The Story Of Funk

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01Funk Used To Be A Bad Word2011010520121222 (6M)
20130817 (6M)
20131230 (6M)

Actress Pam Grier tells the story of funk music.

From the 1960s through to the present day, funk music reverberates through popular culture. Whether it's in fashion, street language, TV, the movies or pop music, the far reaching influence of funk is everywhere. In this three-part series American actress Pam Grier takes listeners on an historic funk odyssey. She's been a fan of the music since she starred in the so-called Blaxploitation movies of the 1970s. Back then, funk was not only the soundtrack to her films but also to a vital time in American history. It was a time of self discovery, struggle and social change. The music reflected all of that.

In this first part, Pam goes back to the source, when funk - in the words of George Clinton - "used to be a bad word." Pam reveals how jazz and the R&B music of the 50s informed the rhythms and energy of funk music. As well as the all important architects of the sound like James Brown and Sly Stone, the programme also shines a spotlight on some of the unsung heroes such as Charles Wright and the Last Poets.

The series features contributions from Earth Wind and Fire, Kool and the Gang, Sly and the Family Stone, George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, P-Funk musicians, Average White Band, Cameo, Clyde "Funky Drummer" Stubblefield, Charles Wright, The Last Poets, Beverley Knight, Matt Fink, Acid Jazz's Eddie Piller and rapper Shock G.

From the 1960s through to the present day funk music reverberates all through popular culture.

Whether it's in fashion, street language, TV, the movies or pop music, the far reaching influence of funk is everywhere.

In this three part series, American actress Pam Grier ensures Radio 2 is one station under a groove, taking listeners on an historic funk odyssey.

She's been a fan of the music since she starred in the so-called Blaxploitation movies of the 1970s.

Back then, funk was not only the soundtrack to her films but also to a vital time in American history for black people.

It was a time of self discovery, struggle and social change.

The music reflected all of that.

In this first part, Pam goes back to the source, when funk - in the words of George Clinton - 'used to be a bad word'.

Pam reveals how jazz and the R 'n' B music of the 50s informed the rhythms and energy of funk music.

As well as the all important architects of the sound like James Brown and Sly Stone, the programme also shines a spotlight on some of the unsung heroes such as Charles Wright and the Last Poets.

Blaxploitation actress Pam Grier presents the first part of Radio 2's Story of Funk.

02Let's Take It To The Stage2011011220121223 (6M)
20130818 (6M)
20131231 (6M)

Actress Pam Grier continues the story of funk music.

From the 1960s through to the present day funk music reverberates all through popular culture. Whether it's in fashion, street language, TV, the movies or pop music, the far reaching influence of funk is everywhere. Actress Pam Grier continues her funk odyssey. She's been a fan of the music since she starred in the so-called Blaxploitation movies of the 1970s. Back then, funk was not only the soundtrack to her films but also to a vital time in American history. It was a time of self discovery, struggle and social change. Funk music reflected all of that.

In part two, Pam examines the funkiest decade of all time: the 1970s. Back when bell bottoms, afros and hoop earrings were the thing, an explosion of bands took funk to the world stage. We're talking acts like George Clinton's P-Funk, Kool & the Gang, Stevie Wonder, Average White Band, The Bar-Kays, the Ohio Players and The Meters. Plus there was the emergenece of new genres such as jazz funk, African funk and Latin funk.

The series features contributions from Earth Wind & Fire, Kool & the Gang, Sly & the Family Stone, George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, P-Funk musicians, Average White Band, Cameo, Clyde "Funky Drummer" Stubblefield, Charles Wright, The Last Poets, Beverley Knight, Matt Fink, Acid Jazz's Eddie Piller and rapper Shock G.

In part two, Pam examines the funkiest decade of all time: the 1970s. Back when bell bottoms, afros and hoop earrings were the thing, an explosion of bands took funk to the world stage. We're talking acts like George Clinton's P-Funk, Kool & the Gang, Stevie Wonder, Average White Band, The Bar-Kays, the Ohio Players and The Meters. Plus there was the emergence of new genres such as jazz funk, African funk and Latin funk.

From the 1960s through to the present day, funk music reverberates all through popular culture.

Whether it's in fashion, street language, TV, the movies or pop music, the far-reaching influence of funk is everywhere.

