Street Corner Soul

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012007101120160503 (6M)

Ronnie Spector explores the rise, fall and enduring influence of doo wop.

Like rap in the 1980s, doo wop was once the DIY music of young America. For people who couldn't afford instruments, all that was needed was a talent for singing in harmony.

With the help of the musicians, the producers and the hustlers who made it happen; this series charts the rise, fall, and rise again, of the music. It also considers whether doo wop, as the first black street music to go mainstream, was a precursor to hip hop and rap.

The first programme, Opening Notes, looks at how the success of gospel groups in the late 1940s inspired a new style of close harmony rhythm and blues. And before long, vocal groups like The Swallows, The Ravens and The Orioles were flying high in the charts.

Contributors include: Leonard Puzey of The Ravens, Heman Denby of The Swallows, Ira Tucker of The Dixie Hummingbirds, Deborah Chessler, composer of It's Too Soon To Know by The Orioles, writers Todd Baptista and Marv Goldberg.

The documentary was first broadcast on Radio 2 in 2007.

0120071011

0120071011

012007101120150602 (6M)

Ronnie Spector explores the rise, fall and enduring influence of doo wop.

Like rap in the 1980s, doo wop was once the DIY music of young America. For people who couldn't afford instruments, all that was needed was a talent for singing in harmony.

With the help of the musicians, the producers and the hustlers who made it happen; this series charts the rise, fall, and rise again, of the music. It also considers whether doo wop, as the first black street music to go mainstream, was a precursor to hip hop and rap.

The first programme, Opening Notes, looks at how the success of gospel groups in the late 1940s inspired a new style of close harmony rhythm and blues. And before long, vocal groups like The Swallows, The Ravens and The Orioles were flying high in the charts.

Contributors include: Leonard Puzey of The Ravens, Heman Denby of The Swallows, Ira Tucker of The Dixie Hummingbirds, Deborah Chessler, composer of It's Too Soon To Know by The Orioles, writers Todd Baptista and Marv Goldberg.

The documentary was first broadcast on Radio 2 in 2007.

The story of doo-wop, beginning with the emergence of vocal harmony groups.

0120071011

012007101120121023
20140422 (6M)
20130716 (6M)

Ronnie Spector explores the rise, fall and enduring influence of doo wop.

Like rap in the 1980s, doo wop was once the DIY music of young America. For people who couldn't afford instruments, all that was needed was a talent for singing in harmony.

With the help of the musicians, the producers and the hustlers who made it happen; this series charts the rise, fall, and rise again, of the music. It also considers whether doo wop, as the first black street music to go mainstream, was a precursor to hip hop and rap.

The first programme, Opening Notes, looks at how the success of gospel groups in the late 1940s inspired a new style of close harmony rhythm and blues. And before long, vocal groups like The Swallows, The Ravens and The Orioles were flying high in the charts.

Contributors include: Leonard Puzey of The Ravens, Heman Denby of The Swallows, Ira Tucker of The Dixie Hummingbirds, Deborah Chessler, composer of It's Too Soon To Know by The Orioles, writers Todd Baptista and Marv Goldberg.

The documentary was first broadcast on Radio 2 in 2007.

The story of doo-wop, beginning with the emergence of vocal harmony groups.

Ronnie Spector explores the rise, fall and enduring influence of doo wop.

Like rap in the 1980s, doo wop was once the DIY music of young America. For people who couldn't afford instruments, all that was needed was a talent for singing in harmony.

With the help of the musicians, the producers and the hustlers who made it happen; this series charts the rise, fall, and rise again, of the music. It also considers whether doo wop, as the first black street music to go mainstream, was a precursor to hip hop and rap.

The first programme, Opening Notes, looks at how the success of gospel groups in the late 1940s inspired a new style of close harmony rhythm and blues. And before long, vocal groups like The Swallows, The Ravens and The Orioles were flying high in the charts.

Contributors include: Leonard Puzey of The Ravens, Heman Denby of The Swallows, Ira Tucker of The Dixie Hummingbirds, Deborah Chessler, composer of It's Too Soon To Know by The Orioles, writers Todd Baptista and Marv Goldberg.

The documentary was first broadcast on Radio 2 in 2007.

How doo-wop began with the emergence of vocal harmony groups such as The Ink Spots.

Ronnie Spector explores the rise, fall and enduring influence of doo wop.

Like rap in the 1980s, doo wop was once the DIY music of young America. For people who couldn't afford instruments, all that was needed was a talent for singing in harmony.

With the help of the musicians, the producers and the hustlers who made it happen; this series charts the rise, fall, and rise again, of the music. It also considers whether doo wop, as the first black street music to go mainstream, was a precursor to hip hop and rap.

The first programme, Opening Notes, looks at how the success of gospel groups in the late 1940s inspired a new style of close harmony rhythm and blues. And before long, vocal groups like The Swallows, The Ravens and The Orioles were flying high in the charts.

Contributors include: Leonard Puzey of The Ravens, Heman Denby of The Swallows, Ira Tucker of The Dixie Hummingbirds, Deborah Chessler, composer of It's Too Soon To Know by The Orioles, writers Todd Baptista and Marv Goldberg.

The documentary was first broadcast on Radio 2 in 2007.

How doo-wop began with the emergence of vocal harmony groups such as The Ink Spots.

Another chance to hear legendary singer Ronnie Spector explore the rise, fall and enduring influence of doo wop.

Like rap in the 1980s, doo wop was once the DIY music of young America. For people who couldn't afford instruments, all that was needed was a talent for singing in harmony.

With the help of the musicians, the producers and the hustlers who made it happen; this series charts the rise, fall, and rise again, of the music. It also considers whether doo wop, as the first black street music to go mainstream, was a precursor to hip hop and rap.

