Strange Justice

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012012061820130826

After many years as an anti-apartheid activist and member of the ANC, lawyer Albie Sachs was almost killed by a car bomb planted by South African security agents. He lost his right arm and an eye, but after a period in exile returned to South Africa and was appointed by Nelson Mandela to be Justice of the Constitutional Court.

In this series of essays, he reflects on the life and work of the court and on some of the most difficult judgments he himself has had to make.

First broadcast in June 2012.

After many years as an anti-apartheid activist and member of the ANC, lawyer Albie Sachs was almost killed by a car bomb planted by South African security agents. He lost his right arm and an eye but after a period in exile returned to South Africa and was appointed by Nelson Mandela to be a justice of the Constitutional Court.

022012061920130827

Albie Sachs was appointed by Nelson Mandela to be Justice of the Constitutional Court of South Africa. In the second of his five Essays, he reflects on the personal challenges he faced when dealing with the highly sensitive issues which came in the wake of the new South Africa.

First broadcast in June 2012.

032012062020130829

Lawyer Albie Sachs was appointed Justice of the Constitutional Court by Nelson Mandela. In the third of his series of Essays, he looks at the question of equality in the new South Africa.

First broadcast in June 2012.

042012062120130830

In the fourth in his series of Essays, lawyer Albie Sachs continues his reflection on the work of South Africa's Constitutional Court. In this programme he looks at the issues surrounding religion and religious belief that have been brought before the Court, and the challenges he faced in making the right judgment.

First broadcast in June 2012.

05 LAST20120622

In the last in his series of Essays, lawyer Albie Sachs looks at the issue around social and economic rights which were brought before the Constitutional Court of South Africa. From the rights of the homeless to the right to clean latrines, he reveals the complexities of legal judgment in the new South Africa and the personal challenges he had to meet in coming to the right decision.