Sunday Morning With [Radio Scotland]

Episodes

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20110605

Sunday Mornings With Sally Magnusson is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

This Sunday, Sally Magnusson's first hour guest is one of the American Episcopal Church's most controversial Bishops, Jack Spong - known for his outspoken views and author of umpteen wildly popular books.

The Mother's Union will be holding their 'General Assembly' in Edinburgh this week - Sally will be finding out exactly who they are, and why they're so concerned about a forthcoming review looking at children being forced to grow up too fast.

And we tackle what can be a difficult and painful subject for many in this country - looking after a loved one with dementia.

Amongst others, we hear from carer Tommy Whitelaw, Professor June Andrews and former soprano singer and current Music in Hospitals performer, Rosanne Brackenridge.

Sally's guest is Jack Spong, one of the Episcopal Church's most controversial bishops.

20110605

Sunday Mornings With Sally Magnusson is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

This Sunday, Sally Magnusson's first hour guest is one of the American Episcopal Church's most controversial Bishops, Jack Spong - known for his outspoken views and author of umpteen wildly popular books.

The Mother's Union will be holding their 'General Assembly' in Edinburgh this week - Sally will be finding out exactly who they are, and why they're so concerned about a forthcoming review looking at children being forced to grow up too fast.

And we tackle what can be a difficult and painful subject for many in this country - looking after a loved one with dementia.

Amongst others, we hear from carer Tommy Whitelaw, Professor June Andrews and former soprano singer and current Music in Hospitals performer, Rosanne Brackenridge.

Sally's guest is Jack Spong, one of the Episcopal Church's most controversial bishops.

20110703

Sunday Mornings With Sally Magnusson is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20110703

Sunday Mornings With Sally Magnusson is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20110710

Sunday Mornings With Sally Magnusson is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20110710

Sunday Mornings With Sally Magnusson is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20110717

Sunday Mornings with Cathy MacDonald is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20110717

Sunday Mornings with Cathy MacDonald is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20110724

Sunday Mornings with Cathy MacDonald is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20110724

Sunday Mornings with Cathy MacDonald is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20110807

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20110807

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20110814

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20110814

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20110828

Dave Batstone joins Ricky to talk about his anti-slavery organisation Not For Sale, and how an incident close to home spurred him on to establish it.

Also joining the discussion will be Stephen Craig, the CEO of All Saints clothing company to tell us how he is responding to the challenges Dave's organisation is posing.

We'll also chat to Elspeth Atkinson about her role as Director of MacMillan Cancer Support and how she combines that with being the wife of a bishop.

Wandering pilgrim Scot Peacock joins Ricky in the studio to talk about his recent journey along the Camino de Santiago de Compostela.

Author Mark Lynas has written Ricky's book of the week, 'The God Species', about what the environmental movement has got wrong, and he's not afraid to admit his own mistakes along the way too.

Anna Magnusson also brings us news of an icon inspired exhibition from Beauly in Inverness-shire.

All this and the usual mix of wonderful music from Ella Fitzgerald, Glen Campbell, Rascall Flatts, Jimmy Cliff and Billie Holiday.

Dave Batstone joins Ricky to talk about his anti-slavery organisation Not For Sale.

20110828

Dave Batstone joins Ricky to talk about his anti-slavery organisation Not For Sale, and how an incident close to home spurred him on to establish it.

Also joining the discussion will be Stephen Craig, the CEO of All Saints clothing company to tell us how he is responding to the challenges Dave's organisation is posing.

We'll also chat to Elspeth Atkinson about her role as Director of MacMillan Cancer Support and how she combines that with being the wife of a bishop.

Wandering pilgrim Scot Peacock joins Ricky in the studio to talk about his recent journey along the Camino de Santiago de Compostela.

Author Mark Lynas has written Ricky's book of the week, 'The God Species', about what the environmental movement has got wrong, and he's not afraid to admit his own mistakes along the way too.

Anna Magnusson also brings us news of an icon inspired exhibition from Beauly in Inverness-shire.

All this and the usual mix of wonderful music from Ella Fitzgerald, Glen Campbell, Rascall Flatts, Jimmy Cliff and Billie Holiday.

Dave Batstone joins Ricky to talk about his anti-slavery organisation Not For Sale.

20110911

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20110911

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20111030

Writer and guitarist from 80's band Fairground Attraction, Mark Nevin, talks to Cathy Macdonald about the highs and low's of his time in the band, his second career as a psychotherapist and how his faith has influenced his life.

With the beginning of the Islamic Hajj next week the annual pilgrimage to Mecca, Muslim Amjid Bashir explains the Hajj's importance and what it's like to make the journey.

Author and sociologist Frank Furedi talks about his book 'On Tolerance', how our outwardly tolerant society often encourages intolerance'.

As its National Adoption week, Christine Lawson shares her experience of adopting three siblings and Angie Barmby explains what it feels like to be adopted.

And this year Glasgow's St Mungo Singers celebrate their 40th anniversary reporter Paul Saunders catches up with them during their rehearsals for a special mass.

Fairground Attraction guitarist Mark Nevin talks to Cathy about his career.

20111030

Writer and guitarist from 80's band Fairground Attraction, Mark Nevin, talks to Cathy Macdonald about the highs and low's of his time in the band, his second career as a psychotherapist and how his faith has influenced his life.

With the beginning of the Islamic Hajj next week the annual pilgrimage to Mecca, Muslim Amjid Bashir explains the Hajj's importance and what it's like to make the journey.

Author and sociologist Frank Furedi talks about his book 'On Tolerance', how our outwardly tolerant society often encourages intolerance'.

As its National Adoption week, Christine Lawson shares her experience of adopting three siblings and Angie Barmby explains what it feels like to be adopted.

And this year Glasgow's St Mungo Singers celebrate their 40th anniversary reporter Paul Saunders catches up with them during their rehearsals for a special mass.

Fairground Attraction guitarist Mark Nevin talks to Cathy about his career.

20111106

Sunday Mornings With Cathy Macdonald is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today. Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs. Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Join Cathy Macdonald and guests for two hours of music and conversation.

20111106

Sunday Mornings With Cathy Macdonald is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today. Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs. Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Join Cathy Macdonald and guests for two hours of music and conversation.

20111113

It's Remembrance Sunday and Bob Dickson reports on the importance to honour not only those who've died in battle, but also those who've suffered life changing injuries.

Sergeant Gary Jamieson talks of loosing both legs and an arm in Afghanistan and what inspired him to keep going.

When she was General Secretary of The Church of Scotland's Guild, Alison Twaddle spent over a decade doing, in her words, everything possible to champion the marginalised in Scotland and beyond.

And just over two years ago she got some unexpected personal news that changed her life.

Alison talks about her diagnosis, her life and her faith.

BBC 2's award winning comedy 'Rev' is back for a second series Cathy hears from its co-creator and writer James Wood about the show's inspiration and from actor and stand up comedian Miles Jupp who plays the unbearable pedant Nigel.

Plus the early years from 0 to 3 are hugely important in a child's development; Psychologist Suzanne Zeedyk explains why sometimes that message is difficult for parents to take on board.

Bob Dixon reports on the importance of honouring who have suffered life changing injuries.

20111113

It's Remembrance Sunday and Bob Dickson reports on the importance to honour not only those who've died in battle, but also those who've suffered life changing injuries.

Sergeant Gary Jamieson talks of loosing both legs and an arm in Afghanistan and what inspired him to keep going.

When she was General Secretary of The Church of Scotland's Guild, Alison Twaddle spent over a decade doing, in her words, everything possible to champion the marginalised in Scotland and beyond.

And just over two years ago she got some unexpected personal news that changed her life.

Alison talks about her diagnosis, her life and her faith.

BBC 2's award winning comedy 'Rev' is back for a second series Cathy hears from its co-creator and writer James Wood about the show's inspiration and from actor and stand up comedian Miles Jupp who plays the unbearable pedant Nigel.

Plus the early years from 0 to 3 are hugely important in a child's development; Psychologist Suzanne Zeedyk explains why sometimes that message is difficult for parents to take on board.

Bob Dixon reports on the importance of honouring who have suffered life changing injuries.

20111127

Would you give up a normal family life to set up a community for people in crisis? Author and journalist Tobias Jones bought a 10-acre woodland in Somerset, set up home with his family and then opened it up as a refuge for those going through tough or troubled times.

He shares his experiences.

It's World Aids day this week and there are over 33 million people globally living with HIV.

A lot has changed for those diagnosed with the virus, and for those close to them, and yet many of the challenges they face are still huge.

Rev.

Marion Chatterley from HIV charity Waverly Care explains what it's like to look after the spiritual and pastoral care of those living with HIV.

For those who feel the call to the ministry but can't manage it full time, there's a new Church of Scotland scheme that allows them fulfil their ambition on a smaller scale.

And for BBC Scotland's Explorer Season - more about the legacy of two remarkable Victorian lady adventurers and how they helped recover a remarkable medieval treasure trove of stories.

Plus, does Christmas mean more about the ringing of cash registers than bells? Find out about a new adult nativity with a modern twist which tries to bring back the real meaning of Christmas.

Tobias Jones opened up a refuge for people in crisis.

20111127

Would you give up a normal family life to set up a community for people in crisis? Author and journalist Tobias Jones bought a 10-acre woodland in Somerset, set up home with his family and then opened it up as a refuge for those going through tough or troubled times.

He shares his experiences.

It's World Aids day this week and there are over 33 million people globally living with HIV.

A lot has changed for those diagnosed with the virus, and for those close to them, and yet many of the challenges they face are still huge.

Rev.

Marion Chatterley from HIV charity Waverly Care explains what it's like to look after the spiritual and pastoral care of those living with HIV.

For those who feel the call to the ministry but can't manage it full time, there's a new Church of Scotland scheme that allows them fulfil their ambition on a smaller scale.

And for BBC Scotland's Explorer Season - more about the legacy of two remarkable Victorian lady adventurers and how they helped recover a remarkable medieval treasure trove of stories.

Plus, does Christmas mean more about the ringing of cash registers than bells? Find out about a new adult nativity with a modern twist which tries to bring back the real meaning of Christmas.

Tobias Jones opened up a refuge for people in crisis.

20111204

Sunday Mornings With Cathy Macdonald is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Join Cathy Macdonald and guests for two hours of music and conversation.

20111204

Sunday Mornings With Cathy Macdonald is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Join Cathy Macdonald and guests for two hours of music and conversation.

20111211

Sunday Mornings With Cathy Macdonald is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Join Cathy Macdonald and guests for two hours of music and conversation.

20111211

Sunday Mornings With Cathy Macdonald is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs.

Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Join Cathy Macdonald and guests for two hours of music and conversation.

20120101

Join Cathy Macdonald, Ricky Ross and guests for two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20120101

Join Cathy Macdonald, Ricky Ross and guests for two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20120115

Sunday Mornings With Richard Holloway is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today. Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs. Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20120115

Sunday Mornings With Richard Holloway is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today. Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs. Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20120205

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today. Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs. Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20120205

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today. Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs. Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20120212

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today. Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs. Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20120212

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today. Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs. Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20120226

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today. Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs. Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20120226

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today. Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs. Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20120325

On Sunday Morning this week Ricky Ross talks to former primary school teacher and educational expert Mary Lappin. Mary introduced 'Seasons For Growth', a loss and grief education programme which supports young people through times of change.

A Syrian living in Scotland explains how his family back home are coping through the uprising and what it's like to witness the revolution from afar.

With the return of the 'Apprentice', Ricky discusses if it's just great entertainment and harmless fun, or is there something a bit unpleasant about what the programme stands for?

Reporter Paul Saunders visits the Marie Curie Hospice in Glasgow to find out about the role of the Hospice Chaplain and hears from one patient about why she finds it such a positive place.

Plus, acclaimed journalist and writer Stephen Armstrong talks about his book, 'The Road To Wigan Pier Revisited'. He retraces the journey taken by George Orwell 75 years ago to discover if the poverty and social injustice revealed then still exist today.

Ricky Ross talks to former primary school teacher and educational expert Mary Lappin.

20120325

On Sunday Morning this week Ricky Ross talks to former primary school teacher and educational expert Mary Lappin. Mary introduced 'Seasons For Growth', a loss and grief education programme which supports young people through times of change.

A Syrian living in Scotland explains how his family back home are coping through the uprising and what it's like to witness the revolution from afar.

With the return of the 'Apprentice', Ricky discusses if it's just great entertainment and harmless fun, or is there something a bit unpleasant about what the programme stands for?

Reporter Paul Saunders visits the Marie Curie Hospice in Glasgow to find out about the role of the Hospice Chaplain and hears from one patient about why she finds it such a positive place.

Plus, acclaimed journalist and writer Stephen Armstrong talks about his book, 'The Road To Wigan Pier Revisited'. He retraces the journey taken by George Orwell 75 years ago to discover if the poverty and social injustice revealed then still exist today.

Ricky Ross talks to former primary school teacher and educational expert Mary Lappin.

20120401

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today. Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs. Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20120401

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today. Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs. Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20120415

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today. Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs. Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20120415

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today. Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs. Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20120422

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today. Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs. Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20120422

Sunday Mornings With Ricky Ross is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today. Topical and where necessary provocative it takes the weeks events and breaks them down into what it means to the individual and our society's values and beliefs. Complementing this are conversations with people who have something to say on how we live our lives; whether through their personal experiences, what they write or preach, or because they've dedicated themselves to making the world a better place.

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20120506

Join Sally Magnusson and guests for two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20120506

Join Sally Magnusson and guests for two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20120513

Join Sally Magnusson and guests for two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20120513

Join Sally Magnusson and guests for two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20120527

This week Sally Magnusson talks to columnist Melanie Reid about life and living following the horse riding accident which left her paralysed from the neck down.

Scotland urgently needs more foster carers. We consider the challenges and rewards of foster care for families and the children they open their homes to.

Following an eventful week at the Church of Scotland's General Assembly we get a snapshot of life behind the scenes with the people who make it all happen. And outgoing Convenor of the Church & Society Council of the Church of Scotland, Reverend Ian Galloway, shares his views on some of the week's highlights.

Children's author Hilary Robinson tackles the sensitive issue of child bereavement in her illustrated book "The Copper Tree".

And Sally speaks to Don MacDonald who left his comfortable Edinburgh lifestyle with his family and set up a farm in Zambia for local street children.

20120527

This week Sally Magnusson talks to columnist Melanie Reid about life and living following the horse riding accident which left her paralysed from the neck down.

Scotland urgently needs more foster carers. We consider the challenges and rewards of foster care for families and the children they open their homes to.

Following an eventful week at the Church of Scotland's General Assembly we get a snapshot of life behind the scenes with the people who make it all happen. And outgoing Convenor of the Church & Society Council of the Church of Scotland, Reverend Ian Galloway, shares his views on some of the week's highlights.

Children's author Hilary Robinson tackles the sensitive issue of child bereavement in her illustrated book "The Copper Tree".

And Sally speaks to Don MacDonald who left his comfortable Edinburgh lifestyle with his family and set up a farm in Zambia for local street children.

2012060320120603 (RS)

This week Cathy is back in the presenter seat to take you through the summer months. She talks to Father Roddy Johnston, and his unconventional route to the priesthood.

Here's a question for you: where would you find a cursing stone, and would you really use it for that? Cathy chats to Dr Donald William Stewart about this most intriguing of religious artefacts recently discovered on a Scottish island.

Reporter Bob Dickson finds out how an Edinburgh based arts project in Edinburgh is encouraging young people with autism to explore and express their artistic side.

A new fictional detective is about to hit the bookstores, but this one isn't of the hardboiled, hard-drinking variety, but a village vicar turned super-sleuth! The author, James Runcie, also happens to be the son of a former Archbishop of Canterbury.

On this Jubilee weekend The Big Lunch is held across the country, encouraging neighbours and communities to come together to share company and food. Cathy talks to Alastair McIntosh of GalGael, and Rev Doug Gay about why sharing a meal with people you may not even know provides such social nutrition and a spirit of neighbourliness.

All this and the usual excellent selection of music, listen in between 7am-9pm this Sunday Morning With Cathy Macdonald.

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking ask what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

2012060320120603 (RS)

This week Cathy is back in the presenter seat to take you through the summer months. She talks to Father Roddy Johnston, and his unconventional route to the priesthood.

Here's a question for you: where would you find a cursing stone, and would you really use it for that? Cathy chats to Dr Donald William Stewart about this most intriguing of religious artefacts recently discovered on a Scottish island.

Reporter Bob Dickson finds out how an Edinburgh based arts project in Edinburgh is encouraging young people with autism to explore and express their artistic side.

A new fictional detective is about to hit the bookstores, but this one isn't of the hardboiled, hard-drinking variety, but a village vicar turned super-sleuth! The author, James Runcie, also happens to be the son of a former Archbishop of Canterbury.

On this Jubilee weekend The Big Lunch is held across the country, encouraging neighbours and communities to come together to share company and food. Cathy talks to Alastair McIntosh of GalGael, and Rev Doug Gay about why sharing a meal with people you may not even know provides such social nutrition and a spirit of neighbourliness.

All this and the usual excellent selection of music, listen in between 7am-9pm this Sunday Morning With Cathy Macdonald.

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking ask what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

2012061020120610 (RS)

As a solicitor, Len Murray loved the performance element of court. Now retired from the profession he's a Burns aficionado and after dinner speaker. He talks to Cathy Macdonald about his life before, during and after the theatricality of the Scottish law courts.

When 40 leading Western thinkers were invited to the Dalai Lama's Himalayan residence to discuss the world's problems, filmmaker Khashyar Darvich was there to record events. As his film, "Dalai Lama Renaissance" screens across Scotland, he shares his experience of spending time in close quarters with the Buddha of Compassion.

Congolese ex-asylum-seeker Consol Efomi lost almost everything during the political turmoil of his homeland. Now living in Scotland, he tells Cathy about keeping his Christian faith and turning his fortunes around.

Ecotherapist and founder of Wild Earth organisation, Dave Bingham, on why spending time alone in the company of Mother Nature is essential for restoring our spiritual equilibrium.

And we hear about The Place2Be; the charity offering children a place in schools where they can go to regain their emotional wellbeing.

2012061020120610 (RS)

As a solicitor, Len Murray loved the performance element of court. Now retired from the profession he's a Burns aficionado and after dinner speaker. He talks to Cathy Macdonald about his life before, during and after the theatricality of the Scottish law courts.

When 40 leading Western thinkers were invited to the Dalai Lama's Himalayan residence to discuss the world's problems, filmmaker Khashyar Darvich was there to record events. As his film, "Dalai Lama Renaissance" screens across Scotland, he shares his experience of spending time in close quarters with the Buddha of Compassion.

