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0120131204Louise Welsh explores some of the most famous tales of murder and the medieval Scots Kings and asks how modern writers might tell them today. This week, the filthy, gory and shocking murder of James I down a sewer in Perth, plus the story of Sir Robert Graham, the brave knight who crossed the king and tried to arrest him in parliament before he went too far. Novelist James Robertson joins Louise Welsh to give his version of the tale. Historians Michael Brown, Roland Tanner and Fiona Watson clue Louise in on the King's part in his own downfall and archaeologists Mark and Derek Hall help Louise find the medieval murder scene in modern Perth.
012013120420140618 (RS)Louise Welsh explores some of the most famous tales of murder and the medieval Scots Kings and asks how modern writers might tell them today. This week, the filthy, gory and shocking murder of James I down a sewer in Perth, plus the story of Sir Robert Graham, the brave knight who crossed the king and tried to arrest him in parliament before he went too far. Novelist James Robertson joins Louise Welsh to give his version of the tale. Historians Michael Brown, Roland Tanner and Fiona Watson clue Louise in on the King's part in his own downfall and archaeologists Mark and Derek Hall help Louise find the medieval murder scene in modern Perth.
0220131211Louise Welsh explores some of the most famous tales of murder and the medieval Scots Kings and asks how modern writers might tell them today. This week the story of James II, from traumatised child witness, to adult perpetrator of violence. Young James II was forced to witness one of the most famous murders under trust in Scottish history: the Black Dinner. Before his eyes, the young teenage Earl of Douglas and his younger brother were snatched from the banqueting table and beheaded by the King's guardians - despite the tears and pleas of the ten year old King. The King was supposed to learn a lesson and 'toughen up'. He certainly did. As an adult he became a murderer himself - bumping off yet another earl of Douglas in a shocking pack-attack with his courtiers. Prime material for shocking, bloody historical opera? Louise sets out with award winning opera composer Stuart MacRae to think how they could do 'James II - the Opera'. Historians Fiona Watson, Katie Stevenson, Michael Brown help Louise and Stuart understand the history and motives, while archaeologist Peter Yeoman from Historic Scotland takes them behind the scenes of Edinburgh Castle to the Black Dinner crime scene itself and into the depths of the walled-up medieval David's tower - a perfect setting for music to send chills up your spine.
0320131218Louise Welsh explores some of the most famous tales of murder and the medieval Scots Kings and asks how modern writers might tell them today. This week James III - a prime contender for Scotland's most useless, dislikeable King. You think you've got problems with your family - just be grateful you don't have a relative like James III, jealous, skinflint and quite likely to try bumping you off. His nobles didn't like him any better than his family, and when faced with the alarming proposition of following His Royal Incompetency into pitched battle against that chap from England they found under the car-park - the future Richard III, they decided to lynch his court favourites over a handy bridge instead, and to kidnap the King. Did James learn a lesson from this? No. From here it gets worse. He ends up in a battle against rebel forces led by his own teenage son. Historians Jenny Wormald, William Hepburn and Norman MacDougall explain to Louise how you sack an underperforming king, while playwright David Greig of 'Dunsinane' fame considers how he'd take a crack at the epic rivalry of Stewart versus Stewart that finally brought James down.
Tales of a Crimewriter: The Stewarts [Radio Scotland]0120131204
Tales of a Crimewriter: The Stewarts [Radio Scotland]022013121120140625 (RS)Louise Welsh explores some of the most famous tales of murder and the medieval Scots Kings and asks how modern writers might tell them today. This week the story of James II, from traumatised child witness, to adult perpetrator of violence. Young James II was forced to witness one of the most famous murders under trust in Scottish history: the Black Dinner. Before his eyes, the young teenage Earl of Douglas and his younger brother were snatched from the banqueting table and beheaded by the King's guardians - despite the tears and pleas of the ten year old King. The King was supposed to learn a lesson and 'toughen up'. He certainly did. As an adult he became a murderer himself - bumping off yet another earl of Douglas in a shocking pack-attack with his courtiers. Prime material for shocking, bloody historical opera? Louise sets out with award winning opera composer Stuart MacRae to think how they could do 'James II - the Opera'. Historians Fiona Watson, Katie Stevenson, Michael Brown help Louise and Stuart understand the history and motives, while archaeologist Peter Yeoman from Historic Scotland takes them behind the scenes of Edinburgh Castle to the Black Dinner crime scene itself and into the depths of the walled-up medieval David's tower - a perfect setting for music to send chills up your spine.
Tales of a Crimewriter: The Stewarts [Radio Scotland]0220131211
Tales of a Crimewriter: The Stewarts [Radio Scotland]032013121820140702 (RS)Louise Welsh explores some of the most famous tales of murder and the medieval Scots Kings and asks how modern writers might tell them today. This week James III - a prime contender for Scotland's most useless, dislikeable King. You think you've got problems with your family - just be grateful you don't have a relative like James III, jealous, skinflint and quite likely to try bumping you off. His nobles didn't like him any better than his family, and when faced with the alarming proposition of following His Royal Incompetency into pitched battle against that chap from England they found under the car-park - the future Richard III, they decided to lynch his court favourites over a handy bridge instead, and to kidnap the King. Did James learn a lesson from this? No. From here it gets worse. He ends up in a battle against rebel forces led by his own teenage son. Historians Jenny Wormald, William Hepburn and Norman MacDougall explain to Louise how you sack an underperforming king, while playwright David Greig of 'Dunsinane' fame considers how he'd take a crack at the epic rivalry of Stewart versus Stewart that finally brought James down.
Tales of a Crimewriter: The Stewarts [Radio Scotland]0320131218

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  • "Crime and Justice / Factual / History