Thinking Allowed

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Episodes

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20031105

Laurie Taylor explores how internet usage and public policy towards consumer rights have transformed traditional relationships between the public and the professional services.

20031112

Laurie Taylor explores how the presence of 13 million Muslims in Western Europe is beginning to expose the inadequacies of the continent's historic links between church and state.

20031126

Laurie Taylor investigates why people complain about their work culture.

20031203

Laurie Taylor explores the multi-agency approach to our youth justice system.

20031231

In the spirit of the age Laurie Taylor and guests discuss the idea that ideas by themselves are a source of material change.

20040107

Sociologist Loic Wacquant talks to Laurie Taylor about how he became a boxer called Busy Louis and joined the very community he was meant to be studying.

20040310

Laurie Taylor hears about new links between colonial history and long term economic growth, investment and financial development.

Is it who gets colonised by whom or how a society gets colonised that counts?

20040331

Laurie Taylor and guests, Professor in Colonial and Postcolonial studies Elleke Boehmer and American academic and author Jay Mechling, discuss the social and cultural impact of the boy scout movement.

20040407

Jonas Larsen of Roskilde University in Denmark talks to Laurie Taylor about tourism and photography - what do our holiday snaps tell us about ourselves?

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Rituals, traditions and conventions are all under threat as Laurie Taylor invites his guests to think the unthinkable about society and the ideas that shape it.

20040519

Rituals, traditions and conventions are all under threat as Laurie Taylor invites his guests to think the unthinkable about Society and the ideas that shape it.

20040602

Human behaviour, institutions and conventions are put under the microscope as Laurie Taylor leads the discussion on topical items and issues from the academic and research world.

20040623

Human behaviour, institutions and conventions are put under the microscope as Laurie Taylor leads the discussion on topical items and issues coming out of the academic and research world.

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Laurie Taylor and guests explore some of the ideas that shape modern society.

20040901

As the Government plans to increase the use of tagging for criminals, Laurie Taylor examines the origins and effects of this form of punishment.

20040908

From Robben Island to the Maze Prison, the preservation of sites associated with conflict is a sensitive issue.

Laurie Taylor considers how the appropriate afterlife of such places is decided upon.

20040915

Laurie Taylor ponders cross cultural diffusion and asks why cricket has become the national game of PAKISTAN, INDIA and the West Indies yet failed to take root in CANADA and the UNITED STATES

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

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How have kinship patterns changed over the last forty years? Sociolgist Nickie Charles joins Laurie Taylor on this week's Thinking Allowed to talk about the ways in which contemporary family networks persist despite the instability of 21st century life.

20050105

Laurie Taylor speaks to Laura Piacentini about her time living in a RUSSIAn prison colony.

Piacentini's research is an investigation into the notion of imprisonment, a notion that appears to be ingrained in the psyche and social lives of RUSSIAn people.

20050112

Thinking Allowed goes underground into the illegal world of night-time car racing in Helsinki.

Looking into this carnival of danger, Laurie Taylor explores the seduction of speed, immortality and danger and asks how these settings become spaces for the expression of emotion, sexuality and desire.

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From the sight of an artwork to the scent of perfume or the savour of dinner, sensory perception informs our social world.

In Western society sight and sound is favoured over any other sense, but what is the world like to cultures that privilege touch or smell?

Why do many people in west-African societies hold hands when they talk; how in the rain forests of Papua New Guinea is the time of day is told by bird calls?

In Thinking Allowed, Laurie Taylor finds out the answers, exploring the role the senses play in mediating cultural experience and expression.

20050223

Ratna Kapur, author of Erotic Justice: Law and the New Politics of Postcolonialism joins Laurie Taylor to argue that anti-trafficking strategies and laws have meant women from developing countries are increasingly limited in their freedom to move, are under greater surveillance, and are ever more constrained by regressive views on sexual integrity and women's central place in the home.

20050302

What is an intellectual? What distinguishes them from philosophers, scientists, politicians and entrepreneurs? What codes do they live by? And are they on the verge of extinction or, at the very least, enforced exile from public life?

Laurie Taylor is joined by Steve Fuller Professor of Sociology at the University of Warwick and author of The Intellectual.

20050309

Does an Arab idea of terrorism constitute something radically different from Western notions? Jordanian academic Fares Braizat joins Laurie Taylor to present the findings of his extensive research.

20050316

In 2001, Wanda Jean Allen was the first Black woman in America to receive the death penalty since 1954.

As a poor, far from intellectual female who murdered her lesbian lover, her case excited a level of interest and prurience similar to that of the infamous Aileen Wournos.

Laurie Taylor, in conversation with Professor Kendall Thomas from Columbia University in NEW YORK, looks at the factors that led to Allen's execution and asks what role does race, gender and sexuality play in sentencing someone to death?

20050323

Laurie Taylor presents a special edition from the British Sociological Association 2005 Conference in YORK, featuring speakers who discuss changing perceptions of risk.

20050406

New research has been carried out looking at the migratory experience of British ex-patriots now living in the Lot Valley, a largely rural and agricultural area in Southwest FRANCE that has been described as The Place that Time Forgot.

Michaela Lord, from the University of Hull, the co-author of the study, joins Laurie Taylor on Thinking Allowed to discuss the individual and varied motivations behind the decision to migrate, of which the most influential is the cultural change taking place in the UK.

But how far does the migratory experience meet their expectations and how much has the pattern of migration transformed the lifestyles of the local community for better or worse?

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Laurie Taylor explores international relations in the Middle East with Professor Fred Halliday, whose new book asserts that the complexity of the region is underestimated.

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Laurie Taylor looks at the concept of skill.

Policy makers suggest that skills are vital ingredients for national economic prosperity.

But precisely what is a skill?

In the past skills were equated with technical know-how or manual dexterity, but they now seem to include personal characteristics, behaviours and attitudes.

Has the concept of skill become so broad and wide that to speak of skills is almost meaningless? If so, what are the implications for contemporary education and training, and will we witness the marginalisation of theoretical knowledge?

20050518

Laurie Taylor discovers a long-suppressed medical scandal where a leading PSYCHIATRIST of the early 20th century came to believe that mental illnesses were the product of chronic infection that poisoned the brain.

A ruthless course of surgical treatment then followed which many patients did not survive.

What does the case say about the relationship between doctors and patients and are there any contemporary resonances of this case?

20050525

In the summer of 2003, Laurie Taylor travelled to Cape Town in South Africa to learn from social scientists about the other side of this celebrated tourist spot.

As part of Radio 4's Africa Day 2005, Thinking Allowed revisits some of the issues uncovered in these landmark programmes, as Laurie retraces his steps analysing the changes that have taken place in areas such as crime and violence, land reform and intellectual life.

Then Cafe Africa

Taking tea in the afternoon.

20050601

While baseball is America's most popular sport, soccer is the world's most popular sport.

Laurie Taylor looks at what these two iconic sports reveal about the societies and economies that spawned them.

Why are Americans appalled that star players like David Beckham are traded like horsemeat, but then why do baseball clubs make money while soccer clubs don't?

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Notions of identity have overwhelmed people for centuries.

Tales from life and literature show how people put on masks to discover who they really are under the masks they usually wear.

Laurie Taylor explores the idea of self-imitation, looking at the basic human ways of negotiating reality, illusion, identity and authenticity, only to find that it is not unusual for us to become travesties of ourselves, particularly as we age and change.

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Laurie Taylor looks at the cultural history of dieting and finds out why we are so obsessed with food.

For centuries, what we eat has been a significant part of our daily ritual.

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Drinking, especially drinking alcohol, has been a significant part of different cultures across the world.

From the sake drinking salarymen of Tokyo to the burgundy sipping flaneurs of Paris, alcohol plays a wide range of functions.

It has religious, familial, social and political meaning and it has always played a key role in the production and expression of identity.

In Thinking Allowed, Laurie Taylor discovers how the act of consuming, or indeed abstaining from alcohol ties in with self-presentation, ethnicity, class and culture.

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Laurie Taylor speaks to music journalist Peter Shapiro about his new book, Turn the Beat Around, which traces the history of disco - the music that taste forgot.

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Laurie Taylor is joined by Maurice Bloch, professor of Anthropology at the London School of Economics to discuss his latest research which explores the highly controversial territory between the cognitive and social sciences.

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Laurie Taylor travels to Sheffield to visit Norfolk Park Housing Estate.

Built in the 1960s with 15 high rise blocks set in rolling parkland, the estate was much loved by the residents.

But in the early '90s the decision was taken to demolish the towers and re-develop the estate.

Ten years on, most residents are still waiting to be re-housed.

What went wrong and why has well-intentioned council policy failed so many of those who lived on the estate?

20050817

Laurie Taylor visits Belfast to discover why since the Good Friday agreement there has been a flourishing of Protestant Marching Bands.

20050824

In 1997 the Scottish Tories suffered a wipeout at the General Election and in the last election, only one Scottish Conservative was voted in.

Laurie Taylor travels to Dumfries and Galloway, a former Conservative stronghold, and finds out how local Tory Party activists have mobilised themselves.

20050831

The world of the bouncer who patrols the doors to the pubs and clubs lining our high streets, has been a male dominated arena, apparently full of violence and aggression.

However, in recent years more and more women have started to take on this role, but they have done so in a very different way.

Laurie Taylor walks the streets of London's Soho to speak to some of these female bouncers, or door supervisors, to find out what kind of skills and resources they bring to the job and he asks why they are more in demand than ever before.

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From shopping to politics, celebrity culture affects every facet of our lives whether we like it or not.

But exactly how much influence does celebrity culture have on contemporary society? Are they an important part of our national or cultural identity; and how do celebrities articulate constructions of gender, age, class and sexuality?

Laurie Taylor explores some of these issues and asks since when has celebrity culture become a serious subject to study? Is it more bling bling than the academic real thing?

20050928

Laurie Taylor speaks to Stefan Szymanski, professor of economics at Imperial College London, who challenges some of our preconceptions of transnational pharmaceutical companies.

He argues that in order to supply drugs on humanitarian grounds in poor countries, we need to protect the profits of these companies in rich countries.

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The weChishanu Christians are one of the fastest growing religious movements in Zimbabwe having seen a marked increase in the 1990s, not just in the number of people attending the services but also in the number of services they hold each day.

They are the Christians who don't read the Bible.

Academic attention to a flat and lifeless scriptural text, they affirm, can only impede their live and direct relationship with God.

Though claiming a distinct break with African custom, the movement is informed by African history and culture - they believe in witchcraft and in spirit possession.

Taking witchcraft seriously has been key to the success of many African churches and seems no less successful here.

In this week's Thinking Allowed, Laurie Taylor speaks to Matthew Engelke lecturer at the Department of Anthropology at the London School of Economics about his research on religion in Zimbabwe.

The anthropology of Christianity - now a branch of anthropology of emerging importance - helps provide an understanding of the history and culture of Zimbabwean society.

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The vibrant and captivating world of post war London was a place for gay liberation.

The city had forged an extensive and diverse queer culture that still exists today, and provided a space for men to make sense of their sexuality.

Laurie Taylor explores the intimate and complex world of queer London - how did the city influence the culture and politics of gay life, and how in turn did gay life shape the culture and politics of the city?

20051102

Why is it that in our modern multicultural society we still turn out every November 5th to commemorate a planned act of Catholic terrorism which was defeated four hundred years ago?

Laurie Taylor looks at our celebration of Guy Fawkes Night and how it has changed over the centuries.

20051109

Over the past two decades, a vast number of new jobs have been created in affluent economies.

They are seen as more rewarding, requiring more skill and employees are paid more for their trouble.

But despite these beneficial trends, employees work longer hours, are less satisfied at work and there is a marked increase in inequality.

Laurie Taylor talks to Francis Green, who addresses this paradox in his new book 'Demanding Work'.

20051116

Laurie Taylor discusses how The Beatles kick-started the trend for fans to identify with particular band members and the way in which cultural role models have developed since then.

Part of the run up to Radio 4's season marking the 25th anniversary of John Lennon's death.

20051123

Laurie Taylor examines the cultural politics of weddings and the reasons why both participants and onlookers regard them as key indicators of class, taste and aspiration.

20051130

The town of Anna in Illinois has about 7000 people.

It benefits from a mild four-season climate, with spring arriving early, and is the perfect place for retirement, outdoor recreation or an exceptionally enjoyable family life.

But Anna is a 'Sundown Town', so called because until the 1970s, it was common to see at the city limits signs such as, 'Nigger, Don't Let the Sun Go Down on You in Anna'.

Anna, in fact, is an acronym for Aint No Niggers Allowed.

Laurie Taylor looks at the phenomenon of these US 'white only' towns that stretch from Maine to California, and finds that the informal practice of barring blacks (and sometimes other groups) after nightfall is astonishingly wide.

20051207

Street traders in Barcelona form a vibrant back bone to the city.

Many of them come from South Asia and West Africa, forming a diverse and animated community with strong social bonds.

Laurie Taylor looks at the experiences of this distinct community finding out how travelling and negotiating new cultures have helped form their fluid and diasporic identities.

20051214

The Oakland Riders enjoy the distinction of attracting the most feared fans in American football, with a reputation for drinking, fighting - and outrageous costumes.

Devotion to the team binds this working class, multiracial group of people together.

Laurie Taylor talks to Professor Jim Miller who followed the fans through a dramatic season in an attempt to get to grips with the reality behind the ferocious image.

20051221

Laurie Taylor looks at the popularity of 'chick lit', a new genre of romance writing aimed at women, and finds out what this says about contemporary culture.

20051228

The end of apartheid in South Africa was heralded as a new, modern, democratic beginning for the country.

But despite this, support for the authority of chiefs and chieftancy, based on hundreds of years of tradition, has thrived.

Laurie Taylor looks at the role chiefs play in South Africa and how they are no longer considered relics of the past but key figures in national and local politics.

20060104

Laurie Taylor follows the growth of the occult tradition and the part it plays in the history of ideas.

What cultural shifts caused its rise in popularity in the 19th Century?

20060111
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20070103

To mark the beginning of Liverpool's 800th year, Laurie Taylor visits the city to explore its contribution to the social sciences.

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Mortuary worker, sewer engineer, sex worker, refuse collector? how do the people who do society's dirtiest jobs manage to make their occupations seem more palatable? Laurie Taylor discusses a major new study on how to survive the world's worst jobs.

20070228

The Death of Honour

Are we living in a 'post-honour society'? Social theorist James Bowman claims that the ancient idea of honour has become meaningless in the Western world, and that it is this development more than anything else which underlies the clash between Eastern and Western cultures.

Laurie Taylor hears the arguments and the evidence, and asks whether we are better off without honour.

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The established cultures of the financial world's trading markets are succumbing to modern technology.

Laurie Taylor talks to former share dealer turned anthropologist Caitlin Zaloom about the arcane rites of a dying world.

20070321

Concern is growing over violence in the workplace, with an increasing number of assaults on nurses, transport workers, retail staff and other workers.

Laurie Taylor talks to P J Waddington, the author of a major new study into violence at work and its effects.

20070328

Both suicide and deliberate self-harm involve large numbers of young people, many in their teens and many lesbian or gay.

Laurie Taylor discusses new research into the role of sexuality and gender identity in suicide among young people.

How often do struggles over issues of being gay, lesbian or transgender lead to suicidal practices, and what can be done to help these young people?

20070404
20070411

China is set to become the world's second biggest economy by 2015, but there is a social cost for such expansion.

Laurie Taylor is joined by an international panel of experts to look at China's enormous floating population of some 200 million migrant workers, who are moving great distances from rural areas to cities in order to find work.

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Laurie Taylor discusses a scholarly study of Esalen, the Californian institute which introduced the West to the spiritual teaching of the East.

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Laurie Taylor hears surprising tales from a Peruvian anthropologist on how Amazonian Indians make friends.

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Why do street people and rough sleepers use names to disguise their identity and how can an understanding of that culture aid the people who want to help them? Laurie Taylor discusses new research with Tom Hall

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Laurie Taylor discusses a new study with author Kester Aspden into one of the most notorious cases of police racism in Britain, after the body of David Oluwale was pulled from a canal in Leeds in May 1969.

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How has erotic and intimate life changed since 1945? Laurie Taylor hears the findings of a new report by sociologist Jeffrey Weeks

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Laurie Taylor presents three programmes examining the social gaps in today's divided Britain.

He is joined by politicians David Willetts and Frank Field to explore the geography of poverty and the effect of today's vastly increased home ownership on those who rent.

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Laurie Taylor presents three programmes examining the social gaps in today's divided Britain.

Politicians David Willetts and Frank Field explore the generation gap.

How different are today's young people from their parents' generation and why is communication between age groups more difficult today?

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Laurie Taylor presents the final programme of a special series examining the social gaps in today's divided Britain.

In this programme on The Attainment Gap, he and two politicians, David Willetts and Frank Field, explore the statistics and cross-examine the specialists.

Why are the children of professional children so much more able to prosper in school and at work? And how can you predict someone's achievements and attainments at 26 when they are only 26 months?

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Human behaviour, institutions and conventions are put under the microscope as Laurie Taylor leads a discussion on topical issues coming out of the academic and research world.

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Gentrification in Harlem

Laurie Taylor presents a special programme from New York, exploring the changes in a neighbourhood undergoing a huge economic revival and their effect on local residents.

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Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

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He discusses the nature of trust in modern society with the social theorist Marek Kohn.

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He discusses the history of glamour with Stephen Gundle.

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Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

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Laurie Taylor discusses how imagination and reality combine to create the environments in which we live.

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Imagination and the Countryside

Novelist Joanna Trollope, sociologist Howard Newby and rural ethnographer Martin Phillips discuss the rural idyll.

The dream the British have of the countryside is not always borne out by the experience of living there, yet the ideas we hold about the countryside often prompt changes.

Martin's research revealed long-term residents complaining of too many village fetes and incomers who are simply too keen to get involved in everything.

Joanna Trollope explains what drove her out of the countryside five years ago.

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Laurie Taylor discusses how imagination and reality combine to create the environments in which we live.

2/3.

Imagination and the Suburbs

He talks about facts and fantasies of suburban life with writer Iain Sinclair and sociologists Paul Barker and Nick Hubble.

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Laurie Taylor discusses how imagination and reality combine to create the environments in which we live.

3/3.

Imagination and the City

In front of a live audience at the Radio Theatre at Broadcasting House, Laurie is joined by writer Will Self, sociologist Richard Sennett and geographer Doreen Massey.

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Laurie Taylor debates research into the changing attitudes towards the bodies displayed in our museums.

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Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how police get a confession from suspects - tactics a bit different from in Guy Fawkes's day.

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Laurie Taylor talks to Amanda Vickery about the history of the home.

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Was the Imperial era the result of repressed sexuality? A new book claims that forbidden desires lie behind the West's great cultural output.

Laurie talks to Robert Muchembled, author of Orgasm and the West, and historian Joanna Bourke.

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Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

There is a revolution happening in security and the human body is at the centre of new ways of monitoring and controlling the way we live.

From fingerprinting to retinal scans.

Laurie Taylor explores the way that the history of biometrics has changed the relationship between the citizen and the state.

What are the new measures that are due to be introduced? How are new technological developments likely to change the way we live? Laurie talks to anthropologist Mark Maguire about changes which mean that the body becomes our passport and asks whether the so-called 'securitization of identity' will change the way we think of ourselves.

Plus, is it possible for a social scientist to always remain uninvolved in the world he is studying? When does it become impossible to keep your mouth shut? Laurie talks to two medical sociologists, Charles Bosk and Clare Williams, about the ethical questions they have had to face.

20090422

Laurie discusses the history of murder, from duelling to drive-by killings, with Pieter Spierenburg, author of A History of Murder: Personal Violence in Europe from the Middle Ages to the Present and Joanna Bourke, author of An Intimate History of Killing.

Why was the murder rate higher in the Middle Ages than it is now? What factors have pushed the practice of killing men down the social order and should we worry about the first increase in the murder rate for over 200 years?

Laurie also hears of the surprise of Antje Bednarek, a German sociologist pursuing an ethnography of Young Scottish Conservatives.

She had not realised that tracking them down would be such a tricky business.

From duels to drive-by, Laurie Taylor discusses the history of murder.

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

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Laurie Talyor asks if the buildings built today cater for modern life or merely reflect idealistic dreams.

He hears a savage indictment of architecture, and also discusses the enduring influence of class.

Laurie Talyor asks if the buildings built today cater for modern life.

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Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

How Victorian geographer Halford Mackinder's theories of Empire are back in vogue.

Laurie Taylor presents.

How Halford Mackinder's theory of Empire is back in vogue.

Laurie Taylor discusses geopolitics and the science of spheres of influence.

'Who rules East Europe commands the Heartland.

Who rules the Heartland commands the World-island.

Who rules the World Island commands the World'.

So decreed Halford Mackinder, one of the pioneers of geography and of the nascent science of geopolitics.

He had a huge influence on the strategy of the British Empire and a great impact on the foreign policy of Hitler.

Gerry Kearns, author of Geopolitics and Empire: The Legacy of Halford Mackinder tells Laurie Taylor that, with dwindling resources of gas and oil and the quest for sphere of influence, Mackinder is very much back in vogue.

Also, Laurie speaks to Roma academics Delia Grigore and Ian Hancock about ambivalent feelings towards traditional gypsy or Romani culture and the threats and advantages of assimilation.

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From dizziness to chronic pain, the overstretched health service is faced with increasing numbers of patients with symptoms that defy a medical explanation.

They are often subject to repeated tests and treatment yet their illness persists.

Laurie Taylor is joined by Monica Greco, whose research suggests the practice of patient choice ensures that many such patients get worse rather than better.

Also on the programme, Róisín Ryan-Flood, the author of Lesbian Motherhood: Gender, Families and Sexual Citizenship, talks about the growing numbers of lesbians choosing to have children by donor insemination and the evolution of new definitions of family.

Exploring medically unexplained symptoms, lesbian motherhood and new definitions of family.

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With Laurie Taylor.

Can Darwin explain why some societies become modern?

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

Darwinian theory has provided a powerful explanation for animal behaviour, but can it be used to explain how humans act? Evolutionary psychologists contend that it can and have brought their critique to bear on many fields including economics, law, anthropology and sociology.

Laurie speaks to Lesley Newson about her theory that evolution can explain how societies become modern.

Also on the programme, why western women are increasingly relaxed about attending sex clubs and 'ping pong' bars in Thailand.

Erin Sanders tells Laurie about her latest research.

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Is an unequal society bad for your health?

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

Research has shown that health and social problems become more acute in an unequal society, where the gap between the richest and poorest is greatest.

For most of us, respect is measured in money, and lack of it or low pay tells us that we are worth very little.

But given the chance, would we as a society be prepared to rebalance?

Laurie Taylor discusses these issues with Professor Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett, authors of The Spirit Level: Why Equal Societies Almost Always So Better, and Sunder Katwala from The Fabian Society, on a new paper on underlying motivation.

Also teddy bears; how did a real hunting story become a political myth which left Theodore Roosevelt forever credited as the namesake of the teddy bear, symbolic of childhood innocence?

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The 15th century mosques of India were built by Hindu craftsmen trained on temples.

Shakespeare borrowed from Seneca and emulated Ovid in the writing of his plays, and reggae was introduced to Britian by Jamaican immigrants who had brought African influence to the development of ska which in turn had borrowed from American R and B.

No wonder that Edward Said said that, 'the history of all cultures is the history of cultural borrowing'.

But is that cultural borrowing a fair exchange? Are some cultures more readily imposed than others and is there any sense in resisting the influence of foreign ways of life? Laurie Taylor discusses cultural hybridity with Tariq Ali, Peter Burke and Angela McRobbie.

Cultural hybridity: is globalisation making the world homogenous?

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Laurie Taylor explores the myths and enduring realities of the British police with Clive Emsley and Dick Hobbs.

Robert Peel brought the Metropolitan Police Force into being in 1829; it was a centralised body of 3,000 uniformed men expected to patrol designated areas.

They were the original 'Bobbies on the Beat'.

However, in an age of mass public protests, Chartism and agitation for electoral reform, the police were founded more as a response to a crisis in public order than in a move to protect private property.

The Weekly Dispatch of 1829 warned, 'The New Police is a military body employed in civil duties...

it is a powerful engine in the hands of government, and may be employed for the suppression of public freedom.' How much has changed?

