Soviet James Bond, The

Episodes

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Broadcast
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20141218

2014121820151226 (RS)

In the depths of the Cold War, the Soviets had their own version of James Bond, a superspy whose adventures thrilled readers from Minsk to the Urals. But whereas Bond enjoyed champagne, gambling and beautiful women, the spy codenamed Stierlitz was a Russian patriot of austere tastes (though he does enjoy vodka and singing Russian songs). In novels like "Diamonds for the Dictatorship of the Proletariat," Stierlitz carved a parallel path to that being followed by the great 007. Spy fan Miles Jupp explores the extraordinary legacy of the Soviet James Bond and his creator Julian Semyonov.

20141218

2014121820150712 (RS)

In the depths of the Cold War, the Soviets had their own version of James Bond, a superspy whose adventures thrilled readers from Minsk to the Urals. But whereas Bond enjoyed champagne, gambling and beautiful women, the spy codenamed Stierlitz was a Russian patriot of austere tastes (though he does enjoy vodka and singing Russian songs). In novels like "Diamonds for the Dictatorship of the Proletariat," Stierlitz carved a parallel path to that being followed by the great 007. Spy fan Miles Jupp explores the extraordinary legacy of the Soviet James Bond and his creator Julian Semyonov.

20141218

2014121820150708 (RS)

In the depths of the Cold War, the Soviets had their own version of James Bond, a superspy whose adventures thrilled readers from Minsk to the Urals. But whereas Bond enjoyed champagne, gambling and beautiful women, the spy codenamed Stierlitz was a Russian patriot of austere tastes (though he does enjoy vodka and singing Russian songs). In novels like "Diamonds for the Dictatorship of the Proletariat," Stierlitz carved a parallel path to that being followed by the great 007. Spy fan Miles Jupp explores the extraordinary legacy of the Soviet James Bond and his creator Julian Semyonov.

20141218

2014121820150403 (RS)

In the depths of the Cold War, the Soviets had their own version of James Bond, a superspy whose adventures thrilled readers from Minsk to the Urals. But whereas Bond enjoyed champagne, gambling and beautiful women, the spy codenamed Stierlitz was a Russian patriot of austere tastes (though he does enjoy vodka and singing Russian songs). In novels like "Diamonds for the Dictatorship of the Proletariat," Stierlitz carved a parallel path to that being followed by the great 007. Spy fan Miles Jupp explores the extraordinary legacy of the Soviet James Bond and his creator Julian Semyonov.

20141218

2014121820150120 (RS)
20150121 (RS)

In the depths of the Cold War, the Soviets had their own version of James Bond, a superspy whose adventures thrilled readers from Minsk to the Urals. But whereas Bond enjoyed champagne, gambling and beautiful women, the spy codenamed Stierlitz was a Russian patriot of austere tastes (though he does enjoy vodka and singing Russian songs). In novels like "Diamonds for the Dictatorship of the Proletariat," Stierlitz carved a parallel path to that being followed by the great 007. Spy fan Miles Jupp explores the extraordinary legacy of the Soviet James Bond and his creator Julian Semyonov.

The name is Isaev, Maxim Maximovich Isaev. Miles Jupp uncovers the Soviet James Bond.

20141218

20141218

20141218

20141218

20141218