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20130106
20130908Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.
20131006Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.
20131013Cathy's first guest is Jenn Ashworth author and former Mormon. Her latest book 'The Friday Gospels' tells a fictional tale of a Mormon family, welcoming their son home from a two-year mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
A recently launched campaign in primary schools aims to teach children about abuse, self-protection and asking for help. Does this signify a cultural shift, are you ready to listen to children more? Cathy will be joined by Mo Davidson a volunteer on this project, and retired primary Head Teacher, and Debbie Fry, Lecturer in Child Protection at Edinburgh University's NSPCC Child Protection Research Centre.
Should schools be teaching values and morals as well as the three R's? It sounds like an excellent idea in practice, but to find out if schools and educationalists in Scotland can delivery it is Professor Bob Davis, the Head of the School of Education at Glasgow University, and Danny Murphy a retired Comprehensive Head and currently Senior Teaching Fellow at Moray House School of Education at Edinburgh University.
Last year students at Glasgow School of Art came up with the original idea of training guide dogs to assist people who have dementia. Reporter Anna Magnusson's been to Arbroath to meet Frank and Maureen and their labrador retriever, Oscar, along with Pat Brodlie of Alzheimer Scotland to find out more.
Northern Ireland is pulling away from conflict - but the murals remain. But a new project is trying to replace them with more neutral images. But there's been some resistance from both sides of the divide, as Professor Bill Rolston, Director of the Transitional Justice Institute at the University of Ulster, explains to Cathy.
All this and the usual mix of great music. Don't miss a second of it.
20131020Two hours of music and stimulating conversation from a faith and ethical perspective.
20131020Cathy's first guest is Nigel Osborne, one of Britain's leading composers' he's also a pioneer in the use of music therapy to help children traumatized by war. A master musical communicator, he's worked in conflict zones around the world and believes that music can have a profound effect on the human brain.
With more adults living alone than in any other type of household, Cathy examines the topic of loneliness with Valerie Crookston, from Contact the Elderly; Herald Columnist Catriona Stewart, and Reverend Owain Jones of the United Church of Bute. Does living alone mean being lonely, or can it be a positive experience? And what can be done to help those people who live alone and would rather not?
Edinburgh chamber choir, the St Andrew Camerata will sing at mass in St Peter's basilica. Before heading off for Rome, the choir's conductor, Vincent Wallace and choir member and managing director Gordon Duncan told Cathy how they managed to get the Vatican performance.
Church of Scotland minister the Reverend Aftab Gohar whose mother, nephew, niece and other family members and friends died in a suicide bombing at All Saints' Church in Peshawar tells Cathy why he forgives those responsible.
Cathy talks to Francis Mckee, Director of the Centre for Contemporary Arts in Glasgow about a specially created art exhibition inspired by the life and legacy of St Columba. And we hear from some of the artists involved who came together on Raasay, near Skye to discuss and respond to themes linked to St Columba, as well as questions about landscape, spirituality, religion and identity.
All this and the usual mix of great music.
20131027Two hours of music and conversation with a faith and ethical perspective with Ricky Ross. Taking the week's events to ask what they say about our values and beliefs.
This year marks 25 years since the publication of 'Touching the Void'. It's a breathless account of the ascent of the previously unclimbed west face of the Siula Grande in Peru, by Simon Yates - and the author of the book - Joe Simpson. But it's really about what happened on the way down, and what happened cast a long shadow across the rest of their lives. It was a climb that a fellow mountaineer wryly described to them before they attempted it, as "a challenging day out". Mountaineer and author, Joe Simpson, joins Ricky.
The events at Grangemouth have highlighted the importance to the local and national community of good mediation skills. Hugh Donald, of Place for Hope, an ecumenical organisation based in Scotland that offers mediation services and Peter Monaghan, north west area director for ACAS - Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service - look at what sort of skills are needed to rebuild fractured relationships.
Reviewing "The Jewish Cardinal" a film based on the life of Jean-Marie Lustiger, part of the UK Jewish Film Festival.
And what do you look for in a Godparent? And, in the light of events in a Chapel in London a few days ago, how many Godparents do you need?
20140209Richard meets Stephen Grosz, who after practising as a psychoanalyst for over 25 years, put his experiences and findings about human behaviour in a book. The Examined Life; How We Lose and Find Ourselves, is a collection of real life stories, straight from his consulting room.
Is it religion or the misinterpretation of it that's to blame for the blood that's shed in the name of one's God? The writer A.L. Kennedy and Mona Siddiqui, Professor of Islamic and Interreligious Studies, at New College, University of Edinburgh, unpack this fascinating area.
They'll also be looking at the idea of giving a prisoner reading material as part of their jail sentence, as one US judge recently did. What should we be reading if we want to change the way people think and act?
And we hear the final part of holocaust survivor Zdenka Fantolva's harrowing and incredibly moving story.
Plus there'll be the usual helping of great music.
20140406Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.
20140525Join Sally Magnusson and guests for two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about our values and beliefs.
