Soul Music

Series about emotionally intense music.

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
20041225

This much-loved hymn was first penned as a poem by Christina Rosetti.

Vaughan Williams asked Gustav Holst to put it to music for his English Hymnal published in 1906.

The other popular version was written by organist Harold Darke - then aged 21.

The meaning of his dedication to 'MAC' has only recently come to light.

Peggy Reynolds, Ian Bradley and Raymond Head discuss the history of the carol.

20050228

The series that examines those pieces of music that never fail to touch their audience.

Noel Coward wrote Mad About the Boy in 1932 for the review, Words and Music, to celebrate the powerful appeal of the silent movie star. Most recently it's been taken up as a gay anthem.

Sheridan Morley, Sir John Mills, Maria Aitken and Kit Hesketh-Harvey explain why this has become the most recorded number of all Coward's work.

20050307

2/5. Swing Low Sweet Chariot: How has one of the spirituals originally sung by slaves in the American Deep South come to be popularised by choirs, rugby fans and pop stars across the globe?

20050314

3/5. Series about pieces of music with a powerful emotional impact. Written by Ben E King in his bedroom on a cheap guitar, Stand By Me went on to establish King as a solo artist.

20050321

The series that examines those pieces of music that never fail to touch their audience.

So little is known about the life of J S Bach yet his music opens up a world of imagination. The Concerto in D minor is often described as being like a conversation between lovers.

David Gregory of the CBSO, rock guitarist Steve Hackett, and Terry Waite CBE are among those moved by the music of the two violins as they imitate, interrupt and overlap each other in one of Bach?s most sublime creations.

20050328

Like a Rolling Stone

The series about pieces of music with a powerful emotional impact features, Bob Dylan's anarchic ballad which became the anthem of a generation. Robbie Robertson, Al Kooper, Greil Marcus and Paula Radice muse on a song that threw down a challenge and changed lives.

20080209

John Kander presents the story behind the classic song New York, New York. Songwriting duo Kander and Ebb wrote the title song for the film. Unfortunately, the star Robert de Niro didn't like it, so they furiously wrote another one.

20080927
20081011
20081018
20110715

Series about pieces of music with a powerful emotional impact. 4: Widor's Toccata. Organist Thomas Trotter dissects the popular piece of wedding music.

Widor's Toccata: Organist Thomas Trotter dissects the popular piece of wedding music.

01"new York, New York"2008010820080112

Songwriting duo Kander and Ebb wrote the title song for the film. Unfortunately, the star Robert de Niro didn't like it, so they furiously wrote another one. John Kander presents the story behind a classic song.

01Series 10, Send In The Clowns20100907

Stephen Sondheim's song, Send In the Clowns, from the musical 'A Little Night Music' was written late in rehearsals for the actress Glynnis Johns, playing the part of Desiree. A song of regret and anger, the part has famously been played by Judi Dench, and the song became an independent hit, sung by Judy Collins, Shirley Bassey and Barbra Striesand. Hannah Waddingham played the youngest ever Desiree in Trevor Nunn's production, and used her memories of an unhappy relationship to inspire her performance.

Stephen Sondheim's Send In The Clowns is a classic tune that has inspired moving memories.

01Series 1120110301

Mozart's Clarinet Quintet

Written in 1789, two years before Mozart's death, this first ever work for string quartet plus clarinet remains a firm favourite for music lovers around the world. In this programme Professor Paul Robertson describes how his wife played this piece to him whilst he lay in a coma. Clarinettist Peter Furniss tells of the solace the slow movement provided his mother as she lay dying. And Alex Smith explains the importance of this piece in his work to help children with autism, Asperger's, dyslexia and other childhood disorders.

Music lovers describe the impact that Mozart's Clarinet Quintet has had on their lives.

01Series 1120110305

Music lovers describe the impact that Mozart's Clarinet Quintet has had on their lives.

01Series 12, Mendelssohn's Octet20110816

This exploration of the impact that Mendelssohn's Octet has had on different people's lives, demonstrates the healing power of music in a variety of situations around the world.

Mendelssohn wrote his Octet for double string quartet in 1825 when he was only 16 years old. Despite his youth, this is a mature and brilliant piece of music described in this programme by the interviewees as "carnivalesque", "a romp", "a party".