Laurie also discusses the worldwide influence of the Scottish diaspora and asks why such an enormous number Scots left their country of birth even when times were good.

Tom Devine enlightens Laurie ahead of his talk at the Festival of Politics in Edinburgh.

Laurie Taylor discusses myth and reality in the history of the British police.

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

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Can children be both clever and popular in school? Laurie explores the role of class swot.

New research on a group of high achieving 12 and 13-year-old children could provide insight into why children underachieve in school.

Laurie Taylor talks to Becky Francis from Roehampton University, one of the authors of a new report into the uneasy relationship between being clever and popular.

Laurie finds out how children negotiate being both academically successful and liked by their peers, and the differences in classroom experience for boys and girls.

While a boy can avoid being bullied if he is both sporty and successful, girls are more likely to be picked on and seen as asexual if they do well in school.

Does the risk of being bullied or labelled a 'swot' prompt children of both sexes to avoid performing to their best ability?

Also, Laurie explores the letters sent home by soldiers in WWI and what they reveal about the emotional experience of war.

He talks to Michael Roper and Joanna Bourke about the role of the connection between the home front and the battlefield, and why it was critical in helping soldiers cope with the horrors of war.

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The life of philosopher RG Collingwood, and restorative justice in Northern Ireland.

What is the best way to settle a dispute, and if you are a victim of crime what is the best way to get justice? Laurie Taylor finds out about an alternative to police and courts and the conventional criminal justice system.

The idea of restorative justice is to try to find a new way to settle arguments and bring justice so that offenders and victims can carry on living side by side.

Can bringing victims and culprits together to talk or making a guilty party compensate the injured one provide the answer? And can it work for all crimes, however serious? Laurie talks to Anna Eriksson and Heather Strang about the use of restorative justice in Northern Ireland.

For countries with a long history of violence in their communities, can restorative justice be used to heal the wounds?

Also in the programme, what lessons can we learn from history about how to live our lives? Laurie talks to Prof Fred Inglis about the life of philosopher Robin Collingwood and how we can live the good life by learning our lessons from the past.

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Laurie Taylor discusses the language of crime and the codes of criminal communication with Diego Gambetta, mafia scholar and criminal sociologist.

He finds out why, in order to survive in the criminal underworld, language requires subtle, coded and sometimes gruesome modes of communication.

From horses heads in bed to scars and tattoos, Laurie finds out why the language of the criminal underworld is often written in code.

20091007

America's social state is withering at the expense of its expanding prison system and the UK is heading in the same direction, with potentially disastrous consequences.

That's the argument of Laurie Taylor's guest, Loic Wacquant, Professor of Sociology at the University of California.

From 1980 to 1990, spending by the US government on operating its prisons and correctional establishments doubled while at the same time spending on public housing more than halved.

According to Wacquant, this process is continuing - he says that 'the construction of prisons has effectively become the country's main housing programme'.

Are America's penal policies too harsh, and if prisons and correctional facilities are becoming increasingly important, what are the social consequences?

He talks to Laurie about why he believes America is too ready to accept a state of poverty for huge sections of its population and at the same time see the social state obliterated.

Is America punishing its poor and is the UK at risk of following the same path, overly dependent on prisons while eroding its social state?

Sociologist Loic Wacquant discusses the consequences of a growing US prison system.

20091014

Laurie Taylor finds out about what we leave with the dead and why.

From clothes to jewellery, photographs, hats, eye glasses, walking sticks, letters and even food, alcohol and tobacco, the objects mourners leave in the coffins and caskets of their loved ones tells us a huge amount about our attitudes to death and the rituals it involves.

Laurie talks to Sheila Harper, sociologist at the Centre for Death and Society at the University of Bath, whose new study about 'modern-day grave goods' reveals fascinating insights into our attitudes to death, how we grieve, the ritual of death and mourning.

She points out that the objects we leave today are remarkably similar to the kinds of goods uncovered by archaeologists in graves going back thousand of years.

20091021

From suburbs to housing estates, Laurie Taylor explores the history and future of urban planning and asks if where we live affects how we live.

How do housing estates and suburbs serve their residents and what is the future for planning our towns and cities? Social housing has its roots in Victorian philanthropy, and in 1979 nearly half of Britain's population lived in local authority housing.

Many suburbs grew as cities and their populations expanded.

Laurie is joined by Paul Barker and Lynsey Hanley to discuss housing estates and suburbs.

Will urban planning ever be able to fulfill Aneurin Bevan's dream of social integration?

From suburbia to housing estates, Laurie Taylor discusses planning our towns and cities.

20091028

While nine out of ten people agree organ donation is a good thing, a recent audit found 40 per cent of bereaved families, when approached, didn't agree to donate.

Laurie Taylor discusses new research which uncovers some of the reasons behind this apparent anomaly.

Magi Sque, from the University of Southampton, was part of a team who interviewed families who had declined organ donation.

While many agreed in principle, carried organ donor cards and knew their relatives desire to donate, they still didn't feel able to let their loved ones organs be used.

The most common reason families gave for this was a simple desire to keep the body intact.

They didn't want the dead to be 'hurt' any more.

Magi explains why the research reveals some of our deep-seated cultural beliefs, and how those beliefs have their roots in wider society's values and, at times of grief, can completely overcome our pre-existing views.

20091104

In a series of special programmes in association with the Open University, Laurie Taylor explores the subject of white collar crime, from its late addition to the statute books to the increasing difficulty in securing a conviction.

He speaks to the key academic experts in the field, explores the latest sociological research and hears from professionals on both sides of the law about the culture, the practice and most often the non-prosecution of white collar crime.

In this edition, Laurie considers the culture of the crime.

What exactly is white collar crime, who commits it and why?

Laurie Taylor explores white collar crime.

What exactly is it, who commits it and why?

20091111

In a series of special programmes in association with the Open University, Laurie Taylor explores the subject of white collar crime, from its late addition to the statute books to the increasing difficulty in securing a conviction.

He speaks to the key academic experts in the field, explores the latest sociological research and hears from professionals on both sides of the law about the culture, the practice and most often the non-prosecution of white collar crime.

In this edition, Laurie explores the culture of corporate crime and how regulatory bodies serve to keep the police at arm's length.

In the UK, people are twice as likely to suffer a serious injury at work than to be a victim of violent crime, yet only a fraction of safety crimes are actually prosecuted.

Globally, more people are killed at work each year than are killed in war.

Why has corporate crime had a low priority, why has it been so hard to prosecute corporations and will the new crimes of corporate manslaughter and corporate murder make firms more responsible for the crimes they commit?

Why has corporate crime had such a low priority?

2009111820091123

Laurie Taylor explores the punishment of white collar crime.

In a series of special programmes in association with the Open University, Laurie Taylor explores the subject of white collar crime.

Is it right that middle-class offenders should spend more of their sentence in open prisons? Should the loss of a professional position be taken into account when sentencing white collar criminals? Is our prison system set up to cope with professionals who offend? Laurie concludes his exploration of white collar crime and talks to past offenders including Jonathan Aitken, leading criminologist Michael Levi, and the former Director of Public Prosecutions, Sir Ken MacDonald, about the punishment of white collar criminals.

Is it time we changed our attitude to crime in the workplace? Should we put more effort into enforcing the law and detecting white collar crime?

In a series of special programmes in association with the Open University, Laurie Taylor explores the subject of white collar crime, from its late addition to the statute books to the increasing difficulty in securing a conviction.

He speaks to the key academic experts in the field, explores the latest sociological research and hears from professionals on both sides of the law about the culture, the practice and most often the non-prosecution of white collar crime.

In this edition, Laurie explores the subject of punishing white collar crime.

Laurie Taylor explores white collar crime.

20091125

Barack Obama famously used new technologies in his 2008 election campaign.

Could those same techniques be used to reinvigorate the next UK general elction in the same way it did for Obama's Web 2.0 campaign? From MySpace and Facebook, text messages to email, will new media transform the election in the same way it did for America? Or is the UK too party political for digital technology to have the same impact? Laurie Taylor discusses with Rachel Gibson, Professor of Political Science at the University of Manchester.

Also, how musicians performing can give new insights into negotiation, learning and decision making.

Howard S Becker, professional jazz player and acclaimed sociologist, joins Laurie to discuss what jazz and music can teach the rest of the world.

Will UK party politics be transformed by new media and digital technology?

20091202

Laurie Taylor talks to Karen Ho, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Minnesota.

She went to Wall Street to understand how the lives, experiences and ideologies of the investment bankers who work there shaped not just the financial markets but the very nature of employment across America.

How the ideology of Wall Street bankers shape the nature of employment in the US.

20091209
20091216

Laurie Taylor explores the history of clothing behind bars.

From broad arrows on prisoners suits in the 19th century to the orange jumpsuits worn by inmates of the Guantanamo Bay detention camp, the uniform prisoners wear is used by penal institutions to weild power over, punish, and sometimes humiliate their prisoners.

Prison uniforms reveals the culture of the time.

Laurie is joined by Juliet Ash from the Royal Collge of Art to undress the history of prison clothing and discuss what it reveals about the social cultural and political context of the time.

Laurie Taylor explores the history of prison clothing, from arrows to orange jumpsuits.

20091223

The new bourgeoisie played an enormously important role in the history of industrial and imperial Britain.

The extent to which cousin marriage proliferated in the 19th century relates to the central question as to which people were going to lead Industrial England.

Close-knit families in Victorian England delivered enormous advantages.

They shaped vocations, generated patronage, yielded vital commercial information and gave access to capital; no wonder that marriage within the family, between cousins or between in-laws, was a characteristic strategy of this new bourgeoisie.

Laurie Taylor discusses private life in 19th-century England with Adam Kuper, the author of Incest and Influence: The Private Life of Bourgeois England, and Catherine Hall, Professor of Modern British Social and Cultural History at University College, London.

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Laurie Taylor explores national branding and the commodification of ethnic identity.

How does a country's international reputation affect its economy and its political power? The diplomatic advisor Simon Anholt says it is extremely important, and takes great pains to measure national PR.

Each year he publishes an index which ranks 50 countries in terms of their reputation.

He tells Laurie Taylor who is at the top and who languishes at the bottom, and why.

Ethno-theme parks, Native American casinos and Kalahari bushmen attempting to reap profits from pharmaceutical companies using their traditional medicinal plants: all modern examples of how ethnic identity has become a commodity in today's global market place.

John and Jean Comaroff explore how communities sell their traditional culture in their new book, Ethnicity Inc.

They tell Laurie about the effect it has on indigenous cultures, and how selling your identity can be both empowering and impoverishing.

20100210

How has consumerism affected what it means to be black? Does it matter if African-Americans now struggle for commodities rather than rights? Paul Gilroy joins Laurie Taylor to discuss the changing place of black culture.

Paul Gilroy joins Laurie Taylor to discuss the changing place of black culture.

20100217

With the advent of Napster and Pirate Bay, people assume that intellectual piracy is the creation of the digital age.

But Laurie Taylor hears that piracy has a much longer history than expected.

He speaks to the author of a history which traces its lively lineage back to the invention of the Gutenberg Printing Press.

20100224

Why do men pay for sex? Laurie Taylor explores a new study of over 100 London men who regularly use prostitutes.

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The secret history of the servant and the working class at Oxbridge.

Fetching water, cleaning knives, shovelling out a privy, setting fires - how did servants make sense of the tough menial duties in the 18th-century home? During that time they made up the largest occupational group in the British state, and the historian Caroline Steedman argues that servants' resentments and personal philosophies had a huge impact on the development of the English character and the British nation state.

Laurie Taylor discusses a neglected corner of social history with Caroline Steedman and Amanda Vickery.

Laurie also hears about the working class at Britain's elite universities; Diane Reay tells him about her research into state-educated working-class children studying at Oxbridge.

Laurie Taylor discusses the way 18th-century servants thought about their role.

The servant's story in England is a hidden history.

Laurie Taylor discusses new research examining the way people in service in the 18th century thought about their role.

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Laurie Taylor discusses milk and modernity, and why burglary is going out of fashion.

The latest British Crime Survey statistics show 744,000 domestic burglaries in England and Wales.

This may seem a lot, and though it is no consolation to anyone who had their house ransacked last year, it actually represents a drop of more than a million since 1995.

So why is burglary less appealing to criminals? Are they turning to a life without crime or are they simply taking up something else? Laurie Taylor hears from James Treadwell, whose ongoing research seems to present the answer, and it is part of a story involving the plummeting cost of a DVD player and the rising popularity of the iPod.

Also on the programme: milk and modernity.

What part has the wonderful white nectar had in the development of cities, the separation of urban and rural and our notions of what is pure and natural? It is a surprising story in which ideas of what is natural are constantly being inverted.

Laurie speaks to Peter Atkins and Harry West.

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

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The idea that modernity leads to a lessening religious belief is being abandoned by theorists in American and Europe.

Figures like Richard Dawkins and AC Grayling argue that increasingly religion seeks to impinge on science, and now the first systematic study of European cultural groups predicts that fundamentalists of all religions are out-breeding moderates and atheists, and will eclipse them quite soon.

In Israel the Ultra Orthodox will form the majority as soon as 2050.

Since the birth rate of secular people in the West is way below replacement level (2.1), and the birth rate of religious fundamentalists of practically any stripe is far above (roughly between 5 and 7.7 children per mother), through the sheer force of demography, academic Eric Kauffman claims they will become a much bigger force in the Western World.

Is that inevitable? Should people be worried? Laurie discusses the anxieties of atheists and the predictions of demography with three theorists of different perspectives.: The Professor of Contemporary Islamic Studies at Oxford University, Tariq Ramadan; Eric Kauffman, Reader in Politics at Birkbeck College and author of Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth? And Rebecca Goldstein, philosopher and author of 36 Arguments for the Existence of God; A Work of Fiction.

Is the secular world under threat? Discussing new demographics and the future of belief.

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Is the British weekend under threat? Plus new research on home education.

Uninterrupted birdsong, the sound and smell of softly percolating coffee, old ladies cycling to communion through the morning mist, the Sunday papers in bed - all these textures and tastes of the British weekend could be under threat according to a new report called A Lament for the Lost Weekend.

Jill Ebrey spoke to people whose work brought them out of the house at the end of the week and found that, despite days off midweek, losing Saturday and Sunday had a serious impact on the quality of their lives.

Could the British weekend be under threat? Are we aware of what else we might lose when we remove the restrictions that Sunday in particular makes on our activities? Laurie Taylor discusses the changing place of the weekend in British society with Jill Ebrey of Warwick University and Richard Reeves from Demos.

Also, the motivations of people who educate their children at home: There are anything from 20,000 to 50,000 families in the UK who educate their children at home.

Who are they? Why do they choose to shoulder the burden of teaching their children themselves and how do they go about it? Ruth Morton discusses the study she recently presented at the British Sociological Association annual conference.

20100421

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

A brief history of nakedness - its role in politics, protest and popular culture.

20100428

Laurie Taylor discusses capitalism with leading economists David Harvey and Ha Joon Chang.

20100505

From Morse to Wallander, the anthropology of the detective tour.

Plus criminals in Russia.

20100512

Evacuation: the social impact of sending millions to the country during the Second World War.

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New research revealing the rifts and resentment created by researching family history.

Genealogical research has become a passion for a growing number of people.

Programmes like Who Do You Think You Are? and websites like Genes Reunited feed a voracious interest in family origins and the lives of ancestors.

But what impact does this kind of research have on the families which are being studied? Hidden pregnancies...mental illnesses...shunned relatives...

Laurie Taylor talks to sociologist Anne-Marie Kramer, whose research has unveiled some of the conflicts which arise when family skeletons are dragged into the light, and to the cartoonist Martin Rowson who has performed some geneaological research of his own.

Also, how did a Danish stew of left-over vegetables and scrag end of lamb come to epitomise a proud and enduring British city culture? Ciara Kierans discusses a cultural history of Scouse.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

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Laurie Taylor explores the relationship of language to culture with AC Grayling.

Popular stereotypes assume that a nation's language reflects its culture and psychology.

The German's orderly language is held to be a better vehicle for philosophy than Spanish.

The mellow sounds of Portuguese are believed to reflect a relaxed, continental character.

Some linguists have even suggested our mother tongue can limit the capacity for thought.

So a language with no future tense prevents its speakers from anticipating tomorrow.

And primitive cultures which had no word for blue must have been colour blind.

But a new book argues that words are not such a prison house.

Just because we do not have a word for blue does not mean we can't see it or name it one day.

There's evidence of complexity even in the language of hunter gatherer societies.

So says the writer Guy Deutscher, who's joined by the philosopher A.C.

Grayling.

They explore with Laurie Taylor how words shape and define our world.

Also, what explains the contrasting economic fortunes within different parts of the same country? The economist Mario Polese examines the causes and patterns of regional inequality around the world.

How did Manchester, the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution, lose out to London? Why is the formerly impoverished rural South in the US enjoying an economic revival? And is it inevitable that the flight to urban cities will always be at the expense of the areas left behind? Join Laurie Taylor for an exploration into why some regions prosper and others decline.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

20100609

Since 2006 over 200 British soldiers have been killed in Helmand, Afghanistan.

Laurie Taylor discusses a new study which explores the way in which these dead solders have been commemorated in Britain.

We have become familiar with the painful sight of mourners lining the main street of Wootton Bassett, as hearses carry coffins away from RAF Lyneham.

In public acts of remembrance today soldiers are remembered as fathers, husbands, wives, sons and daughters.

This modern way of personalising and even domesticating soldiers is in stark contrast to the twentieth century rituals which mourn the sacrifice of anonymous individual soldiers who have died for the nation.

What lies behind this change of attitude and what impact is the new public consciousness likely to have on how and when we wage war? Laurie talks to Anthony King from Exeter University, author of 'The Afghan War and 'postmodern' memory: commemoration and the Dead of Helmand'.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

The changing way we commemorate the dead: a study of the war in Afghanistan.

20100616

A new concept came along, 'social capital', and it revolutionised the way people are governed and communities are planned.

The only trouble is...it's completely wrong.

That is the contention of sociologist Ben Fine.

He claims that 'social capital' is part of a mindset that sees everything as quantifiable assets akin to money or commercial resources.

Are communities, neighbourhoods and the people more complicated than that? Laurie Taylor discusses an idea which has had a huge impact on social science and beyond, and asks whether it is time to abandon the assumption that people have social qualities that can be weighed and measured.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Is the buzz phrase 'social capital' a big mistake? Ben Fine talks to Laurie Taylor

20100630

How much do the pop infatuations of teen girls have in common with the cult of death metal? Laurie Taylor finds out from young delegates to a sub-culture conference.

Girly pop and heavy metal: Laurie Taylor visits a university conference on sub-cultures.

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Niall Ferguson tells Laurie Taylor about his new book on financier Siegmund Warburg.

Siegmund Warburg laid the foundations of the prosperity which has sustained the post-war City of London, and was one of the architects of European Integration.

Niall Ferguson, in his new book High Financier tells Laurie Taylor how this extraordinarily dominant figure had meticulous business methods and an uncompromisingly strict ethical code.

How much relevance does his example have for today? Could the traders and speculators who inhabit today's financial world learn from the elite of the past? Laurie discusses the lessons we can draw from this figure and the role played by today's financial elite with the historian Niall Ferguson and financial sociologist Karel Williams.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

How much relevance does his example have for today? Could the traders and speculators who inhabit today's financial world learn from the elite of the past? Laurie discusses the lessons we can draw from this figure with the historian Niall Ferguson and financial sociologist Karel Williams.

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Inside the lives of women who strip: Laurie Taylor hears from Rachela Colosi about her research into a lap dancing club.

Also, how climate change will change British society.

Rachela Colosi tells Laurie about her detailed ethnography of a lap dancing club.

20100728

We are told that life presents us with myriad choices.

Like products on a supermarket shelf, our jobs, our relationships, our bodies and our identities are all there for the choosing.

We are encouraged to 'be ourselves', but the pressure to make those choices can lead to enormous anxiety.

In a new study Renata Salecl researches dating sites, self help books and people's relationship to celebrity, and uncovers the complexities involved in the choices we make and how they often lead to disquiet.

In Thinking Allowed on 28 July, Laurie Taylor explores whether we have too much choice in our lives.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

How does having more choice affect our lives? Laurie Taylor discusses a new study.

20100804

Prosperity is accused of encouraging greed, ruining the environment, undermining communities, causing unhappiness and widening social inequalities.

The push for growth has been the bedrock policy for almost every world economy but since the financial crisis, belief in growth has become increasingly challenged.

Daniel Ben-Ami, takes on what he calls the 'growth sceptics' and makes the claim that more affluence benefits the whole of society.

He discusses the 'glories of growth' with Laurie Taylor on Thinking Allowed on 4 August.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Glorious Growth: Daniel Ben-Ami tells Laurie why prosperity is good for all.

20100811

What does it mean to be truly free? Laurie Taylor discusses emancipation, ideas of black freedom from slavery, through key figures of the 20th century to the present day.

Laurie Taylor discusses emancipation, black freedom ideas from slavery to the present.

20100825

Laurie Taylor discusses Karl Marx's theory of Alienation with Philosophy Professor, Sean Sayers, political economist, Ian Fraser, and Professor of Medical Ethics, Donna Dickenson.

Marx saw Alienation as an objective condition inherent in waged labour under capitalism.

He believed that the mass proletariat were alienated because the fruits of production belonged to the employers.

Factory workers were estranged from themselves, from the products of their labour, and from each other.

Human relations came to be seen as relations between commodities rather than people.

Marx believed this alienation would be overcome in a communist future in which we could "hunt in the morning, fish in the afternoon, rear cattle in the evening, criticise after dinner...without ever becoming hunter, fisherman, shepherd or critic".

Individuals would become multifaceted and be at one with their creative selves.

Work, in such a future, would be an end in itself rather than a means to an end in the form of a wage.

Thinking Allowed explores the evolution and development of Marx's theory of Alienation.

Can it, in any way, capture the experience of today's worker? Or is it hopelessly outdated in an economy dominated by a service sector rather than factory production?

Laurie Taylor explores the meaning and relevance of Karl Marx's theory of alienation.

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When is a crime a 'hate crime', and what does that term actually mean? How has living on what other people throw away become a subject for criminologists? Laurie explores some of the latest ideas on crime as he visits the British Society of Criminology Conference held this year at Leicester University.

He hears from the film maker Rex Bloomstein, from Sylvia Lancaster whose daughter Sophie was murdered because of the way she looked and from Jeff Ferrell, the Professor of Criminology from the United States who has been living out of dumpsters, skips, rubbish bins in an attempt to understand an increasingly criminalised and marginalised way of life.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Laurie Taylor visits the British Society of Criminology Conference at Leicester University.

20100915

From Hitchcock's 'Rear Window' to Facebook and Twitter, from Soviet Spies to Parisian cafÃ(c)s, eavesdropping is a universal phenomenon.

John Locke, who has provided the first serious and systematic study of the behaviour, tells Laurie that it is a practice which extends into the animal kingdom and biological brings advantages to birds and chimpanzees.

An attempt to understand the lives of others can be help one live better oneself but despite the fact that it has shaped human history and culture, listening in to what others are saying continues to have a very bad name.

Also on the programme Emmeline Taylor presents her research on CCTV in schools and the impact on privacy.

Producer: Chris Wilson.

An exploration of the meaning and history of 'eavesdropping', from cafe society to Twitter.

20100922

The United States does not have the highest living standard in the world - The washing machine has changed the world more than the internet - People in poor countries are more entrepreneurial than people in rich countries: Three contentions from the economist Ha-Joon Chang as he joins Laurie Taylor and tries to dispel what he sees as the myths and prejudices of free-market capitalism.

He claims that we labour under the misconception that financial markets become more efficient, when the opposite is true and his analysis suggests that by breaking free of its free-market ideology, capitalism can be vastly improved.

Producer: Chris Wilson.

Eeconomist Ha-Joon Chang tries to expose the 'myths' of free-market capitalism.

20100929

Laurie Taylor discusses a new study of au pairs in the UK.

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Laurie Taylor talks to Pulitzer prize winner C.J Chivers, a former US Marine and currently a journalist at the New York Times about the cultural, social and political impact of the AK-47 or Kalashnikov.

A gun that has transformed how we fight wars and who can fight them, the AK-47 is a weapon central to many civil wars all over the world.