In this three-part series, American actress Pam Grier ensures Radio 2 is one station under a groove, taking listeners on an historic funk odyssey.

She's been a fan of the music since she starred in the so-called Blaxploitation movies of the 1970s.

Back then, funk was not only the soundtrack to her films but also to a vital time in American history for black people.

It was a time of self discovery, struggle and social change.

Funk music reflected all of that.

In part two, Pam examines the funkiest decade of all time: the 1970s.

Back when bell bottoms, afros and hoop earrings were the thing, an explosion of bands took funk to the world stage.

We're talking acts like George Clinton's P-Funk, Kool & the Gang, Stevie Wonder, Average White Band, The Bar-Kays, the Ohio Players and The Meters.

Plus there was the emergence of new genres like Jazz, African and Latin Funk.

The series features contributions from Earth Wind & Fire, Kool & the Gang, Sly and the Family Stone, George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, P-Funk musicians, Average White Band, Cameo, Clyde 'Funky Drummer' Stubblefield, Charles Wright, The Last Poets, Beverley Knight, Matt Fink, Acid Jazz's Eddie Piller and rapper Shock G.

Blaxploitation actress Pam Grier presents the second part of Radio 2's Story of Funk.

03 LASTFrom P-funk To G-funk2011011920121224 (6M)
20130819 (6M)
20140101 (6M)

From the 1960s through to the present day funk music reverberates all through popular culture.

Whether it's in fashion, street language, TV, the movies or pop music the far reaching influence of funk is everywhere.

In this three part series American actress Pam Grier ensures Radio 2 is one station under a groove, taking listeners on an historic funk odyssey.

She's been a fan of the music since she starred in the so-called Blaxploitation movies of the 1970s.

Back then, funk was not only the soundtrack to her films but also to a vital time in American history for black people.

It was a time of self discovery, struggle and social change.

Funk music reflected all of that.

In this final part, Pam reveals how the scene started its inevitable decline.

While funk bands such as Earth Wind & Fire could lay claim to being one of the largest acts in the world, by the end of the 1970s the beat changed.

Disco music took over as the dance-floor music of choice and funk bands either joined the party or disappeared.

It wasn't until the emergence of hip-hop that the music was introduced to a younger generation via record producers who sampled the old funk classics.

The advancement of music technology also helped a new electro-funk scene develop with a certain Prince Rodgers Nelson leading the way.

Pam also examines the often overlooked female funkateers including one of the genre's hidden gems, Betty Davis.

The series features contributions from Earth Wind & Fire, Kool & the Gang, Sly and the Family Stone, George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, P-Funk musicians, Average White Band, Cameo, Clyde 'Funky Drummer' Stubblefield, Charles Wright, The Last Poets, Beverley Knight, Matt Fink, Acid Jazz's Eddie Piller and rapper Shock G.

Blaxploitation actress Pam Grier presents the final part of Radio 2's Story of Funk.

From the 1960s through to the present day funk music reverberates all through popular culture. Whether it's in fashion, street language, TV, the movies or pop music the far reaching influence of funk is everywhere. Pam Grier concludes her funk odyssey. She's been a fan of the music since she starred in the so-called Blaxploitation movies of the 1970s. Back then, funk was not only the soundtrack to her films but also to a vital time in American history. It was a time of self discovery, struggle and social change. Funk music reflected all of that.

In this final part, Pam reveals how the scene started its inevitable decline. While funk bands such as Earth Wind and Fire could lay claim to being one of the largest acts in the world, by the end of the 1970s the beat changed. Disco music took over as the dance-floor music of choice and funk bands either joined the party or disappeared. It wasn't until the emergence of hip-hop that the music was introduced to a younger generation via record producers who sampled the old funk classics. The advance of music technology also helped a new electro-funk scene develop with a certain Prince Rodgers Nelson leading the way.

The series features contributions from Earth Wind & Fire, Kool & the Gang, Sly & the Family Stone, George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, P-Funk musicians, Average White Band, Cameo, Clyde "Funky Drummer" Stubblefield, Charles Wright, The Last Poets, Beverley Knight, Matt Fink, Acid Jazz's Eddie Piller and rapper Shock G.

Pam Grier concludes with a look at how the scene began its inevitable decline.