Choreographer Bill T Jones describes the way in which the Octet showed his company how to keep living during the onslaught of AIDS in the 80's. Cellist Raphael and violinist Elizabeth Wallfisch talk about falling in love whilst learning this music in the 70's. South Korean Lisa Kim tells a story about going on tour with the New York Philharmonic to North Korea and her intense fear and mistrust being replaced by wonder when they played the Octet with a North Korean Quartet. And Matthew Trusler describes the importance of playing this work after the death of his son.

The recording of the Mendelssohn Octet featured in the programme is by the Emerson String Quartet on Deutsche Gramophon.

Exploring the impact that Mendelssohn's Octet has had on different people's lives.

01Series 12, Mendelssohn's Octet20110820
01Series 13, Gerry Rafferty's Baker Street20120131

Gerry Rafferty's glorious and instantly recognisable hit, Baker Street launches the new series of Soul Music.

Rafferty died just over a year ago (on January 4th 2011) at the age of 63, and to mark the anniversary we're celebrating his most popular hit.

His daughter Martha Rafferty recalls hearing her father develop the melody in the attic of their Glasgow home; the sound of him picking-out the tune on his acoustic guitar would drift through the push-up attic-door, filling the rest of the house with what would become his biggest hit. She describes the inspiration for the lyrics: a book called 'The Outsider' by Colin Wilson which Rafferty was reading at the time. It's about the sense of disconnection from the world that artists often feel. Martha regards Baker Street as the lyrical version of that book.

Other contributors include:

Musician and founder member of Stealer's Wheel, Rab Noakes. He describes how the legal wrangling which followed the break-up of Stealer's Wheel inspired the creation of Baker Street. "Winding your way down on Baker Street, light in your head and dead on your feet, well another crazy day, you'll drink the night away and forget about everything". Although Rafferty was living in Scotland at the time, he had to endure long meetings at his lawyers, and Baker Street was where he'd meet friends and drink, and sing, and talk the night away. The lyrics explore the conflicting thoughts and pressures Rafferty faced: he wanted to continue with his music, but - as Martha says - he had a young family to support and there was pressure to get a 'normal job'.

Singer-songwriter Betsy Cook whose former husband, the late Hugh Murphy, produced Baker Street, plays through the melody on her keyboard and describes what makes the song work musically. She also recalls the emotional impact of hearing it played at Hugh Murphy's funeral.

For poet, Ian McMillan, Baker Street provided the sound track to his student years; and busker Gavin Randle plays it often on Brighton pier with a backdrop of murmurating starlings, a setting sun, and passers-by dancing arm in arm.

Martha Rafferty's interview at the start of the programme is illustrated by an acoustic version of the track played especially for Soul Music by the guitarist Hugh Burns. He played on the original recording, and explains how he achieved the stirring guitar solo at the end of the record.

Also included in the programme is the original demo version of Baker Street, on which Gerry Rafferty plays the famous sax solo on guitar. It was released late last year on a Collector's Edition of the City to City album.

Producer: Karen Gregor (whose first decision when starting work on the programme was not to mention the Bob Holness/saxophone riff urban myth... so there is no word of it anywhere in the programme...!).

A celebration of Gerry Rafferty's popular solo hit, Baker Street.

02Series 10, Ma Vlast20100914

At the core of Czech cultural identity is this week's piece - Ma Vlast by Bedrich Smetana. Written in the late

19th century, it's a series of six symphonic poems. For a western audience the most popular and best loved is Vltava, a soundscape which conjures up vivid images of the river which runs through Prague.

Jan Kaplan is a Czech born film-maker who has lived in the UK since 1968. He describes the 'educational concerts' he had to attend as a young boy when - bored to tears - he would endure long performances of Smetana's music. However, as an adult living in exile, his experience of Czech culture was tinged with a remote sense of patriotism and he grew to appreciate his national composer. When - following the 1989 Velvet revolution - he was eventually able to return home, he witnessed one of the most famous and moving performances of Ma Vlast at Smetana Hall in 1990.

Also at that concert was musicologist, Professor Jan Smaczny, who describes his memories of that evening, and explains the history and mythology portrayed in Ma Vlast.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Ma Vlast by Bedrich Smetana has become an integral part of Czech culture.