Congolese ex-asylum-seeker Consol Efomi lost almost everything during the political turmoil of his homeland. Now living in Scotland, he tells Cathy about keeping his Christian faith and turning his fortunes around.

Ecotherapist and founder of Wild Earth organisation, Dave Bingham, on why spending time alone in the company of Mother Nature is essential for restoring our spiritual equilibrium.

And we hear about The Place2Be; the charity offering children a place in schools where they can go to regain their emotional wellbeing.

20120708

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20120708

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20120715

Cathy interviews poet and Salvation Army member John Coutts about his faith and how it's taken him around the globe.

The film Chariots of Fire was rereleased this week. Based on the story of Scottish Athlete Eric Liddell, his daughter Patricia shares her memories of her father.

As the nation searches to find the perfect Jesus, Rev Owain Jones and Theatre Critic Neil Cooper discuss the enduring appeal of Jesus Christ Super Star. Will it engage the public's imagination with religion and reach out to a whole new generation?

In Aberdeen a lavishly illustrated medieval book of animals that once belonged to King Henry the Eighth is going on display for the first time. Professor Jane Geddes discusses some of the moral messages behind the beautiful pictures.

Plus, a day in the life of a grave cleaner. Find out why one man loves tending to graves for families who aren't in the country to do it themselves.

20120715

Cathy interviews poet and Salvation Army member John Coutts about his faith and how it's taken him around the globe.

The film Chariots of Fire was rereleased this week. Based on the story of Scottish Athlete Eric Liddell, his daughter Patricia shares her memories of her father.

As the nation searches to find the perfect Jesus, Rev Owain Jones and Theatre Critic Neil Cooper discuss the enduring appeal of Jesus Christ Super Star. Will it engage the public's imagination with religion and reach out to a whole new generation?

In Aberdeen a lavishly illustrated medieval book of animals that once belonged to King Henry the Eighth is going on display for the first time. Professor Jane Geddes discusses some of the moral messages behind the beautiful pictures.

Plus, a day in the life of a grave cleaner. Find out why one man loves tending to graves for families who aren't in the country to do it themselves.

20120722

This Sunday morning Cathy's special guest is Dr Jim Swire. His later life has been defined by the death of his daughter Flora in the Lockerbie bombing, but this morning Cathy also discovers Jim's deep love of the Isle of Skye where he grew up, as well as his connection with one of Scotland's greatest heroines.

30 years working in aid and development work in Africa has given author Chris McIvor a particular take on the way the continent has changed. He joins Cathy to talk about his latest book 'In The Old Chief's Country', a snapshot from the 1980s, back when Zimbabwe was seen as a model country for other to follow.

For all the athletes competing at the London Olympics, there have been years of training, sacrifice, intense hard work. But there's another challenge facing Muslim athletes at the Games: the Olympics coincide with the month of Ramadan, the traditional period of Muslim fasting. Professor Mona Siddiqui will be joining Cathy to explain the impact on all Muslims of Ramadan.

Ultra-Orthodox Jews in Israel have always been exempted from military service, but that may be about to change. Journalist Phoebe Greenwood will be explaining why this is such a controversial issue.

The story of a crofter from South Uist, who chose not to talk for 50 years and wove intricate items from grass and leaves is being told in a new play which is touring Scotland. 'Angus - Weaver of Grasses' dramatizes the life of Angus Macphee. Cathy is joined by Joyce Laing, an art therapist who's collected Angus's work, and Bob Frith, the artistic director of the theatre company who're touring the play.

Cathy's special guest is Dr Jim Swire, who lost his daughter in the Lockerbie bombing.

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20120722

This Sunday morning Cathy's special guest is Dr Jim Swire. His later life has been defined by the death of his daughter Flora in the Lockerbie bombing, but this morning Cathy also discovers Jim's deep love of the Isle of Skye where he grew up, as well as his connection with one of Scotland's greatest heroines.

30 years working in aid and development work in Africa has given author Chris McIvor a particular take on the way the continent has changed. He joins Cathy to talk about his latest book 'In The Old Chief's Country', a snapshot from the 1980s, back when Zimbabwe was seen as a model country for other to follow.

For all the athletes competing at the London Olympics, there have been years of training, sacrifice, intense hard work. But there's another challenge facing Muslim athletes at the Games: the Olympics coincide with the month of Ramadan, the traditional period of Muslim fasting. Professor Mona Siddiqui will be joining Cathy to explain the impact on all Muslims of Ramadan.

Ultra-Orthodox Jews in Israel have always been exempted from military service, but that may be about to change. Journalist Phoebe Greenwood will be explaining why this is such a controversial issue.

The story of a crofter from South Uist, who chose not to talk for 50 years and wove intricate items from grass and leaves is being told in a new play which is touring Scotland. 'Angus - Weaver of Grasses' dramatizes the life of Angus Macphee. Cathy is joined by Joyce Laing, an art therapist who's collected Angus's work, and Bob Frith, the artistic director of the theatre company who're touring the play.

Cathy's special guest is Dr Jim Swire, who lost his daughter in the Lockerbie bombing.

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20120805

The Edinburgh Festival is upon us, and on the show this morning Cathy is joined by one of its leading lights, the dynamic conductor Christopher Bell. Described by one admirer recently as someone who 'has some magic dust he sprinkles on his singers'. The son of a clergyman brought up in Belfast, Christopher's early love of music flourished in the local cathedral choir. He went on to become one of the founders of the National Youth Choir of Scotland, and he also tells Cathy about his enthusiasm for introducing music to the children.

It's the trial that's dividing a nation and being talked about around the world. In Russia three women are accused of hooliganism motivated by religious hatred after performing a 'Punk Prayer' in the cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow. The BBC's Moscow correspondent Daniel Sandford joins Cathy to discuss why the role of the Russian Orthodox Church in this case has been under heavy scrutiny.

With the Scottish football season kicking off this weekend, Dave Scott from Nil By Mouth and sociologist Dr John Kelly from the University of Edinburgh talk to Cathy about how the changed circumstances of the oldest footballing rivalry in Scotland may herald a positive shift in attitudes about sectarianism.

Women's rights in sport have been high on the agenda during the run up to the 2012 Olympics - mainly focused on the participation by two Muslim women from Saudi Arabia. It's the first time this deeply conservative Muslim nation has fielded women in its national team. Cathy is joined by Nabila Ramdani, commentator on women's Arab issues, and socio-economic writer Reem Asaad to discuss why the appearance of these athletes in the Games has been causing both anger and celebration.

Cathy is joined by dynamic conductor Christopher Bell.

20120805

The Edinburgh Festival is upon us, and on the show this morning Cathy is joined by one of its leading lights, the dynamic conductor Christopher Bell. Described by one admirer recently as someone who 'has some magic dust he sprinkles on his singers'. The son of a clergyman brought up in Belfast, Christopher's early love of music flourished in the local cathedral choir. He went on to become one of the founders of the National Youth Choir of Scotland, and he also tells Cathy about his enthusiasm for introducing music to the children.

It's the trial that's dividing a nation and being talked about around the world. In Russia three women are accused of hooliganism motivated by religious hatred after performing a 'Punk Prayer' in the cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow. The BBC's Moscow correspondent Daniel Sandford joins Cathy to discuss why the role of the Russian Orthodox Church in this case has been under heavy scrutiny.

With the Scottish football season kicking off this weekend, Dave Scott from Nil By Mouth and sociologist Dr John Kelly from the University of Edinburgh talk to Cathy about how the changed circumstances of the oldest footballing rivalry in Scotland may herald a positive shift in attitudes about sectarianism.

Women's rights in sport have been high on the agenda during the run up to the 2012 Olympics - mainly focused on the participation by two Muslim women from Saudi Arabia. It's the first time this deeply conservative Muslim nation has fielded women in its national team. Cathy is joined by Nabila Ramdani, commentator on women's Arab issues, and socio-economic writer Reem Asaad to discuss why the appearance of these athletes in the Games has been causing both anger and celebration.

Cathy is joined by dynamic conductor Christopher Bell.

20120812

Cathy's first hour guest this morning is Dr Mary Hepburn, who has won the Scotswoman of the Year for her pioneering work in women's health in some of Glasgow's poorest communities. She founded the Special Needs in Pregnancy clinics, an approach which began treating patients' social problems alongside their medical ones - a holistic approach, but one that was quite radical at that time.

Have you ever felt uncomfortable with how frank or unsubtle some charity advertising has become? Well it would appear that you are not alone as complaints have tripled in the last few years. Cathy will be talking to social anthropologist Dr Neil Thin and Yvonne Taylor, who's involved with campaigns for animal welfare charity, PETA - People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals - to discuss if graphic images in charity campaigns are necessary to stir our conscience.

It's 40 years since Idi Amin ordered the expulsion of thousands of Asians from Uganda - most of whom settled here in the UK. Cathy will be hearing some personal stories from people directly affected by that chapter in their country's history.

The Olympic Games come to a close this weekend, and apart from some of the astounding performances we've seen from the worlds' top athletes, another talking point has been the massive public euphoria. But is this a short-lived period, or have the Games given people a real shot of renewed hope and belief, about themselves? Cathy's joined by author and broadcaster Richard Holloway, and social psychologist at St Andrews University, Professor Stephen Reicher,.

Cathy is joined by Dr Mary Hepburn, named Scotswoman of the Year.

20120812

Cathy's first hour guest this morning is Dr Mary Hepburn, who has won the Scotswoman of the Year for her pioneering work in women's health in some of Glasgow's poorest communities. She founded the Special Needs in Pregnancy clinics, an approach which began treating patients' social problems alongside their medical ones - a holistic approach, but one that was quite radical at that time.

Have you ever felt uncomfortable with how frank or unsubtle some charity advertising has become? Well it would appear that you are not alone as complaints have tripled in the last few years. Cathy will be talking to social anthropologist Dr Neil Thin and Yvonne Taylor, who's involved with campaigns for animal welfare charity, PETA - People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals - to discuss if graphic images in charity campaigns are necessary to stir our conscience.

It's 40 years since Idi Amin ordered the expulsion of thousands of Asians from Uganda - most of whom settled here in the UK. Cathy will be hearing some personal stories from people directly affected by that chapter in their country's history.

The Olympic Games come to a close this weekend, and apart from some of the astounding performances we've seen from the worlds' top athletes, another talking point has been the massive public euphoria. But is this a short-lived period, or have the Games given people a real shot of renewed hope and belief, about themselves? Cathy's joined by author and broadcaster Richard Holloway, and social psychologist at St Andrews University, Professor Stephen Reicher,.

Cathy is joined by Dr Mary Hepburn, named Scotswoman of the Year.

20120819

Cathy interviews screen writer and novelist Peter May.

Cathy interviews screen writer and novelist Peter May who's known for the China Thrillers or more recently the Lewis Trilogy. He talks about his early years in journalism, his television career and his books.

BBC's Vatican correspondent David Willey discusses the impact of what has become known as "Vatileaks" - how the former butler to Pope Benedict XVI will stand trial for stealing confidential papers and leaking them to the press.

Two women tell powerful stories through theatre. Rebecca Peyton the writer and performer of the one woman show 'Sometimes I Laugh Like My Sister' explains why 7 years after her sister, the BBC journalist Kate Peyton, was shot dead in Somalia she feels compelled to keep telling her story on stage.

And South African actress Thembi Mtshali-Jones discusses the moving play 'Mother To Mother'. A story of forgiveness and reconciliation through an imaginary testimonial between two mothers which recounts and relives the murder of Amy Biehl in Cape Town in 1993.

Renowned Scottish composer James Macmillan's new work 'Since It Was the Day of Preparation' is based on the story of the resurrection. It's being performed at the Edinburgh Festival this year and Cathy asks James about his experiences of writing music about his faith.

20120819

Cathy interviews screen writer and novelist Peter May.

Cathy interviews screen writer and novelist Peter May who's known for the China Thrillers or more recently the Lewis Trilogy. He talks about his early years in journalism, his television career and his books.

BBC's Vatican correspondent David Willey discusses the impact of what has become known as "Vatileaks" - how the former butler to Pope Benedict XVI will stand trial for stealing confidential papers and leaking them to the press.

Two women tell powerful stories through theatre. Rebecca Peyton the writer and performer of the one woman show 'Sometimes I Laugh Like My Sister' explains why 7 years after her sister, the BBC journalist Kate Peyton, was shot dead in Somalia she feels compelled to keep telling her story on stage.

And South African actress Thembi Mtshali-Jones discusses the moving play 'Mother To Mother'. A story of forgiveness and reconciliation through an imaginary testimonial between two mothers which recounts and relives the murder of Amy Biehl in Cape Town in 1993.

Renowned Scottish composer James Macmillan's new work 'Since It Was the Day of Preparation' is based on the story of the resurrection. It's being performed at the Edinburgh Festival this year and Cathy asks James about his experiences of writing music about his faith.

20120826

Raja Shehadeh joins Cathy to talk about his work as a human rights lawyer.

Palestinian Christian Raja Shehadeh joins Cathy to talk about his work as a human rights lawyer and his new book 'Occupation Diaries'.

Tony Nicklinson's death last week came less than seven days after he lost his High Court case to allow doctors to end his life. Cathy discusses the human, philosophical and spiritual dimension to the 'right to die debate' with Hospital Chaplain Blair Robertson and Mona Siddiqui - Professor of Islamic and Interreligious Studies, Edinburgh University.

Human Rights activist Xavier Willam and BBC Correspondent Orla Guerin discuss Pakistan's controversial blasphemy laws after a case emerged of a Christian girl, reportedly with Downs Syndrome, being accused of desecrating pages of the Koran.

You might be familiar with St Columba and St Ninian but what do you know about St Donnan? Professor Thomas Clancy, lecturer in Celtic and Gaelic studies at Glasgow University talks about Scotland's first ever martyr.

Also what attracts young people to Naturism? 18 year Kimberly Craigie, the new youth officer for British Naturism, explains why she chooses to be a naturist and why she's on a mission to recruit other young people.

20120826

Raja Shehadeh joins Cathy to talk about his work as a human rights lawyer.

Palestinian Christian Raja Shehadeh joins Cathy to talk about his work as a human rights lawyer and his new book 'Occupation Diaries'.

Tony Nicklinson's death last week came less than seven days after he lost his High Court case to allow doctors to end his life. Cathy discusses the human, philosophical and spiritual dimension to the 'right to die debate' with Hospital Chaplain Blair Robertson and Mona Siddiqui - Professor of Islamic and Interreligious Studies, Edinburgh University.

Human Rights activist Xavier Willam and BBC Correspondent Orla Guerin discuss Pakistan's controversial blasphemy laws after a case emerged of a Christian girl, reportedly with Downs Syndrome, being accused of desecrating pages of the Koran.

You might be familiar with St Columba and St Ninian but what do you know about St Donnan? Professor Thomas Clancy, lecturer in Celtic and Gaelic studies at Glasgow University talks about Scotland's first ever martyr.

Also what attracts young people to Naturism? 18 year Kimberly Craigie, the new youth officer for British Naturism, explains why she chooses to be a naturist and why she's on a mission to recruit other young people.

20120902

Reformed gambler John Searle tells Cathy about his work helping orphans in Malawi.

Reformed gambler John Searle joins Cathy to explore the mid-life turning point when he left the poker table behind and set out on a journey to help orphans in Malawi. He found God, then founded the Lifeline Fund and now many 100s of Malawians have an education, jobs and professional careers.

A Norwegian court recently sentenced Anders Breivik to 21 years in jail for shooting dead 77 people last July. Presiding Bishop of the Church of Norway Helga Byfuglien and sociologist Dr Aaron Winter from Abertay University in Dundee discuss how different countries respond to acts of shocking violence.

Scottish writer and poet Andrew Grieg describes why he keeps returning to one particular book: David Young's translation of the Czech poet Rilke's 'Duino Elegies'.

Unrestrained corporate marketing is bad for our health, for society and for the planet according to Stirling University social marketing expert Prof Gerard Hastings who talks about his new book The Marketing Matrix. Ronnie Convery, communications director of the Archdiocese of Glasgow, offers his faith-based reflection as well as accounting for his church's actions when it issued a controversial message for Marriage Sunday.

Eva Loeffler's father was the founder of the Paralympic movement, German ex-pat Dr Ludwig Guttman. She recalls his remarkable commitment to patients with spinal injuries and the earliest Paralympic events.

20120902

Reformed gambler John Searle tells Cathy about his work helping orphans in Malawi.

Reformed gambler John Searle joins Cathy to explore the mid-life turning point when he left the poker table behind and set out on a journey to help orphans in Malawi. He found God, then founded the Lifeline Fund and now many 100s of Malawians have an education, jobs and professional careers.

A Norwegian court recently sentenced Anders Breivik to 21 years in jail for shooting dead 77 people last July. Presiding Bishop of the Church of Norway Helga Byfuglien and sociologist Dr Aaron Winter from Abertay University in Dundee discuss how different countries respond to acts of shocking violence.

Scottish writer and poet Andrew Grieg describes why he keeps returning to one particular book: David Young's translation of the Czech poet Rilke's 'Duino Elegies'.

Unrestrained corporate marketing is bad for our health, for society and for the planet according to Stirling University social marketing expert Prof Gerard Hastings who talks about his new book The Marketing Matrix. Ronnie Convery, communications director of the Archdiocese of Glasgow, offers his faith-based reflection as well as accounting for his church's actions when it issued a controversial message for Marriage Sunday.

Eva Loeffler's father was the founder of the Paralympic movement, German ex-pat Dr Ludwig Guttman. She recalls his remarkable commitment to patients with spinal injuries and the earliest Paralympic events.

20120909

Cathy's guest this morning has travelled to some of the most volatile countries in the world as a photojournalist, but his focus on the disadvantaged and vulnerable has come at a personal cost. Join Cathy in the company of photographer Don McCullin.

With the close of the Paralympic Games this weekend many people have had their previous views of disability turned around. But has it all been positive and what will be the lasting impact? Cathy's joined by Professor John Swinton of Aberdeen University, and Susie Fitton of Capability Scotland.

Terry Waite is remembered by many as a hostage in Beirut for nearly 5 years in the late 1980s. He's used this experience to inform his role with the homeless charity Emmaus, and during a visit to Glasgow last week Cathy caught up with him. Scottish artist Gerard Burns was also at that event to see his painting of The Road to Emmaus gifted to the charity, and he joins Cathy to talk about the significance of that moment.