With testimony from its inventors, its users and its victims, Laurie explores how a single instrument can have been so influential as both transformer and destroyer.

He also talks to Phillip Smith, Professor in the Department of Sociology at Yale University, about new research looking at public incivility.

What drives some people to such extremes of public rudeness?

Producer Chris Wilson.

Laurie Taylor examines the social impact of the AK-47, plus rudeness in public places.

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Exploring the latest research into how society works.

Is Doctor Who political? Also, Laurie Taylor explores the notion of historical anti-American bias.

Is Doctor Who political? Laurie explores the notion of an historical anti-American bias.

20110112
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The impact of paramilitary punishment attacks on the young delinquents of Belfast.

Committing crime in West Belfast carries a double jeopardy.

As well as the police, there are the paramilitaries to look out for.

Between 1973 and 2007 there were two and a half thousand shootings and beatings attributed to republican paramilitaries as punishment attacks.

Young people have been 'tarred and feathered', had their legs broken, hundreds have been 'knee-capped' and a few have been 'executed' - i.e.

murdered - in response to what they are assumed to have done.

For three years at the height of this practice Heather Hamill lived and worked in the Catholic Community of West Belfast to research the pseudo-judicial process administered by the IRA.

As punishment attacks are growing again, this time at the hands of dissident republican groups, she discusses paramilitary punishment attacks with Laurie and the criminologist Dick Hobbs.

Also on the programme today, Hanna Zagefka discusses her report which shows why people give more money to natural disasters like the Asian Tsunami than human ones like the crisis of Darfur.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

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The British government is seeking to develop a way to accurately measure the happiness of the population, in France such a gauge already exists, but is happiness really the proper goal of life? The French philosopher Pascal Bruckner tells Laurie that happiness has become a burdensome duty, and that the wave of enthusiasm for pursuing the nebulous quality has the opposite effect of actually promoting unhappiness amongst those who seek it.

Much better, says he, to accept that happiness as an unbidden and fragile gift that arrives only by grace and luck.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Is happiness the answer? Pascale Bruckner tells Laurie he doubts that it is.

20110316

The Prime Minister recently criticised what he called 'state multiculturalism' and said it had failed, arguing that Britain needs a stronger national identity.

Is it time to turn our backs on the multi-cultural idea? And what would a stronger national identity mean to people who feel at the cultural margins of our society? As the politicians debate, Laurie Taylor speaks to Britain's leading cultural theorist, Stuart Hall.

They discuss culture, politics, race and nation in a special edition of Thinking Allowed.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

A special edition: Laurie talks to cultural theorist Stuart Hall.

20110323

Will power and prosperity shift to the frozen North? A new book predicts that Iceland, Greenland, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, and Russia will be the beneficiaries of a new world order.

By 2050, four megatrends - climate change, rising population, globalisation and resource depletion - will lead to the rise of 'The New North', as migration, energy bonanzas and international trade turn the world upside down.

The geographer, Professor Laurence Smith, tells Laurie Taylor why these projections amount to more than planetary palm reading.

Also, does the morality of the 19th century Temperance movement influence modern day attitudes to drinking? The law lecturer, Henry Yeomans, argues that prohibitionism - contrary to popular belief - lives on in 'binge drinking' Britain.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Laurie Taylor explores shifts in world power.

Also, the legacy of 19th-century Temperance.

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Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Laurie Taylor explores craft and community with Richard Sennett and David Gauntlett.

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Laurie Taylor explores radical gardening with George McKay.

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Laurie Taylor explores representations of the paranormal in the media.

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Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

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Dirt is dust, soil, refuse, excrement, bacteria, filth, sleaze, slime, smut.

How easily the word changes its meaning from the physical to the moral.

It is this fascinating relationship Collection's exhibition 'Dirt: The Filthy Reality of Everyday Life'.

In a special edition recorded with an audience of the public at Wellcome, Laurie Taylor and a panel of experts explore the meaning of dirt, its relationship to order and how hygiene and the mass generation of dirt have become such potent symbols of civilisation.

He is joined by the anthropologist Adam Kuper, the writer and cartoonist Martin Rowson and the historian Amanda Vickery to discuss dirt and why it provokes such fear, loathing and occasionally desire.

Producer: Charlie Taylor and threat which dirt seems to pose that is explored in the Wellcome.

Dirt, filth and why we like to be clean: A special edition at the Wellcome Collection.

20110615

Some everyday things - keys, combs, glasses - have the ability to enchant or absorb.

Laurie Taylor talks to Steven Connor about why paraphernalia can have an almost magical power.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Combs, keys, glasses and bags - why some everyday objects have a special power.

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Laurie Taylor discusses the mummy's curse and other Oriental myths with Marina Warner and Roger Luckhurst.

The Ancient Egyptians had no real concept of the curse; instead, Luckhurst argues, it was a product of the Victorian imagination, a result of British ambivalence about Egypt's increasing self-determination.

The curse was part of a wider Western tradition of portraying the East as exotic and irrational, dominated by superstitions.

That attitude is revealed in the British reaction to English language translations of The Arabian Nights, which played into Oriental stereotypes of barbarity, cruelty and unbridled sexuality.

Marina Warner discusses the reasons why the stories of Aladdin et al are as popular as ever in modern, multi-cultural Britain.

Producer: Stephen Hughes

Author Audrey Linkman discusses the relationship between photography and death in her study of post-mortem portraits from the late 19th century to the modern day, and how they reflect contemporary attitudes towards mortality.

Laurie Taylor investigates the curse of the mummy and other myths of the Orient.

20110810
20110817

Does beauty pay? A new book argues that good looking people have higher incomes and even boost company profits.

Laurie Taylor is joined by the author and professor of economics, Daniel Hamermash and by the social scientist, Dr Catherine Hakim, who claims evidence for the power possessed by those with 'erotic capital'.

Also, Gordon Matthews, the author of a book about Chungking Mansions, the cheapest accomodation in Hong Kong, describes its multifarious residents.

This ramshackle building in the heart of the tourist district is home to a polyethnic melting pot of people - from Pakistani phone stall operators to American backpackers and Indonesian sex workers.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Laurie Taylor hears why it pays to be 'beautiful'.

Also, Chungking Mansions in Hong Kong.

20110824

Thinking Allowed explores the changing nature of home in a 3 part summer series recorded in the homes of our listeners.

Who do we live with, how do our homes operate and what do they say about us and about the dramatic social transformations of the last century and the century to come? By invitation, in each edition a new type of home is invaded, analysed and explained by Laurie Taylor and a panel of two sociologists round the kitchen table.

Much political debate still revolves around the assumption that most of us live in conventional family homes.

However research suggests that in 20 years time only 2 out of 5 people will be in marriages and married couples will be outnumbered by other types of household.

Behind closed doors, Britain is changing: Single living has increased by 30% in 10 years but at the same time financial pressures are fuelling a growth in extended families - people sharing bills, childcare and mucking-in in a way which makes private life far less private.

After generous invitations from Thinking Allowed listeners, Laurie Taylor visits three.

In this edition he visits a big multi-generational family in Bristol accompanied by the sociologists Rachel Thomson and Esther Dermot.

They attempt to divine the future for Britain's private life.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Home life 1: Laurie and sociologists visit a multi-generational household.

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Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

Producer: Chris Wilson.

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Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

Producer.

Chris Wilson.

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Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

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"poor mentality", "placidly bovine", "volubly unreachable", "feeble minded" - just some of the terms used by social workers as they tried to describe the poor in the 1920s and 30s. Much of their case work was given over to discussing whether the poor were deserving or whether they were making fraudulent claims on the charities and government organisations these new professionals were representing. Laurie is joined by Mark Peel, the author of a new study of social work and poverty in the United States, Australia and Britain, and they discuss which attitudes have changed and which remain the same with the historian Selina Todd.

Also, how evangelic Christians have turned their backs on fire and brimstone and are seeking to put the Bible into the background of everyday life. Matthew Engelke talks about his study of the Bible Society of England and Wales.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Ambient faith and social work, and poverty between the wars. Presented by Laurie Taylor

20120307
20120321

What does the idea of home mean to us in Britain? How is that changing, and are those new needs being met? A new economic landscape and an irresistible pressure on housing are changing the way we live. For the first time since the 1980s home ownership is decreasing, more people are renting longer and people are starting to club together i bigger groups.

In a special edition recorded at the Royal Institute of British Architects, Thinking Allowed examines the concept of home and its relationship to housing. Laurie Taylor is joined by an audience of the public and an expert panel: Angela Brady, President of RIBA; the housing economist Susan Smith, Mistress of Gurton College Cambridge; sociologist Esther Dermott from Bristol University and the architectural writer Jonathan Glancey.

The event draws on a series of investigations of listeners' homes in which Laurie Taylor and a team of sociologists have explored the future of private life. It will also reflect on the RIBA exhibition on the history of the British Home, 'A Place to Call Home'.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

What does the idea of home mean to us in Britain today? A special edition on private life.

20120328
20120411

We pay others to take away our household refuse from the front of our house whilst hoarding other junk in the attic. And while most of us wouldn't mind buying other people's discarded clothes in a charity shop, only a few are prepared to take even edible food from supermarket dumpsters. What hidden motives lurk behind our relationship with waste? Martin O'Brien, author of 'A Crisis of Waste?' and Jeff Ferrell, author of 'Empire of Scrounge', join Laurie to sift through the competing ways of understanding refuse.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Rubbish society: Laurie Taylor discusses the social impact of waste.

20120425

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

2012051620120521
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Laurie Taylor talks to speakers at the British Sociological Association conference 2012

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

2012062720120702

Laurie Taylor asks if a sociology of evil is possible. Also, the morality of cycling.

'Evil' is a concept more readily associated with theology and mental health than social science. But Michel Wievorka, the President of the International Sociological Association, argues, in his new book, for the development of a 'sociology of evil'. He's joined by Peter Young, Head of Criminology at the University of Kent.

Also, the sociologist, Judith Green, talks about her study into the the morality of cycling - do cyclists feel they are 'better' than drivers and have drivers conceded the ethical high ground?

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

2012100320121008

Sickness benefit claimants and their fear of the 'brown envelope'. Laurie Taylor hears about a new study into the views and experiences of the long term sick and disabled in the context of ongoing welfare reforms. The researcher, Kayleigh Garthwaite, highlights their ambivalence - whilst some have a deep seated anxiety about losing rights and income; others hope it will distinguish between the genuinely ill, such as themselves, and those that are 'faking'. Also, the former social science magazine 'New Society' broke new and radical grounds in its creation of a space for thoughtful debate about everyday culture and social issues; showcasing the ideas of academics and intellectuals as diverse as Angela Carter and Richard Hoggart. A former editor, Paul Barker, analyses the heyday and legacy of 'New Society' 50 years after its launch. He's joined by the writer, Lynsey Hanley and the Professor of Cultural Studies, Fred Inglis.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

*2008122420081231

Laurie Taylor brings past and present together to explore the culture of the detective.

He talks to criminologists Louise Westmarland and Dick Hobbs and Kate Summerscale, author of The Suspicions of Mr Whicher; or, The Murder at Road Hill House.

01/02/201220120206
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Britain and Ireland have always lagged far behind the rest of Western Europe in terms of second home ownership.

But, MPs apart, there is a relentless upsurge in people owning more than one residence.

In a new report Chris Parks has analysed the effect of the increase of home ownership on British and Irish society and compared it with other parts of the world.

He discusses his findings with Susan Smith and Laurie Taylor.

Also, Laurie talks to the writer Iain Sinclair about his examination of the culture of the urban cyclist.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

The growth in second home ownership and the cult of the bike.

02/03/201120110307

Is happiness the answer? Pascale Bruckner tells Laurie he doubts that it is.

02/09/200920090907

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

A new book explores what happens to people who return to the island of Dominica, the land of their birth, after living for many years in the UK.

Research suggests around 25 per cent of the Caribbean population will go back to their country of origin, either to work or on retirement.

But what are the forces which dictate this decision, and why do some people choose to go home and others choose to stay here? Research suggests that definitions of home are changing as the world contracts due to global communication and transport.

Laurie talks to Dr Margaret Byron, a social geographer, and the writer Mike Phillips about the meaning of return migration.

Also, the limits of ''silver power'; why old age doesn't lend itself to collective political action and identity.

New research finds that the pensioner movements of the interwar years, which helped shape the postwar welfare state, have declined in importance.

Laurie discusses the politics of ageing and pensioner power with Prof Paul Higgs.

Why do people return to their country of birth? Laurie Taylor explores return migration.

02/12/200920091207

How the ideology of Wall Street bankers shape the nature of employment in the US.

03/08/201120110808

Laurie Taylor investigates the curse of the mummy and other myths of the Orient.

04/11/200920091109

Laurie Taylor explores white collar crime.

What exactly is it, who commits it and why?

In a series of special programmes in association with the Open University, Laurie Taylor explores the subject of white collar crime, from its late addition to the statute books to the increasing difficulty in securing a conviction.

He speaks to the key academic experts in the field, explores the latest sociological research and hears from professionals on both sides of the law about the culture, the practice and most often the non-prosecution of white collar crime.

In this edition, Laurie considers the culture of the crime.

What exactly is white collar crime, who commits it and why?

05/08/200920090810

How Turkey's once revolutionary Islamists became a pillar of the state.

The Islamist movement in Turkey is not revolutionary, it does not decry the United States and it is not opposed to Turkey's liberal capitalist state.

In fact, it forms the democratically-elected government of that country and has done since 2002.

Laurie Taylor discusses an in-depth study which analyses how and why the Islamic movement in Turkey transformed itself into a pillar of the state, and asks whether the process could work in other Muslim countries.

Also, Richard Reeves joins Laurie to discuss the latest research into what it takes to get a decent job in Britain these days.

05/10/201120111010
06/05/200920090511

Laurie Taylor asks if the buildings built today cater for modern life.

Can the tubular steel and smoked glass dreams of leading architects ever take account of the mess of life? Jeremy Till claims that architecture exists in a bubble and ignores the way people really live.

He joins Laurie Taylor to discuss how architecture engages - or fails to engage - with the society for which it builds.

They are joined by Ricky Burdett, Chief Architectural Advisor for the Olympic Development Authority, to critique a profession whose output we all have to live with.

Plus, Will Atkinson from Bristol University introduces his groundbreaking study into the life decisions made by the children of working class parents.

He finds that despite claims that we live in a new society, class is remarkably durable.

06/07/201120110711
07/04/201020100412

Is the secular world under threat? Discussing new demographics and the future of belief.

The idea that modernity leads to a lessening religious belief is being abandoned by theorists in America and Europe.

Figures like Richard Dawkins and AC Grayling argue that increasingly religion seeks to impinge on science, and now the first systematic study of European cultural groups predicts that fundamentalists of all religions are out-breeding moderates and atheists, and will eclipse them quite soon.

In Israel the Ultra Orthodox will form the majority as soon as 2050.

Since the birth rate of secular people in the West is way below replacement level (2.1), and the birth rate of religious fundamentalists of practically any stripe is far above (roughly between 5 and 7.7 children per mother), through the sheer force of demography, academic Eric Kaufmann claims they will become a much bigger force in the Western World.

Is that inevitable? Should people be worried?

Laurie Taylor discusses the anxieties of atheists and the predictions of demography with three theorists of different perspectives.: The Professor of Contemporary Islamic Studies at Oxford University, Tariq Ramadan; Eric Kaufmann, Reader in Politics at Birkbeck College and author of Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth? and Rebecca Goldstein, philosopher and author of 36 Arguments for the Existence of God; A Work of Fiction.

07/10/200920091012

Sociologist Loic Wacquant discusses the consequences of a growing US prison system.

America's social state is withering at the expense of its expanding prison system and the UK is heading in the same direction, with potentially disastrous consequences.

That's the argument of Laurie Taylor's guest, Loic Wacquant, Professor of Sociology at the University of California.

From 1980 to 1990, spending by the US government on operating its prisons and correctional establishments doubled while at the same time spending on public housing more than halved.

According to Wacquant, this process is continuing; he says that 'the construction of prisons has effectively become the country's main housing programme'.

Are America's penal policies too harsh, and if prisons and correctional facilities are becoming increasingly important, what are the social consequences?

He talks to Laurie about why he believes America is too ready to accept a state of poverty for huge sections of its population and at the same time see the social state obliterated.

Is America punishing its poor and is the UK at risk of following the same path, overly dependent on prisons while eroding its social state?

08/02/201220120213
08/06/201120110613

Dirt, filth and why we like to be clean: A special edition at the Wellcome Collection.

08/09/201020100913

Laurie Taylor visits the British Society of Criminology Conference at Leicester University.

09/02/201120110214

Laurie discusses cosmetic surgery in Brazil and the health of British working men.

With a culture which equated health with beauty, Brazil has developed the biggest cosmetic surgery industry in the world.

Public clinics often offer classic cosmetic procedures for free and 'La Plastica' is the realisable aim of people who can sometimes not afford the bus fair to make their consultation.

How has plastic surgery become such an important part of the Brazilian culture and economy, and why is beauty seen as a 'right' for people who may not have electricity or running water.

Laurie talks to Monica Figuero from Newcastle University and Alex Edmonds who's written on this subject.

Also on the programme, Alan Dolan on how working class masculine culture in Britain puts men's health at risk.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

09/05/20122012050920120514
09/06/201020100614

The changing way we commemorate the dead: a study of the war in Afghanistan.

Since 2006 over 200 British soldiers have been killed in Helmand, Afghanistan.

Laurie Taylor discusses a new study which explores the way in which these dead solders have been commemorated in Britain.

We have become familiar with the painful sight of mourners lining the main street of Wootton Bassett, as hearses carry coffins away from RAF Lyneham.

In public acts of remembrance today soldiers are remembered as fathers, husbands, wives, sons and daughters.

This modern way of personalising and even domesticating soldiers is in stark contrast to the twentieth century rituals which mourn the sacrifice of anonymous individual soldiers who have died for the nation.

What lies behind this change of attitude and what impact is the new public consciousness likely to have on how and when we wage war? Laurie talks to Anthony King from Exeter University, author of 'The Afghan War and 'postmodern' memory: commemoration and the Dead of Helmand'.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

09/12/200920091214

Why are more people living on their own and what are the consequences for society?

The number of people living in single person households has doubled since 1971.

Why are more people living alone and what are the consequences for the environment and the economy? How do ideas in the popular press of the single lifestlye really match reality? Laurie Taylor talks to Lynn Jamieson, Professor of Sociology at the University of Edinburgh, and to Jan MacVarish from the University of Kent about one of the biggest demographic shifts since World War Two.

Also in the programme, Laurie discusses anthropological research into the culture of Wall Street.

How much is the global economy influenced by the culture of bankers; are wider, brutal economic forces the more powerful player? Laurie talks to Professor of Sociology Robin Blackburn, from the University of Essex.

10/02/201020100215

African American consumer culture and the history of tea.

The car was a potent symbol of freedom for black America, but the cultural critic Paul Gilroy argues that the escape it once represented has become a cage for the African American.

Consumerism and the ultimate commodity of the car has turned the fight for rights into a race to buy new things.

He tells Laurie Taylor how black people spend far more on their cars than whites and how the automobile has fatally undermined culture and community.

In his new book, Darker Than Blue, Paul Gilroy writes about how jazz, blues, hip-hop and much of what stood for black culture now seems generically American and is exported around the world.

And within the United States luxury goods, motor cars, branded items and a quest for individual gratification have diluted the collective spirit which brought African Americans the civil rights they won.

With his brilliant and provocative analysis, Paul Gilroy traces the shifting character of black culture on both sides of the Atlantic and offers an account of what it means to be black in Britain and the United States.

10/03/201020100315

The meaning of military futurology, and anti-racist comedy in the UK and US.

Armies have always sought to guess the enemy's next move based on past experience.

Such crystal gazing took on a fresh urgency during the Cold War as the new discipline of military futurology grappled with the threat of nuclear war.

Since then, military futurists have taken their imaginings into more apocalyptic realms.

Charged by Western policy makers with the task of 'thinking the unthinkable', they foresee future threats which owe as much to science fiction as to real life.

They anticipate cities controlled by terrorists and drug cartels, dictators who've acquired the genetic secret of longevity, even the development of a 'magic bullet' which can't be countered.

But do such grim predictions provide a justification for an endless global war against enemies that may never exist? Laurie Taylor discusses a new survey of military futurism with its author, Matthew Carr, and with the geographer Stephen Graham.

Also, from Richard Pryor to Lenny Henry - how humour can reinforce or subvert racial stereotypes.

The sociologist Simon Weaver tells Laurie about his research into the nature and variety of anti-racist comedy.

10/06/20092009061020090615

Exhibiting the 'Savage'.

How Paris and London created human zoos in the name of science.

Laurie Taylor discusses 'human zoos', the practice of putting colonial subjects on display to western audiences.

He is joined by Charles Forsdick, co-editor of Human Zoos: Science and Spectacle in the Age of Colonial Empires, and the cultural commentator Kate Berridge.

There were 20-25,000 on display, in special villages, in circuses and in bars.

Millions of spectators from New York to London, Tokyo to Warsaw visited at their feeding times, watched as they gave birth and came to ogle at their extraordinary physicality as they stood nude behind bars.

These were the people of Africa, Aboriginals from Australia, Fijians, Zulus and even Laplanders, brought to the cradle of imperialism to tell a story of savagery and civilisation.

Also Girl Racers, an ethnographic study of car modifiers in Aberdeen, and how the women involved in the youth cult intergrate themselves in a traditionally male pass time.

Karen Lumsden from Aberdeen University tells Laurie about her research.

11/01/201220120116
11/04/201220120416

Rubbish society: Laurie Taylor discusses the social impact of waste.

11/05/201120110516

Laurie Taylor explores representations of the paranormal in the media.

11/08/201020100816

Laurie Taylor discusses emancipation, black freedom ideas from slavery to the present.

11/11/200920091116

Why has corporate crime had such a low priority?

In a series of special programmes in association with the Open University, Laurie Taylor explores the subject of white collar crime, from its late addition to the statute books to the increasing difficulty in securing a conviction.

He speaks to the key academic experts in the field, explores the latest sociological research and hears from professionals on both sides of the law about the culture, the practice and most often the non-prosecution of white collar crime.

In this edition, Laurie explores the culture of corporate crime and how regulatory bodies serve to keep the police at arm's length.

In the UK, people are twice as likely to suffer a serious injury at work than to be a victim of violent crime, yet only a fraction of safety crimes are actually prosecuted.

Globally, more people are killed at work each year than are killed in war.

Why has corporate crime had a low priority, why has it been so hard to prosecute corporations and will the new crimes of corporate manslaughter and corporate murder make firms more responsible for the crimes they commit?

13/01/201020100118
13/05/200920090518

Laurie Taylor hears of new research which counters contemporary fears about immigration.

Are walls going up around Britain's communities? Are we sleepwalking to racial segregation? Laurie hears of new research which counters some contemporary fears about immigration in Britain.

In 2005, Trevor Phillips, then Chair of the Commission for Racial Equality warned, 'The walls are going up around many of our communities and the bridges are crumbling...

we are sleepwalking our way to segregation'.

Are there really ghettoes growing in Britain's cities? Laurie talks to Ludi Simpson about his new research into the state of segregation in Britain and hears from Tariq Modood about how and why Muslim communities are feared.

Also in the programme, Laurie hears from Rachel Shabi about the Mizrahis, Israel's Jews from Arab lands.

They talk Arabic and their customs are rooted in the Middle East, but despite constituting more that half of the Israeli population she claims that they are sidelined and discriminated against in their own country.

13/07/201120110718
14/10/200920091019

Laurie Taylor finds out about what we leave with the dead and why.

From clothes to jewellery, photographs, hats, eye glasses, walking sticks, letters and even food, alcohol and tobacco, the objects mourners leave in the coffins and caskets of their loved ones tells us a huge amount about our attitudes to death and the rituals it involves.

Laurie talks to Sheila Harper, sociologist at the Centre for Death and Society at the University of Bath, whose new study about 'modern-day grave goods' uncovers the fascinating, touching and often moving examples of our gifts to the dead and why the objects we leave today are remarkably similar to the kinds of items uncovered by archaeologists in graves going back thousand of years.

Duncan Sayer, archaeologist from the Centre for Death and Society, discusses how human society has buried their dead.

Also in the programme: alcohol as a lens to understand social change.

