Tennyson's Maud

Joseph Millson reads Alfred, Lord Tennyson's 1855 dark and lyrical poem Maud to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the poet's birth.

A disturbed young man roams the windswept hills, haunted by his father's suicide and his mother's early death.

He blames his father's old friend, the lord of the Hall, for his ruin.

The young man was betrothed to Maud, the lord's daughter, when they were children, but she and her family left the area after the suicide.

But now there are workmen up at the Hall - Maud has come home.

With Kathryn Nutbeem.

Sound design by Christopher Shutt.

Directed by Abigail le Fleming.

Episodes

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Broadcast
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CS20090726
CS2009072620090801
20131003 (BBC7)
20131004 (BBC7)

Joseph Millson reads Alfred, Lord Tennyson's 1855 dark and lyrical poem Maud to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the poet's birth.

A disturbed young man roams the windswept hills, haunted by his father's suicide and his mother's early death.

He blames his father's old friend, the lord of the Hall, for his ruin.

The young man was betrothed to Maud, the lord's daughter, when they were children, but she and her family left the area after the suicide.

But now there are workmen up at the Hall - Maud has come home.

With Kathryn Nutbeem.

Sound design by Christopher Shutt.

Directed by Abigail le Fleming.Joseph Millson reads Alfred, Lord Tennyson's 1855 dark and lyrical poem Maud.

CS20090801
CS* *2009072620090801

Joseph Millson reads Alfred, Lord Tennyson's 1855 dark and lyrical poem Maud to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the poet's birth.

A disturbed young man roams the windswept hills, haunted by his father's suicide and his mother's early death.

He blames his father's old friend, the lord of the Hall, for his ruin.

The young man was betrothed to Maud, the lord's daughter, when they were children, but she and her family left the area after the suicide.

But now there are workmen up at the Hall - Maud has come home.

With Kathryn Nutbeem.

Sound design by Christopher Shutt.

Directed by Abigail le Fleming.