Cathy will also be hearing about the book that's inspired the Moderator of the Church of Scotland, Albert Bogle. Listen in to find out what it is.

There's also the final poem in the poem in the Written World series. All this and the usual excellent selection of music, listen in between 7am-9pm this Sunday Morning With Cathy Macdonald.

Cathy is joined by photographer Don McCullin.

20120909

Cathy's guest this morning has travelled to some of the most volatile countries in the world as a photojournalist, but his focus on the disadvantaged and vulnerable has come at a personal cost. Join Cathy in the company of photographer Don McCullin.

With the close of the Paralympic Games this weekend many people have had their previous views of disability turned around. But has it all been positive and what will be the lasting impact? Cathy's joined by Professor John Swinton of Aberdeen University, and Susie Fitton of Capability Scotland.

Terry Waite is remembered by many as a hostage in Beirut for nearly 5 years in the late 1980s. He's used this experience to inform his role with the homeless charity Emmaus, and during a visit to Glasgow last week Cathy caught up with him. Scottish artist Gerard Burns was also at that event to see his painting of The Road to Emmaus gifted to the charity, and he joins Cathy to talk about the significance of that moment.

Cathy will also be hearing about the book that's inspired the Moderator of the Church of Scotland, Albert Bogle. Listen in to find out what it is.

There's also the final poem in the poem in the Written World series. All this and the usual excellent selection of music, listen in between 7am-9pm this Sunday Morning With Cathy Macdonald.

Cathy is joined by photographer Don McCullin.

20120923

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20120923

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20120930

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20120930

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20121014

Years spent in an isolated existence on an island off Mallaig gave artist, Rob Fairley, the solitude and space to pursue his twin passions for art and climbing. He talks to Cathy Macdonald about how this lifestyle informs his spirituality.

As a group of Jewish mothers compete for the distinction of being crowned "Jewish Mum of the Year", we ask how accurately a reality television series reflects the Jewish community.

Hajj, the pilgrimage to Mecca, is one of the greatest religious observances in Islam which must be performed at least once in a lifetime by every able-bodied Muslim. A major event within the faith, we hear about the preparations that proceed it.

Set up to give the homeless a chance to earn an income, how has the Big Issue magazine maintained its momentum and continued to impact on people's lives 21 years since it was started?

Too much time spent watching a screen can have serious health implications for young children. We consider how realistic it is to curb this habit in today's technology-led lifestyle.

And marking the 50th anniversary of the opening session of the Second Vatican Council, in which the Catholic Church tried to locate its position in the modern world - with Professor John Haldane of the University of St Andrews.

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20121014

Years spent in an isolated existence on an island off Mallaig gave artist, Rob Fairley, the solitude and space to pursue his twin passions for art and climbing. He talks to Cathy Macdonald about how this lifestyle informs his spirituality.

As a group of Jewish mothers compete for the distinction of being crowned "Jewish Mum of the Year", we ask how accurately a reality television series reflects the Jewish community.

Hajj, the pilgrimage to Mecca, is one of the greatest religious observances in Islam which must be performed at least once in a lifetime by every able-bodied Muslim. A major event within the faith, we hear about the preparations that proceed it.

Set up to give the homeless a chance to earn an income, how has the Big Issue magazine maintained its momentum and continued to impact on people's lives 21 years since it was started?

Too much time spent watching a screen can have serious health implications for young children. We consider how realistic it is to curb this habit in today's technology-led lifestyle.

And marking the 50th anniversary of the opening session of the Second Vatican Council, in which the Catholic Church tried to locate its position in the modern world - with Professor John Haldane of the University of St Andrews.

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20121021

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20121021

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20121104

Join Ricky Ross and guests for two hours of music and conversation with a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20121104

Join Ricky Ross and guests for two hours of music and conversation with a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20121111

Join Ricky Ross and guests for two hours of music and conversation with a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20121111

Join Ricky Ross and guests for two hours of music and conversation with a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20121202

Join Ricky Ross and guests for two hours of music and conversation with a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20121202

Join Ricky Ross and guests for two hours of music and conversation with a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20130106

2013010620130324 (RS)

Music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective. This week, another chance to hear Ricky Ross, Eildon Dyer and Alastair McIntosh as they bask in the warmth of Brazil, following Ricky's charity trip there to find out about land reform and its implications for Scotland.

Two hours of music and conversation with a faith & ethical perspective. This week Ricky Ross, Eildon Dyer and Alastair McIntosh bask in the warmth of Brazil following Ricky's recent charity trip there to find out about land reform and its implications for Scotland.

20130106

Two hours of music and conversation with a faith & ethical perspective. This week Ricky Ross, Eildon Dyer and Alastair McIntosh bask in the warmth of Brazil following Ricky's recent charity trip there to find out about land reform and its implications for Scotland.

20130113

20130113

Reverend Giles Fraser was born of Jewish heritage before choosing a career in the Christian church leading to his role as Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral. He talks to Ricky Ross about his faith and recent resignation from St Paul's over the handling of the Occupy London protest group.

For many people hitting middle age means having a crisis but why should it? We discuss how to embrace our middle years rather than fear them.

As Belfast's flag dispute continues to cause conflict we get an update on the situation there.

Two weeks into January and for many their New Year's resolutions are falling by the wayside. How can we bolster our wavering will power and maintain our resolve?

The UK's only disabled Scout group celebrates 80 years of bringing adventure and challenges to boys with disabilities. We join them on a weekend camp.

And as the UK Scout and Girl Guide organisations open consultations with members on whether an alternative version of the oath to God should be created to include non-believers, we consider the relevance of the Promise today.

20130120

As shamed cyclist Lance Armstrong comes clean to chat show queen, Oprah, we consider why confessionals are no longer just between you and God, and why it takes a public apology to claw your way back into public affection.

Reverend Paolo Dall'Oglio was expelled from Syria last year for speaking up against the Assad regime, and for voicing the concerns of the country's Christian community. He explains to Ricky why he's still actively trying to garner international support for Christians in the region.

Head of BBC Alba and founding board member of El Sistema, Maggie Cunningham, tells Ricky about island life, her passion for the Gaelic language and culture, and her illustrious broadcasting career.

Up to 100 million pilgrims will attend the Kumbh Mela over the next 6 weeks. The Hindu festival takes place in the Indian city of Allahabad where the rivers Ganges and the Yamuna meet. Followers from all over the world will bathe in the holy waters, and live in the tented city. Ricky finds out how being part of such a collective event could be good for your health.

And we find out more about the life of a remarkable minister, Jim Punton, who championed the cause of the poor and oppressed.

20130127

With ambitions of art school, no television in the family home and a grandfather trading in circus horses, a life on the stage wasn't an obvious career path for Alison Peebles. She talks to Ricky Ross about those early years and how living with multiple sclerosis gives even greater purpose to her work as an actress and director now.

Immigrating to a new country is always a culture shock. We hear about the specific challenges of faith from migrants who've settled in Scotland.

Many Jewish people migrated to Scotland during dark times in European history. To mark Holocaust Memorial Day we'll find out about the experience of Scotland's Jewish community.

Is there still a place for dedicated religious programmes in our radio and TV schedules? Radio 2's undergoing a shakeup to its Sunday programming, Radio 4's Thought for the Day is regularly under fire, and why don't more characters in mainstream programmes reflect a particular faith? We ask whether religious broadcasting should be more integrated in our schedules.

And we hear a report from the launch of Scotland's biggest ever campaign to combat global hunger.

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Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, taking the week's events to task and asking what they say about our values and beliefs.

20130217

This week Richard chats to Diane Blood, her story is one of a determined woman winning a battle with the medical establishment. She tells Richards how she succeeded in giving birth to two children using her deceased husband's sperm against all the odds.

The Pope surprised everyone last week by announcing his

resignation and walking away from the most powerful spiritual position on the planet. Richard talks to Ronnie Convery, Communications Director of the Catholic Archdiocese of Glasgow, and David Chillingworth, Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church about the issues surrounding this momentous event and what comes next for both the Pope and the Catholic Church.

In the month that's seen a report into the notorious Magdalene Laundry system in Ireland, the women affected and their supporters have received an apology - well, sort of - after a long struggle for justice. Richard will be discussing whether governments should apologise whole heartedly for past misdemeanours, and if such apologies do any good.

In her tour of Scotland's holy places, Anne Ellis has come to Edinburgh to find out about the impact of the Disruption of the Church of Scotland on the development of the new art of photography in the 19th century.

Lent began on Wednesday last week, but it seems Lent is appealing more and more to the secular world. Richard will be finding out more.

All this and the usual excellent selection of music, listen in between 7am-9am this Sunday Morning With Richard Holloway.

20130303

From 7am you can hear Richard Holloway talking to the Minister of St Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh, Dr Gilleasbuig Macmillan, on the eve of his departure from the post after nearly 40 years. He'll be talking about his work at St Giles and his life beyond it.

Richard will be talking to Father Jim Crampsey, journalist Stephen McGinty, and Mary Cullen, editor of Catholic publication Open House, about how society responds when individual leaders and institutional structures are shown to be fallible.

Reporter Bob Dickson continues his 'Folk Saints' series and reveals a woman who was dubbed 'The Angel of the Gorbals', Lilias Graham.

How do you answer the questions of a curious and confused child after the death of a parent? Elke Barber decided to write a book for children to help them deal with such bereavement. Mark Hazelwood, of Palliative Care Scotland, also joins Richard to explore what we can learn from other countries and cultures about dealing with grief.

All this and the usual excellent selection of music, listen in between 7am-9am this Sunday Morning With Richard Holloway.

20130310

He could have gone into politics but instead chose a career in the Catholic Church in Scotland. As their Media Director Peter Kearney talks to Ricky Ross about coping with challenges in the public eye, as well as the personal challenge of life as a single father following the loss of his wife.

Rowdy, irreverent and not for the faint-hearted - what's the special alchemy of comedy and musical theatre that's made The Book of Mormon a hit both sides of the Atlantic?

We consider the challenges, and ethics, of establishing support networks for sex offenders in the community to prevent repeat offending.

Art historian Anne Ellis examines the impact of mental health on artists and their work with a review of Peter Howson's latest exhibition.

Following the death of her adopted brother, Michaela Foster Marsh travelled to his native homeland of Uganda. She tells us about the remarkable series of coincidences that led to her meeting his biological family, and the charity she was inspired to set up in his memory.

20130414

Cathy's first guest is Farah Khushi. It was while growing up in Pakistan and listening to her grandmother's stories that Farah first became aware of domestic violence. It was a cause she would take up as an adult and Chair of Scottish Circle, committed to raising awareness of the issue across the world.

In the week of Margaret Thatcher's death, we revisit the iconic address she gave to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland 25 years ago. It was an address that became better known as 'The Sermon on the Mound.' Cathy talks to the Very Rev Dr Finlay Macdonald who was present that day in May 1988.

As the benefit cuts take hold across the country, a number of churches throughout the UK have spoken out against what they see as a system that will penalise society's most vulnerable. So what does the future hold under our current welfare system - and how do we get ethical values to permeate it? Cathy will be discussing these issues in the company of the Rev Ian Galloway, Minister of Gorbals Parish Church, and John Deighan, the Parliamentary Officer for the Catholic Church.

In our most stressful moments we've all probably daydreamed about walking away from our jobs, and the responsibilitiesof modern living. Buddhist nun Ani Lhamo did just that, she's lived for the last 20 years in the Samye Ling Tibetan monastery in Scotland. Cathy talks to her about her spiritual journey and an extraordinary 4 year retreat she once undertook.

The classic play 'Dr Faustus', a tale of greed and defiance of the authority of God that sees Faustus sell his soul to the devil in exchange for power and knowledge. There's a new radical version of the play out, we sent Ronnie Convery to review it and he'll join Cathy in the studio to reveal if it still has the power to shock.

20130421

Homeless and struggling with drug addiction, James Bowen's life was on a downward spiral until a stray cat crossed his path. He tells Cathy Macdonald how the remarkable bond he formed with the ginger tom he named Bob helped turn his life around.

What do you want for Scotland's future? Postcards from Scotland is a book series designed to stimulate radical new ways to rethink how we live. We hear from two of the writers behind the series about the alternative community projects they've seen.

Author of the Narnia series, CS Lewis found faith in his midlife. Professor of Theology and author of biography, 'CS Lewis: A Life', Alister McGrath gives his views why so many regard this former atheist as a Christian icon.

In honour of clocking up his two hundredth Thought for the Day writer and broadcaster, Denis Rice, shares his secrets for finding fresh ways to react to the news.

And we'll hear varying views on the much loved Roman Catholic priest whose outspoken opinions sometimes put him at odds with his church. Father John Fitzsimmons features this week in our Folk Saints series.

20130428

Cathy is joined by children's campaigner Camila Batmanghelidjh. Camila had a privileged upbringing in Iran, and even at a young age she knew her future would involve helping children. She formed her first charity while still in her twenties - The Place To Be - a counselling service for school children that grew into a nationwide organisation. She talks to Cathy about the reasons why she loves working with children despite all the challenges involved.

The subject of Empathy is explored with Camila and Sue Robison, who works for The Roots of Empathy project in Scottish schools. Its focus is to try and create an environment where children can display and develop empathy. Cathy finds out how it works and what the long-term benefits can be.

Humanist weddings are on the increase in Scotland, already outnumbering Roman Catholic ceremonies, and if the trend continues they look set to outnumber Church of Scotland ones in a couple of years. Cathy talks to Caroline Lynch, Humanist and Chair of Secular Scotland, and Rev Gillean McLean about the attraction, and why a ceremony is still so important to people.

Parents are bombarded with dos and don'ts when raising their children but how much support and guidance do grandparents get? Author Rob Parsons and grandmother of four Rev Gillean Maclean, explore the joys and pitfalls of being a grandparent.

All this and a great mix of music, this Sunday morning from 7am.

20130505

Making a financial investment that doesn't pay is a bitter pill to swallow, but how much worse when the money's not your own and runs into millions of pounds? Donnie G MacLeod was Finance Director of the Western Isles Council when they lost all their funds in the Bank of Credit and Commerce International collapse of 1991. He talks to Cathy Macdonald about rebuilding his life from rock bottom and the economic state we're in today.

Is it taboo to talk of taking benefits away from older people? We add our voice to the debate.

Would you join a co-housing scheme later in life? Find out what 'living together apart' means and if it's the way for Scotland to meet the housing needs of an ageing population.

Rectories have long attracted and inspired many of Britain's most famous writers. Deborah Alun-Jones explores this fascinating relationship and shares her findings from her book, "The Wry Romance of the Literary Rectory".

And, on the windswept shores of Iona, how the island's tranquility acted as a balm for one couple coming to terms with tragedy.

2013051220150104 (RS)

In a special edition of the Sunday programme, Cathy Macdonald explores the spiritual significant of the island of Iona, along with some of the beautiful music inspired by it.

Cathy begins her journey with former Leader of the Iona Community John Harvey, and his wife Molly at Govan Old Parish Church in Glasgow, where the Iona Community was founded in the 1930s by the charismatic Church of Scotland minister George Macleod.

The music of Iona is an integral part of island life and for the lives of the Community members, and musician Jane Bentley has been influenced to take that musicality from Iona back into her own community. Cathy meets her during one of the music and mental health workshops she runs in Paisley.

The artist John Lowrie Morrison talks to Cathy in his studio near Oban about how the island's unique light and spirituality touches his work.

On arrival on Iona Cathy meets Davie Kirkpatrick, whose family have lived on Iona for generations. Davie talks about what it's like to be a native islander on such a significant holy site.

A special pilgrimage across Iona in the company of Community member and peace campaigner Helen Steven completes Cathy's exploration of the impact of Iona in Scotland and beyond.

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Mother-of-five Judy Fairbairns is a woman who lived life on the edge - the edge of the country, the edge of her wits, and the edge of what it's possible for one woman to do. Juggling family life with multiple business ventures in a wind-battered corner of the Hebrides she charts it all in her memoir 'Island Wife: Living on the Edge of the Wild'. She joins Sally Magnusson to share her tale.

What kind of values do you want for our society in the years after the referendum? We hear how the Church of Scotland is planning a series of open forums - and why they reckon they're well placed to do it.

Pink or blue - does how you dress your children affect them for life?

We experience some hospitality Sikh-style to find out the role of food in the faith.

And - traditional versus modern. Opinion is divided on what hymns should be sung in church. Is it possible to please all the people all the time? We'll hear from one fearless hymn writer who thinks he can heal the division.

20130630

Cathy Macdonald talks writing, dancing, faith and the paranormal with writer and poet, Lorn Macintyre.

They're regarded by the public as defenders of the truth against a culture of corruption but what are the wider implications of being a whistleblower? We ask Professor Gavin MacFadyen of the Centre for Investigative Journalism, and Rab Wilson, who put his head above the parapet in his workplace.

Genetics Professor Steve Jones scrutinizes the Bible from a scientific perspective and shares his findings from his book "The Serpent's Promise: The Bible Retold as Science."

Mary Lily Walker's name may be missing from the history books but her pioneering reform of Dundee's social landscape 100 years ago remains as relevant today. Developmental Psychologist, Dr Suzanne Zeedyk, tells us more about this remarkable woman and her legacy.

A popular destination for visitors now, Glasgow's St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art had a controversial start. We visit the multi-faith attraction as it celebrates its 20th birthday to find out more.

20130818

Ricky's special first hour guest is lawyer and prominent anti-apartheid campaigner and activist, Albie Sachs. He was involved in creating South Africa's post-apartheid constitution after the first democratic elections in 1994, and Nelson Mandela appointed him a Judge in the country's newly established constitutional court. He talks about his fight for freedom, which saw him imprisoned in solitary confinement and seriously injured by a car bomb.

After a bloody and difficult week in Egypt, peace experts Rosemary Hollis and Paul Rogers discuss where the Egyptians could go next, and how to get opposing sides round the table for talks.

Bob Dickson brings another story of a remarkable person whose faith enabled them to touch the lives of others in extraordinary ways. We learn about the unorthodox Christian radical Father Roland Walls, who helped found a monastic style community in a green tin shack in a former miners welfare institute in Midlothian.

And Ricky finds out how an orchestra of instruments moulded from trash, has transformed and brought music to one slum town in Paraguay. Filmmaker, Alejandra Nash, speaks to Ricky about her documentary 'Landfill Harmonic'.

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Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20130915

Rev John Dear joins Cathy to talk about his constant struggle as a peace activist.

