Stephanomics

Episodes

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120111019

In the first of three programmes, Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with top economic thinkers. Together they debate the twists and turns of the world economy - and assess where the euro will be in five to ten years time. And they'll consider the implications for jobs and growth in order to map the future economic landscape.

Producer: Caroline Bayley

Editor Stephen Chilcott.

. Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with top economic thinkers.

220111026

In the second of three programmes, Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with a panel of top economic thinkers. She'll be asking just who is to blame for the current economic mess we're in. Was it the fault of the bankers - who plenty of people want to blame - or was it the economists? And what can we learn from this, or is the problem that we simply don't learn lessons from past crises? Stephanie Flanders will be joined in the studio to debate these questions by the billionaire investor, George Soros, Sir Howard Davies, who is the former director of the LSE, former chairman of the FSA and former deputy governor of the Bank of England, and also Dr DeAnne Julius, chairman of Chatham House and a former member of the Bank of England's monetary policy committee.

Producer: Caroline Bayley

Editor: Stephen Chilcott

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

. Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with top economic thinkers.

03Phone-in edition20130423

Stephanie Flanders and an expert panel answer your economics questions in a live phone-in.

For the last 5 years economic questions have dominated the news. But do you have questions that haven't been answered?

What would happen if a country left the Euro? What do hedge funds actually do? What about quantitative easing? If the Government owns a third of its own debt, why can't it just rip it up and solve our debt problem overnight?

In a special edition of Stephanomics, the BBC's economics editor Stephanie Flanders and an expert panel will try and answer your economics questions in a live phone-in.

Get in touch with your questions NOW. Email: stephanomics@bbc.co.uk or tweet @bbcradio4 #stephanomics or call 03 700 100 444 from 8am on Tuesday 23rd April.

03Phone-in Edition20130423

Stephanie Flanders and an expert panel answer your economics questions in a live phone-in.

For the last 5 years economic questions have dominated the news. But do you have questions that haven't been answered?

What would happen if a country left the Euro? What do hedge funds actually do? What about quantitative easing? If the Government owns a third of its own debt, why can't it just rip it up and solve our debt problem overnight?

In a special edition of Stephanomics, the BBC's economics editor Stephanie Flanders and an expert panel will try and answer your economics questions in a live phone-in.

Get in touch with your questions NOW. Email: stephanomics@bbc.co.uk or tweet @bbcradio4 #stephanomics or call 03 700 100 444 from 8am on Tuesday 23rd April.

3 LAST20111102

In the third of three programmes, Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with top economic thinkers. Together they debate the twists and turns of the world economy. They'll discuss growth and ask whether it's time to consider an alternative economic model. And they'll consider the implications of the euro's problems and the future for jobs in the western world.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

. Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with top economic thinkers.

010120111019

In the first of three programmes, Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with top economic thinkers.

Together they debate the twists and turns of the world economy - and assess where the euro will be in five to ten years time.

And they'll consider the implications for jobs and growth in order to map the future economic landscape.

Producer: Caroline Bayley

Editor Stephen Chilcott.

Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with top economic thinkers.

010120111019

In the first of three programmes, Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with top economic thinkers.

Together they debate the twists and turns of the world economy - and assess where the euro will be in five to ten years time.

And they'll consider the implications for jobs and growth in order to map the future economic landscape.

Producer: Caroline Bayley

Editor Stephen Chilcott.

Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with top economic thinkers.

010220111026

In the second of three programmes, Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with a panel of top economic thinkers.

She'll be asking just who is to blame for the current economic mess we're in.

Was it the fault of the bankers - who plenty of people want to blame - or was it the economists? And what can we learn from this, or is the problem that we simply don't learn lessons from past crises? Stephanie Flanders will be joined in the studio to debate these questions by the billionaire investor, George Soros, Sir Howard Davies, who is the former director of the LSE, former chairman of the FSA and former deputy governor of the Bank of England, and also Dr DeAnne Julius, chairman of Chatham House and a former member of the Bank of England's monetary policy committee.

Producer: Caroline Bayley

Editor: Stephen Chilcott

Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with top economic thinkers.

010220111026

In the second of three programmes, Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with a panel of top economic thinkers.

She'll be asking just who is to blame for the current economic mess we're in.

Was it the fault of the bankers - who plenty of people want to blame - or was it the economists? And what can we learn from this, or is the problem that we simply don't learn lessons from past crises? Stephanie Flanders will be joined in the studio to debate these questions by the billionaire investor, George Soros, Sir Howard Davies, who is the former director of the LSE, former chairman of the FSA and former deputy governor of the Bank of England, and also Dr DeAnne Julius, chairman of Chatham House and a former member of the Bank of England's monetary policy committee.

Producer: Caroline Bayley

Editor: Stephen Chilcott

Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with top economic thinkers.

0103 LAST20111102

In the third of three programmes, Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with top economic thinkers.

Together they debate the twists and turns of the world economy.

They'll discuss growth and ask whether it's time to consider an alternative economic model.

And they'll consider the implications of the euro's problems and the future for jobs in the western world.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with top economic thinkers.