20140608Leading Forensic Anthropologist Sue Black has been called on for her expertise in many high profile cases, including the conviction of Scotland's largest paedophile ring, as well as heading the British Forensic Team's exhumation of mass graves in Kosovo. She joins Cathy in the first hour to talk about her life and career.
One of the shocking and devastating consequences of war that we don't often hear about is sexual violence. An unlikely pairing, Foreign Secretary William Hague, and Angelina Jolie, the Special Envoy for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, draw attention to this issue in The Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict Zones. Carron Mann, from Women for Women, David Pratt, Foreign Editor at the Sunday Herald, and Dr Juliet Cohen, Freedom from Torture, discuss the biggest gathering ever on this subject which is happening in London this week.
And we find out more about a Scottish missionary who brought Christianity and engineering to Uganda. Whilst relatively unknown here in Scotland, Alexander McKay is known to every school child in Uganda. Artist Sanna Gateja explains why he's organised an exhibition in McKay's home town, to give the missionary the recognition he deserves in his home country.
Plus we drop into rehearsals for Guide Gods. Acclaimed performer Claire Cunningham explains how she's using dance, live music and interviews to explore how the major world faiths view deafness and disability.
20140706Journalist, Allan Little, has for more than three decades reported from countless countries and conflicts, including Iraq, former Yugoslavia, South Africa and Moscow. He joins Richard Holloway to discuss what he's taken from these experiences.
During the week on Good Morning Scotland pastors and preachers take over from journalists and politicians, take a moment to reflect on a news story in The Thought for the Day slot. Last week, some young people from Generation 2014 (a group of 50 Scottish teenagers who'll have the right to vote in the Independence Referendum and who BBC Scotland's been following over the year) took over the TftD slot. Nathan Epemolu was one of those contributors and he tells Richard how he found it.
And, David Goodman, a member of the Jewish Reform Community and Spencer Fildes, Chair of the Scottish Secular Society join Richard to discuss whether a time for a religious reflection, or even a non-religious philosophical reflection is still relevant?
And, as developments in the Middle East continue to cause concern. David Goodman, a member of the Jewish Reform Community and Richard consider whether dramas like BBC 2's new series "The Honourable Woman" can ever helpfully capture the reality of the situation.
As Leonard Cohen turns 80, a new book explores the life, work and passion of this poet-turned-musician. Liel Leibovitz, the author of "A Broken Hallelujah, Leonard Cohen's Secret Chord", explains his enduring appeal.
And in the run up to the Commonwealth Games we get another Poetry Postcard - this time from Northern Ireland; Michael Longley brings us "All of These People".
20140907Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, taking the week's events to task and asking what they say about values and beliefs.
20140921Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, taking the week's events to task and asking what they say about values and beliefs.
20140928Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, taking the week's events to task and asking what they say about values and beliefs.
Cathy Macdonald With Sami Awad20141207Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, taking the week's events to task and asking what they say about values and beliefs.
20150607
To mark five days of special music programmes on Radio Scotland to celebrate BBC Music Day, Sunday Morning With Ricky Ross celebrates some of the roots of sacred music, with some very special people. It's a journey from the spiritual and gospel traditions, through the power and emotions of protest songs.
Ricky will be joined by a world-renowned mezzo soprano Andrea Baker; poet, author and minister Steve Stockman; Scotland's very own music-maestro John Bell of the Wild Goose Worship Group; Church of Scotland minister Ian Gilmour; broadcaster and author of "Detroit 67" Stuart Cosgrove; church musician Martin Ritchie, and renowned singer-songwriter Karine Polwart.
Together they'll explore how music captures and expresses what words alone can't quite say, and why music is such an important part of religious expression.
All this and the gospel group Soul Nation Choir playing live throughout the programme.
20150621
Two hours of music and conversation from a faith and ethical perspective, asking what the week's events say about values and beliefs.
20150628
20150712
Ian McMillan, aka the Bard of Barnsley, is one of our best loved contemporary poets. He joins Ricky to share stories about his life, work and his beloved Yorkshire.
We hear the last instalment of teenager Hannah Hafiz's audio diary giving us an insight into her experience of Ramadan.
On the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre, film maker Samir Mehanovic and journalist David Pratt talk about how the region has moved on from one of the worst atrocities in Europe since the Second World War, and whether divisions along ethnic and religious lines still exist.
A group of Brazilian evangelical Christians recently launched 'Facegloria' - a social networking site that they believe is morally and technically better than Facebook. But with 600 words banned, no violence, sexual imagery or gay content, is it a control too far for social networking? Reverend Dr Peter Phillips gives us his thoughts on the pros and cons of the site, and we hear from Christian mother and daughter, Andrea and Anabelle, whether they'd be tempted to use it.
And in his book 'Misquoting Muhammad, The Challenge and Choices of Interpreting the Prophet's Legacy', Jonathan A.C. Brown takes the reader back in time through Islamic civilisation offering an inside view into how key and controversial aspects of Islam took shape, doing some myth-busting along the way.

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  • Entertainment / Music / Religion and Ethics / "Entertainment / Music / Religion and Ethics" / News / Religion and Ethics