20130922

Cathy's guest is former nun Eleanor Stewart.

20130929

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20131006

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20131013

Cathy MacDonald talks to Jenn Ashworth about her latest book, The Friday Gospels.

20131013

Cathy's first guest is Jenn Ashworth author and former Mormon. Her latest book 'The Friday Gospels' tells a fictional tale of a Mormon family, welcoming their son home from a two-year mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

A recently launched campaign in primary schools aims to teach children about abuse, self-protection and asking for help. Does this signify a cultural shift, are you ready to listen to children more? Cathy will be joined by Mo Davidson a volunteer on this project, and retired primary Head Teacher, and Debbie Fry, Lecturer in Child Protection at Edinburgh University's NSPCC Child Protection Research Centre.

Should schools be teaching values and morals as well as the three R's? It sounds like an excellent idea in practice, but to find out if schools and educationalists in Scotland can delivery it is Professor Bob Davis, the Head of the School of Education at Glasgow University, and Danny Murphy a retired Comprehensive Head and currently Senior Teaching Fellow at Moray House School of Education at Edinburgh University.

Last year students at Glasgow School of Art came up with the original idea of training guide dogs to assist people who have dementia. Reporter Anna Magnusson's been to Arbroath to meet Frank and Maureen and their labrador retriever, Oscar, along with Pat Brodlie of Alzheimer Scotland to find out more.

Northern Ireland is pulling away from conflict - but the murals remain. But a new project is trying to replace them with more neutral images. But there's been some resistance from both sides of the divide, as Professor Bill Rolston, Director of the Transitional Justice Institute at the University of Ulster, explains to Cathy.

All this and the usual mix of great music. Don't miss a second of it.

20131020

Cathy's first guest is Nigel Osborne, one of Britain's leading composers' he's also a pioneer in the use of music therapy to help children traumatized by war. A master musical communicator, he's worked in conflict zones around the world and believes that music can have a profound effect on the human brain.

With more adults living alone than in any other type of household, Cathy examines the topic of loneliness with Valerie Crookston, from Contact the Elderly; Herald Columnist Catriona Stewart, and Reverend Owain Jones of the United Church of Bute. Does living alone mean being lonely, or can it be a positive experience? And what can be done to help those people who live alone and would rather not?

Edinburgh chamber choir, the St Andrew Camerata will sing at mass in St Peter's basilica. Before heading off for Rome, the choir's conductor, Vincent Wallace and choir member and managing director Gordon Duncan told Cathy how they managed to get the Vatican performance.

Church of Scotland minister the Reverend Aftab Gohar whose mother, nephew, niece and other family members and friends died in a suicide bombing at All Saints' Church in Peshawar tells Cathy why he forgives those responsible.

Cathy talks to Francis Mckee, Director of the Centre for Contemporary Arts in Glasgow about a specially created art exhibition inspired by the life and legacy of St Columba. And we hear from some of the artists involved who came together on Raasay, near Skye to discuss and respond to themes linked to St Columba, as well as questions about landscape, spirituality, religion and identity.

All this and the usual mix of great music.

20131020

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20131027

Two hours of music and conversation with a faith and ethical perspective with Ricky Ross. Taking the week's events to ask what they say about our values and beliefs.

This year marks 25 years since the publication of 'Touching the Void'. It's a breathless account of the ascent of the previously unclimbed west face of the Siula Grande in Peru, by Simon Yates - and the author of the book - Joe Simpson. But it's really about what happened on the way down, and what happened cast a long shadow across the rest of their lives. It was a climb that a fellow mountaineer wryly described to them before they attempted it, as "a challenging day out". Mountaineer and author, Joe Simpson, joins Ricky.

The events at Grangemouth have highlighted the importance to the local and national community of good mediation skills. Hugh Donald, of Place for Hope, an ecumenical organisation based in Scotland that offers mediation services and Peter Monaghan, north west area director for ACAS - Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service - look at what sort of skills are needed to rebuild fractured relationships.

Reviewing "The Jewish Cardinal" a film based on the life of Jean-Marie Lustiger, part of the UK Jewish Film Festival.

And what do you look for in a Godparent? And, in the light of events in a Chapel in London a few days ago, how many Godparents do you need?

20131027

Two hours of music and conversation with a faith and ethical perspective.

20131103

Ricky Ross is joined by author Maajid Nawaz.

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Author and journalist John Niven talks about his writing and coping with loss and guilt after the death of his brother.

As the Philippines recover from Typhoon Haiyan, we explore how one can remain positive and not despair in the face of disaster.

Chakwe Daka talks about life on the streets in Zambia - and learn discover a fusion of cultures: Zambian and Gaelic.

The story of Zaccheus is well known to many church goers, but now the story of the money lender who repaid his debts fourfold is being used to help offenders in Scotland's prisons.

And fifty years ago on Friday (22 November) the first Catholic president of the United States was assassinated. How much was John F Kennedy influenced by his faith? And how did he come to be an icon for Scottish Catholics?

Two hours of music and conversation with a faith and ethical perspective.

20131124

Two hours of music and conversation with a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20131201

Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20131208

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective with Richard Holloway.

20131215

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20131222

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20140105

Join Richard this week as he explores the subject of forgiveness. His first hour guest will be Richard Moore, who was shot and blinded, aged 10, during one of Northern Ireland's worst years of The Troubles. He tells Richard how he later met and forgave the soldier who shot him.

Richard will also discuss how major faiths define forgiveness, in the company of Rabbi Mark Solomon and theologian Elizabeth Templeton.

Marina Cantacuzino explains how her Forgiveness Project had developed into a platform to give people opportunities to explore issues around forgiveness and tell their own personal stories, including an interview with Jo Berry about her own personal story of forgiving and moving on.

Julie Nicholson, whose daughter Jenny died in the terrorist attacks in London in 2005, stepped down as a parish priest because she could not forgive the perpetrators. She talks to Richard about how the events have led her on a journey of discovery about the meaning of forgiveness.

20140112

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20140119

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20140126

Ricky's first hour guest this morning is Deirdre Davis, the actress best known for playing Eileen Donachie for the past 13 years in BBC Scotland soap River City. Ricky chats to her about her career and her life as a committed Christian.

The British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) recently updated their guidelines to reflect public opinion, which is increasingly concerned over the use of language and the sexualisation of young women in film and music videos. Ricky is joined by film critic Paul Gallagher and writer Katie Grant to discuss the difficulties in agreeing to what the guidelines should be.

A Church of England diocese have issued Nine Commandments for the modern day tablet, to help provide guidance on how to navigate your way through social media. Philip Blackledge, Rector of Holy Trinity Melrose, and author Katie Grant, talk about exercising caution and the kind of issues they consider before hitting the send button.

Holocaust survivor Zdenka Fantlova survived 3 concentration camps, including Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen. She shares her story with us, one that begins in her native Czechoslovakia on the day of the German invasion.

The 4 Corners Belfast Festival is organised on a cross denominational basis with churches working together to encourage people to leave their corner of the city and explore new places and new perspectives. Ricky talks to the founders of the festival, Reverend Steve Stockman of Fitzroy Presbyterian Church, and Father Martin MaGill, Parish Priest at Sacred Heart Parish Church.

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20140202

Richard Holloway returns as presenter and is joined in the first hour of the programme by one of the world's most prolific and loved authors, Alexander McCall Smith. Most of us will know him for his No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency series set in Botswana and his 44 Scotland Street series set in Edinburgh, but he's also written librettos for opera. Richard finds out more about Alexander McCall-Smith's life and favourite pieces of music.

We may be familiar with the story of Noah's Ark, but a new book on the subject takes another look at this ancient myth and reaches some interesting conclusions. Richard talks to author Irving Finkel about what he's discovered.

Our reporter Carol Purcell talks to Holocaust survivor Zdenka Fantlova in this second part of an interview with Zdenka. The German invasion of her native Czechoslovakia has happened, and she and other members of the Jewish community are sent to the German camp Terezin. She wants more than anything to stay with her boyfriend Arno who is with her in the camp. But then the transportations begin. A tale of endurance against the odds.

This week marks the start of the Winter Olympic Games in Russia. But it has already been overshadowed by criticism and concern over gay rights, human rights and corruption. What approach should we take towards countries whose moral and political standards are very different to our own? Engage or disengage? Richard will be chewing over these dilemmas with Professor Trevor Salmon, Emeritus Professor of International Relations at Aberdeen University, and Alison Phipps, Professor of Languages and Intercultural Studies, at the University of Glasgow.

All this and the usual wonderful mix of music, don't miss it.

20140209

Richard meets Stephen Grosz, who after practising as a psychoanalyst for over 25 years, put his experiences and findings about human behaviour in a book. The Examined Life; How We Lose and Find Ourselves, is a collection of real life stories, straight from his consulting room.

Is it religion or the misinterpretation of it that's to blame for the blood that's shed in the name of one's God? The writer A.L. Kennedy and Mona Siddiqui, Professor of Islamic and Interreligious Studies, at New College, University of Edinburgh, unpack this fascinating area.

They'll also be looking at the idea of giving a prisoner reading material as part of their jail sentence, as one US judge recently did. What should we be reading if we want to change the way people think and act?

And we hear the final part of holocaust survivor Zdenka Fantolva's harrowing and incredibly moving story.

Plus there'll be the usual helping of great music.

20140216

Richard's guest for the first hour is well known to this programme and BBC Scotland TV news, but she's usually the one asking all the questions. Journalist and broadcaster Sally Magnusson's new book 'Where Memories Go ; Why Dementia Changes Everything' is a moving, personal account of her mother's decline and death from dementia, and the effect it had on the family who cared for her.

How likely is it that in the near future Artificial Intelligence will be able to create, speak, drive, comfort, learn, or reason? And if it does, what kind of moral code would we need for this brave new world? Richard is joined by Alan Bundy, Professor of Automated Reasoning at the School of Informatics, University of Edinburgh, and Owain Jones, Minister of the United Church of Bute and self-confessed science fan.

A new work of fiction imagines a world where a female Archbishop is appointed, and she's got one of the top jobs, she's the Archbishop of Canterbury. It's a timely book given how divided many churches are on the role of women in their institutions. Richard talks to Rev Ruth Innes about the book and how likely this scenario could ever come true.

If many of us can look back at our parents' generation and say that we've done better in life, can the same be said of our children when they compare themselves to us? Richard will be finding out how parents feel about a different economic future for their off-spring, in the company of Rev Ruth Innes, Owain Jones, and expert and writer about childhood, Sue Palmer.

A programme full of fascinating conversations and debate, and peppered with great music. Don't miss it.

20140223

Richard's first hour guest is Scottish playwright and artist, John Byrne. He wrote the hugely popular Tutti Frutti for television, in theatre, he's best known for the Slab Boys Trilogy and more recently, he designed and painted the mural for the ceiling of Edinburgh's Kings Theatre. Once described as "the first post-modernist from Paisley", we find out more about the man behind this ferocious and restless talent.

The Right Reverend Lorna Hood, Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, was part of a group of leading Scottish figures who were invited to visit Srebrenica, by the charity Remembering Srebrenica. She tells Richard why it was so important to meet people directly affected by the 1995 massacre that took place there, one of the worst atrocities on European soil since the 2nd world war.

Philosopher Roman Krznaric wants to launch an empathy revolution. He explains why empathy can change lives and inspire political action. His book Empathy: A Handbook for Revolution is out now, published by Rider Books.

And barely a week goes by when we don't hear about some crisis in the banking sector, huge bonuses being paid to bank executives or unethical practises being uncovered. But over in Holland, Dutch bankers have started to swear an oath to promise to do their job with integrity. The oath is the first of its kind in Europe. Maud Van Gaal, finance reporter for Bloomberg News in Amsterdam; Eve Poole from Ashridge Business School, and philosopher Roman Krznaric, join Richard to discuss whether an ethical code backed by a solemn oath can help win back public confidence.

20140302

Richard's first hour guest is writer and critic, Olivia Laing. For her most recent book "The Trip To Echo Spring", she went in search of six great American writers, all of them alcoholics. We find out more about the woman behind the fiction.

We drop by a food bank in Edinburgh and hear from the Reverend Iain May of South Leith Parish Church. And Ewan Gurr, Development Officer for the Trussell Trust in Scotland, and the Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church, Bishop David Chillingworth join Richard to discuss why in a country where there's enough food to feed everyone, there's been a rise in demand for charitable food aid.

David Pratt, Foreign Editor of The Sunday Herald, was part of a group of leading Scottish figures who were invited to visit Srebrenica, by the charity Remembering Srebrenica. He joins Richard to discuss the effect the visit had on him.

Later this week SCIAF- the Scottish International Aid Fund - launches its' Wee Box, Big Change appeal encouraging people to give up something for Lent to support the charity's work in Africa, Asia and Latin America. The focus of this year's campaign is Colombia, a country ravaged by decades of armed conflict and human rights abuses. Earlier this year, Val Morgan from SCIAF and David Pratt visited the country to find out about the work being done to help indigenous and African Colombian communities affected by the conflict.

20140309

This Sunday Cathy is joined by a woman who has been inspiring change in attitudes to domestic violence for years. Debora Kemby grew up in the Democratic Republic of Congo, but her work there helping victims of domestic abuse meant she had to flee the country and eventually started a new life in Scotland.

With the news dominated by events in Ukraine, what perspective can we gain from those who are emotionally and culturally connected to the country but who have to witness events unfolding from afar? Scotland has a well-established Ukrainian community, and Cathy chats to one of its members, Michael Ostapko about how the community are coming together during these difficult times.

This month marks the thirtieth anniversary of one of the most bitter and divisive industrial disputes in Britain's history. The miners' strike of 1984 lasted almost a year. Our reporter Bob Dickson has been finding out about the legacy of the dispute for the communities involved.

The debates about why we're better together or why we should go it alone are everywhere, but one interesting outcome of the debate is that it is creating a space for conversation. It's making us consider what kind of country we'd like to be living in, irrespective of the outcome of the Referendum. Each month starting today Sunday Morning With will pick a big theme to explore with different thinkers. Yesterday was International Woman's Day, so how would we like to see the role of women progress in Scotland in 2015 and beyond, in terms of gender justice and equality? Cathy is joined by Alison Phipps, Professor of Languages and Intercultural Studies, at the University of Glasgow. Dr Lesley Orr, feminist historian, writer and activist, and Kristi Long, an anthropologist with a particular interest in gender equality.

20140316

This Sunday Cathy is joined by Bengali-born journalist and author Lipika Pelham. She moved with her husband to Jerusalem to pursue his dream of working for conflict resolution. In a region of such complexities, Lipika found her integrity and her relationship tested by the city's intensely felt divisions.

It's been a year since the Catholic Church appointed a new pope after the unexpected resignation of Benedict XVI, Cathy is joined by Archbishop of St Andrews and Edinburgh, The Most Rev Leo Cushley, and Quaker and writer Alastair McIntosh to discuss the substance behind the outward success of Pope Francis.

With the death of Tony Benn last Friday, we hear again highlights of Richard Holloway's interview with the late Labour politician from last year, when he spoke movingly to Richard about his childhood and family.

How do you get a real sense of a place, enough to write a whole book about it, without ever having set foot in it? Leilah Nadir's new book, 'The Orange Trees of Baghdad', in search of my lost family', is a moving memoir which does just that, as she gets to know the city through her father's memories.

Noorah Al-Gailani, Curator of Islamic Civilisations at Glasgow Museums, is from Baghdad, and talks to Cathy about the book.

To celebrate the forthcoming Commonwealth Games, BBC Scotland is asking a poet from each of the competing nations and territories to send a poem on a postcard to Glasgow. We'll hear the very first Commonwealth poetry postcard on the programme today.

All this and the usual great mix of music, don't miss it.

20140323

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20140330

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20140406

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20140413

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20140420

The Easter story is one we take many important lessons from - having hope in dark times, renewal, and redemption. But how do we relate such difficult themes to children? Episcopal Minister Philip Blackledge, and Stephen McKinney, Leader of Creativity, Culture and Faith at the University of Glasgow's School of Education, explore how to share the Easter story with children.

And Lisa catches up with Gemma Steele, Young Scot Unsung Hero Award winner, about going from high school in South Uist to setting up an orphanage in Kenya.

Lisa's first hour guest is singer songwriter Steph MacLeod, who opens up about his alcohol addiction. The young classical guitarist drank so excessively that he ended up begging on the streets of Edinburgh. But with one chance meeting he managed to turn his life around, leading him to God, rehab, sobriety, and song writing - in that order he says. He'll also be performing one of his songs.

20140420

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20140427

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20140504

Join Sally Magnusson and guests for two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20140511

Join Sally Magnusson and guests for two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20140511

Acclaimed academic Barbara Taylor is Sally's guest on the show, and as well as talking about her body of work, she's also frank about her experience of being a psychiatric patient. She's written intimately about the experience in her memoir 'The Last Asylum'.

Society isn't perfect, but it doesn't stop us dreaming that things could be better. One man has put his ideals into print. Sally is joined by author Gerry Hassan, who's written 'Caledonian Dreaming: The Quest for a Different Scotland'. He thinks Scotland is in a state of turbulence and flux, but from this uncertain place new and exciting changes can emerge, regardless of the outcome of the referendum later this year.

The political debate about why we're better together or why we should go it alone is dominating the news this year. One positive off-shoot of this is the space that's being created for conversation. And that's exactly what we're doing here on our Sunday Morning programme. Each month we're picking a Referendum theme to explore with different thinkers, and on today's programme it's identity.

Joining Sally is Mona Siddiqui, Professor of Islamic and Interreligious studies, New College Edinburgh University,

Mary Cullen, Editor of the religious publication Open House, and writer Gerry Hassan...

Next month the World Cup kicks off, and all eyes will be firmly on host nation, Brazil. Although some people might be celebrating, others have been out protesting - all this money spent on stadiums and infrastructure for the games, while millions in the country are living in poverty. Sally is joined by Mara Luz, Depute Convener for Latin America and the Caribbean to find out the reality of what's going on behind the football preparations.

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Join Sally Magnusson and guests for two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20140525

Join Sally Magnusson and guests for two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

20140601

Moneeza Hashmi, President of the Commonwealth Broadcasting Association, former Director of Programmes at Pakistan Television and the daughter of one of the most famous revolutionary poets of Urdu, Faiz Ahmed Faiz, joins Cathy.

The Common Weal's blueprint for Scotland - a practical vision for a new fairer society or pie in the sky idealism? Robin McAlpine, Director of the Jimmy Reid Foundation, and political commentator, Alex Massie, sift the reality from the idealism.