02Series 10, Ma Vlast20100918

At the core of Czech cultural identity is this week's piece - Ma Vlast by Bedrich Smetana. Written in the late

19th century, it's a series of six symphonic poems. For a western audience the most popular and best loved is Vltava, a soundscape which conjures up vivid images of the river which runs through Prague.

Jan Kaplan is a Czech born film-maker who has lived in the UK since 1968. He describes the 'educational concerts' he had to attend as a young boy when - bored to tears - he would endure long performances of Smetana's music. However, as an adult living in exile, his experience of Czech culture was tinged with a remote sense of patriotism and he grew to appreciate his national composer. When - following the 1989 Velvet revolution - he was eventually able to return home, he witnessed one of the most famous and moving performances of Ma Vlast at Smetana Hall in 1990.

Also at that concert was musicologist, Professor Jan Smaczny, who describes his memories of that evening, and explains the history and mythology portrayed in Ma Vlast.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Ma Vlast by Bedrich Smetana has become an integral part of Czech culture.

02Series 11, Simple Gifts20110308

Simple Gifts started life as a Shaker Hymn and became incorporated into the hymn Lord of the Dance and Aaron Copland's ballet suite Appalachian Spring.

In this programme, Nora Guthrie describes the central place this tune has played throughout her life. Pete Lashley tells how he heard it unexpectedly whilst touring in New Zealand. Michael Carter explains why his father chose this tune for his famous hymn "Lord of the Dance" and Scott Malchus describes running a marathon whilst listening to this music.

Producer, Rosie Boulton.

Music lovers describe the important place the tune Simple Gifts has had in their lives.

02Series 11, Simple Gifts20110312

Simple Gifts started life as a Shaker Hymn and became incorporated into the hymn Lord of the Dance and Aaron Copland's ballet suite Appalachian Spring.

In this programme, Nora Guthrie describes the central place this tune has played throughout her life. Pete Lashley tells how he heard it unexpectedly whilst touring in New Zealand. Michael Carter explains why his father chose this tune for his famous hymn "Lord of the Dance" and Scott Malchus describes running a marathon whilst listening to this music.

Producer, Rosie Boulton.

Music lovers describe the important place the tune Simple Gifts has had in their lives.

02Series 12, Wichita Lineman20110823

Wichita Lineman, the ultimate country/pop crossover track, is the subject of this week's Soul Music.

David Crary is a lineman from Oklahoma. He describes his job - storm-chasing to mend fallen power-lines; travelling on 'dirt roads, gravel roads, paved roads... up in the farmlands of Illinois and Missouri... down south in the Swamplands... it ain't nothing to swerve in the middle of the road in your bucket-truck to miss an alligator '.

He recalls the first time he heard Wichita Lineman, travelling in the back of his family's Station Wagon, listening to the radio... thinking that being a lineman 'must be a cool job' if someone's written a song about it. Also a part-time musician, David has recorded his own version of the song which sums up his working life... on the road, working long hours, away from his wife and six kids.

Wichita Lineman was written by Jimmy Webb for the Country star Glen Campbell. It tells the story of a lonely lineman in the American midwest, travelling vast distances to mend power and telephone lines.

Released in 1968 it's an enduring classic, crossing the boundary between pop and country. It's been covered many times, but it's Glen Campbell's version which remains the best loved and most played.

Johnny Cash also recorded an extraordinary and very raw version. Peter Lewry, a lifelong Cash fan, describes how this recording came about, towards the end of Cash's career.

Meggean Ward's father was a lineman in Rhode Island... her memories of seeing him in green work trousers, a plaid shirt and black boots, wrapping his cracked hands in bandages every morning before setting off to climb telephone poles are interwoven forever with Wichita Lineman... as a child she always felt the song was written for her father, who else?

Glen Campbell also gave an interview for this programme. Shortly after the interview was recorded, Campbell went public about his diagnosis of Alzheimer's. His contribution to the programme is brief, and includes an acoustic performance of the song. It was a real privilege to record this, appropriately enough, down the line.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Wichita Lineman - the ultimate country/pop track, an enduring classic on UK and US radio.