The links between drink, national identity and economic prosperity.

15/04/200920090420
15/06/201120110620

Combs, keys, glasses and bags - why some everyday objects have a special power.

15/09/201020100920

An exploration of the meaning and history of 'eavesdropping', from cafe society to Twitter.

16/12/200920091221

Laurie Taylor explores the history of prison clothing, from arrows to orange jumpsuits.

17/02/201020100222

A history of Intellectual piracy; the morality of obesity.

Disputes about piracy are often seen as a product of the internet age, but a new analysis claims a history going back to the advent of print culture in the 15th century.

Adrian Johns talks about his new book, Piracy: The Intellectual Property Wars from Gutenburg to Gates.

He tells Laurie Taylor how piracy spread the ideals of the Enlightenment and has been the engine of innovation as often as its enemy.

Adrian Johns argues that it exemplifies the struggle to reconcile commerce and creativity, and that the pirates are no longer just producers who stand to make a financial gain, but implicate many citizens who download music or films illegally in the confines of their home.

He suggests that these new forms of piracy force a radical reappraisal of the meaning of intellectual property.

Also on the programme, Laurie Taylor explores the morality of obesity.

He talks to Helena Webb about her study of the conversations between doctors and patients in an obesity clinic.

She explains why obese patients take credit for weight loss but make excuses for weight gain.

18/01/201220120123
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Does inequality lead to religion? Laurie Taylor explores the lastest research.

Tom Rees has conducted research into religion and personal insecurity in 50 countries.

Using figures on how much people pray and how unequal income is in each of them, he claims to have found evidence to show that the most religious societies are the most unequal, and concludes the inequality leads to religion.

Is it fear and hardship that makes people of one country more religious than another, or is there a mysterious third factor that can explain why some nations pray so much more than others? Laurie Taylor talks to Tom Rees about his findings, and to sociologist of religion David Voas.

What are the key factors the underlie acceptance to Oxford University? New research explores the influence of cultural factors on the decisions that admissions tutors make at the elite university.

After allowing for exam results and for cultural knowledge, Alice Sullivan tells Laurie that men were twice as likely to get a Science place than women and that some ethnic minorities faced an even greater disadvantage.

20/01/201020100125

The Future of Work and Teddy Bear Diaries.

Twitter, Broadband, BlackBerries, Globalisation - are they all forces ranged against out traditional concept of work or does a deeper analysis favour continuity over change? Laurie Taylor discusses the workplace of the future with Richard Donkin, author of The Future of Work, and with Kevin Doogan from Bristol University.

Are we all set to become 'portfolio workers' or is the factory system in place since the Industrial Revolution and the office 9 to 5 set to continue for a while yet.

Also, what have you been doing with your teddy lately? Schools have begun sending young children home with teddy bears to write diaries of their shared experiences over holidays or half-terms.

So widespread has this practice become that children as far apart as China and Norway are jotting down the daily experiences they share with these teds.

A unique opportunity for a sociologist to compare childhood experiences in these two places.

Laurie's guest Randi Waerdahl talks about her research.

20/05/200920090525

Slumming: how whites' wild times in America's black areas changed sex and politics forever

'Slumming' was the name given to the thousands of white middle class voyeurs crossing boundaries of race, class and sexual orientation to trip into the worlds of the poor on their dorstep.

There they learnt to drop the restraints of respectability and savoured an often salatious sense of sex and discovery in the period of prohibition.

The jazz raged, the 'pansies' preened, but after the party what was the effect on the communities they visitied? Laurie talks to the author of Slumming, Chad Heap, and the writer Bonnie Greer about the impact that the wild white adventuring in urban areas had on sexual and racial politics in America.

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

20/07/201120110725
21/07/201020100726

Leering punters, seedy dives, cruel and crude objectification of women's bodies...

the classic image of a strip joint does not leave much space for the notion that occasionally the women might enjoy the performances they give.

However, a new ethnography of a lap dancing club in the North of England presents a slightly more complicated picture of life as a sexual entertainer.

The sociologist Rachela Colosi worked as a dancer in the clubs she studied and her study offers a rare insiders account of the relationships between the dancers, with the management and the highs and lows, rewards and occasional despair of life as a stripper.

Also, Laurie Taylor will be talking to Marek Kohn about his predictions for the shape of British society in 2100 after global warming has brought its influence to bear.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Rachela Colosi tells Laurie about her detailed ethnography of a lap dancing club.

21/09/201120110926
21/10/200920091026

From suburbia to housing estates, Laurie Taylor discusses town and city planning.

How do housing estates and suburbs serve or fail to serve their residents? Three out of four British people live in the suburbs, many of which grew as cities and their populations expanded.

Laurie Taylor is joined by Paul Barker and Lynsey Hanley to discuss housing estates and suburbs.

What form of housing most fulfills people's desires? And will urban planning ever be able to fulfill Aneurin Bevan's dream of social integration?

Also on the programme, why modernity makes us forgetful.

Does the speed and transience of life today damage our shared and individual memories? The social anthropologist Paul Connerton thinks it does.

He discusses his latest book with Laurie Taylor.

22/04/200920090427

From duels to drive-by, Laurie Taylor discusses the history of murder.

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

Laurie discusses the history of murder, from duelling to drive-by killings, with Pieter Spierenburg, author of A History of Murder: Personal Violence in Europe from the Middle Ages to the Present and Joanna Bourke, author of An Intimate History of Killing.

Why was the murder rate higher in the Middle Ages than it is now? What factors have pushed the practice of killing men down the social order and should we worry about the first increase in the murder rate for over 200 years?

Laurie also hears of the surprise of Antje Bednarek, a German sociologist pursuing an ethnography of Young Scottish Conservatives.

She had not realised that tracking them down would be such a tricky business.

22/07/200920090727

Most of the research into black children's experience in British education has focused on the underachievement of boys, whereas black girls are thought to be doing well.

However, new research from Heidi Mirza at the Institute of Education shows that, far from being served well by the system, black girls are having to make huge efforts to overcome obstacles to their advancement and are still falling behind white girls and boys.

Laurie Taylor hears about supplementary schools, retaking GCSEs and entrenched attitudes from largely white teaching staff.

Laurie also hears about the secret history of roads.

Joe Moran calls them, 'the most commonly-viewed and least-contemplated landscape in Britain'.

He tells Laurie how our motorways are built on pulped remaindered literature and that migratory birds use our system as tools for their navigation.

Why black girls succeed and fail in education?

23/03/201120110328

Laurie Taylor explores shifts in world power.

Also, the legacy of 19th-century Temperance.

Will power and prosperity shift to the frozen North? A new book predicts that Iceland, Greenland, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, and Russia will be the beneficiaries of a new world order.

By 2050, four megatrends - climate change, rising population, globalisation and resource depletion - will lead to the rise of 'The New North', as migration, energy bonanzas and international trade turn the world upside down.

The geographer, Professor Laurence Smith, tells Laurie Taylor why these projections amount to more than planetary palm reading.

Also, does the morality of the 19th century Temperance movement influence modern day attitudes to drinking? The law lecturer, Henry Yeomans, argues that prohibitionism - contrary to popular belief - lives on in 'binge drinking' Britain.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

23/12/200920091228

Was marrying within the family key to success of the ruling classes in Victorian England?

The new bourgeoisie played an enormously important role in the history of industrial and imperial Britain.

The extent to which cousin marriage proliferated in the 19th century relates to the central question as to which people were going to lead Industrial England.

Close-knit families in Victorian England delivered enormous advantages.

They shaped vocations, generated patronage, yielded vital commercial information and gave access to capital; no wonder that marriage within the family, between cousins or between in-laws, was a characteristic strategy of this new bourgeoisie.

Laurie Taylor discusses private life in 19th-century England with Adam Kuper, the author of Incest and Influence: The Private Life of Bourgeois England, and Catherine Hall, professor of modern British social and cultural history at University College, London.

24/02/201020100301

CP Snow first used the phrase 'corridors of power' in his book Homecoming in 1956.

It soon became a cliché, conjuring up a world of officialdom, hierarchy, whispers and secret machinations.

The advent of open plan, with its airy atriums and glass walls, was supposed to put pay to all that, ushering in a new sense of democracy to the work place.

However, research from Rachel Hurdley reveals the hidden values of corridors.

The chance meetings, gossip and confrontations which actually undermine hierarchy will all be lost if we fail to appreciate the seemingly unimportant passage between doors.

She discusses her research with Laurie Taylor and with the architect Jeremy Till.

Simon Duncan, Professor of Comparative Social Policy at the University of Bradford, talks about the phenomenon of Living Apart Together - or 'LAT' - a form of relationship which keeps partners out of each other's living space.

Corridors under threat and is 'living apart together' a new form of family?

24/03/201020100328

In April the world's publishing industry descends on Earls Court for the London Book Fair.

It is principally a showcase of British books and an opportunity to sell their foreign rights but there is so much more going on.

Laurie Taylor talks to the social scientist Brian Moeran and the publishing industry insider Damian Horner about parties, restaurants, one-upmanship and the importance of long-term friendships in an industry which relies on something as intangible as the quality of a book.

He also talks to David Cox about the forerunners to the Metropolitan Police, the Bow Street Runners.

Were they anything more than corrupt thief-takers and a private security firm for the upper classes? Laurie hears new evidence which casts them as world class innovators in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Book fairs and the Bow Street Runners.

25/01/201220120130
25/08/201020100830

Laurie Taylor explores the meaning and relevance of Karl Marx's theory of alienation.

25/11/200920091130

Will UK party politics be transformed by new media and digital technology?

Barack Obama famously used new technologies in his 2008 election campaign.

Could those same techniques be used to reinvigorate the next UK general elction in the same way it did for Obama's Web 2.0 campaign? From MySpace and Facebook, text messages to email, will new media transform the election in the same way it did for America? Or is the UK too party political for digital technology to have the same impact? Laurie Taylor discusses with Rachel Gibson, Professor of Political Science at the University of Manchester.

Also, how musicians performing can give new insights into negotiation, learning and decision making.

Howard S Becker, professional jazz player and acclaimed sociologist, joins Laurie to discuss what jazz and music can teach the rest of the world.

26/01/201120110131

People have often referred to conflicts between the concepts we use to understand the best way to live - ideas like Liberty, Equality, Justice, Democracy.

You need to suppress one to achieve the other, and this - the argument goes - proves that they are not universal moral concepts.

In his engagingly titled new book, Justice for Hedgehogs, the US philosopher Ronald Dworkin seeks to show that there is no incompatibility between these ideas because they are part of a single unified value, they only appear to conflict because of the way we are looking at them.

But how do we ascribe this value with a universal role without recourse to God, or some other metaphysical entity? Laurie discusses the idea with Ronald Dworkin and AC Grayling.

Also, shinning up the greasy pole: Bill Jones talks about his essay on how Prime Ministers pick their ministers and how to get ahead in politics.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Ronald Dworkin and Anthony Grayling on liberty versus equality.

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

26/05/201020100531

Has black music declined? Laurie Taylor discusses with Paul Gilroy and Caspar Melville.

From Curtis Mayfield to 50 Cent, from Nina Simone to JayZ, black music has declined in its quality and lost its moral stance.

That's the contention of the cultural critic Paul Gilroy.

He joins Laurie Taylor and Caspar Melville to discuss the counter-cultural stance that black popular music once had, and explore whether it really has been destroyed.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

26/08/200920090831

Laurie Taylor discusses the life and work of leading cultural commentator Richard Hoggart.

Laurie Taylor discusses the life and work of leading cultural commentator Richard Hoggart, asking why his time is coming again.

Hoggart's evidence in the Lady Chatterley trial changed censorship for ever, his influence on the Pilkington Committee established the norms of public service broadcasting still in operation today and his academic work led to the invention of cultural studies in the UK.

He is considered a titan of contemporary culture and his famous book The Uses of Literacy combined sociology with literature and biography, going on to have a huge influence on the way popular culture was viewed.

That influence has been on the wane in recent decades, but now a new edition of Hoggart's book is about to be published, a biography is being written and a recent conference was dedicated to his work.

27/05/200920090601

Laurie hears of a new study which compares betting shops to 18th-century coffee houses.

The betting shop is an egalitarian space; unlike pubs there is no necessity to buy, and as long as your behaviour does not impact on anyone else's you can do what you want.

It also brings people of different backgrounds and ethnicities together in a unique way.

Although gambling carries a stigma and people often campaign against opening more betting shops in their communities, Rebecca Cassidy tells Laurie that they are incredibly cosmopolitan and tolerant, and are emblematic of changes that are happening in Britain.

Laurie also hears from Miriam Glucksmann, who has updated a study of women working on assembly lines which she first published anonymously nearly 30 years ago.

27/07/201120110801
28/04/201020100503

Laurie Taylor discusses capitalism with leading economists David Harvey and Ha Joon Chang.

Capital is the lifeblood that flows through the body politic of all those societies we call capitalist, spreading out, sometimes as a trickle and other times as a flood, into every nook and cranny of the inhabited world", writes David Harvey, the world's most cited academic geographer.

He gives Laurie a radical critique of what governs that flow of capital and what causes the crises which, he claims, will increasingly disrupt that flow with alarming rapidity.

Modern economics has buried its head in detail but ignored the systematic character of capital flow, he claims, and it is time for a restore an understanding of how capital works.

Also on Thinking Allowed is the Cambridge development economist Ha-Joon Chang.

In his analysis the detailed global programmes on international development amount to little more than poverty reduction, and the rich world is keeping the less developed countries poor in the name of free trade.".

28/07/201020100802

How does having more choice affect our lives? Laurie Taylor discusses a new study.

We are told that life presents us with myriad choices.

Like products on a supermarket shelf, our jobs, our relationships, our bodies and our identities are all there for the choosing.

We are encouraged to 'be ourselves', but the pressure to make those choices can lead to enormous anxiety.

In a new study Renata Selacl researches dating sites, self help books and people's relationship to celebrity, and uncovers the complexities involved in the choices we make and how they often lead to disquiet.

In Thinking Allowed on 28 July, Laurie Taylor explores whether we have too much choice in our lives.

Also, a new study from Norwegian Sociologist Sveinung Sandberg looks at the life skills that Oslo drug dealers acquire and explores whether operating from within a welfare state is very different from the street life of dealers in the USA.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

28/09/201120111003
28/10/200920091102

The social and cultural influences on bereaved families' decisions to donate organs.

While nine out of ten people agree organ donation is a good thing, a recent audit found 40 per cent of bereaved families, when approached, didn't agree to donate.

Laurie Taylor discusses new research which uncovers some of the reasons behind this apparent anomaly.

Magi Sque, from the University of Southampton, was part of a team who interviewed families who had declined organ donation.

While many agreed in principle, carried organ donor cards and knew their relatives desire to donate, they still didn't feel able to let their loved ones organs be used.

The most common reason families gave for this was a simple desire to keep the body intact.

They didn't want the dead to be 'hurt' any more.

Magi explains why the research reveals some of our deep-seated cultural beliefs, and how those beliefs have their roots in wider society's values and, at times of grief, can completely overcome our pre-existing views.

We also hear from Professor Caroline Knowles of Goldsmiths College, London who has researched the history, meaning and journey of the flip flop sandal.

29/06/201120110704
30/09/200920091005

Laurie Taylor discusses the secret codes of criminal communication.

Laurie Taylor discusses the language of crime and the codes of criminal communication with Diego Gambetta, mafia scholar and criminal sociologist.

He finds out why, in order to survive in the criminal underworld, language requires subtle, coded and sometimes gruesome modes of communication to avoid being found out by rivals or police.

Laurie is joined by Dick Hobbs, sociologist from the LSE, to find out why the language of the criminal underworld is often written in code.

Also, what makes a scandal? Ari Adut from the University of Texas discusses.

30/12/200920100104

Laurie Taylor is at the University of Bedfordshire to discuss class and social mobility.

31/03/201020100405

Sexuality in later life and interracial relationships in Latin America.

Current sexual surveys reveal that many older people continue to enjoy sex.

As the ageing population expands, the pharmaceutical industry has been quick to exploit opportunities to market drugs to eliminate age related sexual problems.

But the sociologist Professor Barbara Marshall tells Laurie that sexual medicine is in danger of pathologising the normal processes of ageing and promoting a youth centred definition of sexuality.

Also, does love overcome race in Brazilian democracy? There is a much higher intermarriage between races in South America than in Europe or the USA, Laurie explores the underlying traits which govern who marries whom in Latin American Society.

Aids Conspiracy Theories; Comics2012053020120604
20120604 (R4)

British comics are full of iconic and transgressive characters from Dan Dare to Minnie the Minx. Laurie Taylor talks to professor James Chapman the author of a new book charting the cultural history of British comics. They are joined by the broadcaster Matthew Sweet.

Also, Professor Nicoli Nattrass explains why a disproportionate percentage of Black South Africans and African Americans subscribe to conspiracy theories about the origins of AIDS..

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

A cultural history of British comics plus AIDS conspiracy theories.

Alexis De Tocqueville - Call Centres20061122

Laurie Taylor examines the legacy of one of the greatest political thinkers of all time, Alexis de Tocqueville.

With his biographer and eminent American studies scholar, Professor Hugh Brogan, Laurie wonders what would de Tocqueville have to say about democracy today.

Alienation20100830
Another World Is Possible If20041020

Laurie Taylor talks to veteran anti globalisation campaigner Susan George about her new book 'Another World is Possible If' which proposes that fellow activists should balance their zeal with a dose of realism.

Archaeology Of Homelessness; Residential Care Revisited2012112120121126

Residential care revisited - Laurie Taylor considers Peter Townsend's landmark research, 'The Last Refuge', fifty years after its publication. Retracing Townsend's footsteps, a hundred, older volunteer researchers sought to find out what had happened to the 173 care homes in his classic study. Julia Johnson, one of the authors of the new study, charts the changes and continuities in care for older people in England and Wales. She's joined by Robin Darton, an expert in social care, Also, the archaeologist Rachael Kiddey, examines artefacts from two homelessness sites in Bristol and York. What can these items, as well as oral histories collected from the homeless, tell us about what it means to have no shelter in the 21st century?

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Older people in residential care - a landmark study. Also, an archaeology of homelessness.

Residential care revisited - Laurie Taylor considers Peter Townsend's landmark research, 'The Last Refuge', fifty years after its publication. Retracing Townsend's footsteps, a hundred, older volunteer researchers sought to find out what had happened to the 173 care homes in his classic study. Julia Johnson, one of the authors of the new study, charts the changes and continuities in care for older people in England and Wales. Also, the archaeologist Rachel Kiddy, examines artefacts from two homelessness sites in Bristol and York. What can these items, as well as oral histories collected from the homeless, tell us about what it means to have no shelter in the 21st century?

Are You Being Served? - Madame Tussaud20060621
Australian State Boundaries20030604

Laurie Taylor hears from Australia about a State boundary that only makes sense when Western and Aboriginal concepts of mapping are combined.

Automobility And The Hummer - Khat20061213
Becoming Yellow - Journalist Bias20111024

Laurie Taylor explores impartiality in TV political interviewing.

Laurie Taylor explores impartiality in TV political interviewing and he examines how the colour 'yellow' became applied to people of Asian origin.

Professsor Ian Hutchby from the University of Leicester discusses a recent seminar 'Going Ballistic: Non-neutrality in the Televised Hybrid Political Interview'.

In it, he outlines the structures of a new form of televised political journalism, the Hybrid Political Interview (HPI), which combines standard forms of interview technique with much more tendentious, opinionated, and even argumentative reporting.

Laurie and Ian are joined by the Director of Broadcasting at City University, Lis Howell.

Laurie also discusses a new book called 'Becoming Yellow: A short history of racial thinking'.

Professor Michael Keevak from The National Taiwan University explores how the notion of the colour yellow became attached to people of Asian origin.

Producer: Chris Wilson.

Binge Drinking & British Alcohol Policy - Rural Racism20060920

Does our rural idyll include those of the wrong colour? Laurie Taylor explores the reality of rural racism; the forms it takes and the ways in which it can be challenged.

Black Emancipation20100816

When 'Liberte, egalite, fraternite' first defined the ideals of French Revolution, it was over half century before they applied to the hundreds of thousands of slaves working in the French Colonies.

Similarly the ideals of 'Life Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness', failed to encompass American slaves until as late as 1863.

When these slaves were freed a complicated debate began on what freedom really meant, and how true freedom would be achieved.

From Booker T Washington to Martin Luther King, from WEB Dubois to Frantz Fanon, ideas of black freedom have been defined, tested and fought for.

In the first of a three part series tracing some of the key ideas of sociology, Laurie Taylor talks to Paul Gilroy, Brett St Louis and Gurminder Bhambra about ideas of black freedom and the impact they have had.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Laurie Taylor discusses emancipation, ideas of black freedom from slavery to the present.

Blame The Parents? - Chungking Mansions, Hong Kong20110822

Blame the parents? New research on UK gangs.

Also, Chungking Mansions in Hong Kong.

Are we right to blame the parents? Is there anything they could do? Laurie Taylor speaks to two researchers behind a massive investigation into the families of British gang members.

Judith Aldridge and Jon Shute tell him what they discovered about the lives and experience of families with children in gangs and whether it is possible to intervene.

Also, Gordon Mathews, the author of a book about Chungking Mansions, the cheapest accommodation in Hong Kong, describes its multifarious residents.

This ramshackle building in the heart of the tourist district is home to a polyethnic melting pot of people - from Pakistani phone stall operators to American backpackers and Indonesian sex workers.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Book Publishing - Active Citizenship20101115

Laurie Taylor examines new research about publishing and looks at active citizenship.

Laurie Taylor talks to Cambridge sociologist Professor John Thompson about his book 'Merchants of Culture' which approaches the US/UK publishing trade from an anthropological point of view.

Laurie also talks to MP Jesse Norman and author Dan Hind about Dan's new book The Return of the Public arguing for more active citizenship.

Producer: Chris Wilson.

Boxing Styles Uk Vs Us - Why Nations Fail20120312

Why do some nations remain mired in poverty whilst others thrive? A new book argues that the clue to prosperity has less to do with a country's climate, culture and geography than with the inclusivity of its institutions. Authoritarian regimes may succeed in the short run, but long term wealth is only ensured by secure private property, the rule of law and democracy. James Robinson, Professor of Government at Harvard University, discusses his thesis with Laurie Taylor. They're joined by Paul Collier, Professor of Economics at Oxford University. Also 'A Straight Left against a Slogging Ruffian' - the origins of different boxing styles in the UK and US. Research by, Kasia Boddy, an English lecturer at University College, London, explores the boxing boom in the years leading up to the First World War. How did anxieties about the pre-war balance of power turn into a debate on the pros and cons of English versus American styles of boxing? And does this cultural clash about sporting technique still get played out today?

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Why Nations Fail. Plus boxing, UK and US style.

Breaking Rules; Wall Street Women2012081520120820

Inside the world of Wall Street women, and the role of morality in preventing crime.

The first generation of women to establish themselves on Wall Street began their careers in the 1960s. Laurie Taylor hears from Melissa Fisher about her in depth study of the working lives of the women at the heart of America's financial centre, and Liz Bolshaw joins the discussion to bring a comparison with women in The City of London.

Also, Beth Hardie joins Laurie to discuss her new report on youth crime in Peterborough called Breaking Rules. Does morality have a role in preventing people committing crime? Her study uncovers its importance.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

British Asian Identity - Bsa Annual Conference - Cycle Messengers20060419

What is the significance of employment within Pakistani men's peer group relations? And how do the social dynamics that underlie those relations provide the context for understanding the particular nature and form that ethnicity takes?

Laurie Taylor looks at Britain's South Asian communities, the variations within it and the nature of the inequalities it faces, by exploring how labour market positions influence identity.

British Chinese Pupils - Sudden Deaths20060524
Builders And Musicians2012071820120723

Building workers constitute between five and ten per cent of the total labour market in almost every country. We rely on them to construct the infrastructure of our societies yet we know little about their culture. The sociologist, Darren Thiel, talks to Laurie Taylor about his study into their every day lives on a London construction site.

Also, drawing on research with musicians in the North East of England, Dr Susan Coulson finds that co-operation, creativity and entrepreneurship make uneasy bedfellows.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Builders' lives and the cooperation between musicians.

Capital Punishment20031007
Catholic Police Officers In Northern Ireland - Facebook2011041320110418

Catholic police officers in Northern Ireland and Facebook in Trinidad.