0103 LAST20111102

In the third of three programmes, Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with top economic thinkers.

Together they debate the twists and turns of the world economy.

They'll discuss growth and ask whether it's time to consider an alternative economic model.

And they'll consider the implications of the euro's problems and the future for jobs in the western world.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Stephanie Flanders discusses the global financial crisis with top economic thinkers.

020120120717

Top economists discuss with Stephanie Flanders how we can pull out of the current crisis.

In the first of a new series of her award-winning programme on the economics of our times, the BBC's Economics Editor Stephanie Flanders discusses with leading thinkers what can pull us out of today's crisis. In the 1930s Britain returned to growth first through a housing boom in the private sector and then through a world war. Eighty years later, what is going to do it this time?

Among those joining Stephanie are the leading economic historian, Nicholas Crafts.

020120120717

Top economists discuss with Stephanie Flanders how we can pull out of the current crisis.

In the first of a new series of her award-winning programme on the economics of our times, the BBC's Economics Editor Stephanie Flanders discusses with leading thinkers what can pull us out of today's crisis. In the 1930s Britain returned to growth first through a housing boom in the private sector and then through a world war. Eighty years later, what is going to do it this time?

Among those joining Stephanie are the leading economic historian, Nicholas Crafts.

Top economists discuss with Stephanie Flanders how we can pull out of the current crisis.

In the first of a new series of her award-winning programme on the economics of our times, the BBC's Economics Editor Stephanie Flanders discusses with leading thinkers what can pull us out of today's crisis. In the 1930s Britain returned to growth first through a housing boom in the private sector and then through a world war. Eighty years later, what is going to do it this time?

Among those joining Stephanie are the leading economic historian, Nicholas Crafts.

020220120724

Stephanie Flanders discusses what the future of the US and Chinese economies mean for us.

In the second of her discussion programmes looking at the key economic issues of our time, Stephanie Flanders asks where the Chinese and US economies are heading. Conventional wisdom holds that America is set on an historic downward path while the Chinese giant is poised to dominate the global economy. But is this view too simplistic?

Although managing only a low growth rate at present, dramatically lower energy costs are helping the US reindustrialise its economy. At the same time it continues to enjoy unrivalled advantages in the technology and service sectors. Meanwhile, China's growth is slowing and its economy still rigidly planned. It is critically dependent on imported raw materials on the one hand and on exports to the advanced industrialised economies on the other. It is also strangely imbalanced with prodigious amounts of investment but puny levels of consumption.

So what does the future hold for the two global economic giants - and how will Britain be affected? Joining Stephanie to discuss the prospects are: Arvind Subramanian of the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington DC and author of "Eclipse: Living in the Shadow of China's Economic Dominance"; Charles Dumas, chief executive of the independent economic consultancy, Lombard Street Research, and author of "The American Phoenix: Why China and Europe Will Struggle After the Coming Slump"; and Paul Ormerod, economist and writer on business, whose books include "Butterfly Economics".

Producer: Simon Coates

Editor: Stephen Chilcott.

In the second of her discussion programmes looking at the key economic issues of our time, Stephanie Flanders asks where the Chinese and US economies are heading. Conventional wisdom holds that America is set on an historic downward path while the Chinese giant is poised to dominate the global economy. But is this view too simplistic?

Although managing only a low growth rate at present, dramatically lower energy costs are helping the US reindustrialise its economy. At the same time it continues to enjoy unrivalled advantages in the technology and service sectors. Meanwhile, China's growth is slowing and its economy still rigidly planned. It is critically dependent on imported raw materials on the one hand and on exports to the advanced industrialised economies on the other. It is also strangely imbalanced with prodigious amounts of investment but puny levels of consumption.

So what does the future hold for the two global economic giants - and how will Britain be affected? Joining Stephanie to discuss the prospects are: Arvind Subramanian of the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington DC and author of "Eclipse: Living in the Shadow of China's Economic Dominance"; Charles Dumas, chief executive of the independent economic consultancy, Lombard Street Research, and author of "The American Phoenix: Why China and Europe Will Struggle After the Coming Slump"; and Paul Ormerod, economist and writer on business, whose books include "Butterfly Economics".

Producer: Simon Coates

Editor: Stephen Chilcott.

In the second of her discussion programmes looking at the key economic issues of our time, Stephanie Flanders asks where the Chinese and US economies are heading. Conventional wisdom holds that America is set on an historic downward path while the Chinese giant is poised to dominate the global economy.

But is this view too simplistic? Although managing only a low growth rate at present, lower energy costs are helping the US reindustrialise its economy. At the same time it continues to enjoy unrivalled advantages in the technology and service sectors. Meanwhile, China's growth is slowing and its economy still quite rigidly planned. It is critically dependent on imported raw materials on the one hand and on exports to the advanced industrialised economies on the other.

So what does the future hold for the two global economic giants - and how will Britain be affected?

020220120724

Stephanie Flanders discusses what the future of the US and Chinese economies mean for us.

