Sound Of Cinema - You Ain't Heard Nothing Yet

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01The Sounds Of Early Cinema2013093020140811

The live music and sound effects, the unruly audiences, the performers paid to interpret mysterious foreign intertitles, the usherettes spraying the audience with disinfectant. Matthew Sweet explores the sound-world of cinema's beginnings, from the orchestras of big-budget epics to the small improvising bands of the fleapits - and discovers how their ghosts haunt the modern cinemagoing experience.

First broadcast September 2013.

The live music and sound effects, the unruly audiences, the performers paid to interpret mysterious foreign intertitles, the usherettes spraying the audience with disinfectant. Matthew Sweet explores the sound-world of cinema's beginnings, from the orchestras of big-budget epics to the small improvising bands of the fleapits - and discovers how their ghosts haunt the modern cinemagoing experience.

First broadcast September 2013.

02Miklos Rozsa2013100120140812

The novelist Jonathan Coe explores how a joint concert with Arthur Honegger led to the composer Miklós Rózsa writing for film, including the scores for 'Ben-Hur', 'Spellbound' and 'The Lost Weekend'.

The novelist Jonathan Coe explores how a joint concert with Arthur Honegger led to the composer Miklós Rózsa writing for film, including the scores for 'Ben-Hur', 'Spellbound' and 'The Lost Weekend'.

03Camille Paglia20131002

The American academic and social critic Camille Paglia on the film scores which have inspired her since childhood including the work of Bernard Herrmann, John Dankworth and Max Steiner.

04David Thomson20131003

The writer and film critic David Thomson explores how film composers create mood and how the best music evokes a place beyond reality.

05 LASTMatthew Sweet20131004

What happens when cinema shuts up? Matthew Sweet explores those moments when the talkie stops talking and cuts the music dead: the final minutes of William Wyler's Roman Holiday; the heist in Rififi; Oliver Hardy's long despairing look into the camera lens. He also listens hard to those cinematic sounds being silenced by digital technology from the fizz of a reel-change to the wear and tear on a film's soundtrack and asks what we have lost now that cinema is no longer a physical, photochemical medium.