In the wake of the murder of Ronan Kerr, a Catholic police officer in Omagh, Laurie talks to Dr Mary Gethins about her research into the Catholic police officers who have joined the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI).

She conducted a survey of 300 serving officers followed by in depth interviews with 70 current, trainee and officers and explored the rewards for doing a job which can isolate people from their communities, expose them to prejudice from colleagues and always carries the risk of violence from dissident republicans.

Community policing is an enduring problem for the force with some Catholic communities utterly rejecting the legitimacy of the police.

Will the PSNI eventually becoming an integrated force, respected by Catholics and Protestants alike? Perhaps the strong reaction against the murder of Ronan Kerr will help establish the authority of the police force across Northern Irish society.

Also on Thinking Allowed, Facebook in Trinidad.

Laurie talks to Danny Miller about his ethnographic study of Facebook users in the Caribbean island.

He finds it can wreck your marriage, put your job in jeopardy but actually bolsters community and augments many of the positive aspects of modern life.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Change - Working Class Education20060927
Channel 4 - The Day Of The Dead2007103120071105
Charisma20050126

Winston Churchill was a charismatic leader, but what exactly makes a person charismatic? Laurie Taylor investigates.

Chavs - Ageing Goths20110704

Have the working class in modern Britain become objects of fear, scorn and ridicule? That's the claim of Owen Jones who joins Laurie and Imogen Tyler on today's Thinking Allowed.

He claims that the media and politicians alike dismiss as feckless, criminal and ignorant a vast, underprivileged section of society whose members have become stereotyped by one, disgust-filled word - 'chavs'.

If this is true, then how has the reality of the working-class majority become regularly served up as a feral rump for our contempt and amusement?

Also, what happens to Goths when they get old? Laurie talks to Paul Hodkinson about his study of members of that youth cult which used to be called Gothic Punk.

How have they adapted their love of black clothes, multiple piercings, make up and androgyny to mortgages, children and the rites of passage incumbent upon middle age?

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

That word 'chav' and the characterisation of the working class.

Also, ageing Goths.

Children And Consumption - Pessimism20060712
Children In Hospitals; History, Heritage And Tradition In British Politics2012121220121217

British politics, heritage and history. Laurie Taylor explores the divergent stories political parties construct about our history and their own historical roles. From disputes over the National Curriculum for History to the assertion of a lost 'social democratic' tradition by New Labour. Research Fellow, Emily Robinson, argues that politicians' manipulation of the past leaves them unable to speak of different futures. Also, Allison James talks about her research on the experience of sick children in hospital.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

How British political parties construct history, and children's experiences in hospital.

Children, Sex And Mobile Phones - Terror Of History20110815

With Laurie Taylor.

Mobile phones and sexual discovery, also the 'terror of history'.

What role does the mobile phone have in showing off, hooking up and getting dumped? Laurie talks to Emma Bond about her new study into how young people use mobile phones in their intimate sexual relationships.

Also on the programme the historian Teofilo Ruiz talks about the radical thesis of his book the Terrors of History: Is our struggle to find rational solutions to the fearful events of history entirely in vain? Is the idea of progress nothing more than a sweet lie? David Byrne also joins them to discuss whether anything can be done to address the cruel vicissitudes that history makes us suffer.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

China And The Markets - Ufo Religion2007102420071029
Cities And Ethnicities2008040220080407

Can identifying with a city rather than a nation help racial integration? Laurie Taylor asks what causes harmony and what causes racial tension in today's cities.

Cities And Memory2008010220080107
Civic Core - Public Convenience20101129

Laurie Taylor examines new research into the public convenience.

Laurie Taylor talks to Professor Harvey Molotch from New York University about his book examining public conveniences from a sociological, architectural and town planning perspective.

Laurie also discusses the idea of a 'civic core'- who volunteers in their community and how? - and talks to Professor John Mohan about his research paper exploring volunteerism.

They are joined by Professor Su Maddock.

Producer Chris Wilson.

Class At Christmas20101227

Laurie Taylor explores Christmas, compassion and class, from the Victorian era to today.

Chestnuts roasting on an open fire, children gathered beneath a sparking tree, a table groaning with turkey....the cliches of the season are as alive and well as they were in Dickens time.

But does everybody have equal access to the bounty of Christmas and the good will of others? The geographer, Steve Millington, finds that the distaste some middle class people feel for 'excessive' displays of xmas lights in working class areas reveals a narrative of class hostility which echoes Victorian attitudes to the 'undeserving' poor.

He joins Laurie Taylor, the sociologist Bev Skeggs and the historian Julie Marie Strange to explore Christmas, compassion and class, then and now.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Comedy Capital - Work's Intimacy20110711

British comedy, from Music Hall to TV sitcom, was once a democratic medium.

Humour united people otherwise divided by class and education.

But new research finds that the Alternative Comedy Movement transformed comedy's place in our culture.

It rejected the 'lowbrow' tone of earlier humour, creating the basis for comic taste to provide new forms of social distinction.

The sociologist, Sam Friedman joins Laurie Taylor to debate comedy snobbery.

Also, mobile communications have elided the distinction between work and home.

The cultural studies lecturer, Melissa Gregg, and the Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis, Rosalind Gill, ask if the lines between our personal and professional lives are increasingly blurred.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Laurie considers the links of our work and home lives plus the cultural currency of comedy.

Communities In The Mind - Creolisation20060125
Conflict, Anxiety And Discontent20040324

Laurie Taylor reports from the British Sociological Association Annual Conference in YORK - the theme is conflict, anxiety and discontent.

Conspiracy Theories - International Suffering20120130

Do you remember the moon landings? Up to 20% of American believe they never happened. When it comes to 9/11 the public suspicion is even greater. Polls consistently show that between 30% and 40% of Americans think the official account is a cover up, that the US establishment was directly involved in planting explosives in the towers or was guilty of deliberately looking the other way as the attacks were planned. In this country we are scarcely more trusting. Why has suspicion of conspiracy become so widespread? Laurie discusses the lure of the conspiracy theory with David Aaronovitch and Jovan Byford.

Also on the programme, the suffering of strangers: What is it that makes us care for people we have never met and have very different lives from our own? A sense of justice or an impulse for charity? Laurie talks to Kate Nash

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Exploring conspiracy theories and the suffering of strangers.

Cook Books And Identity - Cultural Identities And Globalisation2008042320080428
Cosmetic Tourism - Debt 5,000 Years20120116

In Britain the market for cosmetic surgery is now estimated to be worth about £900 million per year, and world-wide it is growing fast too, with people increasingly combining surgery with a holiday abroad. The lines between a hospital procedure and a recuperative break are being blurred and Laurie hears of new research from Ruth Holiday exploring the experiences of people who have a face-lift in Costa Rica or liposuction in Koh Samui. Jacqueline Sanchez-Taylor tells him about her study of young British women who view breast augmentation as a beauty treatment, 18 women from one group of friends have all had the op and are very relaxed about the risks.

Also on the programme - being in the red is nothing new: David Graeber tells Laurie about his anthropological study of 5,000 years of Debt which shows that dispensing credit precedes even the invention of money.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

5,000 years of debt, plus cosmetic surgery tourism.

Cosmopolitanism - Dietetics20110117

Laurie Taylor explores cosmopolitan values and the morality of medicine and health.

Many of our global problems - from climate change to terrorism - require international not local solutions.

Yet the world is increasingly fractured by nationalism.

The political scientist, David Held, has a new book which explores cosmopolitan values.

He tells Laurie Taylor why we should regard ourselves as citizens of the world rather than members of nations.

Also, should we take responsibility for our own health, bodies and nutrition? Steven Shapin, Professor of the History of Science, talks about Dietetics - a branch of traditional western medicine which sought to prevent illness rather than find a cure.

Originating in the 2nd century it held that good health reflected a virtuous life.

This moral approach to the body died out with the advent of modern science but may now be enjoying a revival.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Couchsurfing - Trauma Advocacy2012110720121112

Ever in need of a new way to travel? 'Couchsurfing', in the form of online social networking, allows users to travel with and stay at the homes of fellow users. It's just one example of how the internet aids face to face intimacy - sometimes amongst strangers. Paula Bialski talks to Laurie Taylor about her book 'Becoming Intimately Mobile'. Based on five years of ethnographic research amongst coach surfers and online hitchhiking website users, it documents new forms of human hospitality and connection. Also, trauma advocates in Croatia. Vanessa Pupavac and Ben Shephard reflect on the growth of compensation schemes for victims of civil war.

Producer:Jayne Egerton.

Craft And Community20110502

Is DIY culture and home improvement linked to the ideals of John Ruskin? David Gauntlett, author of Making is Connecting believes it is and he contends that bloggers and online enthusiasts are the inheritors of Britain's creative culture - making communities through their craft in the same way that medieval stone masons used to do.

But is posting a skate-boarding dog on YouTube really comparable to carving a gargoyle on a gothic cathedral? The sociologist Richard Sennett joins Laurie Taylor and David Gauntlett to discuss making things, creating communities and what counts as craftsmanship.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Laurie Taylor explores craft and community with Richard Sennett and David Gauntlett.

Craftwork And Skill2008020620080211
Creating Capabilities20110801

Development of a country is conventionally measured by GDP, but that can mask a growing inequality in that nation and makes no reference to freedoms, rights or education. The philosopher Martha Nussbaum outlines her 'human capabilities' approach which she has developed with the Nobel Prize winning economist Amartya Sen. She tells Laurie that her index can be applied around the world and across all cultures as an index which measures how populations are flourishing or flailing.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Martha Nussbaum on human capabilities.

Development of a country is conventionally measured by GDP, but that can mask a growing inequality in that nation and makes no reference to freedoms, rights or education.

The philosopher Martha Nussbaum outlines her 'human capabilities' approach which she has developed with the Nobel Prize winning economist Amartya Sen.

She tells Laurie that her index can be applied around the world and across all cultures as an index which measures how populations are flourishing or flailing.

Crime Mapping - Obituary Yuri Levada20061206
Cuban Cure - Moral Panics20101213

Laurie explores Cuba's success in developing world-beating bioscience.

Also moral panics.

With the huge investment needed and patents which have the potential to generate a lot of money, biochemistry is perhaps the most capitalistic strain of science.

How did Cuba - a socialist, embargoed, isolated, developing world country - manage to become one of the world's leaders in genetic modification and bioscience? Laurie talks to Simon Reid Henry, Lecturer in Geography at Queen Mary London about his new book The Cuban Cure; Reason and Resistance in Global Science.

Also on the programme - 'moral panics'.

The phrase was first defined by Stan Cohen in an analysis of the reaction to Mods and Rockers fighting on Britain's beaches.

Since then it has been used many times by social scientists to describe media reaction to everything from dangerous dogs to binge drinking, but how useful is the term? Does it falsely imply that there is no underlying reason for social concern? Laurie discusses the uses and abuses of the notion of moral panic with Chas Critcher, Emeritus Professor of Communications at Sheffield Hallam University and Jewel Thomas, Post Graduate Researcher, Oxford University.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Culinary Culture And Globalisation - Dignity20120402

With Laurie Taylor. Including Michelin-starred restaurants and the meaning of dignity.

Britain congratulates itself on the success of its restaurants and its stable of 21 multiple Michelin-starred eateries, but how many people know that Germany has nearly double that figure? What are the Germans cooking up that leaves the Brits behind? Economic sociologist Christel Lane discusses her recent research with Laurie Taylor, arguing that, while French culture still dominates in restaurants awarded multiple stars by the 'little red book', it is a regional emphasis which sets Germany apart. Food critic and editor of Waitrose Kitchen William Sitwell joins the discussion of the extent of globalising factors in the high end restaurant industry. Does the ubiquity of lemongrass or the rise of the Othello Cake show that French influence is starting to wane?

Also in the programme: why do we show dignity towards the dead when they are not around to appreciate it? Dignity is a quality which pervades many aspects of modern life. Philosopher Michael Rosen explains the practical applications of dignity, how it forms the basis of notions like human rights and the tangles and confusions that arise from diverging notions of what dignity means.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Culture - Abstinence And Personal Identity20060412

How do humans decide to withhold from doing something? Labels like vegetarian, virgin, recovering alcoholic or non-smoker get thrown around to identify forms of abstinence.

Laurie Taylor investigates.

Culture Of Apocalypse - Politics Of The Veil2008012320080128
Cunning - Online Dating20060426

Laurie Taylor explores what it means to be cunning, as he is led through an enticing labyrinth full of problems.

How do we strip away pretext to unmask the underlying reality?

Dective Tours And Russian Organised Crime20100510

From Morse to Wallander, the anthropology of the detective tour.

Plus criminals in Russia.

Crime tours which take people to the scenes from works of detective fiction are an increasing feature of regional tourism across Europe.

What draws people to the places where fictional murders were imagined to have taken place?

Laurie Taylor talks to Stijn Reijnders who has made an anthropological study of three detective tours, Wallander in Sweden, Baantjer in Holland and Morse in Oxford.

The crime fictional novelist Val Mcdermid joins them to discuss her impression of the importance of landscape in encapsulating impressions of crime and guilt.

Also on the programme Patricia Rawlinson discusses her study of organised crime in Russia.

When Soviet era economics made way for 'Shock Therapy' privatisation in the early 1990s, the resulting social chaos was blamed on organised crime.

Was it to blame? And is gangsterism really so antithetical to unbridled capitalism?

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Demise Of A Welsh Steel Town - Sexual Politics Of Ballroom Dancing (bsa 60th Anniversary)2011042020110425

A special edition marking the British Sociological Association's 60th anniversary.

Laurie Taylor considers some of the seminal figures who've changed the face of sociology in the UK over more than half a century.

He also highlights some of the most interesting research to emerge from this year's BSA conference, including Professor Valerie Walkerdine's study of the demise of breadwinning masculinity in a former South Wales steel town.

How do men cope when few options are available other than 'women's work' in supermarkets and industrial cleaning? In addition, he hears about Dr Vicki Harman's exploration of ballroom dancing and traditional gender roles.

Is it possible to be a feminist as well as being twirled around in a cloud of chiffon and sequins?

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

A special edition with new research from the British Sociological Association conference.

Democracy, Liberty And Human Rights20061018

Why are American politics in such an appalling state? And what does it mean for the rest of us? Laurie Taylor is in conversation with distinguished law professor, and leading political philosopher, Ronald Dworkin, in his weekly look at the latest academic research.

Denmark20060823

is a country well known for its tolerance of alcohol, drugs and pornography - but it also boasts the highest rates of under-age binge drinkers in Europe.

Laurie investigates the reasons behind these figures and asks whether there is a growing ambivalence in Denmark towards their famed liberality.

Dirt20040114

This week Laurie Taylor discusses our attitudes towards dirt and cleanliness.

Laurie Taylor talks to Tim Dant, sociologist at the University of East Anglia who has been exploring the significance of dirt in the work of technicians who service and repair cars.

Having to deal with dirt and grease, which both have an ambiguous form, feel, colour and texture means that the work of technicians can be seen as 'dirty work' and is often regarded as low status and unattractive in comPARISon to high status 'clean work' of offices.

Laurie contrasts his work with Elizabeth Shove, sociologist at Lancaster University and author of 'Comfort, Cleanliness and Convenience' who has been examining our changing attitudes towards cleanliness and dirt removing strategies such as bathing and showering.

Disenchantment20100818

The sociologist Max Weber saw the Enlightenment as the period when science started to take over from religion as the way of comprehending human existence, and became the defining character of modernity.

The process of casting magic and superstition aside in favour of rationality he defined as 'disenchantment': no longer was the world a place of supernatural signs and natural magic.

In the second of a special series of programmes looking at some of the key concepts in social science, Laurie Taylor explores the idea of disenchantment with three experts.

David Voas, Sam Whimster and Linda Woodhead, discuss how the idea has been applied to understanding the development of secular societies and whether we are now entering a phase of re-enchantment.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

The impact of the rational: Laurie Taylor explores the social concept of 'Disenchantment'.

Disenchantment20100823
Drugs Trial Calamity - Mccarthy Stigma20101011

Laurie Taylor examines new research about black listed artists during the McCarthy period.

Professor Laurie Taylor looks at new research dealing with the McCarthy period in US History when actors and artists found themselves unable to work having been denounced or charged for having associations with communism.

The stigma and the effect of the accusations is examined by Elizabeth Pontikes, author of 'Stained Red' and she discusses her detailed analysis of the work prospects of those associated with black listed actors and film workers in the US film Industry from 1945 to 1960.

Laurie also talks to Professor Adam Hedgecoe about his sociological research into a drug trial that went disastrously wrong.

Producer: Chris Wilson.

Economic Migration And Happiness - Hairdressing And Emotional Labour20101018

Laurie Taylor discusses being paid to be nice and explores migration versus happiness.

Laurie Taylor asks whether migrants who move to another country for economic reasons are likely to increase their levels of happiness with higher incomes.

Using the USA as a focus for his research, Dr David Bartram from Leicester University uncovers evidence that casts doubt on this assertion and he's joined by Bristol University researcher Dr Michaela Benson who has written widely about migration and happiness.

Laurie's second topic for discussion is 'being paid to be happy'.

Rachel Cohen is a Senior Research Fellow at the University of Warwick and her research paper "When it pays to be friendly: Employment Relationships and Emotional Labour in Hairstyling" is discussed by Laurie and by writer Michael Bywater, who explores the broader notion of being paid to be friendly.

Producer.

Chris Wilson.

Emerging Tolerance20040804

This programme marks the start of the Thinking Allowed summer series, a four part ethnographic portrait of Amsterdam.

Laurie Taylor explores the origins of the city's much admired reputation for tolerance - from the roots of Calvinism and the democratic principles of water management to the squatter movement and the momentous effect this had on the city.

Englishness20040428

Laurie Taylor considers what it is that makes the ENGLISH quite so ENGLISH.

Ethical Capital - The Burden Of Happiness20110307

The British government is seeking to develop a way to accurately measure the happiness of the population.

In France such a gauge already exists, but is happiness really the proper goal of life? The French philosopher Pascal Bruckner tells Laurie Taylor that happiness has become a burdensome duty, and that the wave of enthusiasm for pursuing the nebulous quality has the opposite effect of actually promoting unhappiness amongst those who seek it.

Much better, says he, to accept that happiness as an unbidden and fragile gift, arrives only by grace and luck.

Also on the programme, Patricia Drentea talks about her new study 'Ethical Capital: What's a Poor Man Got to Leave?'.

It looks at the hoped for legacy of people who have no financial assets to leave their families.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Is happiness the answer? Pascal Bruckner says it is not.

Also, the legacies of the poor.

Ethnic Pay Gap, Racial Segregation2012091920120924

Segregation: a Global History of Divided Cities' Laurie Taylor talks to Carl Nightingale, the author of a groundbreaking new book about the ideology and practice of racial segregation in the city. Traversing continents and millennia, he analyses the urban divide from its imperial origins to postwar suburbanisation; from the racially split city of Calcutta to the American South in the age of Jim Crow. Finally, he considers the extent to which separation by race continues to deform the contemporary city. Also, the sociologist Malcolm Brynin, charts the causes and consequences of pay gaps between different ethnic groups in the UK.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

New research on how society works. Racial segregation in the city - past and present.

Segregation: a Global History of Divided Cities' Laurie talks to Carl Nightingale, the author of a groundbreaking new book about the ideology and practice of racial segregation in the city. Traversing continents and millennia, he analyses the urban divide from its imperial origins to postwar suburbanisation; from the racially split city of Calcutta to the American South in the age of Jim Crow. Finally, he considers the extent to which separation by race continues to deform the contemporary city.

Euro-islamaphobia - Viewing The Body2008031220080317
Evacuation20100517

The social impact of sending millions from the cities to the country during WWII.

In 1939 over three quarters of a million unattended schoolchildren left Britain's towns for the supposed safety of the countryside.

They were the first wave of evacuees and they stunned their rural hosts with their combination of lice, bedwetting, bad table manners, dirtiness, inadequate clothing and malnutrition.

For the first time the realities of urban deprivation were brought out of the shadows of the city and into the light of public opinion.

What effect did the experience have on social policy in Britain? Laurie Taylor talks to John Welshman, the author of a new book Churchill's Children: The Evacuee experience in war time Britain and also to the social historian Selina Todd.

Also on the programme the extraordinary enthusiasm for the barbecue which gripped America in the years after the war.

Laurie talks to Tim Miller about the birth of what has become known as 'Patio Daddy-o'.

Evil Incarnate - Violent Night20060719
Family Funerals; Red Tape2012112820121203

Red Tape in India - a major new study by the renowned anthropologist, Akhil Gupta, seeks to understand why state bureaucracy hinders the fight against poverty in the world's third largest economy. Laurie Taylor hears about his ethnographic study among officials in charge of development programs in rural Uttar Pradesh. Why is it that the expansion of government programmes have failed to improve significantly the lives of the poorest? Fellow anthropologist, Dr Alpa Shah, joins the discussion. Also, the sociologist, Kate Woodthorpe explores how funeral arrangements illuminate the modern family.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Family Life Running Hotels - Slum Travellers2008021320080218

Laurie Taylor explores the lot of London's poor a century ago through the accounts of pioneering Socialist reformer Beatrice Webb.

Fanaticism20100621

: use and abuse of a wild idea.

Laurie Taylor talks to John Gray.

How much does Robespierre have in common with Bin Laden? Can you equate Stalin with Savonarola? The term 'fanatic' is often applied to those who criticise the status quo, and a new book by Alberto Toscano explores the question of whether fanaticism ever means more than the ideas of which the West does not approve.

In 'Fanaticism', Toscano traces the development of the idea from the reaction to the 16th century Peasants War in Germany through to contemporary ideas about Islamism.

In Thinking Allowed he will tell Laurie Taylor that movements which we call 'fanatical' are often revealed by history to be dedicated to freedom.

Laurie's other guest, the philosopher John Gray, will beg to differ.

Also the myths that make sense of life in a high crime area: Kaye Haw talks about her study of young people.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Fanaticism: use and abuse of a wild idea.

Female Jockeys; Military Migrants2012121920121224

Military Migrants and the British Army. From Fiji to Ghana, the British military recruits soldiers to fight Britain's wars. Since 1998 overseas recruitment has been stepped up in response to labour shortages and diversity programmes. The sociologist, Vron Ware, talks to Laurie Taylor about her new book 'Military Migrants: Fighting for Your Country'. She argues that this new category of soldier inhabits a contradictory situation - on the one hand, praised as a 'hero' but on the other, stigmatised as an 'immigrant' and 'foreigner'. They're joined by the sociologist, Les Back. Also, Deborah Butler discusses her research on trainee female jockeys in the horse racing world.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Laurie Taylor on our multinational armed forces, and Deborah Butler on female jockeys.

Finland20060830

The spotlight is on a country that has swiftly embraced a global identity and through technological advancement has positioned itself squarely on the world stage.

But underneath this hi-tech modernity are a number of fascinating cultural distinctions, which are easily overlooked.

Laurie explores these distinctions, examining the resurgence of the traditional reindeer herders, the Sami and their culture, while also exploring the ambivalent relationship between the Russians - the hidden minority of Finland - and native Finns.

French Culture - Network Nudge20100906

Has French culture become provincial and inward looking? France aspires to be a global cultural power.

But a new book - 'The Death of French Culture' - argues that its government creates a walled garden producing cinema and literature for its own market but not for the world.

Gone are the days of geniuses like Emile Zola and Francois Truffaut who spoke to millions.

Laurie Taylor is joined by the book's author Donald Morrison and by Noelle Lenoir, a former French minister for European affairs.

They consider whether protectionism has caused a decline in French creativity and if state subsidies produce mediocre art.

Also, the economist Paul Ormerod highlights the power of networks to change behaviour.

Could an understanding of how our connections influence our choices help tackle everything from obesity to unemployment?

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Laurie explores the decline in French culture and the power of networks.

Gangsta Rap20050209

In the late 1980s, gangsta rap music emerged in urban America, giving voice to, and making money for, a social group widely considered to be in crisis: young, poor, black men.

On this weeks Thinking Allowed Laurie Taylor is joined by Eithne Quinn to talk about her research into the culture and commerce of gangsta rap in her new book 'Nuthin' But a ""G"" Thang'.