02Series 12, Wichita Lineman20110827
02Series 13, Gresford, The Miners' Hymn20120207
02Series 13, Gresford, The Miners' Hymn20120211

Exploration of the haunting melancholy of Gresford, the Miners' Hymn, by Robert Saint.

03Series 10, Faure Requiem20100921

"He wanted it to be something that's consoling and helpful. It's the end of their lives where they can rest in peace". World renowned choral conductor Sir David Willcocks, shares his personal reflections on the Faure Requiem alongside those for whom the music has comforted and inspired. Known for its peaceful and hopeful nature the Faure Requiem has been called 'The lullaby of death'. Whilst Gabriel Faure himself never spoke directly about what inspired his interpretation of the Requiem, author and biographer Jessica Duchen has speculated that it may have been born out of his experience as a soldier during the Franco-Prussian war. In this edition of Soul music, personal stories of conflict and deliverance are shared from across the decades. Reaching from the beaches of Normandy to the plains of Afghanistan and into the skies of Salisbury. Faure composed the first version of the work, which he called "un petit Requiem" with five movements, of which the Pie Jesu and In Paradisum have become arguably the most popular. "Everything I managed to entertain by way of religious illusion I put into my Requiem, which moreover is dominated from beginning to end by a very human feeling of faith in eternal rest.".

Sir David Willcocks' personal reflections on the Faure Requiem.

03Series 10, Faure Requiem20100925
03Series 10, Faure Requiem20120218

03Series 11, The Impossible Dream20110315

In this series that explores those pieces of music that never fail to move us, this week we feature, 'The Impossible Dream', a song that talks of the resilience of the human spirit. It tells the story of a quest and it's had a surprising journey of it's own. It was originally composed for the 1965 musical The Man of La Mancha which was inspired by Miguel de Cervantes story of Don Quixote. The music was written by Mitch Leigh and the lyrics by Joe Darion. Now in his 80's Leigh explains how his first writing partner was WH Auden and talks about why this particular piece struck a chord with African American friends at that time. Generations on, international Soprano Lesley Garrett recalls how this song inspired her childhood dreams in Doncaster, Yachtsman of the Year Geoff Holt talks about how this song carried him across the Atlantic on one of the most important voyages of his life and former advertising executive Rob Chew explains how this piece is helping him face lifes biggest challenge.

Producer Nicola Humphries.

Lesley Garrett and yachtsman Geoff Holt on the inspiring song, The Impossible Dream.

03Series 11, The Impossible Dream20110319

In this series that explores those pieces of music that never fail to move us, this week we feature, 'The Impossible Dream', a song that talks of the resilience of the human spirit. It tells the story of a quest and it's had a surprising journey of it's own. It was originally composed for the 1965 musical The Man of La Mancha which was inspired by Miguel de Cervantes story of Don Quixote. The music was written by Mitch Leigh and the lyrics by Joe Darion. Now in his 80's Leigh explains how his first writing partner was WH Auden and talks about why this particular piece struck a chord with African American friends at that time. Generations on, international Soprano Lesley Garrett recalls how this song inspired her childhood dreams in Doncaster, Yachtsman of the Year Geoff Holt talks about how this song carried him across the Atlantic on one of the most important voyages of his life and former advertising executive Rob Chew explains how this piece is helping him face lifes biggest challenge.

Producer Nicola Humphries.

Lesley Garrett and yachtsman Geoff Holt on the inspiring song, The Impossible Dream.

03Series 12, Spiegel Im Spiegel20110830

Exploring the impact that Estonian composer Arvo Pärt's piece for piano and violin Spiegel im Spiegel has had on people's lives.

Written in 1978, just prior to his departure from Estonia, Arvo Pärt's Spiegel im Spiegel is musically minimal, yet produces a serene tranquillity.

It's in F major in 6/4 time, with the piano playing rising crotchet triads and the violin playing slow scales, alternately rising and falling, of increasing length, which all end on the note A. The score of the piece looks deceptively simple, but as violinist, Tasmin Little explains, it's one of the most difficult pieces to perform because the playing has to simply be perfect, or the mood is lost.