Marking 100 years since the outbreak of the First World War with Hilary Robinson, author of 'Where The Poppies Now Grow' for young children. The book is set during the war, and written in rhyme, in homage to the war poets, and tells the story of a friendship that helps heal the tragedy of war.

Bringing you another poetry postcards from around the Commonwealth in advance of the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow this summer. Pushpa Valabh brings today's poem from Pakistan.

Is it possible that the internet could help to relieve the curse of loneliness in old age? Author and storyteller, Millie Gray, writer and broadcaster, Denis Rice, and silver surfer, Alasdair Deer, share their thoughts on ageing well.

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Leading Forensic Anthropologist Sue Black has been called on for her expertise in many high profile cases, including the conviction of Scotland's largest paedophile ring, as well as heading the British Forensic Team's exhumation of mass graves in Kosovo. She joins Cathy in the first hour to talk about her life and career.

One of the shocking and devastating consequences of war that we don't often hear about is sexual violence. An unlikely pairing, Foreign Secretary William Hague, and Angelina Jolie, the Special Envoy for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, draw attention to this issue in The Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict Zones. Carron Mann, from Women for Women, David Pratt, Foreign Editor at the Sunday Herald, and Dr Juliet Cohen, Freedom from Torture, discuss the biggest gathering ever on this subject which is happening in London this week.

And we find out more about a Scottish missionary who brought Christianity and engineering to Uganda. Whilst relatively unknown here in Scotland, Alexander McKay is known to every school child in Uganda. Artist Sanna Gateja explains why he's organised an exhibition in McKay's home town, to give the missionary the recognition he deserves in his home country.

Plus we drop into rehearsals for Guide Gods. Acclaimed performer Claire Cunningham explains how she's using dance, live music and interviews to explore how the major world faiths view deafness and disability.

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Academic and journalist Andrew Solomon joins Cathy in the first hour to speak about his award winning book 'Far from the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity'. It's framed by his experience of being a gay child with straight parents and is based on 10 years of extensive research.

The recent attacks in Iraq by radical jihadist group ISIS have been dominating news headlines around the world. Dr Erica Hunter from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, looks at who ISIS are, how they emerged, and the religious ideology that drives them.

In this month's Referendum discussion we turn our attention towards poverty, and exploring that gap between the have and have-nots. Recent figures show that 18% of Scots are suffering from three or more measures of poverty such as a lack of food, heating and clothing. Revd Martin Johnstone and Cath Milligan from The Poverty Truth Commission, and Dr John McKendrick, Senior Lecturer in Social Studies at Glasgow Caledonian University, look at why poverty and inequality are still such issues when there's so much wealth around.

Devout Mormon Carys Bray was on track to fulfil what she believed to be her God ordained destiny, which was to be a good mother and wife. But when her journey with motherhood took a very dramatic turn, she was forced to question the faith she grew up with.

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Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

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Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.

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Journalist, Allan Little, has for more than three decades reported from countless countries and conflicts, including Iraq, former Yugoslavia, South Africa and Moscow. He joins Richard Holloway to discuss what he's taken from these experiences.

During the week on Good Morning Scotland pastors and preachers take over from journalists and politicians, take a moment to reflect on a news story in The Thought for the Day slot. Last week, some young people from Generation 2014 (a group of 50 Scottish teenagers who'll have the right to vote in the Independence Referendum and who BBC Scotland's been following over the year) took over the TftD slot. Nathan Epemolu was one of those contributors and he tells Richard how he found it.

And, David Goodman, a member of the Jewish Reform Community and Spencer Fildes, Chair of the Scottish Secular Society join Richard to discuss whether a time for a religious reflection, or even a non-religious philosophical reflection is still relevant?

And, as developments in the Middle East continue to cause concern. David Goodman, a member of the Jewish Reform Community and Richard consider whether dramas like BBC 2's new series "The Honourable Woman" can ever helpfully capture the reality of the situation.

As Leonard Cohen turns 80, a new book explores the life, work and passion of this poet-turned-musician. Liel Leibovitz, the author of "A Broken Hallelujah, Leonard Cohen's Secret Chord", explains his enduring appeal.

And in the run up to the Commonwealth Games we get another Poetry Postcard - this time from Northern Ireland; Michael Longley brings us "All of These People".

20140720

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, taking the week's events to ask and asking what they say about values and beliefs.

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Journalist, novelist, and broadcaster Cristina Odone joins Cathy for the first hour to talk about her life, work, and her time at the helm of The Catholic Herald.

To mark the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, Indian artist Nalini Malani presents In Search of Vanished Blood. She'll be discussing her haunting artwork with Cathy, which will transform the entire Western façade of the Scottish National Gallery on Edinburgh's Mound.

Acclaimed military historian Trevor Royle talks about editing a collection of prose, letters and articles by Scottish writers from the Great War, including work by John Buchan, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, and Hugh MacDiarmaid.

On the subject of writing that emerged from the war, Nalini Malani, Trevor Royle, and Greg Garrett, Professor of English at Baylor University, Texas, look at the impact that war and conflict has had on creativity. They'll explore how artists have responded to war.

And in the week Edinburgh comes alive with festivals, live music from Simply Soweto Encha, who've been described as a creative and joyous sound sensation from South Africa.

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Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, taking the week's events to task and asking what they say about values and beliefs.

20140817

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, taking the week's events to task and asking what they say about values and beliefs.

20140831

Cathy Macdonald talks to author Mark Gevisser about his memoir.

Author Mark Gevisser was born and brought up in Johannesburg in South Africa. The gay son of Jewish immigrants, he talks to Cathy about the memoir he's written about his life and growing up in the 1970s in a society deeply affected by apartheid.

Stories about Muslim radicals and terrorism hit the headlines on a daily basis, but how do you respond when you're a young Muslim, and you regularly hear about your faith being associated with such a negative force? Cathy is joined in discussion by Rameez Mahmood, a student at University of Strathclyde and the Vice President of its Islamic Society, Islamic scholar Shayk Hassan Rabbani who works with young Muslims in Glasgow, and member of the Muslim community Adil Mahmood.

Edinburgh is home to the oldest Jewish community in Scotland, but there remains little trace of the community's history on the stones of the city itself. A new exhibition at the National Library of Scotland uncovers some of the hidden stories of this diverse community. Our reporter, Bronwen Livingstone, went along to the exhibition to find out more.

Pope Francis recently gave the go-ahead for the beatification of Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Romero, who was murdered celebrating mass in 1980. He was a proponent of Liberation Theology, and the Catholic Church had allegedly blocked this process because of concerns that he had links with Marxism. Could this signal a resurgence for Liberation Theology? Cathy is joined by author Alastair McIntosh, and Tim Duffy of the Catholic Justice and Peace Committee.

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Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, taking the week's events to task and asking what they say about values and beliefs.

20140921

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, taking the week's events to task and asking what they say about values and beliefs.

20140928

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, taking the week's events to task and asking what they say about values and beliefs.

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He's found great success in all he's turned his hand to - television and film, theatre and opera, academia and science - Sir Jonathan Miller reflects on a long and distinguished career, with Richard Holloway.

Scholar and statesman, Dr Gopalkrishna Gandhi, shares his unique perspective on independence. He, like his remarkable grandfathers before him, Mahatma Gandhi and Chakravarti Rajagopalachari, has dedicated his life and career to India. He talks about why Scotland's referendum campaign was good for democracies all over the world.

With the Scottish Mental Health Arts and Film Festival currently taking place, Richard speaks to writers Jo McFarlane and Jake Neufeld about how writing can help you through the darkness of depression.

And photographer Michael St Maur Sheil has captured the resting place of thousands who lost their lives during the First World War. He tells Richard of the cemeteries, burial plots and memorials he visited all around the world, and some of the moving stories behind the images he caught.

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Richard's guest for the first hour of the programme is the prolific writer, lecturer and broadcaster, Kenan Malik. His latest book 'The Quest for a Moral Compass' explores the history of moral thought over three millennia. He also talks to Richard about growing up in Britain as the child of immigrants from India.

Last weekend a special Catholic Synod opened at the Vatican, with a focus on the subject of 'the family'. So what can we expect to be the outcome, are ground-breaking reforms on the horizon, or will it be a re-affirmation of the status quo?

Richard is joined by parish priest and Assistant General Secretary at the Bishops' Conference of Scotland, Father Tom Boyle, and editor of the Catholic publication Open House, Mary Cullen.

A new national memorial dedicated to Scotland's organ and tissue donors has been unveiled at the Royal Botanic Garden in Edinburgh. Our reporter Carol Purcell went to this quiet corner of the Garden to talk to the artist Alec Findlay, and two people whose lives have been directly touched by organ donation.

This week sees the return of 'The Listening Project', a collaboration between Radio 4 and The British Library, capturing shared moments between friends or loved ones about something important to them. This week Mary and Lauren, a grandmother and granddaughter, who have always shared a special bond, talk about being there for one another through difficult times.

Philosopher Stewart Sutherland had written an essay entitled simply 'Greed', exploring how this oldest of sins has been paraded both in history and modern times. Richard is also joined by Quaker Christine Davis to discuss this most enduring of human vices.

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Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20141102

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20141123

Aled Jones joins Ricky Ross to chat about his life and career, from boy soprano to singer and broadcaster.

In the week that 'Clare's Law' is piloted in parts of Scotland, giving women the choice to access information about a partner's potentially violent past, Ricky discusses how much impact this will have on incidences of domestic abuse in Scotland. Joining him is Dr Lesley Orr, feminist historian, theologian and activist and Lily Greenan, Chief Executive of Scottish Women's Aid

St Paul's Cathedral in London is marking the centenary of the First World War by displaying a beautifully embroidered altar frontal, which was made by injured soldiers, including a Scottish soldier from Aberdeen. Our reporter Anna Magnusson went to St Paul's to find out more.

In this week's Listening Project, mum Sarah and daughter Natalie talk about a very difficult time in their lives when Natalie was seriously ill.

Academic and commentator on religious affairs Mona Siddiqui joins Ricky to talk about her new book, 'My Way', reflecting and drawing on her faith as well as weaving in her own personal story.

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Dame Stephanie "Steve" Shirley, arrived in Britain at the age of 5, on one of the Kinder transport trains which brought refugee children to London to escape the Nazis. Despite this incredibly difficult beginning she found a loving family and great success in Britain. The entrepreneur and philanthropist shares stories about her life and career.

Although many of us will have experienced loneliness, there's still some shame in admitting it. It has now hit the headlines, being labelled a crisis which causes great physiological and physical suffering. Poet and theologian Pádraig Ó'Tuama and writer Olivia Laing join Cathy to talk through the nature of loneliness and the impact that it has.

In this week's 'The Listening Project' granddaughter Alison quizzes her grandparents Sheila and Tom about what has kept them together for more than 6 decades.

And another granddaughter remembers her icon of a grandfather. Coming up to the first anniversary of his death, Nandi Mandela shares personal memories of her grandfather Nelson Mandela with reporter Carol Purcell.

Plus poet, author and president of the International Zen Therapy Institute, Dr David Brazier, tells Cathy why Buddhism and mindfulness are as important in 21st century Britain as they were thousands of years ago.

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Reverend Kate Bottley, the vicar from Channel 4's Gogglebox is fast becoming a TV favourite. She talks to Cathy about her life and her faith.

Its 500 years since John Knox, the Protestant preacher who was a leading figure in the Reformation in Scotland, was born. The controversial clergyman still manages to stir passions. He's ardently loved by some and passionately despised by others. Reverend Dr Nikki MacDonald , Minister for the Upper Clyde Parishes in South Lanarkshire and author Harry Reid, who's written about the Reformation, join Cathy to discuss the man behind the myth.

A new coalition of civic leaders in Scotland has just been launched to examine the impact of welfare reforms on Scotland. The Scottish Leaders Welfare Group is made up of people from Scotland's churches and trade unions, local authorities and voluntary sector. Father Thomas Boyle, Parish Priest at Our Lady of Lourdes in Bishopton joins Cathy to explain its aims.

In our occasional series in which we ask "Who Are They...." our reporter Bob Dickson is trying to find out more about some of the smaller or less well known faith groups and religions and churches. This week he meets some of Scotland's two and a half thousand Methodists.

And,

In this week's Listening Project, sisters Suzi and Julie talk about the effect Suzi's struggles with an eating disorder and substance abuse had on their relationship.

20141221

Dolina MacLennan is a woman of many talents. The renowned singer, actress, storyteller and activist tells Cathy MacDonald about the forces which have influenced her life and creativity.

Ridley Scott's Boxing Day blockbuster 'Exodus: Gods and Kings' joins a long line of cinema epics based on the Bible. Film critic, Richard Fitzwilliams gives his verdict.

Professor Jolyon Mitchell, Director of the Centre for Theology and Public Issues at the University of Edinburgh and film critic Paul Gallagher join Cathy to explore why Hollywood has an appetite for all things biblical again and whether film-makers should carry an extra responsibility of care when tackling this sacred text.

Traditional Scottish musician and composer Mike Vass explains how a bout of illness led him to follow in the footsteps of literary figure Neil Gunn. Mike undertook an identical journey around the west coast of Scotland that the writer did in 1937, which inspired the album In the Wake of Neil Gunn.

What would you do to make your Christmas simpler? This is what charity ALTERnativity is urging us to ask ourselves in this busy festive period. Leanne Clelland from the charity joins Cathy to discuss the benefits of asking this question and the kind of responses they've received.

And in this week's Listening Project, identical twins Rosie and Mary discuss what the value of having a twin.

20150111

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20150118
20150125

Thomas Joshua Cooper is a leading contemporary landscape photographer who came to Scotland to set up the photography department at Glasgow School of Art. He speaks to Ricky about the risks he takes to capture an image; how his art connects him to the earth; and his rich cultural heritage drawing on his Cherokee, Jewish and Christian background.

With the marking of Holocaust Memorial Day we turn our attention to Ravensbruck; the only concentration camp exclusively for women. We hear from Sarah Helm, who has written a book on the subject, capturing the camp's history and sharing the stories of the some of the survivors.

What can a Greek tragedy written over 2,000 years ago possibly say about the current situation in Syria? Georgina Paget, from Syria: The Trojan Women project, and film maker Yasmin Fedda, tell us about a group of Syrian refugees who have taken on the Euripides' play, and why they relate so strongly to the women of Troy.

In this week's Listening Project, Gregor, a shy 11 year old who has had difficulty meeting new people, speaks to his dad Dave about the drama workshops that have done wonders for his confidence.

And as celebrations get underway for Burns Day, David Hopes, Director of Robert Burns Birthplace Museum, shares what the importance was of values and faith in the Bard's life.

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20150201

Ricky's guest in the first hour of the programme is a champion of civil liberties and human rights, and once called 'the most dangerous woman in Britain' by a British tabloid. Shami Chakrabarti joins Ricky to talk about her life and career.

What do you remember from your religious education class at school? Not always the most riveting hour in our school day, but over the years it's gone through quite a dramatic change. Ricky finds out more about how it's evolved, in the company of 6th year pupil Catherine Rose; former teacher Rosa Murray; and Professor Stephen McKinney, author of a history of religious education.

The intrigues and politics of the Tudor court is a story we think we already know, yet it has enthralled us again in the new TV dramatization of Wolf Hall.

The drama's also shone a light on the politics of King's Henry's court and the tussles with the church, as well as overturning the ideals some of us previously held of saintly figures from that era, Ricky is joined by Jolyon Mitchell, Senior Lecturer in Communication, Theology and Ethics at the University of Edinburgh, and Rosa Murray, to find out why it was the Tudors marked such a pivotal time in religious history.

In this week's Listening Project, Robert shares a conversation with Sister Bruce, the nursing sister who cared for him after a serious house fire, and how they became lifelong friends.

Scottish photographer David Eustace has a remarkable list of clients, including Sir Paul McCartney, Stephen Fry and Sophia Loren. But his latest role has seen him take on a new ambassadorial post with the Scotland Homeless World Cup team. David talks to Ricky about why he's so passionate about this collaboration.

20150208

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

20150215

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

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On the show this morning, a guest who's life started in the East End of Glasgow embroiled with drink and drugs, and ended up on Harley Street as a highly respected and sought-after counsellor. Cathy talks to Mark Dempster about his life and career.

From footballers to Hollywood A-listers, celebrities supporting charitable causes are everywhere.

But how effective and valuable are celebrity endorsements to charities? Cathy is joined by Fraser Hudghton at the Institute of Fundraising; and Laura Kelly Dunlop, of the charity International Network of Street Papers to find out more.

Cathy is joined by author Paul Roberts, who has written what can best be described as a labour of love. A year on from losing his wife Jennifer to cancer, he recounts the story of her life and loves, in the hope of helping others experiencing a similar loss.

The Listening Project this week is sticking with the theme of love. Husband and wife Pam and Ken, who were forced to give up an awful lot for a future together.

Iceland's Pagans have resurrected some of the old ways and will soon be able to publicly worship at a shrine to Thor, Odin and Frigg. Next month construction begins on the island's first major temple to the Norse Gods since Viking times. Its High Priest, Hilmar Orn Hilmarsson, tells us more.

20150308

Cathy enjoys the company of the Right Reverend John Chalmers, Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland and finds out about his recent trip to the Vatican to meet His Holiness Pope Francis.

Zainab Hawa Bangura is the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict at the UN. With more than 20 years of experience in conflict resolution and reconciliation in Africa - including engaging with rebel groups - her influence is considerable. On a rare trip to Scotland to coincide with International Women's Day, Cathy spoke to her about her work.

60 years after he wooed over a million Scots with a 6 weeks residency at Glasgow's Kelvin Hall, Cathy remembers the visit of American Evangelist Billy Graham. Professor Callum Brown, of Glasgow University, discusses the influence Graham left on Scotland.

On The Listening Project this week, friends Mark and Mayra share their memories of Mayra's son Andrew, who tragically died of a brain haemorrhage when he was only fifteen years old.

Until three years ago, author, Derek Niemann had known little about the German side of his family. Then he made the shocking discovery that his grandfather had been an officer in the SS. He tells Cathy how he went about unearthing the hidden story of his family's lives in wartime Germany.

20150315

Ricky's guest for the first hour of the programme is best known for his work behind the microphone, cracking jokes, and co-hosting BBC Radio Scotland's satirical football show Off The Ball. But Stuart Cosgrove is also a passionate northern soul fan and the author of a new book about the influence of Detroit on soul music.