In explaining how this music genre emerged, Quinn argues that gangsta rap both reflected and reinforced the decline in popular protest politics and the rise in individualism and entrepreneurialism that took place after the 1970s.

Gay Chav Erotic - Investment Clubs2008041620080421
Gay Muslims20041208

Laurie Taylor talks to sociologist Dr Andrew Yip, who has looked at the ways in which gay Muslims have bridged the gap between their sexuality and their Islamic culture and beliefs.

Gender Voting - Revolution2007101720071022
Gift Giving20050330

Laurie Taylor looks at the social function of gift giving and asks whether you can solve the problem by giving money or does that somehow make a nonsense of it all?

Global Higher Education - Homophobia And Football20101025

Laurie Taylor examines homophobia and football and looks at global higher education.

Laurie Taylor examines some new research about homophobia and football and talks to Professor Ellis Cashmore from Staffordshire University about how fans, players and management respond to the issue.

They're joined by writer and broadcaster David Goldblatt who has a strong interest in sport.

Laurie also discusses the growth of global higher education and talks to Ben Wildavsky whose new book charts the development of academic migration across the world- looking at the cross border movement of students, academics, faculties and the development of new universities in places like China, Asia and The Middle East.

Producer Chris Wilson.

Grammar Schools & Social Mobility - The Opera Fanatic20111205

Laurie Taylor explores opera in Argentina, plus grammar schools and social mobility.

Laurie Taylor explores opera fanatics at the Teatro Colon in Buenos Aires and compares them to fans in Cardiff, with Professor Claudio Benzecry from the University of Connecticut and Professor Paul Atkinson from Cardiff University.

And he explores the popularly held notion that grammar schools aid social mobility with Dr Adam Swift from the University of Oxford.

Producer Chris Wilson.

Grandparents - Tourism2007120520071210
Gym - Ageing Inside Out20061108
Happy Families? - Science's First Mistake20101101

Laurie Taylor discusses the family and why we should be sceptical about science.

Was there ever a golden age of the family? Political debates about the family often invoke a norm of family life in which marriages lasted and children thrived.

But a new report suggests that pre-marital sex, cohabitation, single parenthood and illegitimacy have been rife for two centuries.

It's the post war period from 1945-1970 which is unusual for its high rates of enduring marriages.

Many people in the past didn't ever marry because of the problems in obtaining or affording a divorce.

The historian Professor Pat Thane discusses families, real and ideal, with Laurie Taylor.

Also, are most scientific claims little more than delusions? The Professor of Information Systems, Ian Angell talks about his co-authored book 'Science's First Mistake' which critiques science's claims to 'truth'.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Hidden Spaces And Urban Life - Geodemography20061115
Home At Riba20120326

What does the idea of home mean to us in Britain today? A special edition on private life.

What does the idea of home mean to us in Britain? How is that changing, and are those new needs being met? A new economic landscape and an irresistible pressure on housing are changing the way we live. For the first time since the 1980s home ownership is decreasing, more people are renting longer and people are starting to club together in bigger groups.

In a special edition recorded at the Royal Institute of British Architects, Thinking Allowed examines the concept of home and its relationship to housing. Laurie Taylor is joined by an audience of the public and an expert panel: Angela Brady, President of RIBA; the housing economist Susan Smith, Mistress of Gurton College Cambridge; sociologist Esther Dermott from Bristol University and the architectural writer Jonathan Glancey.

The event draws on a series of investigations of listeners' homes in which Laurie Taylor and a team of sociologists have explored the future of private life. It will also reflect on the RIBA exhibition on the history of the British Home, 'A Place to Call Home'.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Home Improvement And Diy - Caribbean Languages In British Schools20060510

How have the racialised politics of Britain had a detrimental effect on succeeding generations of white and Black Britons? Have Black communities allowed themselves to be incorporated into arrangements that work against their collective interests?

Eminent Professor Gus John joins Laurie Taylor, in Thinking Allowed, to answer these questions and to discuss John's latest book Taking a Stand, which calls for a radical evaluation of Government policies, structures and prescriptions.

Home Life 1: Multi-generational Household20110829

Home life 1: Laurie and sociologists visit a multi-generational household.

Thinking Allowed explores the changing nature of home in a 3 part summer series recorded in the homes of our listeners.

Who do we live with, how do our homes operate and what do they say about us and about the dramatic social transformations of the last century and the century to come? By invitation, in each edition a new type of home is invaded, analysed and explained by Laurie Taylor and a panel of two sociologists round the kitchen table.

Much political debate still revolves around the assumption that most of us live in conventional family homes.

However research suggests that in 20 years time only 2 out of 5 people will be in marriages and married couples will be outnumbered by other types of household.

Behind closed doors, Britain is changing: Single living has increased by 30% in 10 years but at the same time financial pressures are fuelling a growth in extended families - people sharing bills, childcare and mucking-in in a way which makes private life far less private.

After generous invitations from Thinking Allowed listeners, Laurie Taylor visits three.

In this edition he visits a big multi-generational family in Bristol accompanied by the sociologists Rachel Thomson and Esther Dermot.

They attempt to divine the future for Britain's private life.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Home Life 2: Single Person Household20110831

Thinking Allowed explores the changing nature of home in a 3 part summer series recorded in the homes of our listeners.

Who do we live with, how do our homes operate and what do they say about us and about the dramatic social transformations of the last century and the century to come? By invitation, in each edition a new type of home is invaded, analysed and explained by Laurie Taylor and a panel of two sociologists round the kitchen table.

Much political debate still revolves around the assumption that most of us live in conventional family homes.

However research suggests that in 20 years time only 2 out of 5 people will be in marriages and married couples will be outnumbered by other types of household.

Behind closed doors, Britain is changing: Single living has increased by 30% in 10 years but at the same time financial pressures are fuelling a growth in extended families - people sharing bills, childcare and mucking-in in a way which makes private life far less private.

After invitations from a host of Thinking Allowed listeners, Laurie Taylor visits three.

In this edition he travels to Cove in Argyll and Bute to meet someone who lives alone and works from home.

He is accompanied by the sociologists Roona Simpson and Bren Neale in order to help divine the future for Britain's private life.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Home life 2: Laurie and sociologists visit a single person household.

Home Life 2: Single Person Household20110905

Home life 2: Laurie and sociologists visit a single person household.

Thinking Allowed explores the changing nature of home in a 3 part summer series recorded in the homes of our listeners.

Who do we live with, how do our homes operate and what do they say about us and about the dramatic social transformations of the last century and the century to come? By invitation, in each edition a new type of home is invaded, analysed and explained by Laurie Taylor and a panel of two sociologists round the kitchen table.

Much political debate still revolves around the assumption that most of us live in conventional family homes.

However research suggests that in 20 years time only 2 out of 5 people will be in marriages and married couples will be outnumbered by other types of household.

Behind closed doors, Britain is changing: Single living has increased by 30% in 10 years but at the same time financial pressures are fuelling a growth in extended families - people sharing bills, childcare and mucking-in in a way which makes private life far less private.

After invitations from a host of Thinking Allowed listeners, Laurie Taylor visits three.

In this edition he travels to Cove in Argyll and Bute to meet someone who lives alone and works from home.

He is accompanied by the sociologists Roona Simpson and Bren Neale in order to help divine the future for Britain's private life.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Home Life 3: Nuclear Household20110907

Thinking Allowed explores the changing nature of home in a 3 part summer series recorded in the homes of our listeners.

Who do we live with, how do our homes operate and what do they say about us and about the dramatic social transformations of the last century and the century to come? By invitation, in each edition a new type of home is invaded, analysed and explained by Laurie Taylor and a panel of two sociologists round the kitchen table.

Much political debate still revolves around the assumption that most of us live in conventional family homes.

However research suggests that in 20 years time only 2 out of 5 people will be in marriages and married couples will be outnumbered by other types of household.

Behind closed doors, Britain is changing: single living has increased by 30% in 10 years but at the same time financial pressures are fuelling a growth in extended families - people sharing bills, childcare and mucking-in in a way which makes private life far less private.

After invitations from a host of Thinking Allowed listeners, Laurie Taylor visits three different homes.

In the last of the series he travels to a village near Preston in Lancashire to meet what is sometimes called a classic 'nuclear' family.

He and his accompanying sociologists, Jacqui Gabb from the Open University and Professor Peter Bramham from Leeds Metropolitan University, attempt to divine the future for Britain's private life.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Home Life 3: Laurie and sociologists visit a 'nuclear' family.

Home Life 3: Nuclear Household20110912

Home Life 3: Laurie and sociologists visit a 'nuclear' family.

Thinking Allowed explores the changing nature of home in a 3 part summer series recorded in the homes of our listeners.

Who do we live with, how do our homes operate and what do they say about us and about the dramatic social transformations of the last century and the century to come? By invitation, in each edition a new type of home is invaded, analysed and explained by Laurie Taylor and a panel of two sociologists round the kitchen table.

Much political debate still revolves around the assumption that most of us live in conventional family homes.

However research suggests that in 20 years time only 2 out of 5 people will be in marriages and married couples will be outnumbered by other types of household.

Behind closed doors, Britain is changing: single living has increased by 30% in 10 years but at the same time financial pressures are fuelling a growth in extended families - people sharing bills, childcare and mucking-in in a way which makes private life far less private.

After invitations from a host of Thinking Allowed listeners, Laurie Taylor visits three different homes.

In the last of the series he travels to a village near Preston in Lancashire to meet what is sometimes called a classic 'nuclear' family.

He and his accompanying sociologists, Jacqui Gabb from the Open University and Professor Peter Bramham from Leeds Metropolitan University, attempt to divine the future for Britain's private life.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Home Life 4: Shared Home2011122820120102

Is there an age in which people should couple-up and settle down? Laurie Taylor visits the home of 6 young people who are extending their student sharing habits into their early thirties. What is the factor that keeps an increasing amount of people living like this - is it economics, good friendships or an antipathy towards what other people might regard as growing up? Laurie and his two sociological companions, Esther Dermott from Bristol University and Josh Richards from the University of Manchester accompany him on his investigation.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Laurie explores the home lifestyle of six young people who live together.

Home Life 4: Shared Home20120102
Hoodies - City Planning2008022720080303
Hostility To Tax; Mumbai Slums2012062020120625

Annawadi is a makeshift settlement in the shadow of luxury hotels near Mumbai's international airport. The Pulitzer prize winning writer, Katherine Boo, spent 4 years hearing the stories of the slum dwellers who stand little chance of joining the 'new' Indian middle class. She talks to Laurie Taylor about her new book "Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death and Hope in a Mumbai Slum". Also, the sociologist, Jeff Kidder, highlights new research which analyses why so many Americans are morally opposed to taxation. They're joined by British sociologist, Peter Taylor Gooby, who's researched British attitudes to tax.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

A study of the slums of Mumbai. Also, the rights and wrongs of taxation.

Annawadi is a makeshift slum in the shadow of luxury hotels near Mumbai's international airport. The Pulitzer prize winning writer, Katherine Boo, spent 3 years hearing the stories of those Indians who stand little chance of joining the 'new' middle class. She talks to Laurie Taylor about life, death and hope in a Mumbai slum. Also, the sociologist, Jeff Kidder, highlights new research which analyses why so many Americans are morally opposed to taxation. They're joined by British sociologist, Peter Taylor Gooby, who's researched British attitudes to tax.

Household Breakup In New Orleans - Communist Memories20110606

Hurricane Katrina led to the compulsory evacuation of all the residents of New Orleans.

They were sent to shelters in distant destinations ranging from Houston to Tennessee.

The scale of the disaster meant that most were unable to stay with or near family.

But new research finds that this trauma was compounded by the authorities' failure to recognise the prevalence of extended families amongst the New Orleans poor.

The trailers to which they re-located were set up for nuclear families as was the reconstructed housing to which they returned.

The American social scientist Michael Rendall discusses post Katrina family breakdown with Laurie Taylor.

Also, the process of remembering Communism in Central Eastern Europe.

The historian James Mark's new book considers how countries come to terms with the legacies of the past.

He joins the Psychology lecturer, Dr Jovan Byford, to question whether people's actual memories of the communist era at odds with officially imposed narratives?

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Family breakdown post Hurricane Katrina.

Also, remembering Communism.

Immortality; Evil2012071120120716

Laurie Taylor explores the ways in which human beings have resisted the idea of mortality.

From Victorian seances to schemes which upload our minds into cyberspace, there are myriad ways in which human beings have sought to conquer mortality. The philosopher, John Gray, discusses his book "The Immortalisation Commission: Science and the Strange Quest to Cheat Death" with Laurie Taylor. The cultural historian Marina Warner joins the debate. Also, listeners' response to Thinking Allowed's recent discussion on the sociology of 'evil'. Professor Barry Smith, the director of the Institute of Philosophy, explores contrasting analyses of 'evil' within modern thought.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Incivility - Ak-47 (kalashnikov)20101122

Laurie Taylor examines the social impact of the AK-47, plus rudeness in public places.

Laurie Taylor talks to Pulitzer Prize winner C.J Chivers, a former US Marine and currently a journalist at the New York Times about the cultural, social and political impact of the AK-47 or Kalashnikov.

A gun that has transformed how we fight wars and who can fight them, the AK-47 is a weapon central to many conflicts all over the world.

With testimony from its inventors, its users and its victims, Laurie explores how a single instrument can have been so influential as both transformer and destroyer.

They are joined by military historian Richard Holmes.

Laurie also talks to Philip Smith, Professor in the Department of Sociology at Yale University, about new research looking at public incivility.

What drives some people to such extremes of public rudeness?

Producer Chris Wilson.

Industrial Ruins - Kamikaze20060607
Inequality And Nakedness20100426

A brief history of nakedness - its role in politics, protest and popular culture.

Nakedness can thrill, it can disgust, it can humiliate, amuse and entertain.

The sight of humans without clothes provokes powerful and contradictory impressions: it is both the shame of Adam and Eve as they are expelled from Eden and the purity of Jesus as he is baptised; both the humiliation of prisoners at Abu Ghraib and the exuberance of young people at a rock festival.

The power of the taboo against nakedness in Western Culture has meant that it is a potent form of protest, but as films like the Full Monty and plays like Calendar Girls bring it into the mainstream, have our attitudes to nakedness changed? Laurie discusses A Brief History of Nakedness with its author Philip Carr-Gomm and the sociologist Angela McRobbie.

Also, the geographer Danny Dorling argues that inequality in the rich world is perpetuated by five ingrained beliefs: elitism is efficient; exclusion is necessary; prejudice is natural; greed is good; despair is inevitable.

He uses his social research to argue that those beliefs are nothing more than myths.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Intolerable Strangers20040818

Amsterdam's tolerance is showing signs of strain.

One particular flashpoint is the issue of immigration.

Whereas the city has traditionally welcomed immigrants there has been a hardening of attitudes towards those wanting to settle in Holland.

Laurie Taylor looks at who is visible and who is not on the streets of Amsterdam.

Intoxication2012122620121231

Laurie Taylor explores the role and meaning of both alcohol and drugs in human life.

Intoxication - In a special programme, Laurie Taylor explores the role and meaning of both alcohol and drugs in human life. Why do so many people chose to alter their consciousness with stimulants, whether legal or illicit? Professor James Mills, the author of 'Cannabis Nation..' is joined by Dr Fiona Meesham and Professor Chris Hackley.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Irregular And Undocumented Workers - America's Death Penalty20110228

Every country in the Western world has abandoned the use of capital punishment in the name of civilisation and humanity.

Yet in the USA, dozens of states and the Federal Government itself continue to execute criminals for certain crimes.

Laurie Taylor talks to David Garland about his investigation into the US death penalty and how America has become a peculiar exception in a world which is moving towards abolition.

They are joined by former Director of Public Prosecutions, Ken (Lord) MacDonald.

Also on the programme David Whyte presents new research gathered from interviewing undocumented workers in Britain.

Seven years on from the tragedy on Morecombe sands, what is the experience of illegal workers in the UK?

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Why does the US support capital punishment? Also, illegal workers in the UK.

Islam And Capitalism - Sex Before The Sexual Revolution20110221

Sex before the Sexual Revolution and how Islam reacts to capitalism.

Sexual Intercourse began in I963, according to Philip Larkin's 'Annus Mirabilis'.

But what of the dark ages before the sexual revolution? A new study shows them to be not quite as repressed, unfulfilled and pitiable as many have been keen to cast them.

In this edition Laurie talks to Kate Fisher and Simon Szreter about their illuminating exploration of intimate life in England between 1918 and 1963, which involved them speaking frankly and in depth to almost a hundred people about their sex lives in the period.

Also, Charles Tripp talks about the relationship between Islam and capitalism, and some Muslim societies' reactions to what are seen as the dangers of a rapacious and socially destructive force.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Italian Family 1: Milan2012082220120827

Why is the Italian birth rate falling? Laurie Taylor on the crisis of the Italian family.

Italy, home to the Pope and the Holy See, perhaps the most Catholic of all countries, is undergoing a peculiarly un-Catholic crisis; it now has one of the lowest birth rates in the world. There are so few children being born that if the current trend persists, traditional Italians are at risk of dying out in just a handful of generations. How can the nation famed for Romanticism, for enormous affectionate families, for Mamma Mia and for an enviable certainty that all you need is good food, good wine and your family around you, be the same nation that no longer gives birth? Laurie travels to Milan to unpick the tangled interactions between the individual, the family, the church and the state and discovers why Italians are delaying parenthood and in many cases rejecting having a family altogether.

The first of three special editions on the crisis of the Italian family.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Italian Family 2: Naples2012082920120903

Laurie Taylor visits Naples to investigate the role of Italian family values.

Italy, home to the Pope and the Holy See, perhaps the most Catholic of all countries, is undergoing a peculiarly un-Catholic crisis; it now has one of the lowest birth rates in the world. There are so few children being born that if the current trend persists, traditional Italians are at risk of dying out in just a handful of generations. How can the nation famed for Romanticism, for enormous affectionate families, for Mamma Mia and for an enviable certainty that all you need is good food, good wine and your family around you, be the same nation that no longer gives birth? Laurie travels to the South of Italy and visits the sole-remaining glove maker in Naples, in an attempt to discover whether the Italian family business is heading for extinction. He also explores whether organised crime is a distortion of Italian family values - or their logical extension.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Italian Family 3: Studio Discussion2012090520120910

Is the fabled Italian family in terminal decline? Laurie Taylor discusses the crisis.

What has cause the Italian family to decline so fast? What are the prospects for encouraging Italians to start having more children? Laurie is joined in the studio by three experts in order to discuss his explorations of the family in Italy. Geoff Andrews, David Gilmour and Annalisa Piras give their views on what has caused the Italian crisis and what hopes there are for the future.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Jazz20041229

Has jazz lost its soul? During the black civil rights movement jazz was seen as a radical musical form both politically and artistically.

It was threatening and dangerous to the white bourgeoisie who, according to jazz musician Gilad Atzmon, responded by claiming jazz as their own academic and technical adventure.

Laurie Taylor is joined by Gilad Atzmon and Caspar Melville, Lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths University of LONDON and author of an essay The Shape of Jazz, to discuss whether despite becoming a huge money spinner, jazz can once again become an innovative musical form of resistance.

Fairytales

Is there still a place for childrens fairy stories in contemporary life?

Laurie Taylor goes in search of CINDERELLA with Sally Feldman, Head of Media, Arts and Design at University of Westminster and author of an article You shall go to the ball and Dr Karin Lesnik-Oberstein, Director of The Centre for International Research in Childhood at University of Reading and editor of Childrens Literature: New Approaches.

Jazz And Politics20060315

Jazz rapidly became one of America's greatest cultural exports, but did Britain initially embrace or resist it? Laurie Taylor is joined by George McKay - professor of cultural studies and leading chronicler of British countercultures - to examine the surprising ways that jazz accompanied social change during what was a period of rapid transformation in Britain.

Jobs For The Boys2012080120120806

'Jobs for the Boys?' New research presented at the British Sociological Association's 2012 conference claimed that middle class people hoard job opportunities in the UK TV and film industry. In a pre- recorded interview from the conference, Professor Irena Grugulis, suggests to Laurie Taylor that working class people don't get these jobs because they don't have the right accents, clothes, backgrounds or friends. Indeed, it's hard to find an area of the economy where connections and contacts are more significant. But is this mainly due to structural changes in the industry rather than to class based prejudice? The media expert, Sir Peter Bazalgette and Professor of Sociology, Mike Savage, respond to this research and explore nepotism, networking and discrimination in the media world and beyond.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

'Jobs for the Boys?' Discrimination and nepotism in the media industry, with Laurie Taylor

John Stuart Mill - Bob Marley2007112120071126
Joseph E. Stiglitz - Globalisation2007112820071203
Journalists & The Old School Tie - Classical Liberalism20060726
Kinship2012061320120618

is a key term in Anthropology. It describes the genealogical and biological ties which bind human beings to each other. The French anthropologist, Maurice Godelier, tells Laurie Taylor about his groundbreaking study into the evolution of kinship as a reality, as well as a concept. He disputes the idea that it constitutes the original building block of society; arguing instead that political and religious allegiances cut across family groups. He also suggests that traditional ideas of 'kinship' are complicated by the modern day transformation in family forms. The celebrated British anthropologists, Henrietta Moore and Adam Kuper, join the debate.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

New research on how society works.

Kissing Men - Decline Of Violence In History20111107

Laurie Taylor explores ideas about a decline in human violence with Steven Pinker.

Laurie Taylor explores Professor Steven Pinker's notion of a decline in human violence with Anthony O'Hear, Professor of Philosophy at the University of Buckingham.

Laurie also examines an apparent rise in heterosexual men kissing other men, with Professor Eric Anderson from the University of Winchester.

Producer.

Chris Wilson.

Live Music - Mafia20110404
Liverpool Football Club - Au Pairs20101004

Laurie Taylor discusses a new study of au pairs in the UK and examines Liverpool FC.

Laurie Taylor explores the different experiences of au pairs in the UK and finds that the ( predominantly ) girls view of the families they work for is not always very positive.

Laurie also talks to sociologist John Williams about his new biography of Liverpool Football Club and explores not only the early history of the club in the late 19th century and its place in the rapidly expanding seaport of Liverpool, but also how it has reflected the city it inhabits and how it fits into what some call Liverpool's 'exceptionalism'.

Producer: Chris Wilson.

Liverpool Riots - Children And Politics20110718

30 years ago riots broke out in Liverpool which lead to 160 arrests and 258 police officers needing hospital treatment.

The four days of street battles, arson and looting lead to violent disturbances in many other British cities and have changed community relations and disorder policing in the country forever.

On today's Thinking Allowed, Laurie Taylor explores a study of first hand accounts of those tumultuous days, from police officers, rioters and residents.

Richard Phillips and Diane Frost recreate the times.

Also on the programme, what makes a child political? Dorothy Moss discusses research which reveals how engaged young children are in issues and social change.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Laurie Taylor hears about the Liverpool riots and political childhoods.

Market Forces20060628
Marseille2008032620080331

Laurie Taylor visits Marseille to explore its unique racial geography.

When France was torn apart by riots, why did its most diverse city remain unscathed?

Mass Colaboration - Free Trade2008030520080310
Migration - Music And Politics20111017

Laurie Taylor explores music as a threat to national security and new work on immigration.

Laurie Taylor explores new research that resonates in society.

In the recent Arab Spring a Syrian singer has his vocal chords cut after singing at protest rallies.

Forty years ago the Chilean musician Victor Jara had his hands chopped off before being murdered by government forces.

In both cases, music was seen as challenging the power of a dictatorship.

Thinking Allowed explores popular music as a threat to national security.John Street, Professor of Politics at the University of East Anglia joins Laurie to discuss a paper on the subject written by Thierry Cote, Research Associate at the York Center for International and Security Studies in Toronto, Canada

Laurie also looks at a new book co-authored by economist Professor Ian Goldin, a former Vice President of the World Bank, which examines the history, present and future of immigration and argues that, overall, immigration is essential for economic and cultural prosperity.

Producer.

Chris Wilson.

Modern Office Design20040204

Laurie Taylor investigates modern office design.

Radical innovation in the workplace can boost corporate performance and sell the company not just to the public but to staff.

Moving On From Sex Work - The Challenge Of Affluence20060802
Muslim Women's Basketball - Still Life20111031

Laurie Taylor discusses: globalisation is good for you - and Muslim women's basketball.