The first programme, Opening Notes, looks at how the success of gospel groups in the late 1940s inspired a new style of close harmony rhythm and blues. And before long, vocal groups like The Swallows, The Ravens and The Orioles were flying high in the charts.

Contributors include: Leonard Puzey of The Ravens, Heman Denby of The Swallows, Ira Tucker of The Dixie Hummingbirds, Deborah Chessler, composer of It's Too Soon To Know by The Orioles, writers Todd Baptista and Marv Goldberg.

The documentary was first broadcast on Radio 2 in 2007.

0220071018

022007101820150603 (6M)

Ronnie Spector tells how groups like the Ravens and the Orioles became familiar names.

Another chance to hear legendary singer Ronnie Spector explore the rise, fall and enduring influence of doo wop.

In episode two she tells how, with the success of The Ravens and The Orioles, vocal groups became familiar names in the charts.

0220071018

022007101820140423 (6M)

Another chance to hear legendary singer Ronnie Spector explore the rise, fall and enduring influence of doo wop.

In episode two she tells how, with the success of The Ravens and The Orioles, vocal groups became familiar names in the charts.

02Flying High2007101820121024
20130717 (6M)

With the success of the Ravens and the Orioles, vocal groups became familiar in the charts

Another chance to hear legendary singer Ronnie Spector explore the rise, fall and enduring influence of doo wop.

In episode two she tells how, with the success of The Ravens and The Orioles, vocal groups became familiar names in the charts.

With the success of the Ravens and the Orioles, vocal groups became familiar in the charts

Another chance to hear legendary singer Ronnie Spector explore the rise, fall and enduring influence of doo wop.

In episode two, with the success of The Ravens and The Orioles, vocal groups became familiar names in the charts.

0320071025

032007102520150604 (6M)

As doo-wop took root, the mainstream music industry moved in for a slice of the action.

Ronnie Spector take a look at the rise, fall and influence of doo wop.

By the mid-1950s, hundreds of vocal group records were being released each week and acts like The Penguins, The Five Satins, The Cadillacs and The Moonglows became familiar names in the charts.

As doo wop took root in cities like New York, Philadelphia, Chicago and LA; the mainstream music industry moved in for a slice of the action.

Tracks featured in this episode include The Moonglows' Sincerely, The Cadillacs' Speedo, The Penguins' Earth Angel, The Five Satins' In The Still Of The Nite, and The Chords' Sh-Boom!

First broadcast in 2007.

0320071025

032007102520140424 (6M)

As doo-wop took root, the mainstream music industry moved in for a slice of the action.

Ronnie Spector take a look at the rise, fall and influence of doo wop.

By the mid-1950s, hundreds of vocal group records were being released each week and acts like The Penguins, The Five Satins, The Cadillacs and The Moonglows became familiar names in the charts.

As doo wop took root in cities like New York, Philadelphia, Chicago and LA; the mainstream music industry moved in for a slice of the action.

Tracks featured in this episode include The Moonglows' Sincerely, The Cadillacs' Speedo, The Penguins' Earth Angel, The Five Satins' In The Still Of The Nite, and The Chords' Sh-Boom!

03Sh-boom!2007102520121025
20130718 (6M)

As doo-wop took root, the mainstream music industry moved in for a slice of the action.

Ronnie Spector take a look at the rise, fall and influence of doo wop.

By the mid-1950s, hundreds of vocal group records were being released each week and acts like The Penguins, The Five Satins, The Cadillacs and The Moonglows became familiar names in the charts.

As doo wop took root in cities like New York, Philadelphia, Chicago and LA; the mainstream music industry moved in for a slice of the action.

Tracks featured in this episode include The Moonglows' Sincerely, The Cadillacs' Speedo, The Penguins' Earth Angel, The Five Satins' In The Still Of The Nite, and The Chords' Sh-Boom!

As doo-wop took root, the mainstream music industry moved in for a slice of the action.

Another chance to hear legendary singer Ronnie Spector take a look at the rise, fall and influence of doo wop.

By the mid-1950s, hundreds of vocal group records were being released each week and acts like The Penguins, The Five Satins, The Cadillacs and The Moonglows became familiar names in the charts.

As doo wop took root in cities like New York, Philadelphia, Chicago and LA; the mainstream music industry moved in for a slice of the action.

Tracks featured in this episode include The Moonglows' Sincerely, The Cadillacs' Speedo, The Penguins' Earth Angel, The Five Satins' In The Still Of The Nite, and The Chords' Sh-Boom!

0420071101

042007110120150605 (6M)

Ronnie Spector looks at why some doo-wop acts did not reap their deserved rewards.

Another chance to hear legendary singer Ronnie Spector looking at the rise, fall and influence of doo wop.

In the fourth and final episode, Ronnie looks at why some successful acts didn't reap the deserved rewards.

0420071101

04 LAST2007110120140425 (6M)

Another chance to hear legendary singer Ronnie Spector looking at the rise, fall and influence of doo wop.

In the fourth and final episode, Ronnie looks at why some successful acts didn't reap the deserved rewards.

Ronnie Spector looks at why some doo-wop acts didn't reap their deserved rewards.

Another chance to hear legendary singer Ronnie Spector looking at the rise, fall and influence of doo wop.

In the fourth and final episode, Ronnie looks at why some successful acts didn't reap the deserved rewards.

04 LASTThe Price Of Fame2007110120121026
20130719 (6M)

Another chance to hear legendary singer Ronnie Spector looking at the rise, fall and influence of doo wop.

In the fourth and final episode, Ronnie looks at why some successful acts didn't reap the deserved rewards.

An invasion of British acts was about to change the music business forever.