As more news reports break about the Islamic State militants in Iraq systematically destroying ancient sites, as well as artefacts in the Mosul Museum, Ricky is joined by Noorah Al-Gailani, Curator of the Islamic Collection, Glasgow Museums, and Mark Altaweel, lecturer in Near Eastern Archaeology at University College London to discuss the significance of what is being lost.

400 years after his death and in the wake of a special mass held in his honour, Father James Crampsey, Director of the Lauriston Jesuit Centre in Edinburgh and Ronnie Convery, Communications Director of the Archdiocese of Glasgow, shine a light on the enduring legacy of Scottish born Saint John Ogilvie.

On The Listening Project this week it's mother and daughter Kath and Kate. Kath is 92 and chats to her daughter about child-rearing. Kate's still bemused by her mum's approach towards parenting, even after all these years.

As adults we've all experienced information overload from TV news and the internet and newspapers, so what's it like for children? Dr Claire Cassidy, senior lecturer at the University of Strathclyde and author Sue Palmer share their thoughts with Ricky about the challenges of helping children navigate their way through difficult issues around not just learning about boundaries, but touches on their decision-making skills, as well as their fledgling moral compass.

20150322

Ricky is joined by Fraser Nelson, Scottish editor of the current affairs magazine The Spectator, to

talk about matters political and personal.

Journalists Ruth Wishart and Fraser Nelson discuss the state of the Press today - and if its power and ethics have been irretrievably eroded.

Archbishop Leo Cushley reveals to Ricky his vision for the future of the Archdiocese of St Andrews and Edinburgh, and reflects on the Pope's recent announcement about the resignation of Cardinal Keith O'Brien.

Early results from a forthcoming report from the Equality and Human Rights Commission suggest that employees with a religion feel under pressure to keep their beliefs and faith symbols hidden in the public sphere. Farkhanda Chaudhry from Interfaith Scotland and John Haldane, Professor of Philosophy at St Andrews University join Ricky to unpack the reasons why people might feel uneasy.

Money and our relationship with it can often be cited as an indicator of our morality and generosity, but do we over-rely on it as a measure of moral behaviour? Virginia Moffat of Ekklesia; Dr Neil Thin at the University of Edinburgh and John Haldane discuss our complicated emotional and moral relationship with money.

20150329

Journalist and life-long environmental activist George Mobiot talks to Ricky about the roots of his campaigning zeal, as well as his current passions.

Her parents would wave her off with a breezy "Have fun!", not quite realising where she was heading, as her work as a photojournalist took her to conflict zones from Afghanistan to Libya. Lynsey Addario new book, 'It's What I Do - A Photographer's Life of Love and War' recounts her breathless journey so far.

David Goodman, member of the Jewish Reform Community discusses the latest developments in internet ethics, and also a personal reflection on the aftermath of the elections in Israel, and the intransigent rhetoric that's emerged before and after the polls closed.

With a high street coffee company reportedly trying to set the agenda for social debate, Ricky and David Goodman are also joined by Ben Colburn, lecturer in philosophy at Glasgow University, to discover how much we trust business and whether they can really pull off what is being dubbed "conscious capitalism".

We've all seen great Biblical epics retold on film and TV, Gareth Vile - theatre editor of The List - previews the latest, "The Ark", and finds out if giving an old story a contemporary spin works.

Do you have a book that continues to inspire you? Noorah Al Gailani who's the Curator of the Islamic Collection, Glasgow Museums, chooses one of hers.

Peter Stanford joins Ricky to discuss the bad boy of the bible, Judas. But was he the ultimate betrayer or the ultimate scapegoat? A fascinating discussion, don't miss it.

20150412

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20150419
20150426

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20150503

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20150510

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20150524

Join Sally Magnusson and guests for two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20150531

Journalist and broadcaster, Melanie Phillips talks to Sally about her life, career, and her journey from being a darling of the left to an outspoken columnist that the left loves to hate.

Cormac Murphy-O'Connor was unexpectedly appointed Cardinal Archbishop of Westminster in the year 2000, when the Church worldwide was engulfed by the sexual abuse crisis, a scandal which had touched him personally. After overseeing almost a decade of great turbulence and change, he retired in 2009. He talks about his newly published memoir.

If you had a 50/50 chance of having a serious genetic condition and you were offered a test to find out if you were affected - would you have it? The topic's been in the news with the story of a Scottish family of 5 siblings who find themselves faced with whether to get tested for Huntington's disease. Dr Morven Shearer, from the University of St Andrews School of Medicine and Church of Scotland minister the Reverend Gillean Maclean who is affected by an inherited condition in her own family, discuss the issue.

Award-winning columnist Mona Eltahawy is known for her outspoken views on Arab and Muslim issues. She's a feisty campaigner and not afraid to name names when it comes to those she sees as apologists for crimes against women. She talks about her new book - Headscarves and Hymens and Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution.

Andy Peutherer a Glasgow artist who started up the Give Art project which runs in tandem with Maryhill food bank gives both art and artistic materials to children whose families rely on food banks. He tells Sally children need food for their minds as well as their stomachs.

20150607

To mark five days of special music programmes on Radio Scotland to celebrate BBC Music Day, Sunday Morning With Ricky Ross celebrates some of the roots of sacred music, with some very special people. It's a journey from the spiritual and gospel traditions, through the power and emotions of protest songs.

Ricky will be joined by a world-renowned mezzo soprano Andrea Baker; poet, author and minister Steve Stockman; Scotland's very own music-maestro John Bell of the Wild Goose Worship Group; Church of Scotland minister Ian Gilmour; broadcaster and author of "Detroit 67" Stuart Cosgrove; church musician Martin Ritchie, and renowned singer-songwriter Karine Polwart.

Together they'll explore how music captures and expresses what words alone can't quite say, and why music is such an important part of religious expression.

All this and the gospel group Soul Nation Choir playing live throughout the programme.

20150614

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20150621

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

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20150705

Jo Clifford, one of Scotland's most respected playwrights, talks to Ricky about her life as a transwoman and the sheer joy of writing for and performing in the theatre.

John Sturrock, Founder, CEO and Senior Mediator at Core Mediation; Josh Littlejohn, co-founder of Social Bite and Virginia Moffatt of Ekklesia, a think tank examining values and religion in public life join Ricky to discuss balancing personal ethics, visions and values in organisations and our workplaces.

After the shootings in Charleston, Ferguson and Baltimore, African American musician, Rhiannon Giddens, reflects on whether Americans can come together to heal the deep racial divisions which divide her country.

Teenager, Hannah Hafiz shares more of her Ramadan experiences. In her audio diary this week, she's looking for similarities between Islam and Christianity.

Julie Nicholson's daughter Jenny was one of the 52 people killed in the terrorist attacks on London's transport system ten years ago. In the aftermath of her daughter's death, she decided to step down from her role as a parish priest. Her memoir, "A Song For Jenny" tells the story of her response to her daughter's murder. It's now been turned into a drama. Julie Nicholson talks to Ricky about her grief, her anger and her faith. A Song For Jenny is broadcast on BBC One tonight.

In his new film "Mr Holmes", Ian McKellen plays an elderly Sherlock Holmes living quietly in retirement, keeping bees and struggling with his memory and his myth. Owain Jones, Minister at the United Church of Bute and practical theologian, Aileen Barclay join Ricky to discuss the way the film explores ageing, memory and mortality.

20150712

Ian McMillan, aka the Bard of Barnsley, is one of our best loved contemporary poets. He joins Ricky to share stories about his life, work and his beloved Yorkshire.

We hear the last instalment of teenager Hannah Hafiz's audio diary giving us an insight into her experience of Ramadan.

On the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre, film maker Samir Mehanovic and journalist David Pratt talk about how the region has moved on from one of the worst atrocities in Europe since the Second World War, and whether divisions along ethnic and religious lines still exist.

A group of Brazilian evangelical Christians recently launched 'Facegloria' - a social networking site that they believe is morally and technically better than Facebook. But with 600 words banned, no violence, sexual imagery or gay content, is it a control too far for social networking? Reverend Dr Peter Phillips gives us his thoughts on the pros and cons of the site, and we hear from Christian mother and daughter, Andrea and Anabelle, whether they'd be tempted to use it.

And in his book 'Misquoting Muhammad, The Challenge and Choices of Interpreting the Prophet's Legacy', Jonathan A.C. Brown takes the reader back in time through Islamic civilisation offering an inside view into how key and controversial aspects of Islam took shape, doing some myth-busting along the way.

20150719

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, taking the week's events to task and asking what they say about values and beliefs.

20150726

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, taking the week's events to task and asking what they say about values and beliefs.

20150802
20150802

Acclaimed writer and Christian feminist Sara Maitland talks to Cathy about her life and spirituality and the joy she finds in silence and solitude.

A day at the beach is probably something a lot of us take for granted. But for many people with mobility challenges who have to use a wheelchair, a day on the beach isn't an easy option. Our reporter Bob Dickson's been finding out how disabled people in North Berwick are getting the use of specially adapted beach wheelchairs and enjoying a day on the sands.

This week marks the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Marie Mutsuki Mockett explores the effect the bombing of Nagasaki had on her family and how they've dealt with the horrors of the past. And, Dr Peter van den Dungen, from the department of Peace Studies at the University of Bradford and Dr Tanya Maus, Director of the Peace Resource Museum at Wilmington College, Ohio discuss the importance of keeping these stories alive and teaching about peace.

Jim Shepard's novel "The Book of Aron" is about Janusz Korczak, who ran an orphanage in the Warsaw ghetto and followed his charges to the Treblinka extermination camp. David Goodman, a Member of the Jewish Reform Community discusses the book with Cathy.

It is believed that pillaging of cultural heritage sites and profiteering from looted antiquities has helped fund the cash-rich terror group IS.Now it seems plundered antiquities from Syria and Iraq are finding their way to the UK. Mark Altaweel from the Institute of Archaeology at University College London, posed as an antiquities collector and took a trip around London. He tells Cathy what he found.

20150809

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, taking the week's events to task and asking what they say about values and beliefs.

20150816

Novelist and poet John Burnside is Cathy's guest this morning. He talks about how he's used his writing and poetry as a map to navigate his life, one that's taken him from a troubled childhood and mental health issues to professional acclaim and fatherhood.

Benjamin Dix has spoken to migrant workers, survivors of war, those caught up in the drugs trade. These people end up in the pages of the literary comics he creates in the hope of bringing contemporary social and human rights issues to a wider audience.

Change is a feature of all our lives, whether you're beginning school or university, a new job or a relationship. Being emotionally resilient could make all the difference in how we cope with change. Cathy finds out more with Morag Kerr, an Educational Trainer, and Associate at the Centre for Confidence and Wellbeing; and psychologist Suzanne Zeedyk.

In her recently published memoir "Blackout", author Sarah Hepola describes how her relationship with alcohol both defined and distorted her sense of self, and documents the endless nights and memory lost to drink before she decided to find help.

Critic Gareth K Vile has been dipping into the Edinburgh festivals this past week and talks to Cathy about the shows to watch out for.

20150830

Two hours of music and conversation about matters of faith and ethics.

20150906

Two hours of music and conversation about matters of faith and ethics.

20150913

Like first minister, Nicola Sturgeon, Ricky Ross and his guests put education at the top of the agenda. Lindsay Paterson, Professor of Education Policy at the University of Edinburgh; Spencer Fildes, Chair of the Scottish Secular Society; Magnus Linklater, columnist for The Times; and Rosa Murray, Development Officer in Education, Teaching and Leadership at the University of Edinburgh, explore the purpose of education, the kind of citizens we want schools to produce, and the contentious issue of whether schools should be divided along lines of religion, or private versus state.

From the world of banking to creating the most successful parenting website in the country, it's not surprising that politicians and business leaders want to keep Justine Roberts, co-founder of the phenomenally successful Mumsnet, on side. She speaks to Ricky about her life, and her career, and she chooses a couple of her favourite music tracks.

Can a film festival inspire people to campaign on social issues? Tamara Van Strijthem, Executive Producer of Take One Action, and Liz Murray, Scottish Campaigns Director of Global Justice Now, think so - that is the aim of 'Take One Action'. They tell us more.

20150920

Two hours of music and conversation about matters of faith and ethics.

20151004

He's been described as a modern day prophet and compared to Bob Dylan and Mahatma Gandhi; hear Canada's own national treasure and one of Ricky's musical heroes, Bruce Cockburn.

Does the political Left have the moral high ground when it comes to issues of social justice? Ricky puts that question to Baroness Annabel Goldie, Conservative Peer in the House of Lords and Church of Scotland elder; Fraser Nelson, editor of The Spectator; and John Purvis, former Conservative MEP.

Family life, contraception, divorce and issues of sexuality will all be discussed at the Pope-led Synod on the Family. Will it be a turning point for the Catholic Church? John Keenan, Bishop of the Diocese of Paisley, fresh from seeing Pope Francis in the USA, joins Liz Leydon, editor of the Scottish Catholic Observer.

And age is no barrier for silver poets, Diana Hendry and Vicki Feaver, when it comes to taking part in Scotland's Creative Ageing Festival 'Luminate'. There's humour, wisdom and heartbreak as they tackle what you can lose and what you can gain as you age.

20151011

Award-winning theatre director and actor, Cora Bissett, talks to Ricky about her life, and tackling challenging issues including mental health, sex-trafficking, and refugees, in her work.

Ricky visits Gordon Aikman, who has Motor Neuron Disease, and his husband, Joe Pike, in their home to find out how they're dealing with the changes that the advancing illness brings.

With the ongoing story of refugees travelling across Europe, we hear from 3 Edinburgh locals, Denis Rutovitz, Akeel Umar, and Liz McArthur, about why they felt compelled to help those caught up in the migration from conflict areas.

Vicky Cosstick, author of 'Belfast: Toward a City Without Walls', discusses the sectarian walls, gates and fences which continue to divide communities in the city.

As the Royal National Mod kicks off in Oban, Reverend Lorna MacDougall takes a trip down memory lane and reminisces about participating in various provincial and national Mods throughout her childhood.

And it's the stuff of legend with the right amount of religion and mystery to make it a literary and Hollywood staple. Dr Juliette Wood, from Cardiff University, who specialises in medieval folklore and Celtic tradition, and film critic Paul Gallagher, shine a light on the Holy Grail.

20151011

Two hours of music and conversation about matters of faith and ethics.

20151101

Cathy is joined by Nawal el Saadawi, the internationally renowned writer who has been the voice of Egyptian feminism for the past forty-five years.

As part of our occasional series about inspirational moments in our lives, Lucie Armstrong explains why she went to a local support group for her autistic son, but was then inspired to get more involved and give something back.

Issues around sexual consent have been peppering the news for months, with a forthcoming programme on BBC Three this week highlighting the subject from a teenage perspective. Cathy hears from young students Tomiwa and James about their thoughts on the topic, and Ranald Mair who works in social care; and Sandy Brindley, the National Coordinator for Rape Crisis Scotland, discuss why this is an issue that young and old continue to struggle with.

Since writers first put pen to paper, their own experiences have provided them with inspiration. But can you overstep the line and be too candid and revealing about your closest family and friends? Cathy talks to Reverend Philip Blackledge of Holy Trinity Melrose, and author Jenni Fagan to discuss how morally just, is it, to write about people, without their consent, for your own personal gain.

Friday saw the return of the comedy series Citizen Khan, following the trials and tribulations of Mr Khan, a loud-mouthed, patriarchal, cricket-loving community leader. Is it a fond comedy send-up or just reinforcing old stereotypes? Cathy is joined by Aman de Sondy, Senior Lecturer in Contemporary Islam at University College Cork, and Reverend Philip Blackledge.

Aman De Sondy also discusses his recently launched book "The Crisis of Islamic Masculinities" and why we need to have more than one version of Islamic masculinity or femininity.

20151115

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20151122

The cultural critic and writer Ziauddin Sardar has been described as Britain's own Muslim polymath. He shares his personal story with Cathy as well as thinking through where we must go in the aftermath of the attacks in Paris, and the future of Islam in the West.

Simona Rocha is a microbiologist from Romania - not a natural fit for a lover of Gaelic music. But when she first encountered Gaelic singing, something opened up inside her. She tells Cathy how she found a sense of belonging in this most unlikely of places.

It's been over a week now since terrorist attacks shook Paris to the core and ignited many discussions across Europe as to how we must deal with and defeat extremism. Islamic scholar Shaykh Hassan Rabbani, Luke Devlin who works in faith-based community development, and Martin Palmer, broadcaster and Secretary General of Alliance of Religions and Conservation, discuss how we can respond to such atrocities and move forward within our communities.

With the launch of Scottish Interfaith Week - the theme of which is Care for the Environment - Scottish faith leaders and representatives ask followers from their communities to take up the environmental cause as part of their moral duty. Luke Devlin and Martin Palmer are joined by Shagufta Anwar who runs a climate change project at a faith based community organisation in Glasgow.

Imagine waking up and not remembering your past, not recognising your partner and not having any memories of all the years bringing up your children? Artist Shona Illingworth worked alongside someone who experienced this severe form of amnesia, and it led her to explore the significance of memory, both individual and cultural.

20151129

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20151206

Booker Prize winner, John Banville, is searingly honest as he talks with Richard about where his writing comes from, the endless hours he spent working rather than living, and about the Catholicism he grew up with.

Is it time to de-gender children's toys? We explore the impact of having gender specific toys on the development of a child with mum of 4, Andrea McKinnon, and Dr Sarah McGeown, Lecturer in Developmental Psychology at the University of Edinburgh.

"My Nazi Legacy" is a moving film following three men travelling together across Europe - Niklas Frank and Horst von Wächter, are the sons of senior Nazi officers; the third is the international lawyer and author Philippe Sands - his own Jewish family was destroyed by the fathers of the two men he has come to know. We hear from Niklas Frank, and Richard talks to the film's director, David Evans.

In our occasional series, The Things That Matter, writer, academic and activist, Alastair McIntosh, tells Anna Magnusson about the Galgael Trust in Govan, which fosters art and community, and a special work of art in his home that comes from the Galgael workshop.

Mona Siddiqui, Professor of Islamic and Interreligious Studies at the University of Edinburgh, discusses hospitality and care for the stranger in the sacred texts of Islam and other religions - the theme of her book, 'Hospitality in Islam: Welcoming in God's Name'.

Mona is joined by writer Chris Dolan to give their thoughts on a new BBC 4 series, Blood And Gold: The Making Of Spain With Simon Sebag Montefiore, which unlocks 2,000 years of Spanish history, with all its richness and colour and blood and guts.