Is tradition under threat from capitalism, or are we overly negative about the cultural impact of globalisation? Henrietta Moore challenges what she sees as despair about the impact of international capitalism and new technology and claims that globalisation is just as likely to improve the human experience.

She tells Laurie Taylor that her new theory about how we create culture, rejects the notion that it is ever 'imposed' from abroad.

Also, there's an absence of visible Muslim female sportswomen.

Islamic rules on gender segregation and dress codes can create limitations on women's ability to be athletes.

And the secular world of sport doesn't always welcome women who don't wear shorts and swimsuits.

But new research suggests that the picture is changing as women find ways to play sport which don't conflict with their faith.

The sociologist, Dr Sam Farooq, tells Laurie about the young British Muslim women who see no contradiction between basketball and religious belief.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Nationhood; Recognising Transgender2012050220120507

Transgender body modifications and latent nationalism, subjects of two prize-winning books

What drives people to make the often difficult choices to change their bodies and change their gender? How is the everyday affection for one's country changing in English life? Laurie Taylor discusses issues of transsexuals and the body modifications they choose. Also the place of ordinary English nationalism, as he meets the joint winners of The British Sociological Association's Philip Abrams first book prize.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

Networks Of Trust20040526

Laurie Taylor considers how humans have built up the networks of trust upon which our economic institutions are based.

No Logo Or Pro Logo?20040121

Laurie Taylor investigates a business-led response to the claim that brands are the source of all evil.

Anything but say the new disciples of Corporate Social Responsibility.

Norway20060816

In the first of a four-part series on Scandinavia, Thinking Allowed visits Norway, a country that has existed independently only since 1905 and but has built a strong national identity.

Laurie Taylor meets a young ethnically diverse hip hop group who have created a new language and asks how their hybrid form of culture fits into ideas of Norway and belonging.

Odd Couples, Student Drinking20120912

'Odd Couples' - friendships which cross the boundaries of gender and sexuality. A new book challenges the widespread assumption that men and women are fundamentally different and can only forge significant bonds within romantic relationships. It charts the deep friendships between gay men and straight women, and also between lesbians and straight men. Laurie Taylor talks to the sociologist, Anna Muraco, who claims that such 'intersectional' friendships serve as as a barometer for shifting social and sexual norms. The UK sociologist, Brian Heaphy joins the discussion. Also, an in depth study of the centrality of drinking to student identity. Its author, Maria Piacentini, discusses the ways in which young people neutralise feelings of guilt and stigma regarding their alcohol consumption.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Older Gays In Rural Areas; Protest Over Art And Culture In America20111128

Laurie Taylor explores US art protests.

Also, the lives of older, gay, rural dwellers.

Protests against art and culture occur every day across America.

Conservatives object to artworks deemed blasphemous or obscene; liberals rally against depictions they see as racist or misogynist.

But why do some parts of the United States see more such controversies than others? Why so many protests in Atlanta and so few in West Palm Beach? The US sociologist, Steven Tepper, talks to Laurie Taylor about his new book 'Not Here, Not Now, Not That..Protest over Art and Culture in America'.

They're joined by Jo Glanville, the editor of Index on Censorship.

Also, Dr Kip Jones from Bournemouth University discusses the challenges faced by older gay men and lesbians who live in rural areas of The South West of England and Wales.

His paper, 'Gay and Pleasant Land?' uses first hand evidence to explore the attitudes of both older gay countryside dwellers and the communities they live in.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Ottoman Women20041201

Laurie Taylor looks at the little known life of Ottoman women from the beginning of the twentieth century as told through their memoirs, autobiographies and travel journals.

Outsourced Cultures - Happiness Audience's Response2011030920110314

In the Indian call centre or 'outsourcing' industry, workers are trained to emulate the American or British workers which they have replaced.

They change their names, take on western accents and develop lifestyles organised around a foreign culture in a distant time zone.

Laurie Taylor is joined by Henrietta Moore to talk to Shehzad Nadeem about his new study into the hybrid culture these Asian employees have created.

Also on the programme the writer Marek Kohn joins Laurie to discuss the Thinking Allowed audience's spirited response to Pascal Bruckner's indictment of the culture of happiness.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

How answering calls will change your life: the cultural impact of call centres in India.

'over By Christmas' - Race, Sport And Politics20101220

Laurie explores race and sport, also why people thought WW1 would be over by Christmas.

When Jack Johnson became heavy-weight champion of the world and then knocked out the 'Great White Hope' Jim Jeffries in 1910, riots and celebrations broke out throughout the United States.

Black people had a champion who stood as the finest man in the world, and many white people saw that as an image which threatened their supremacy.

In sporting terms the image of the black athlete was forged, a hyper-masculine individual characterised by aggression and defined by physicality.

Laurie is joined by Ben Carrington, author of Race, Sport and Politics, and the sociologist Brett St Louis to discuss the complex history of that stereotype.

An image which has been both to the benefit and also to the great detriment of black people.

Also on the programme, Stuart Hallifax discusses why it was that people said that the First World War would be over by Christmas and whether they truly believed it.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Parents, Teens And The Culture Of Sex: The Claims Of Parenting20111212

Laurie Taylor explores new research into teenage sex in the parental home.

Laurie Taylor examines research into the advice offered to parents with Judith Suissa from the Institute of Education and Frank Furedi from Kent University and looks at comparative research in America and Holland into teenage sex in the parental home with sociologist Amy Schalet from the University of Massachusetts.

Producer: Chris Wilson.

Pets As Kin - India And Spirituality2008040920080414
Physiognomy And Teenage Music20100719

Do facial features indicate moral character? Laurie explores the culture of physiognomy.

The study of facial features and assumptions about their relationship to character informs the judgements we make about people to this day.

For centuries, in literature, in art, in images and cartoons the descriptions of the way people look has served to indicate how they might behave and there is even a kind of science - physiognomy - dedicated to cataloguing the complex relationship between the two.

Laurie Taylor discusses the impact on culture of this strange science of instinct and prejudice with the literature scholar John Mullan and Sharrona Pearl author of About Faces; Physiognomy in Nineteenth-Century Britain.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Pills, Power And People - Tour De France20060705

Human behaviour, institutions and conventions are put under the microscope as Laurie Taylor leads a discussion on topical issues coming out of the academic and research world.

Planet Of Slums2007092620071001
Planet Of Slums (follow Up) - Popular Comedy2007100320071008
Plastination For Display: A New Way To Dispose Of The Dead?20050119

Laurie Taylor looks at the legitimacy of 'plastination for display', the technique used in the controversial exhibition Body Worlds, where plastinated bodies were viewed by the public.

Sociologist Dr Tony Walter talks about public attitudes to this form of disposal of the dead and whether it is a viable alternative to burial and cremation.

Playboy - Celebrity Politics20110530

Is Playboy "an unlikely ally for the feminist cause"? Also, celebrity politics.

Carrie Pitzulo, the author of a new history of Playboy claims it has "a surprisingly strong record of support for women's rights and the modernisation of sexual and gender roles".

Are Bunny Girls and Playmates of the Month really allies of the feminist cause? Laurie is joined by the author Carrie Pitzulo and the sociologist Angela McRobbie to discuss the secret and surprises of the bunny brand.

Also, why do young people trust popular entertainers more than politicians? Sanna Inthorn discusses her new research into celebrity politics.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Polish Migrants To The Uk - The Shipping Container20060531
Politically Connected Firms - Gangs And Territory20101206

Laurie Taylor explores the connections between politics and business around the World.

Professor Laurie Taylor explores the connections between politics and business with economist Mara Faccio, who talks about her new research into the subject.

Laurie also talks to criminologist Judith Aldridge and discusses her research about how territory influences youth gangs.

They are joined by Peter Squires from Brighton University.

Producer: Chris Wilson.

Post-soviet Potato2009061720090622

Laurie Taylor discusses the politics of spuds.

The potato, with just a little bit of milk, can provide all of the nutrients necessary to sustain human life.

Its wonderful productivity and the fact that it can be grown in small family plots in urban and rural areas means that, according to Professor Nancy Ries, it provides subsistence when local economies fail and other sources of food disappear.

This fact more than any other explains why Russia, the home of the vast collective wheat farm, increasingly relies on the potato.

Nearly half of all agricultural production in the country is potatoes and 90 per cent of that is in small family plots.

Is the potato a tool of oppression? Does it perpetuate poverty? Laurie Taylor is joined by Professor Ries and by John Reader, author of The Untold History of the Potato.

Also, Allison Hui from Lancaster University talks about her research into the role of travel in people's hobbies, and how leisure pursuits play an increasing part in global tourism.

Post-Soviet Potato: Laurie Taylor discusses the politics of spuds.

Power Restoration After Hurricane Ike - White Middle Class Identity In Urban Schools20111114

Laurie Taylor looks at new research about middle-class parents and schooling.

Laurie Taylor explores new research examining the motives of middle class parents who deliberately send their children to failing or under-performing schools.'White, Middle Class Identities in Urban Schools' is discussed by the paper's author Diane Reay, Professor of Education at Cambridge University and journalist Melissa Benn.

Laurie also talks to Dr Lee Miller, Department of Sociology, Sam Houston State University in Texas, about her paper 'Hazards of Neo-Liberalism: Delayed Electric Power Restoration after Hurricane Ike'.

Producer Chris Wilson

Presenter LAURIE TAYLOR.

Privacy And Parenting By Mobile Phone.20110725

What is personal, what is confidential and what is private? These are all questions which are addressed in a new sociological study of the nature of privacy.

Christena Nippert-Eng claims that 'privacy violations' are particularly damaging because they go to the heart of our rights to determine ourselves as individuals.

Her work brings precision to an analysis of current reactions to the unwarranted intrusions of the press.

Also on the programme, how the millions of migrants from the Philippines attempt to parent their stay at home children by mobile phone.

Do they think they are successful? Do their children agree? Mirca Madianou talks about her study of mothers in Britain and their children back home.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Privacy and parenting by mobile phone.

Private Military Security; Whisky Tourism2012031420120319

Professionals and cowboys? UK and US military security workers. Also, 'whisky tourism'.

The MIddle Eastern conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have been characterised by widespread deployment of private military and security companies. Their job has been to provide protection to army compounds, aid agencies and governments. Most of these men are American but a third are British. Laurie Taylor hears about new research by Professor Paul Higate, a Reader in Gender and Security at Bristol University. His study finds that British operatives see themselves as cool headed professionals but regard their American counterparts as 'trigger happy cowboys'. But is this perception an objective reality or a self serving illusion? The sociologist, Professor Anthony King, joins this discussion. Also, artifice versus authenticity on the traveller trail.

Professor Karl Spracklen from Leeds Metropolitan University talks about the quest for the 'real' and 'authentic'' in tourism. Whisky tours are now as central to Scottish tourism as buying heather or eating haggis. Has 'tasting a dram' become just another element in the construction of invented tradition?

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Laurie Taylor discusses a study of private and military security firms.

Laurie Taylor discusses a study which goes behind the scenes and reveals the politics and culture of life in private and military security firms.

Prophets Facing Backward20041117

Laurie Taylor talks to author Meera Nanda, whose new book Prophets Facing Backward is a controversial and courageous look at Hindu nationalism in modern INDIA.

Punjabi Suit20040128

The salwar-kameez, or Punjabi Suit, is now a world fashion item.

Laurie Taylor explores its history and how it has become an emblem of exciting new cultural fusions.

Queuing20050413

The queue has been a visually redolent image for decades.

From queuing for rations during World War II to the dole queues of the 70s and 80s, the queue has been exploited for its political capital and social importance.

But why are the British so obsessed with queuing, what does this social norm reveal about us?

Laurie Taylor looks at this apparently daily routine and discovers how fraught and politically charged it can be.

Quiz Shows - The Politics Of Good Intentions20060405

In the wake of 9/11, politicians have claimed we are at an increased risk from terrorist attacks and their actions to deal with this risk spring from good intentions.

Laurie Taylor is joined by David Runciman to discuss whether we are actually witnessing 'politics of good intentions', or whether politicians are exploiting the language of risk for their own ends.

Race And The Seaside - The Brain2011111620111121

Laurie Taylor examines the limits of science and the machine age with writer Bryan Appleyard and philosopher John Gray and asks whether we are in danger of losing the essence of what it is to be human.

And, kiss me quick hats, fortune tellers and buckets and spades.

The cliched pleasures of the English seaside.

But are those delights equally available to all? The seaside is traditionally inhabited by majority white populations, many of whom are older and retired.

And although increasing numbers of ethnic minorities visit and reside by the coast, it remains stubbornly white in our collective imagination.

New research by Dr Daniel Burdsey claims that our nation's identity is bound up with monocultural images of coastal resorts.

Producer: Chris Wilson.

Laurie Taylor looks at the limits of science with Bryan Appleyard and John Gray.

Race In An English Village; Decoding Organisation2012092620121001

Bletchley Park, the decoding organisation, was at the heart of British intelligence operations in the Second World War. A mythology has grown around its secret activities, which some claim shortened the war by several years. Professor Christopher Grey talks to Laurie Taylor about his seminal research into the romance and reality of Bletchley Park. They're joined by Professor Anthony King. Also, race and 'belonging' in an English village. The social anthropologist, Katharine Tyler, explores the attitudes of white residents to their British Asian neighbours in a semi suburban village in the Midlands.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Laurie Taylor explores the culture and work of Bletchley Park.

Bletchley Park, the decoding organisation, was at the heart of British intelligence operations in the Second World War. A mythology has grown around its secret activities, which some claim shortened the war by several years. Professor Christopher Grey talks to Laurie Taylor about his seminal research into the myth and reality of Bletchley Park.

Raoul Moat - The Media Story; Indian Sex Workers20120430

Raoul Moat - the media story, and prostitutes in Calcutta.

The sad story of the hunt for the lone gunman Raoul Moat had many of the ingredients of classic crime fiction: a countryside location; an outsider against the law and an extraordinary set of tragic circumstances that unfolded over time. In this edition of Thinking Allowed Laurie Taylor speaks to Michael Rowe, a criminologist at the centre of the crisis. He gave countless media interviews at the time and has now conducted a study of how 24 hour news media used the rubric of crime fiction to present events in a gripping way. He argues, however, that it was a method in which truth and understanding seem to have been amongst the victims.

Also on the programme Prabha Kotiswaran discusses her ethnographic study of the daily and nightly life of prostitutes in two of India's cities.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Reality Tv20041110

has taken the world by storm.

Its ubiquity is only matched by the universal criticism it attracts for being voyeuristic, vulgar and dehumanising.

But what about those who watch it? Laurie Taylor explores the way in which reality television affects people's perceptions of their everyday lives.

Red Tape In India2012112820121203

Laurie Taylor hears how corrupt officialdom causes poverty.

Red Tape in India - a major new study by the renowned anthropologist, Akhil Gupta, seeks to understand why state bureaucracy hinders the fight against poverty in the world's fourth largest economy. Laurie Taylor hears about his ethnographic study among officials in charge of development programs in rural Uttar Pradash. Why is that the expansion of government programmes have failed to improve significantly the lives of the poorest?

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Regulated Tolerance20040811

Second of a four-part ethnographic portrait of Amsterdam.

Laurie Taylor examines the city's policies on drugs and prostitution.

Religion And Spirituality - Designing The Seaside20061011
Riots In The Uk, Death Of The Weekend2012111420121119

Laurie Taylor explores the summer riots of 2011. Also, the death of the weekend.

What was behind the British riots? From Blackberry and gossip to hard facts and first hand accounts. Laurie Taylor talks to Daniel Briggs about his research into last year's summer of discontent and damage. A definitive account of the nature and causes of the riots of 2011. Also, is it all over for the weekend? The sociologists, Jill Ebrey and Guy Standing, ask whether or not the weekend as a time for rest, family life and pleasure, is threatened with extinction by contemporary patterns of work.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Rituals, Traditions And Conventions20040505

are all under threat as Laurie Taylor invites his guests to think the unthinkable about Society, and the ideas that shape it.

Robots And Gender - Economic Progress20100809

Prosperity is accused of encouraging greed, ruining the environment, undermining communities, causing unhappiness and widening social inequalities.

The push for growth has been the bedrock policy for almost every world economy but since the financial crisis, belief in growth has become increasingly challenged.

Daniel Ben-Ami, takes on what he calls the 'growth sceptics' and makes the claim that more affluence benefits the whole of society.

He discusses the 'glories of growth' with Laurie Taylor and Kevin Doogan on Thinking Allowed on 4 August.

Also, the rise of the 'fembot'.

The Japanese government is investing billions in the development of robotic technology.

They think the robot will do for the 21st century economy what the automobile did for the 20th.

However, Jennifer Robertson thinks that as female robots are developed to perform some of the functions traditionally performed by women, it bodes ill for the future of Japanese society.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Laurie Taylor hears why growth is good for all.

Plus the rise of the fembot.

Same Sex Marriages - The Price Of Whiteness20060503

Laurie Taylor looks at what it means to be Jewish in America.

Sati - Pub Drinking Culture - Memes20060301

The Indian custom of Sati or widow burning, where a wife burns herself on the funeral pyre of her husband, is thought to be a thing of the past.

But Laurie Taylor discovers that's not the case, and the custom occurs in other parts of the world as well.

She looks at the enduring importance of this traditional custom to find out why women voluntarily sacrifice themselves, and what significance this still has in contemporary culture.

Scandinavia - Lingerie Adverts - Slumpy Class20060913

Laurie Taylor finds out how sexual liberality goes hand in hand with an increasingly conservative attitude towards televisual depictions of class, race and sexuality.

Scotland Independence - Viewing The Body Feedback2008031920080324
Seduction By Credit Card And The Moral Transformation Of Debt20040211

Personal debt was until very recently seen in terms of moral transgression.

No more.

With the rapid disappearance of the Puritan work ethic, which emphasised saving over consumption, debt has become socially acceptable in a remarkably short time.

Once regarded as an earned privilege of the thrifty few, the plastic in your pocket has come to be seen as a fundamental social class entitlement - sometimes called affectionately 'Yuppie Food Stamps'.

Today for the first time in the nation's history all three sides of what Manning calls America's debt triangle - government, private business and consumers -- are simultaneously in debt.

Laurie Taylor talks to the economic sociologist Robert D Manning about seduction by credit card and the moral transformation of debt.

Sex20040303

Laurie Taylor considers the politics of Britain's increasingly frank sex culture.

Sex Trafficking - History Of Hunger2007121220071217

Laurie Taylor explores a new study of the history of hunger, from the famines of the 19th century to the Jarrow March.

James Vernon explains how a changing attitude towards hunger marked the development of a social conscience in Britain and led to the development of the welfare state.

Sexual Revolutions2007062020070625

Laurie Taylor talks to Jeffrey Weeks about his new book The World We Have Won, which claims that successive revolutions in erotic mores since 1945 have led to the democratisation of everyday life.

Shifting Demography - Mobile Communications20061004
Skateboard Park - Everyday Arias20060614
Social Capital2010062320100628

Is the buzz phrase 'social capital' a big mistake? Also, what it means to be a twin.

A new concept came along, 'social capital', and it revolutionised the way people are governed and communities are planned.

The only trouble is...it's completely wrong.

That is the contention of sociologist Ben Fine.

He claims that 'social capital' is part of a mindset that sees everything as quantifiable assets akin to money or commercial resources.

Are communities, neighbourhoods and the people more complicated than that? Laurie Taylor discusses an idea which has had a huge impact on social science and beyond, and asks whether it is time to abandon the assumption that people have social qualities that can be weighed and measured.

David Halpern from the Institute for Government defends the concept.

Also, what does it mean to be a twin? A new study by Kate Bacon defines the social pressures put on twins' behaviour.

She explores the extent to which twins can escape their identities as one half of a double act and what they do to forge their own identities.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Is the buzz phrase 'social capital' a big mistake? Ben Fine tells Laurie Taylor

Social Capital; Gentrification2012080820120813

White middle-class settlers in edgy areas, plus how to get ahead in the media.

What happens when middle class white people move into vibrant, ethnically diverse and challenging areas in inner city London? Emma Jackson talks to Laurie about the developing attitudes of the 'gentrifiers' in Peckham and in Brixton.

Also, Irena Grugulis, author of Jobs for the Boys returns to the programme: She address points raised by listeners on her study of networking in the media and discusses the concept of 'social capital'.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Sociologists And The Financial Crisis - Against Security2012101720121022

Are the stringent checks at airports really for our benefit? 'Against Security', a new book by the acclaimed American sociologist, Harvey Molotch, explores the complex systems which are designed to make us feel safe in public places. He tells Laurie Taylor why he thinks that security measures in airports and subways, post 9.11, have damaged the pleasure and dignity of our daily lives. They're joined by the design critic, Stephen Bayley. Also, Sociology's failure to address the financial crisis. The social scientist, Alberto Toscano's paper 'Reformism and Melancholia' argues that the twin spectres of Fordism and Keynesianism have prevented sociologists from imagining a future beyond austerity.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Laurie Taylor on a new book that argues against heightened security measures.

'Against Security'. A new book by the acclaimed American sociologist, Harvey Molotch, explores the complex systems which are designed to make us feel safe in public places. He tells Laurie Taylor why he thinks that security measures in airports and subways, post 9.11, have damaged the pleasure and dignity of our daily lives.

Softer Masculinity In The Sixth Form - Dr Who20110110

Is Doctor Who political? Laurie explores the notion of an historical anti-American bias.

The Daleks are obsessed with racial purity and dedicated to a policy of genocide: They represent the Nazis.

The Jagrafess is a loathsome alien purveying useless information - which he has censored, rewritten and controlled: he represents a modern day media mogul.

This is the theory of the US academic Marc Edward DiPaolo who has analysed the political content of five decades of Doctor Who.

He finds that the Time Lord is a liberal, bohemian, pacifist environmentalist, and definitely anti-American.

Is Doctor Who a closet radical? Laurie and Marc discuss the contention with journalist, broadcaster and some-time Dr Who script-writer Matthew Sweet.

Also on the programme: Softening Masculinities.

New research by Mark McCormac finds that British secondary school boys are far less restrictive in their behaviour than they used to be.

It is okay to use conditioner, comment on someone's clothes, and even give each other a hug?

Sorcery And Politics In Mozambique; Inventing Intelligence20060208
Sport Under Communism - Regeneration Games2012072520120730

Laurie Taylor discusses the security impact of the Olympics. Also, sport under communism.

Advanced CCTV, security cordons and an £80 million pound electric fence: The security impact of the Olympics is already being felt in the London Borough of Newham. Security procedures are some of the most intense and developed in the world, designed to protect not only Olympic visitors but also future residents of the 40,000 new homes due to be completed by the end of the decade. Newham is one of the most impoverished areas in the country and the condition of its current residents stands in sharp contrast to the lives of people flooding into the borough for the Olympics. Laurie Taylor talks to Gary Armstrong about a large scale study of security, policing and the impact of the 'Regeneration Olympics' on the lives of the residents of Newham.

Also on the programme, Laurie speaks to Jonathan Grix about 'sport under communism' and why East Germany was, for two decades, one of the most successful nations in the Summer and Winter Olympics.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Stag Tourism - Men And Childbirth20120123

Vomiting, urinating openly, dressing up as women and public nudity - some of the features of the Stag Tour which show a new kind of masculinity, claims new research from Thomas Thurnell-Read. He tells Laurie that far from the controlled, contained and emotionally repressed image of traditional men, these young men are letting it all hang out - at least for one weekend. Also on the programme how men experience the process of childbirth. Are they sidelined by the medical process? Alan Dolan talks about his latest research.

The social commentator Owen Jones also joins the discussion of modern young men and how masculinity is changing.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Stag Tours and men's experience of childbirth. Laurie encounters the modern male.

Steeltown - Life After Burberry2012040420120409

When the factories close, what happens to the communities they leave behind? In this week's programme, Laurie investigates the effects of industrial decline in Wales, examining in-depth sociological studies of the residents of two industrial Welsh towns.

Professor Valerie Walkerdine discusses the impact of the closure of the steelworks in 'Steeltown.' How does an community cope when its focal point finally closes? How does the community attempt to maintain a sense of identity? How do young men deal with the embarrassment of being branded "mammy's boys" for having to take on 'feminine' work? And how do women manage to hold the community together?

