcontinent and their children. They talk about what is important to carry on between the generations and discuss whether the act of migration always means loss.

Producer: Smita Patel.

02032015081920160123 (R4)

Kavita Puri listens in to intimate and heartfelt conversations between the early pioneers to Britain from the Indian subcontinent and their children. They talk about what is important to carry on between the generations and discuss whether the act of migration always means loss.

Producer: Smita Patel.