20151213

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20151220
20151227

Sharing some of their highlights including interviews with comedian Ruby Wax, columnist Polly Toynbee, 'voice of India' Mark Tully, correspondent Robert Peston, Professor Mary Beard, writer John Burnside and activist Nawal El Saadawi.

20160124

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20160131

A writer and critic who can often amuse and enrage in equal measure; Ricky is joined by A.A Gill to talk about his memoir 'Pour Me: A Life'.

Author Dominic Johnson tells Ricky how a belief in some kind of supernatural force has helped regulate our behaviour and shape the course of human evolution; the subject of his new book, 'God Is Watching You'.

'Is this the end of Christian Britain?' That was the dramatic headline after new research showing, for the first time, that the majority of white British adults classify themselves as having no religion. Ricky is joined by Professor Linda Woodhead, Director of the Religion and Society research programme at the University of Lancaster; Catholic theologian Dr Anthony Allison, and writer and Professor Greg Garrett of Baylor University in Texas, to unpack the truth behind the headline.

As the US edges closer to its presidential nominations, some commentators are voicing concerns that the rhetoric of fear and paranoia is starting to dominate. We'll be looking at the art of politics and the cost of demonizing the 'other', with Professors Linda Woodhead and Greg Garrett.

The film 'Spotlight' portrays the investigation in to one of the biggest abuse cover ups by the Catholic Church - involving the elite of Boston's religious, legal, and government establishment - Greg Garrett and The List's Gareth Vile discuss how well the story's been told on the big screen. They'll also be discussing the controversial film Made in France, telling the story of a home-grown group of terrorists plotting an attack on the French capital, but made before the Paris attacks in November last year.

20160207

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20160214
20160221

Actor David McCallum made his name as Russian agent Illya Kuryakin in The Man from U.N.C.L.E, becoming a pin-up for a generation and went on to star in The Invisible Man and Sapphire and Steel. Retirement doesn't seem to be tempting him - for over a decade he's played 'Ducky', Dr. Mallard on the American police drama NCIS. David McCallum talks to Richard about his life and why he's now turned to writing.

Boycotting - refusing to buy or handle goods as a punishment or protest - is a form of political protest with a long tradition. Last week it became the subject of a fierce debate when the Westminster Government announced a crackdown on public bodies in England and Wales for boycotting countries or companies they deemed unethical. But how effective is boycotting? Or do we do it just to let off steam? Richard explores the issue with Professor Alison Phipps, University of Glasgow, human rights activist Reverend Iain Whyte, and Daniella Peled from the Institute for War and Peace Reporting.

In the late 60s and early 70s Nick Hedges was given a unique assignment - to tour the country taking photographs of Britain's urban poor and the rotting houses they lived in. Nick's photographs helped to galvanise politicians and civic leaders into a radical response to the situation; and massive programmes of slum clearance got underway all over Britain. Nick discusses what it was like then and whether we have learned any lessons since.

Saying a prayer caused quite a stir recently when the Church of England took to social media to pray for Richard Dawkins' recovery from a stroke. Alison Phipps, Reverend Iain Whyte, and Dr Neil Thin, University of Edinburgh, look at the etiquette of prayer and what it brings to our lives.

How many children receive their state education in a language that is not their mother tongue? This is the focus of 'The Colours of the Alphabet', a documentary that premieres at the Glasgow Film Festival. It follows three Zambian children and their families over a period of a year as they go to primary school for the first time. Producer Nick Higgins explains why it's such an important subject.

20160228
20160313

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20160320

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20160327

Exploring themes of pain and loss, redemption and hope this Easter Sunday, Cathy is joined by Mez McConnell, Senior Pastor of Niddrie Community Church in Edinburgh, about his conversion to Christianity after a chaotic life of drugs, crime and violence.

The fall in the number of Scots attending church has become a challenge for every denomination. Our reporter Bob Dickson has been finding out about one solution; church planting, where groups of committed Christians set up small community based churches with the aim of attracting believers and non-believers alike.

We're marking Easter Sunday with a special feature looking at how themes of hope and redemption are expressed through art and by artists. Kevin Franz, of the Society of Friends, and Mo McCullough, talk to artists Joyce Gunn Cairns and Stuart Duffin.

Writer Virginia Moffatt, who works for the theological ideas think-tank, Ekklesia, and musician and member of the Iona Community, John Bell, discuss how faith can inspire creativity and how the creative arts can help us express our complex thoughts about pain and hope, about life and death.

20160410

Award-winning foreign correspondent Christina Lamb talks to Cathy about her life in and out of some of the world's worst war zones, and her writing collaboration with Nobel Peace Prize recipient Malala Yousafzai.

Reporter Cameron Buttle meets The Reverend Colin Macleod at the British military base in Kabul, who ministers to the men and women of the Royal Highland Fusiliers, 2nd Battalion, the Royal Regiment of Scotland, better known as '2 Scots'.

The Panama Papers story put into sharp focus the financial freedoms and decisions that some people in society have. But what about the rest of us who don't have millions to invest? Are we also guilty of overlooking things like cash-in-hand jobs that body swerve tax, while sitting in judgement of high earners?

Cathy is joined by Dr Eve Poole - author of Capitalism's Toxic Assumptions and Associate at Ashridge Business School, and Alison Phipps, Professor of Languages and Intercultural Studies at the University of Glasgow, and a member of the Iona Community.

Foreigner, migrant, refugee - what do these labels do to your sense of who you once were, and the dreams you had? Cathy looks at the idea of creating a new identity, with Tawona Sithole, a poet and storyteller who moved to Glasgow from Zimbabwe; Ghazi Hussein, a Palestinian poet who left Syria in 2000 seeking political asylum in the UK; and Alison Phipps, Co-Convener of Glasgow Refugee, Asylum and Migration Network.

BBC series 'Paul O'Grady: The Sally Army and Me', shows the entertainer getting involved with the various projects the Salvation Army does across the UK. His mentor throughout the series is Captain Jo Moir, who tells Cathy about her experience of shining a light on the varied work of the organisation.

20160501

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20160529

A century ago 6,000 British sailors died at the Battle of Jutland. One of them was 16 year old Archibald Dickson, lost on HMS Queen Mary. Cathy rediscovers very moving letters written by Archie's mother to his brother, Bertie, talking about her grief for her lost son.

Buddhist nun Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo had a burning spiritual curiosity from a young age; it led her to be one of the first Western women to be ordained into Tibetan Buddhism. Cathy caught up with her on a recent visit to Scotland and told her about her spiritual journey so far, including an extraordinary 12 years spent meditating in a cave, high in the snow-capped Himalayan mountains.

The General Assembly of the Church of Scotland came to a close last week. Cathy is joined by Rev Richard Frazer, the new convenor of the Church and Society Council, and former Moderator Dr Alison Elliot.

The humanitarian sector gathered in Istanbul last week for the first World Humanitarian Summit, led by the UN. But can it be more than just a talking shop? Cathy talks to Simon O'Connell, Mercy Corps Europe's Executive Director, who attended the summit.

After a chaotic upbringing and young adulthood, Janey Godley survived it all and went on to thrive with a successful career in comedy. She joins Cathy to talk about her life and career so far.

20160605

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20160612

The Islamic festival of Ramadan began last week, we explore the significance of this month long period of fasting and praying with the Imam of Edinburgh's Central Mosque Yahya Barry and Muslim convert Alan Rooney. Ricky also talks to them about their unique journeys towards their faith that came from very different beginnings.

Continuing BBC Radio Scotland's 'Memories and Conversations' season we hear how sharing stories between generations sparks memories as 4th year pupils at Stirling's Wallace High School reminisce together with three people living with dementia.

The incredible story of how one man managed to circumnavigate the globe fuelled entirely by the goodwill of strangers. Writer Leon Logothetis discusses his travels and the acts of kindness he met along the way.

This weekend sees the start of the very first Empathy Festival in Edinburgh, celebrating and exploring our ability to understand and share what others are feeling, which can be a powerful force for individuals and societies. But how good are we at it - and can we get better? Ricky chats to Dr Autumn Roesch-Marsh and Leon Logothetis.

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, believed by many to be the place where Jesus was buried, is also a site which has caused tension among different Christian denominations. With the first truce in 200 years declared, work has begun to restore it. The BBC's Middle East correspondent Yolande Knell reports from Jerusalem on its progress.

Author, developmental psychologist and human rights activist Gary Barker is the founder of Promundo, an international organisation that works with men to end violence against women. For his new novel "Mary of Kivu" he draws upon experiences of people he's worked with in Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

20160619

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20160703
20160703

20160703

Gordon Strachan, the manager of Scotland's national football team, talks candidly about his life, love, the beautiful game and coping with both success and disappointment on the football pitch.

After the EU referendum - politicians and the media continue to argue over what happens next. The constant talk of unprecedented change has created a real sense of unease with individuals and communities anxious about the uncertainty. Bishop David Chillingworth, Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church; and the Reverend Ian Galloway, Minister for Gorbals Parish Church join Ricky to discuss the unchanging values which might help guide us through these turbulent times.

And Ricky enjoys the company of husband and wife team, Molly and John Harvey - a couple who've devoted their lives to trying to put their Christianity into action; trying to close the gap between where the Church is and the needs of the people the Church should serve.

20160710

The publication of the Chilcot report has brought to the fore again the moral and personal cost of the Iraq war. As the repercussions of the conflict continue to be felt across the world, Ricky talks to the Reverend Angus Macleod of the Church of Scotland's St Columba's Church in London who served in Iraq as a military chaplain.

As a journalist, Decca Aitkenhead is no stranger to covering difficult and sometimes harrowing stories but possibly the hardest one she has ever had to write is her own. Ricky finds out how she's dealt with traumatic events in her life which she's written about in her book, "All At Sea".

The 2016 Homeless World Cup kicks off in Glasgow. Ricky is joined by Karen Boggie, captain of Scotland's women's team, and player turned coach Robert Hare, to hear more about the event which is billed as one of the most inspirational on the planet.

Would you be surprised to hear that a Sufi mystic is the best-selling poet in the United States? So popular that a Hollywood film is planned later this year about his life. Ricky examines the significance of his work with Noorah Al-Gailani, curator of Islamic Civilisations at Glasgow Museums, and Dr Nacim Pak-Shiraz, Head of Persian and Film Studies at the University of Edinburgh.

If you had to put together a hospitality pack to welcome a visitor to your hometown what would you put in it? A project call Refuweegee - based in Glasgow - has created just this, offering a warm welcome to refugees in what can often be a cold place. Ricky delves into the charity's origins with founder Selina Hales and Syrian refugee Ahmad who now works as a volunteer with the group.

20160717

Ricky Ross talks to Canadian Catholic philosopher, theologian and Templeton Prize Laureate, Jean Vanier, at his home in France. Jean is the founder of L'Arche, an international network of communities for people with and without learning disabilities. After the terrible events in France, it's a poignant interview with a man who is a passionate advocate for people of all backgrounds and abilities and how we could live together with respect and compassion.

Have the political incidents and dramas of the past weeks heightened our awareness of some of the issues that for many who feel disengaged are really behind the shifts in power at the top? Ricky talks to Oliver Escobar, Lecturer in Public Policy and Co-Director of What Works Scotland at Edinburgh University; Luke Devlin, Executive Director of the Centre for Human Ecology who's also involved with local community groups; and Pauline Gallacher, Convernor of the Scottish Community Alliance, to find out how to tackle the gulf between leadership and the grassroots in all aspects of our lives, as well as how our day to day lives and interactions within our communities can give us renewed hope in the shadow of the terrorist attack in Nice.

It's been 80 years since the Spanish Civil War, when volunteer fighters beyond Spain travelled to join the International Brigades supporting the democratically elected left wing government. As our reporter Bob Dickson finds out, among them was the late James Maley from Glasgow.

Oliver Escobar talks to Ricky about growing up in Spain with parents who were on opposite sides during the Civil War.

On the 21st anniversary of the massacre of 8,000 Muslim men and boys in Srebrenica during the Bosnian war, Nedžad Avdi?, a survivor of the massacre, talks about his life then and now.

20160724

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20160807

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

Author Elif Shafak talks to Richard Holloway about her life and beliefs.

20160814
20160821

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethics perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20160828

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethics perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20160904

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethics perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20160911

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethics perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20160918

It's a treasured institution, but the pressures and challenges facing the National Health Service often seem insurmountable. Health journalist Penny Taylor and Professor John Gillies from the University of Edinburgh, discuss if it's it time for a grown up and honest debate on the NHS, to find out what we really want and expect from it, and what we need to prioritise.

American novelist, Lionel Shriver, has written a number of powerful and at times chilling books, including the bestseller 'We Need To Talk About Kevin'. She talks about life, writing, and her twelfth novel The Mandibles, in which she tackles a near future where a national economic collapse has hit the USA.

We catch up with Muslim convert Alan Rooney in his third and final Hajj diary, to find out the impact this experience has had on him.

He's won numerous awards and is often cited as one of Israel's greatest living writers, but with that praise has come hefty criticism of his politics. Amos Oz speaks to Cathy about betrayal; a central theme in his latest novel Judas, and he explains why the label of traitor sometimes requires greater scrutiny.

20160925

Writer, presenter and Great British Bake Off 2015 winner Nadiya Hussain talks to Cathy about her Bangladeshi heritage, her faith and what it's like to be described as furthering the cause of Asian women.

Conflicts around the world are having a devastating impact on civilians, particularly on children. Rob Williams, CEO of charity, War Child UK , talks about what can be done to help children growing up in war zones.

In the TV drama 'National Treasure' Robbie Coltrane plays a fictional celebrity accused of historic sex abuse. We look into the effect of such accusations on the family members of those involved. Cathy talks to Prof Nancy Louck, from Families Outside, a Scottish charity supporting families of prisoners. We also hear from Elisabeth, who has personal experience of this situation.

Richard Holloway's new book, 'A Little History of Religion', takes us from the dawn of belief to the present day. Anna Magnusson visits him at his home to find out more about his religious travels.

Jason Lewis is the first person to circumnavigate the globe using only human power. He talks about his expedition and also his activism for global sustainability, ahead of his appearance at the Wigtown Book Festival.

20161002

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20161009

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20161016

She's the master chef who has interviewed everyone from Margaret Thatcher to Madonna, journalist Kirsty Wark opens up to Sally Magnusson about her broadcasting career, motherhood, and her love of Scotland.

Nick Spencer discusses what he believes to be the continuing importance of Christianity as the foundation for many of the social and political ideas we live by today; the subject of his latest book, The Evolution of the West - How Christianity Has Shaped Our Values.

How do you feel when you hear 'oh God' on TV or radio...does it offend you, or does it even register? Sally looks at the changing attitudes towards blasphemy with Alison Phipps, Professor of Languages and Intercultural Studies at the University of Glasgow, and Professor Callum Brown, a Social Historian at the University of Glasgow.

Sally looks at the role arts and language can play in helping refugees integrate into the society they arrive in, with Professor Alison Phipps who is heading up the first 'UNESCO Chair in Refugee Integration through Languages and the Arts', and poet and storyteller Tawona Sithole.

Alison and Tawona go on to focus on one art in particular - poetry. They discuss why poetry is special to them, and how it helps them reflect on life. Plus we hear from Lizzie MacGregor, editor of the anthology 'Whatever The Sea', which addresses from a very Scottish perspective, what it is to grow old.

And is silence something you avoid or you hanker for? Alison Phipps and theatre critic Gareth K Vile, who both have experience of building quiet times into their lives, explore our relationship with silence.

20161023

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20161204

Two hours of music and conversation with a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20161211

Two hours of music and conversation with a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

Actor Gregor Fisher, creator of the much loved boozy street philosopher Rab C Nesbitt, shares stories about his life and work with Ricky.

Rosie's rare chromosomal disorder means she has very complex needs and severe learning disabilities. Her parents, Eric Coulter and Kate Donnelly, speak about the challenges of having an adult child for whom you have to make every single decision.

Baroness Helen Liddell on her appointment as chair of a review group tasked with ensuring the Catholic Church in Scotland implements safeguards in response to sex abuse concerns.

A new BBC 2 programme, Muslims Like Us, challenges how Muslims are often portrayed in the media as one homogenous group. Scottish Muslims Afshan Hussain and Dr Aman De Sondy look at why putting a group of ten very different British Muslims in one house is a positive step in understanding the diversity of those following Islam in the UK.

In our occasional Inspirations series, we hear from poet Peter Jarvis who draws inspiration from his African roots.

It's a song which has become a cultural icon, having been recorded by many singers across many genres. Mezzo-soprano, Andrea Baker, and Professor Raymond MacDonald, Head of Music at the University of Edinburgh, explore the roots and the universal themes of the hymn, Amazing Grace.

20170101

Another chance to hear our show from the Solas Festival in Blackruthven, Perthshire - a Festival which draws inspiration from musical, political, cultural and religious worlds.

Our house band for the first hour are Emily Kelly and Graham Coe, aka The Jellyman's Daughter, a duo from Edinburgh whose voices blend beautifully over a combination of guitar, mandolin and cello.

With religion playing a significant role in national and international politics, as well as being blamed for various acts of violence Ricky and his panel of guests: Alastair McIntosh, author and independent scholar; Pádraig Ó'Tuama, poet, theologian and leader of Corrymeela Community; and Alison Phipps, Professor of Languages and Intercultural Studies at the University of Glasgow, discuss how religious literacy could help us better understand such issues.

Hollie McNish, former UK Slam poetry champion, performs in front of a live audience and joins poet and musician Declan Welsh, and poet Pádraig Ó'Tuama, to look at how poetry helps makes sense of the personal, and why we often turn to poets at a time of tragedy to capture emotion.

Twelve days in the walking, seven years in the writing, Alastair McIntosh talks about his book "Poacher's Pilgrimage", which in is his own words is about "God, war and the faeries".

Alastair McIntosh, Pádraig Ó'Tuama and Alison Phipps reflect on Pilgrimage and Walking, and the world that it opens up internally. They look at the connection between moving through the external landscape and moving through your own internal landscape.

Live music from Declan Welsh, a 22 year old singer-songwriter from East Kilbride, and he explains why he doesn't like to limit himself - the recent law graduate is also a poet and a board member of a Scottish Children's charity.

How aware are you of the privileges you have, and how do you use those privileges? Vérène Nicolas, a Quaker, Mediator and Trainer in Non-Violent Communication joins Pádraig Ó'Tuama and Alison Phipps.