Also in the programme, Jean Jenkins tells Laurie about her research on how the closure of the Burberry factory in Treorchy affected non-work life for the workers concerned. Many people found part time work, but did that really improve their life at home?

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Steeltown meltdown and Burberry closure - life after industry death in two Welsh towns.

Straight Edge - Cremation20061129
Streetlife - Performing Politics In The Square20110411

In 1905 Russians gathered at 6 different points to march on the Winter Palace and the streetscape of St Petersburg contributed enormously to their success.

The Russian poor were cheek by jowl with the rich and this inflamed a class consciousness which - despite industrialisation - the poor suburbs of Europe did much to dissapate.

How does urban geography effect the way societies develop? What have streets given to politics? As street protests continue to challenge authority across the Middle East and violence characterises the marches in our own capital, Laurie is joined by Leif Jerram and John Clarke from the Open University to discuss the role the street in the history of politics.

Also on the programme Jeffrey Alexander discusses how the revolution was 'performed' for Egypt and for the rest of the world from Cairo's central square.

That compelling drama provided a powerful symbol which was enough to bring down the government.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Street Politics and 'performing' the revolution in Tahrir Square.

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

Stuart Hall20110321

A special edition: Laurie talks to cultural theorist Stuart Hall.

The Prime Minister recently criticised what he called 'state multiculturalism' and said it had failed, arguing that Britain needs a stronger national identity.

Is it time to turn our backs on the multi-cultural idea? And what would a stronger national identity mean to people who feel at the cultural margins of our society? As the politicians debate, Laurie Taylor speaks to Britain's leading cultural theorist, Stuart Hall.

They discuss culture, politics, race and nation in a special edition of Thinking Allowed.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Subcultures20100705

Girly pop and heavy metal: Laurie Taylor visits a university conference on sub-cultures.

The term subculture has often been used to describe counter cultural youth groups such as Teddy Boys and Goths.

But this week Thinking Allowed hears from young sociologists from York University who've explored the sub culture of pop fans.

What are the attractions of belonging to such communities of music enthusiasts? Tonya Anderson talks about women in their forties who link up with other Duran Duran fans via the internet in their bedrooms.

And Rosemary Hill reveals the altogether noisier world of female heavy metal aficionados.

Professor Angela McRobbie joins Laurie Taylor in the studio to ask where the fans of teen pop and heavy metal do or don't fit into the history and meaning of subcultures.

Suicide Bombers - Luxury2007111420071119
Superheroes - Ribbon Culture2008022020080225
Supermax - Western Rule20101108

Laurie Taylor explores the growth of high security prisons in America.

Laurie Taylor explores the growth of high security prisons in America alongside the increased use of solitary confinement with criminologist Dr Sharon Shalev whose book 'Supermax' examines both topics.

Laurie's second discussion is with Professor Ian Morris whose major new book 'Why The West Rules- For Now' examines the rise and fall and rise of Eastern and Western societies and asks whether it's possible for historians to predict the future with any confidence.

Producer: Chris Wilson.

Sweden20060906

A country famous for its cradle to the grave welfare system - one that is so well ingrained in the national consciousness that Swedes are content to continue paying high taxes to ensure the continuation of their generous welfare provision.

Laurie looks at one particular aspect of Swedish 'welfarism', where 'cultural integrators' or 'linkworkers' live among immigrants and help them to integrate into Swedish society.

Tales From The Field - Beauty Capital20110919

Being beautiful apparently brings big dividends: "The total effect of facial attractiveness on income is roughly equal to that of educational qualifications or self-confidence", claims Catherine Hakim in her new book Honey Money.

Perhaps it's time to give up on exams and spend more time at the spa because Laurie also hears from the U.S.

economist Daniel Hamermesh that being beautiful can greatly inflate your pay packet.

Also on the programme, Louise Westmarland talks about some of the extraordinary experiences that criminologists have faced whilst researching crime.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Erotic capital and criminologists' tales from the field.

The Auld Enemy20031217

Laurie Taylor hears about SCOTLAND's largest migrant population, the ENGLISH, and discovers how their life stories contradict popular ideas of Scottish attitudes to the Auld Enemy.

A dominant feature in Scottish historiography is the relationship between SCOTLAND and ENGLAND; remarkably no history has been written, until now, of ENGLISH migration north of the border.

Histories have been written about SCOTLAND's other migrant communities, Jews, Italians, Lithuanians, PAKISTANis but not the ENGLISH.

Following an enormous increase in post-war migration, ENGLISH-born Scots now account for one in twelve of the population.

Murray Watson, author of Being ENGLISH in SCOTLAND talks to Laurie Taylor about his new book and discusses how and why his research methods came up with results which contradicted popular fears that anti-ENGLISHness is on the increase.

The British Love Of Gardening - Finance And World Events2007121920071224

Laurie Taylor explores the history of British gardening.

Historian Niall Ferguson discusses the vastly underestimated influence of financial markets on the course of world events.

The Brits Who Stayed On In Hong Kong2010012720100201

On the 1st of July 1997 Hong Kong passed out of British hands and came under Chinese rule, ending more than 150 years of British control.

It was an emotional moment which seemed to signify the final end to an era of British history.

Many expatriates returned to the UK but a minority stayed on.

Today there are still 19,000 British nationals living in Hong Kong, representing only 0.3 per cent of the population.

How do they feel about the changes in the city? What has happened to the colonial life they once lead, and what do they think of people 'back home'? Laurie Taylor discusses an in-depth study by Caroline Knowles which explores the lives and attitudes of the British migrants still living in Hong Kong.

Laurie also talks to Robert Ford, the co-author of a new study exploring the reasons behind people voting for the BNP, the most electorally successful far-right party in British electoral history.

What are the factors behind its success? Angry White Men: Individual and Contextual Predictors of Support for the British National Party examines the social, geographical and attitudinal characteristics of the BNP voter.

The Brits who stayed on in Hong Kong.

On the 1st of July 1997 Hong Kong passed out of British hands and came under Chinese rule, ending more than 150 years of British control. It was an emotional moment which seemed to signify the final end to an era of British history. Many expatriates returned to the UK but a minority stayed on. Today there are still 19,000 British nationals living in Hong Kong, representing only 0.3 per cent of the population. How do they feel about the changes in the city? What has happened to the colonial life they once lead, and what do they think of people 'back home'? Laurie Taylor discusses an in-depth study by Caroline Knowles which explores the lives and attitudes of the British migrants still living in Hong Kong.

Laurie also talks to Robert Ford, the co-author of a new study exploring the reasons behind people voting for the BNP, the most electorally successful far-right party in British electoral history. What are the factors behind its success? Angry White Men: Individual and Contextual Predictors of Support for the British National Party examines the social, geographical and attitudinal characteristics of the BNP voter.

The Coffee House20041222

Laurie Taylor is joined by Markman Ellis the author of The Coffee House: A Cultural History to debate the significance of the 17th and 18th century power houses that underpinned culture and encouraged progress and change, and that of the ubiquitous modern day equivalent in the form of Starbucks, Caffe Nero and Costa Coffee.

The Culture Of The New Capitalism20060118
The Day Of The Dead - Nature2007110720071112
The Games Black Girls Play - Punishment20060308

Laurie Taylor explores the legitimacy of punishment and the relationship between prisons and social order.

The Gangs Of New York20040218

During the years 1995-1999 the NEW YORK chapter of the Almighty Latin King and Queen Nation, one of the most notorious and criminally pursued gangs in the UNITED STATES, declared it was a social movement acting on behalf of the dispossessed.

It renounced violence, refused to be associated with the underground economy and made attending school a criterion of membership.

At the same time 40 of its leaders were indicted for racketeering and murder and received average sentences of 20 years.

The founder, King Blood, the only one not to plead guilty, duly stood trial and received the harshest federal sentence since World War II - 250 years in with the first 45 to be spent in solitary confinement.

Sociologist David Brotherton spent several years with the NEW YORK chapter of the Almighty Latin King and Queen Nation.

He talks to Laurie Taylor about his research into a gang demonised by the State as domestic terrorists whilst simultaneously emerging as a quasi-political entity with strong ideological roots and a clear set of social goals.

The Ghosts Of Berlin2007122620071231

Laurie Taylor visits Berlin to explore the city's continuing struggle with its troubled history.

He visits Nazi monuments, Russian graveyards and Jewish memorials.

He is guided by Brian Ladd's classic work The Ghosts of Berlin: Confronting German History in the Urban Landscape.

The Globalization Of Communication And Internationalization Of Language20040414

Laurie Taylor talks to Deborah Cameron, the Rupert Murdoch Professor of Language and Communication at OXFORD.

The Hairless Body - Ghosts2007101020071015
The High-life And The Row-life2012041820120423

What is the reality of life for a crack cocaine user in South London? Daniel Briggs new ethnography is a day to day observation of the people who use the drug, and their struggles to get the drug and also to get off it. He takes Laurie Taylor on an unsettling journey through violence and intimidation.

Also in the programme, eight men in a boat - but how to stop them from pulling in different directions? Anthony King tells Laurie about his research into how a Cambridge crew prepared for and won the Boat Race. He explains the factors which helped and hindered their attempt to establish a rowing rhythm, and discusses what this says about coordinating action in society at large.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Laurie Taylor discusses an ethnography of crack users and a study of a Cambridge crew.

The Impact Of The Temperance Movement - The New North20110328

Will power and prosperity shift to the frozen North? A new book predicts that Iceland, Greenland, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, and Russia will be the beneficiaries of a new world order.

By 2050, four megatrends - climate change, rising population, globalisation and resource depletion - will lead to the rise of 'The New North', as migration, energy bonanzas and international trade turn the world upside down.

The geographer, Professor Laurence Smith, tells Laurie Taylor why these projections amount to more than planetary palm reading.

Also, does the morality of the 19th century Temperance movement influence modern day attitudes to drinking? The law lecturer, Henry Yeomans, argues that prohibitionism - contrary to popular belief - lives on in 'binge drinking' Britain.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Laurie Taylor explores shifts in world power.

Also, the legacy of 19th-century Temperance.

The Milltown Boys Revisited20041103

In this week's edition of Thinking Allowed, Laurie Taylor speaks to Howard Williamson about his new study The Milltown Boys Revisited.

It's the sequel to Five Years, his groundbreaking 1970s study of one of Europe's largest council estates.

The boys he interviewed had few prospects and bleak futures at its close, in The Milltown Boys Revisited Williamson returns to find out what has become of them.

The Mummy's Curse - Death Photography20110808

Laurie Taylor discusses the mummy's curse and other Oriental myths with Marina Warner and Roger Luckhurst.

The Ancient Egyptians had no real concept of the curse; instead, Luckhurst argues, it was a product of the Victorian imagination, a result of British ambivalence about Egypt's increasing self-determination.

The curse was part of a wider Western tradition of portraying the East as exotic and irrational, dominated by superstitions.

That attitude is revealed in the British reaction to English language translations of The Arabian Nights, which played into Oriental stereotypes of barbarity, cruelty and unbridled sexuality.

Marina Warner discusses the reasons why the stories of Aladdin et al are as popular as ever in modern, multi-cultural Britain.

Author Audrey Linkman discusses the relationship between photography and death in her study of post-mortem portraits from the late 19th century to the modern day, and how they reflect contemporary attitudes towards mortality.

Producer: Stephen Hughes.

Laurie Taylor investigates the curse of the mummy and other myths of the Orient.

The New Arab Man, Lords Club Affiliation2012101020121015

The 'New' Arab Man: Middle Eastern, Muslim men are often represented as 'zealots' and oppressors of women. But Laurie Taylor hears how 2 decades of research by the Professor of Anthropology, Marcia Inhorn, is undermining such cultural stereotypes. Her study found that ordinary Arab men who confront childlessness and infertility are re-thinking conventional masculinity. Also, research by Matthew Bond into elite club membership in the House of Lords. Is a British establishment still evident in the club community? Karel Williams, Professor of Sociology, joins the discussion.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

The New East End20060215
The New Elites And Philanthropy20061101

Laurie Taylor looks at the role played by philanthropy in modern society.

Peter Frumkin explains the importance of having a framework when developing a philanthropic strategy.

The New Enlightenment20060222
The New Enlightenment20060322

The role of religion in society has emerged as one of the key political issues of the beginning of the 21st century.

From Islamist terror attacks to religious hatred laws in the UK, from the increased visibility of the Christian Right in the US, to the riots in Paris last summer, the question of the changing relationship between the secular state and faith has become central to political debate.

Laurie Taylor examines the role of religion in society.

What are the appropriate boundaries between state and faith in a liberal democracy and what role should religion play in public life?

The Politics Of Alcohol - Cooperation20120206

'Sprezzatura' is an Italian word describing a nonchalant effortless style which conceals the skill and artistry involved in doing something. It is a quality which the sociologist Richard Sennett claims embodies the gentlemanly characteristics of cooperation and modesty which came to the fore in Europe during the Renaissance. However, sprezzatura is under siege from the aggressive and competitive tendencies of finance capitalism, and we are losing the art of working together. That is one contention from his new study of cooperation, and what we can do to operate in closer harmony. He joins Laurie and the philosopher John Gray to discuss the meaning of cooperation.

Also on the programme, James Nicholls discusses what it is about the British and booze.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

The British and booze, and how we can all learn to cooperate much better.

The Politics Of Sleep - Women Who Kill20110627

One third of us now think we are sleep deprived.

Why should that be? Who loses the most and how is society reacting? Laurie is joined by Stephen Williams to discuss a new area for sociology, the contested area of the 'politics of sleep'.

Also, what happens when a woman commits murder? It is a very rare event and can challenge ingrained notions about the nature of femininity.

Perhaps because of that, a new study finds that there are existing stereotypes which guide the reaction of both the media and the judiciary to women who kill.

Lizzie Seal and Louise Westmarland join Laurie to discuss our attitudes towards women, murder and femininity

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Laurie discusses the politics of sleep and women who kill.

The Protestant Ethic20040609

Laurie Taylor celebrates the centenary of Max Weber's famous work The Protestant Ethic.

Why did capitalism emerge in the West when it did, and what is the ongoing relationship between economics and religion? Was Weber right, and how is he still relevant in the 21st Century?

The Protestant Ethic20040616

Laurie Taylor celebrates the centenary of Max Weber's famous work, The Protestant Ethic.

Why did Capitalism emerge in the West when it did, and what is the ongoing relationship between economics and religion? Was Weber right, and how is he still relevant in the 21st Century?

The Reuse Of Graves20040225

could markedly improve the economic viability of the West's neglected cemeteries.

However, as Laurie Taylor hears, the issue is highly contentious.

The Sex Lives Of Us2007091220070917
The Sources Of Social Power20031210

Laurie Taylor talks to sociologist Michael Mann about his classic series, The Sources of Social Power, and what its findings imply for the future of the American Empire.

The Uk Strip And Lap-dancing Industry; Blue Jeans2012103120121105

Growth of the strip clubs - Why has erotic dance and stripping become a staple of the night time economy in the UK? Kate Hardy tells Laurie Taylor why her research suggests that the proliferation of these clubs has little to do with the demands of male customers. Instead, it's a by product of the economics of an industry which maintains its profits, even during a recession, by passing the financial risks on to its workers. Also, the anthropologist, Daniel Miller asks what the ubiquity of blue jeans tells us about our individual and social lives. He's joined by the sociologist, Sophie Woodward.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Research finds economics, not customer demand, is leading to an increase in strip clubs.

Growth of the strip clubs - Why has erotic dance and stripping become a staple of the night time economy in the UK? Kate Hardy tells Laurie Taylor that her research shows that the proliferation of these clubs has little to do with the demands of the customers. Instead, it's a by-product of the economics of an industry which maintains its profits, even during a recession, by passing the financial risks on to its workers. Other item TBC

The West Indian Front Room20060201
Tipping Points20111219

Laurie Taylor explores 'The Tipping Point' in new research at Durham University.

Laurie Taylor explores the idea of the Tipping Point using a multidisciplinary project at Durham University as a springboard to examine what tipping points are, how they happen and what effect they have.

Professor Tim Clark and Professor Pat Waugh from Durham University and Professor Alex Bentley from Bristol University are all involved in the Durham Tipping Points project and they are joined by Dr Shahidha Bari from Queen Mary, London to discuss the idea of the tipping point and what it might tell us about ourselves and our environment - and how, perhaps, we can use our understanding of it to prevent significant problems in areas as diverse as banking and sociology.

Producer: Chris Wilson.

Transvestism20040317

Laurie Taylor talks to Charlotte Suthrell about transvestism and its cultural practice and discusses why transvestites are accepted in some societies yet in the UK are so often viewed as deviant or perverse.

Tribute Bands20041215

Laurie Taylor explores a growing sector of the music industry, the tribute band.

Shane Homan, editor of Access all Eras: Tribute Bands and Global Pop Culture, explains the popularity of nostalgia.

Trouble At Work, Travellers Vs Tourists2012102420121029

Trouble at work: Laurie Taylor considers the findings of the largest UK study on ill treatment in the workplace ever undertaken. He's joined by the researchers, Ralph Fevre and Amanda Robinson, who claim that organisations which are well versed in modern management practices may create a culture in which bullying, harassment and stress thrive. Also, travellers versus tourists - Lara Week's research questions whether or not those seeking 'authentic culture' provide more to foreign countries than those who stick to the 'tourist trail'

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Uniforms And Status In Hospitals - Cities Under Siege20120109

How important is the way we dress for work? Laurie speaks to Stephen Timmons who has studied the impact on a hospital of removing professional markers and having almost all staff dress the same.

Also how cities are the new battleground of our increasingly urban world: Stephen Graham, author of Cities Under Siege, tells Laurie that from the slums of the global South to the financial districts of the developed world political violence is policed with increasingly military tactics. He claims that the all over the world the city shows more and more features of a war zone. They discuss what he calls the 'new military urbanism' with Melissa Butcher.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Uniforms in hospitals and policing cities with military measures.

Urban Nightlife - The Burlesque2008013020080204
Urban Protest2012070420120709

From the Paris Commune to the 'Right to the City', cities have long been the centre of utopian dreams and protests. They have generated riches, destitution, celebration and organised and often violent protest. Professor David Harvey, the acclaimed social geographer, talks to Laurie Taylor about the urban roots of the contemporary capitalist crisis and the vision of a city for all. They're joined by the sociologist, Sophie Watson.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Rebel cities - Laurie Taylor talks to David Harvey about trouble on the streets.

Utopia20101229

Laurie Taylor talks to Professor Russell Jacoby, Professor Ash Amin, Professor Barbara Graziosi and The Bishop of Whitby, Martin Warner, about whether we can imagine 'utopia' in the 21st century.

In an age that some describe as filled with anxiety and uncertainty, are we breeding a kind of fatalism towards the future that excludes any notion of utopia? How indeed might we define and describe utopia? Can utopian ideas be not only practical and pragmatic but also democratic? When considering utopia where does religious faith and thinking intertwine with the secular world? Can we even talk about commonly held utopian ideals or are we condemned to imagine utopia only as fantasy, as an intellectual or artistic excerise that is, ultimately, futile.

producer.

Chris Wilson.

Laurie Taylor explores new ideas about Utopia.

Utopia20110103

Laurie Taylor explores new ideas about Utopia.

Laurie Taylor talks to Professor Russell Jacoby, Professor Ash Amin, Professor Barbara Graziosi and The Bishop of Whitby, Martin Warner, about whether we can imagine 'utopia' in the 21st century.

In an age that some describe as filled with anxiety and uncertainty, are we breeding a kind of fatalism towards the future that excludes any notion of utopia? How indeed might we define and describe utopia? Can utopian ideas be not only practical and pragmatic but also democratic? When considering utopia where does religious faith and thinking intertwine with the secular world? Can we even talk about commonly held utopian ideals or are we condemned to imagine utopia only as fantasy, as an intellectual or artistic excerise that is, ultimately, futile.

producer.

Chris Wilson.

Violence - Arab Television2008010920080114
Wealthy Irish And Sandwiches2008011620080121
White Lives - Northern Soul20060329

Laurie Taylor is joined by Andy Wilson to look at how and why individuals became involved in the secretive subculture that existed in the 1970s Northern Soul scene.

Whose City?20040825

The guide books love to talk of Amsterdam as a homely city but whose home is it now? The growing numbers of international corporations of the so called creative city, the tourists who swamp the central districts, or the residents who since the great revolutionary days of the sixties have gone on insisting that this is their town? Laurie Taylor concludes his four part series on Amsterdam by asking 'Whose City?'.

Wine Tasting; Us Philanthropy2012052320120528

Philanthropy is most often associated with the fight against poverty and disease. But a new book claims that the philanthropic foundations established by the major American industrialists - Rockefeller, Carnegie and Ford - have also promoted American values across the world. From Chile to Indonesia, they've invested in the creation of intellectual elites with a neo liberal agenda. And, it's claimed, they've had a significant role on the international stage, transforming America from a parochial nation into a global leader. Professor Inderjeet Parmar explores the power of US philanthropy with Laurie Taylor. Also, what does the language of wine tell us about civilisation? Professor Steven Shapin charts the cultural and chemical evolution of wine tasting.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

Wolves - Neoliberalism & Neoconservatism In Usa20060517
Women, Work And Youth Culture Between The Wars; Wildlife Documentary20061025
Work Identity On The Railway; How To Be Gay2012120520121210

How to be Gay - Laurie Taylor talks to David Halperin, the US Professor of History and Theory of Sexuality, whose controversial new book explores the way in which a gay male sensibility subverts mainstream culture, from Grand Opera to Broadway Musicals. Whilst some gay men repudiate what they perceive as a narrow and stereotypical version of their sexual identity; Halperin argues that a love of kitsch, camp and melodrama is, in fact, linked to a uniquely gay culture: Furthermore, its genius lies in some of its most despised features, namely its snobbery, caricatures of women and adoration of glamour. They're joined by the writer and cultural critic, Owen Jones. Also, Tim Strangleman discusses his study into work identity and 'loss': how older railway workers have reacted to change in their industry.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

Laurie Taylor on a new book exploring gay male identity. Also, work identity in crisis.

How to be Gay - Laurie Taylor talks to David Halperin, the US Professor of History and Theory of Sexuality, whose controversial new book. explores gay culture from Grand Opera to Broadway Musicals. Whilst some gay men repudiate what they perceive as a narrow and stereotypical version of their sexual identity; Halperin argues that a love of kitsch, camp and melodrama is, in fact, linked to a uniquely gay sensibility. Furthermore, he claims that the genius of gay culture lies in some of its most despised features, namely its snobbery, caricatures of women and adoration of glamour. They're joined by the writer and cultural critic, Owen Jones. Also, Tim Strangleman discusses his study into work identity and 'loss': how older railway workers have reacted to change in their industry.

Working-class Lesbians - National Identity & The Media20060809
03Eavesdropping - Cctv In Schools20100920

An exploration of the meaning and history of 'eavesdropping', from cafe society to Twitter

From Hitchcock's 'Rear Window' to Facebook and Twitter, from Soviet Spies to Parisian cafes, eavesdropping is a universal phenomenon.

John Locke, who has provided the first serious and systematic study of the behaviour, tells Laurie that it is a practice which extends into the animal kingdom and brings advantages to birds and chimpanzees.

An attempt to understand the lives of others can help one live better oneself but despite the fact that it has shaped human history and culture, listening in to what others are saying continues to have a very bad name.

Also on the programme Emmeline Taylor presents her research on CCTV in schools and the impact on privacy.

Producer: Chris Wilson.

03 LASTImagination And The City20080901

In front of a live audience at the Radio Theatre at Broadcasting House, Laurie is joined by writer Will Self, sociologist Richard Sennett and geographer Doreen Massey.

0218British Society Of Criminology Conference At Leicester University20100913

When is a crime a 'hate crime', and what does that term actually mean? How has living on what other people throw away become a subject for criminologists? Laurie explores some of the latest ideas on crime as he visits the British Society of Criminology Conference held this year at Leicester University.

He hears from the film maker Rex Bloomstein, from Sylvia Lancaster whose daughter Sophie was murdered because of the way she looked, from Jon Garland, Senior Lecturer in Crimilogy, University of Leicester, and also from Jeff Ferrell, the Professor of Criminology from the United States who has been living out of dumpsters, skips, rubbish bins in an attempt to understand an increasingly criminalised and marginalised way of life.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.

Laurie Taylor visits the British Society of Criminology Conference at Leicester University.