In the second of her discussion programmes looking at the key economic issues of our time, Stephanie Flanders asks where the Chinese and US economies are heading. Conventional wisdom holds that America is set on an historic downward path while the Chinese giant is poised to dominate the global economy. But is this view too simplistic?

Although managing only a low growth rate at present, dramatically lower energy costs are helping the US reindustrialise its economy. At the same time it continues to enjoy unrivalled advantages in the technology and service sectors. Meanwhile, China's growth is slowing and its economy still rigidly planned. It is critically dependent on imported raw materials on the one hand and on exports to the advanced industrialised economies on the other. It is also strangely imbalanced with prodigious amounts of investment but puny levels of consumption.

So what does the future hold for the two global economic giants - and how will Britain be affected? Joining Stephanie to discuss the prospects are: Arvind Subramanian of the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington DC and author of "Eclipse: Living in the Shadow of China's Economic Dominance"; Charles Dumas, chief executive of the independent economic consultancy, Lombard Street Research, and author of "The American Phoenix: Why China and Europe Will Struggle After the Coming Slump"; and Paul Ormerod, economist and writer on business, whose books include "Butterfly Economics".

Producer: Simon Coates

Editor: Stephen Chilcott.

0203 LAST3/320120731

Stephanie Flanders asks if in the quest for growth should we prefer quality over quantity?

In the final programme of the current series, Stephanie Flanders discusses with three leading economists how far long-term economic growth should be the over-riding objective of governments and societies in countries like Britain.

In the boom years, we saw that growth did not automatically lead to increased human contentment or greater welfare. So should we continue to accord it the level of priority which British governments of all parties have given it over recent decades?

One of the reasons why long-term growth may not provide us with a greater sense of well-being is that it does not solve problems created by inequality. But if we had different economic aims would inequality be tackled more successfully? And if so, how?

If we decide to move away from faster growth as our economic objective, that would have other implications for the economy. Governments might no longer feel bound to create freer markets to drive growth. So where might such a dramatic shift in thinking take us? And what are the implications for things like the environment.

Among those joining Stephanie to discuss these ideas are the biographer of John Maynard Keynes, Lord Skidelsky; the environmental economist, Cameron Hepburn; and the leading advocate of free-markets, Patrick Minford.

0203 LAST3/320120731

Stephanie Flanders asks if in the quest for growth should we prefer quality over quantity?

In the final programme of the current series, Stephanie Flanders discusses with three leading economists how far long-term economic growth should be the over-riding objective of governments and societies in countries like Britain.

In the boom years, we saw that growth did not automatically lead to increased human contentment or greater welfare. So should we continue to accord it the level of priority which British governments of all parties have given it over recent decades?

One of the reasons why long-term growth may not provide us with a greater sense of well-being is that it does not solve problems created by inequality. But if we had different economic aims would inequality be tackled more successfully? And if so, how?

If we decide to move away from faster growth as our economic objective, that would have other implications for the economy. Governments might no longer feel bound to create freer markets to drive growth. So where might such a dramatic shift in thinking take us? And what are the implications for things like the environment.

Among those joining Stephanie to discuss these ideas are the biographer of John Maynard Keynes, Lord Skidelsky; the environmental economist, Cameron Hepburn; and the leading advocate of free-markets, Patrick Minford.

In the final programme of the current series, Stephanie Flanders discusses with three leading economists how far long-term economic growth should be the over-riding objective of governments and societies in countries like Britain.

In the boom years, we saw that growth did not automatically lead to increased human contentment or greater welfare. So should we continue to accord it the level of priority which British governments of all parties have given it over recent decades?

One of the reasons why long-term growth may not provide us with a greater sense of well-being is that it does not solve problems created by inequality. But if we had different economic aims would inequality be tackled more successfully? And if so, how?

If we decide to move away from faster growth as our economic objective, that would have other implications for the economy. Governments might no longer feel bound to create freer markets to drive growth. So where might such a dramatic shift in thinking take us? And what are the implications for things like the environment.

Among those joining Stephanie to discuss these ideas are the biographer of John Maynard Keynes, Lord Skidelsky; the environmental economist, Cameron Hepburn; and the leading advocate of free-markets, Patrick Minford.

Stephanie asks if we should abandon long-term economic growth as our top priority.

In the final programme of the current series, Stephanie Flanders discusses with a panel of leading economists how far long-term economic growth should be the over-riding objective of governments and societies in countries like Britain.

In the boom years, we saw that growth did not automatically lead to increased human contentment or greater welfare. So should we continue to accord it the level of priority which British governments of all parties have given it over recent decades?

One of the reasons why long-term growth may not provide us with a greater sense of well-being is that it does not solve problems created by inequality. But if we had different economic aims would inequality be tackled more successfully? And if so, how?

If we decide to move away from faster growth as our economic objective, that would have other implications for the economy. Governments might no longer feel bound to create freer markets to drive growth. So where might such a dramatic shift in thinking take us?

Among those joining Stephanie to discuss these ideas are the biographer of John Maynard Keynes, Lord Skidelsky.