Edinburgh singer-songwriter Ross Wilson, otherwise known as Blue Rose Code, treats us to some music and chats to Ricky about why his songs so often delve deep into the personal.

And every culture has an oral tradition, but why is it so important to nurture it and keep it going? Ricky and his guests look at the power of the story, and how this ancient tradition connects us and gives us a sense of who we are.

20170108

Two hours of music and conversation with a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20170115

"Yes we can - no he didn't", no sooner had he delivered his farewell address than the headline writers were delivering their verdict on Barack Obama's legacy. But what does the concept of a personal legacy mean for us? Ricky talks to Rosa Murray from the Faculty of Education at Edinburgh University and a member of the Catholic Community, and political commentator, Colin Mackay.

Over several weeks, a group of women from diverse ages and backgrounds got to tell their stories by creating Life Books. Our reporter Anna Magnusson spent a morning in the YWCA centre in Glasgow with them as their stories unfolded.

'A Gift of Love' is a volume of Martin Luther King's sermons, published in the UK for the first time. Ricky talks to Rev Iain Whyte. a retired Church of Scotland minister who met Martin Luther King in the 1960s, to find out how rooted his civil rights work was in his role as a preacher.

Recent research suggests Robert Burns suffered from depression, but does knowing that high-profile inspirational people have experienced mental health issues help others? Ricky's joined by Professor Danny Smith of Glasgow University, and Rev Iain Whyte.

The basics of sex education in schools remain largely the same, but campaigners say the social media revolution has changed the sexual landscape, leaving our children vulnerable. Ricky discusses the issues around this divisive topic with Rosa Murray and Goedale Liekens, sexologist, psychologist and Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations Population Fund, who is determined to revolutionise attitudes towards sex.

Former footballer Pat Nevin bucked the stereotype as a player by shunning fast cars in favour of art galleries and music gigs. He joins Ricky to talk about his playing life and early influences.

20170129

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20170205

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

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20170226

Two hours of music and conversation with a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

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A social entrepreneur who has devoted his life to the power of ideas, Gurjit Singh Lalli, speaks to Cathy Macdonald about setting up TEDx Glasgow, his Sikh faith, and why business should be about much more than just money.

British church congregations are thought to be, on average, just 30 percent male - something that 'Christian Vision for Men' wants to change. BBC Reporter Dave Howard, drops into one of their events in Edinburgh to find out how.

How do we come up with more iust solutions when talking about creating peace in the Middle East? Professor Bart McGettrick explains why he believes the only way to do this is to move on from the idea of protests and sanctions, to using the more positive language of love, hope and justice.

And with stories of 'real women' and what women should wear back in the headlines, Cathy takes a closer look at the complexities of female identity, and the definitions and expectations put on women that they are having to contend with. That's with a trio of leading women: Adele Patrick, Lifelong Learning and Creative Development Manager at the Glasgow Women's Library; Briana Pegado, activist and founder of the Edinburgh Students Art Festival; and Talat Yaqoob, Director of Equate Scotland.

20170319

Scottish author Janice Galloway made an immediate impact with her debut novel The Trick Is To Keep Breathing in 1989. Her life has been one of significant literary success but also personal troubles. She joins Cathy to discuss how her personal experiences have worked their way into her writing and how her difficult family history has helped shape her sense of the world.

Simon Amadeus Pillario is the man behind the Word for Word Bible Comics which produces historically accurate graphic novels of books from the Bible. He explains why he's taken the decision to tackle his first New Testament book with the Gospel According to Mark.

With elections taking place across Europe this year there has been a lot of focus on the rise of the politics of the Far Right. Cathy is joined by former white supremacist Arno Michaelis and Imam Yahya Barry to discuss how to respond to the rise of these extreme ideologies.

The emotion of grief is something that we'll all experience at some point in our lives but can we learn better ways of living with the effects? Psychotherapist Julia Samuels and Counsellor Tracy McNair of The Prince and Princess of Wales Hospice in Glasgow outline strategies of how to cope with bereavement.

Archbishop Oscar Romero divided opinion both in the Catholic Church and in his native El Salvador because of his strongly voiced beliefs. To mark the centenary of his birth Cathy is joined by Julian Filochowski Chair of the Romero Trust to analyse the impact of his life, his work and his assassination in 1980.

20170402

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.

20170416

Richard Holloway presents a special Easter Sunday programme, talking to Theologian Dr Aileen Barclay about how her Christian faith guided her through a period of sorrow to a place of hope.

The story of Easter touches on the fundamental themes of Christian faith: redemption and salvation through suffering and life through death. Theologian Padráig O'Tuama; Professor Michael Brady of Glasgow University; and historian and author, Martin Palmer explore the how we address the concept of suffering in our lives.

In a special feature, Richard explores the metaphorical power of the Easter message through the stories of three courageous women who have come through adversity and been touched by hope.

In our occasional series about things that inspire us, regular Thought for the Day contributor Rosa Murray describes how the arrival of her grandson has proved life-affirming.

Ahead of a new documentary on his work, landscape photographer Colin Prior joins Richard to discuss the spiritual beauty and meditative power of the Scottish mountains.

20170423

With the surprise announcement of a June election, Richard Holloway looks at what role, if any, religion will play in the debate, and whether a politician's religious beliefs matter when it comes to the vote - with Nick Spencer, editor of 'The Mighty and the Almighty: How Political Leaders Do God'; Professor Linda Woodhead from the Dept of Politics, Philosophy and Religion at Lancaster University; and Simon Barrow, Director the ethical think tank Ekklesia.

Philosopher Roman Krznaric on the wisdom of the ancient phrase Carpe Diem, and how we can use it to transform our own lives; the subject of his latest book 'Carpe Diem Regained: The Vanishing Art of Seizing the Day'.

Writer Gerda Stevenson and actor Roxana Vilk join Richard to discuss a new BBC Radio Scotland two-part drama, Room for Refugees. Gerda explains why she immersed herself in the world of refugees for the project.

And once model and girlfriend of footballer George Best, Ani Rinchen Khandro, shares why she forsook the world of glamour to become an ordained Buddhist nun, who now runs a Buddhist Meditation Centre in Edinburgh.

20170507
20170507

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.

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20170514

Abi Austen talks to Ricky Ross about transitioning and returning to her military career.

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Two hours of music and conversation with a faith and ethical perspective.

20170618
05/06/201120110612

Sunday Mornings With Sally Magnusson is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

This Sunday, Sally Magnusson's first hour guest is one of the American Episcopal Church's most controversial Bishops, Jack Spong - known for his outspoken views and author of umpteen wildly popular books.

The Mother's Union will be holding their 'General Assembly' in Edinburgh this week - Sally will be finding out exactly who they are, and why they're so concerned about a forthcoming review looking at children being forced to grow up too fast.

And we tackle what can be a difficult and painful subject for many in this country - looking after a loved one with dementia.

Amongst others, we hear from carer Tommy Whitelaw, Professor June Andrews and former soprano singer and current Music in Hospitals performer, Rosanne Brackenridge.

Sally's guest is Jack Spong, one of the Episcopal Church's most controversial bishops.

05/06/201120110612

Sunday Mornings With Sally Magnusson is two hours of music and stimulating conversation taking a faith and ethics based view at the world we live in today.

This Sunday, Sally Magnusson's first hour guest is one of the American Episcopal Church's most controversial Bishops, Jack Spong - known for his outspoken views and author of umpteen wildly popular books.

The Mother's Union will be holding their 'General Assembly' in Edinburgh this week - Sally will be finding out exactly who they are, and why they're so concerned about a forthcoming review looking at children being forced to grow up too fast.

And we tackle what can be a difficult and painful subject for many in this country - looking after a loved one with dementia.

Amongst others, we hear from carer Tommy Whitelaw, Professor June Andrews and former soprano singer and current Music in Hospitals performer, Rosanne Brackenridge.

Sally's guest is Jack Spong, one of the Episcopal Church's most controversial bishops.

07/05/201720170507
07/06/201520160103

Celebrating the roots of sacred music, from the spiritual and gospel traditions, through the power and emotions of protest songs.

Ricky will be joined by a world-renowned mezzo soprano Andrea Baker; poet, author and minister Steve Stockman; Scotland's very own music-maestro John Bell of the Wild Goose Worship Group; Church of Scotland minister Ian Gilmour; broadcaster and author of "Detroit 67" Stuart Cosgrove; church musician Martin Ritchie, and renowned singer-songwriter Karine Polwart.

Together they'll explore how music captures and expresses what words alone can't quite say, and why music is such an important part of religious expression.

All this and the gospel group Soul Nation Choir playing live throughout the programme.

23/04/201720170423

Ani Rinchen Khandro, ex-girlfriend of George Best, talks about becoming a Buddhist nun.

Artist Peter Howson Talks Exclusively To Richard Holloway Ahead Of An Exhibition Of His Work In New York20170409

There are few living Scottish artists whose work packs quite the same emotional punch as Peter Howson. Richard Holloway swaps the radio studio for the art studio, visiting the internationally renowned painter at his place of work to explore some of the big themes his work deals with, including prophecy, religious iconography, masculinity, and depression.

The idea of Big Brother watching over us is not a new idea, but it's perhaps taken on a new dimension in the digital age. Dr Tom Chatfield, author and tech philosopher, and Dr Eric Stoddart, Lecturer in the School of Divinity at the University of St Andrews, look at the impact that state surveillance of our private communications can have on our society and our notions of freedom.

Cryogenics, implanted computer chips, cyborgs - is this the future for the human race? Mark O'Connell discusses Transhumanism, the branch of thought that believes the human race can evolve beyond its current physical and mental limitations; the subject of his latest book, To Be A Machine.

Richard speaks to 22 year old transgender man Luke Murphy and his hero and former Sunday School teacher Anne McMahon, about their truly remarkable and inspiring friendship.

Cathy Macdonald With Sami Awad20141207

Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, taking the week's events to task and asking what they say about values and beliefs.

Guest: Angus Farquhar, Creative Director Of Nva, The Organisation Behind Inspirational Outdoor Sensory Art Events20170326

What words do you use when the unspeakable happens? The London attacks last week left many struggling to find answers and comfort. Two of BBC Scotland's Thought for the Day contributors, former Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, the Very Reverend Alan McDonald, and Quaker author, Alastair McIntosh, consider the responsibility of sharing their words at such a sensitive time, and the messages they wish to convey.

Cathy speaks to Angus Farquhar, Creative Director of NVA, the organisation behind sensory art events such as The Path, a night-time walk through Glen Lyon in Perthshire, and Speed of Light, which involved the transformation of Edinburgh's Arthur's Seat using light and motion.

In the light of Brexit, the continuing debate around Scottish Independence, and events in London last week, Cathy looks at how we move beyond anger and division to foster more meaningful and positive conversations with Duncan Morrow, Director of Community Engagement at Ulster University; Church of Scotland minister, Reverend Shuna Dicks of Aberlour Parish Church; and Simon Bateson, creator of a series of conversations starting next month encouraging engagement and dialogue in local communities.

Writer and human rights activist, Raja Shehadeh, discusses the impact of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict on everyday life, especially on personal relationships; the theme of his latest book Where The Line is Drawn, Crossing Boundaries in Occupied Palestine.

David Martin, Director of Hidden Door Arts Festival shares his response to Nathan Coley's installation "The Lamp of Sacrifice - 286 Places of Worship" on at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art.

In Conversation With Harriet Harman20170219

Cathy talks to Harriet Harman who's been in British politics for almost 35 years - the longest continuous serving women MP. She gives her account of her fight for women's rights and the highs and lows of her political career.

In the run up to Lent, the Archbishop of Canterbury is urging Christians to re-examine their relationship with money. So is it possible for us as individuals to develop a healthier approach to materialism? Cathy is joined by Claudia Hammond, psychologist and author of "Mind over Money" and Buddhist Nun, Gen Kelsang Lhamo of the Kadampa Meditation Centre in Edinburgh.

Crowd funding is becoming an increasingly popular method of paying for healthcare not available on the NHS. We meet the Robertson family from East Lothian who used it to pay for life changing treatment for their daughter and discuss the issue with NHS Chaplain Rev Bryan Vernon, senior lecturer in healthcare ethics at Newcastle University and Sheila McLean Professor Emeritus in ethics and law at Glasgow University.

In 1977 the TV series Roots made a huge impact. Spanning generations the saga begins with young Kunta Kinte being sold into slavery. Forty years on the series has been remade. We ask if its narrative still relevant today. Cathy's joined by Dr. David Silkenat, Lecturer in American History at Edinburgh University and Sir Geoff Palmer, Professor Emeritus at Herriot Watt University

Beatrice Smith came to the UK as a young Rwandan refugee. Eighteen years later she decided to write about those early years after a car accident brought back the trauma she'd experienced as a child in Rwanda. Another catalyst was her daughter's questions about where her mum came from. She recounts it all in her book 'The Search for Home'.

Lisa Summers Sits In20120729

Lisa Summers talks to novelist Gillian Slovo about her writing and how growing up in South Africa with parents involved in the anti-apartheid movement impacted on her life.

The Catholic Church has appointed Philip Tartaglia as the new Archbishop of Glasgow. Journalist Stephen McGinty looks at the challenges ahead for him as the Scottish Government introduces a bill to legalize same sex marriage.

As the Olympics are upon us Lisa hears from the Head of the Multi- Faith Chaplaincy Service for the Olympic and Paralympic Games about how they'll be looking after needs of the athletes.

Olympic Torch bearer and Gold medalist in the Transplant Games Lesley Forrest explains how her kidney transplant and her participation in sport changed her life.

The Zambian athletes have been training In Glasgow before heading to London for the Olympic Games. Reporter Paul Saunders finds out how they got along in Scotland.

Plus, Ivor Telfer from 'More Than Gold' explains how the Christian community can engage with sport and find out what motivates one volunteer to offer hospitality by opening up her own home to the friends of Olympic athletes.

Lisa Summers talks to novelist Gillian Slovo about her writing and her life.

Lisa Summers Sits In20120729

Lisa Summers talks to novelist Gillian Slovo about her writing and how growing up in South Africa with parents involved in the anti-apartheid movement impacted on her life.

The Catholic Church has appointed Philip Tartaglia as the new Archbishop of Glasgow. Journalist Stephen McGinty looks at the challenges ahead for him as the Scottish Government introduces a bill to legalize same sex marriage.

As the Olympics are upon us Lisa hears from the Head of the Multi- Faith Chaplaincy Service for the Olympic and Paralympic Games about how they'll be looking after needs of the athletes.

Olympic Torch bearer and Gold medalist in the Transplant Games Lesley Forrest explains how her kidney transplant and her participation in sport changed her life.

The Zambian athletes have been training In Glasgow before heading to London for the Olympic Games. Reporter Paul Saunders finds out how they got along in Scotland.

Plus, Ivor Telfer from 'More Than Gold' explains how the Christian community can engage with sport and find out what motivates one volunteer to offer hospitality by opening up her own home to the friends of Olympic athletes.

Lisa Summers talks to novelist Gillian Slovo about her writing and her life.

Live From The Solas Festival - Drawing Together The Musical, Political, Cultural And Religious Worlds20170625

Live from the Solas Festival - drawing together the musical, cultural and religious worlds

Sunday Morning with Ricky Ross is live from the Solas Festival in Perth.
The meaning of Home is a festival theme this year, and Ricky is joined by Doug Gay, Lecturer in Theology at Glasgow University, and Alison Phipps, Professor of Languages and Intercultural Studies also at the University of Glasgow, as well as Mara Menzies, a storyteller who has lived both in Kenya and Scotland.
Author of 'Al-Britannia, My Country' James Fergusson joins Ricky to talk about his latest book which recounts his year meeting Muslims from Inverness to Oldham.
What are the challenges facing young people today? Ricky talks to millennial singer-songwriter Rory Butler, young musician Declan Welsh, and lecturer and mother Alison Phipps.
The last 12 months have been hugely eventful politically and socially. Padraig O'Tuama , writer and Community Leader at Corrymeela, Northern Ireland's peace and reconciliation organisation, and Simon Barrow of the beliefs and ethics think-tank, Ekklesia, join Ricky to discuss how we navigate through these often divisive times.
Legend of the Scottish traditional music scene and founding member of the Solas Festival, Mary Ann Kennedy talks about what makes Solas unique.
Vox Liminis developing the role of the arts in the criminal justice system in Scotland. Fergus McNeill, Professor of Criminology and Sociology at the University of Glasgow, and musician Louis Abbott, Artistic Lead on Distant Voices, talk about their work.
The world order has been shaken this year, and our old models of response feel redundant. Do we need to get more creative in our responses? With Padraig O'Tuama , Simon Barrow and performance artist, Sarah Rose Graber.
Live music from The Little Kicks, Rory Butler, Louis Abbot, Mary Ann Kennedy and a flash mob gospel choir.

Richard Holloway Talks To Entrepreneur Josh Littlejohn About Social Change And That Visit From George Clooney20170430

Richard Holloway talks to social entrepreneur Josh Littlejohn.

Sunday Morning With ...20140119

With Ben Thomson20171029

Ricky chats to businessman and former athlete Ben Thomson.

Ricky talks to Ben Thomson who has combined the world of arts and business, and early sporting prowess, to build a formidable career. But he's not done yet, he's currently stirring up debate about fairer treatment for women and better diversity in religion.

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Balfour Declaration this week, reporter Bob Dickson, returns to the birthplace of Arthur James Balfour, in Whittingehame, East Lothian, to reflect on the man and his legacy.

Building a better future for our children relies on a society protecting and enhancing their rights. It's the theme of a major event in Glasgow next week, bringing together political and community leaders with members of faith groups. Ricky talks to the Children's Commissioner for Scotland, Bruce Adamson and conference organiser, Shaykh Rehan Raza.

Five hundred years ago this Tuesday, an obscure monk named Martin Luther published 95 theses challenging the Church of Rome. His actions split the Church, and resulted in the Protestant Reformation. In Scotland the Reformation was more influenced by Calvin than Luther, mainly through the formidable John Knox. Ricky talks to former Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church, Richard Holloway - with contributions from the Right Rev Derek Browning, the Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland - to reflect on this momentous date in religious history.

Take five young women who are more used to socialising than silence, and send them to a convent of nuns. 'Bad Habits, Holy Orders' on Channel 5 has done that, and two very different worlds have come together. Ricky is joined by Dr Sara Parvis from the School of Divinity at Edinburgh University, and Sister Karen Marguerite d'Artois, a member of the Order of Dominican Sisters.