Sounds Of A City

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Episodes

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6MBristol20160214

Colleen 'Cosmo' Murphy, founder of Classic Album Sundays, turns her attention to Bristol in the fifth episode of 'Sounds of a City'. She argues that 'Blue Lines' by Massive Attack is the album that sounds like Bristol.

Featuring interviews with Robert '3D' Del Naja, Neneh Cherry, Cameron McVey, Mark Stewart, James Lavelle, Inkie, Roni Size and more. Colleen delves into how bass culture, graffiti, punk and politics are represented both in Bristol and within the grooves of 'Blue Lines'. She also makes the case for its lasting legacy with musicians in and outside Bristol.

6MMartyn Bennett - Bothy Culture20150816

In this final run of Sounds of a City, Colleen 'Cosmo' Murphy explores the city of Edinburgh. Having already delved into Sheffield through the eyes of Human League's Travelogue album, Liverpool and The Teardrop Explodes' Kilimanjaro, and Manchester with New Order's Power, Corruption and Lies, we're now heading further north to the capital city of Scotland; a city of science and engineering, home of one of the biggest events in the cultural calendar, and a city with an incredibly varied history stretching back thousands of years...Edinburgh. We're looking at an album that links the old with the new, the traditional with the electronic, and it's Martyn Bennett's Bothy Culture. Released in 1997, Martyn's second album takes Celtic folk, Gaelic, and traditional rhythms and poems, and blended them with the ambient electronica of the day, elements of the rave scene, and drum and bass. Bringing the traditional to an entirely new audience and generation, his can-do attitude meant he had no boundaries with which to compose and record. He unfortunately passed away in 2005 due to cancer, and never quite became the influential artist of scenes he deserved to be. In this documentary, we ask why Martyn is so essential to the fabric of the city, we take a look at why the Edinburgh music scene is so small and insular, and how his indirect influence led to the growth of bands such as Young Fathers, Boards of Canada, Treacherous Orchestra, and even Moby. We talk to the likes of Radio 3's Mary Ann Kennedy on his talents and legacy, members of Shooglenifty who worked with Martyn, friend and composer Greg Lawson, and font-of-knowledge and Celtic Connections artistic director Donald Shaw.

6MNew Order: Power, Corruption & Lies20150712

6MNew Order: Power, Corruption & Lies2015071220151226 (6M)

BBC Radio 6 Music's second Wise Woman, Roisin Murphy, selects a recent documentary in which Colleen Murphy lifts the lid on New Order's Power, Corruption and Lies and its relationship to Manchester.

Speaking to the likes of Peter Hook, Stephen Morris and Peter Saville, we breakdown the components of an album that fused punk and dance, art and experimentation, technology and rock, to create something for a new generation of tech-savvy music-philes to get their teeth into. A Certain Ratio's Martin Moscrop and The Charlatan's Tim Burgess discuss this perfect blending, whilst 808 State's Graham Massey contemplates the fact that Manchester has more in common with New York than it does with any other British city. A story that may sound familiar, but with New Order were stepping out from the shadows of Joy Division the idea of experimentation is amplified and braver, and may not have even worked. And then there was that album cover.

6MNew Order: Power, Corruption & Lies20150712

In the third of the Sounds of a City series, Colleen Murphy lifts the lid on New Order's Power, Corruption and Lies and its relationship to Manchester. Speaking to the likes of Peter Hook, Stephen Morris and Peter Saville, we breakdown the components of an album that fused punk and dance, art and experimentation, technology and rock, to create something for a new generation of tech-savvy music-philes to get their teeth into. A Certain Ratio's Martin Moscrop and The Charlatan's Tim Burgess discuss this perfect blending, whilst 808 State's Graham Massey contemplates the fact that Manchester has more in common with New York than it does with any other British city. A story that may sound familiar, but with New Order were stepping out from the shadows of Joy Division the idea of experimentation is amplified and braver, and may not have even worked. And then there was that album cover.

Following our forays into Sheffield and Liverpool, we step into Manchester's world. A world so synonymous with factories, dance music, and Tony Wilson, but it starts showing us its many juxtapositions; from the pastoral to the industrial, the punk pogo to the acid house dance floor. There are always two sides to every story.

6MThe Human League: Travelogue20150503
6MThe Human League: Travelogue2015050320151227 (6M)

DJ Colleen 'Cosmo' Murphy looks deep into the Human League's Travelogue album.

BBC Radio 6 Music's second Wise Woman, Roisin Murphy selects a recent documentary in which Colleen 'Cosmo' Murphy, founder of Classic Album Sundays, looks deep into The Human's League's Travelogue album, and the city from which it was built, Sheffield.

Talking to lead member Martyn Ware, she delves into what made this album such a pivotal moment in the landscape of Sheffield's music scene, and why synths unlocked an entire universe for musicians. From the heavy industry, poverty, and even the space race, everything that went into this album came out the other side to inspire a new generation of musicians, inadvertently starting a dance music revolution in the City. Cabaret Voltaire's Richard H. Kirk discusses the album's pop values, whilst our very own Jarvis Cocker give us his own unique take on the tracks and their links to Sheffield. From Roisin Murphy and Toddla T to Orbital's Paul Hartnoll, the album and the City's influence has been felt far and wide, so tune in to this exploration of one of pop's darkest moments.

6MThe Human League: Travelogue20150503

6MThe Teardrop Explodes: Kilimanjaro20150607

DJ Colleen 'Cosmo' Murphy, fresh from looking at Sheffield and The Human League's Travelogue album, now turns her attention across the Peaks to one of the UK's most important musical cities; Liverpool. Focusing on The Teardrop Explodes Kilimanjaro album, we talk to Julian Cope about how he made the album, why he moved to Liverpool, and why he always travelled to the studio on an invisible horse. Colleen also looks at how Liverpool and Psych are inextricably linked, the importance of Soul Music to the area, how the nightclub Eric's and record shop Probe inspired a scene, and Liverpool's isolation from the rest of the country has helped create a outlook like no other.

Colleen speaks with Shack's Michael Head who grew up surrounded by the influence of The Teardrop Explodes: Holly Johnson, of Frankie Goes To Hollywood, discusses the role of Liverpool's flamboyant gay scene played in the burgeoning post-punk scene: DJ Greg Wilson casts his critical ear over an 80s Liverpool still living under the eclipse of The Beatles: author Mark Cooper share his thoughts on the rivalry between Echo and The Bunnymen and The Teardrops. Colleen also meets Stealing Sheep's Emily Lansley, who is at the vanguard of a younger generation of musicians who embrace Liverpool's psychedelic sound. And if all of that wasn't enough, Zoo Records and KLF founder Bill Drummond shares two of his one minute presentations about the album.