"Spiegel im Spiegel" in German literally can mean both "mirror in the mirror" as well as "mirrors in the mirror", referring to the infinity of images produced by parallel plane mirrors.

The programme contains an interview with visual artist Mary Husted who heard this work and was inspired to produce a set of collages called "Spiegel im Spiegel" which in a round about way, led to her long lost son tracing her for the first time in his life.

Exploring the impact of Arvo Pärt's Spiegel im Spiegel on listener's lives.

03Series 12, Spiegel Im Spiegel20110903

Exploring the impact of Arvo Pärt's Spiegel im Spiegel on listener's lives.

Exploring the impact that Estonian composer Arvo Pärt's piece for piano and violin Spiegel im Spiegel has had on people's lives.

Written in 1978, just prior to his departure from Estonia, Arvo Pärt's Spiegel im Spiegel is musically minimal, yet produces a serene tranquillity.

It's in F major in 6/4 time, with the piano playing rising crotchet triads and the violin playing slow scales, alternately rising and falling, of increasing length, which all end on the note A. The score of the piece looks deceptively simple, but as violinist, Tasmin Little explains, it's one of the most difficult pieces to perform because the playing has to simply be perfect, or the mood is lost.

"Spiegel im Spiegel" in German literally can mean both "mirror in the mirror" as well as "mirrors in the mirror", referring to the infinity of images produced by parallel plane mirrors.

The programme contains an interview with visual artist Mary Husted who heard this work and was inspired to produce a set of collages called "Spiegel im Spiegel" which in a round about way, led to her long lost son tracing her for the first time in his life.

03Series 1320120214

Rachmaninov's 2nd Piano Concerto, which was famously featured in David Lean's film "Brief Encounter", is one of the world's most popular pieces of classical. In this programme people describe the way in which Rachmaninov's 2nd Piano Concerto has touched and shaped their lives. The programme features a pianist from Taiwan whose memories of a repressive childhood were dispelled by the emotions contained within this music. Plus a story from an acclaimed pianist from Argentina who was told she would never play the piano again after a serious car accident, but who has recently performed this piece in New York. And finally an account of the place that this piece of passionate and heartfelt music played in the life of John Peel and his family, told by his wife Sheila Ravenscroft.

The concerto is also given historical and musical context in the programme by pianists Peter Donohoe and Howard Shelley.

Producer: Rosie Boulton.

An exploration of how Rachmaninov's 2nd Piano Concerto touches and changes people's lives.

03Series 1320120218

An exploration of how Rachmaninov's 2nd Piano Concerto touches and changes people's lives.

04Series 10, How Great Thou Art2008012920080202

Series about pieces of music with a powerful emotional impact.

4/4. Spem in Alium

Thomas Tallis's work is one of the most elaborate and spectacular pieces of choral music ever written. Scored for 40 voices, the piece is best sung and heard in the round in order to appreciate an extraordinary sonic experience. Choral conductor Simon Halsey, Michael Morpurgo and others discuss the music's spine-tingling effect on both performers and listeners.

04Series 10, How Great Thou Art20100928

The enduring popularity of the hymn, How Great Thou Art is explored in this series that examines those pieces of music that never fail to move us. Based on a Swedish poem by Carl Gustav Boberg, the hymn was written by the British missionary Stuart Hine in 1949.

It subsequently become an Elvis Presley classic and as the country and western star , Connie Smith explains, it's the piece she always sings to close her show, the stirring lyrics and soaring melody having the ability to move and inspire audiences of all ages and backgrounds.

We also hear from George Beverly Shea, now a hundred and one but with clear memories of singing it at hundreds of Billy Graham crusades.

Examining the power of the hymn How Great Thou Art.

04Series 10, How Great Thou Art20101002
04Series 11, Schubert's Winterreise20110322

Schubert's Winterreise

Written the year before Schubert's death aged just 31, these 24 songs based on poems by Wilhelm Muller describe a journey that takes us ever deeper into the frozen landscape of the soul. Singers Thomas Hampson, Mark Padmore, Alice Coote and David Pisaro describe the experience of immersing themselves in this music. And Bernard Keefe tells of the time he sang these songs in Hiroshima to survivors of the bomb.

Producer: Rosie Boulton.

Music lovers describe the part that Schubert's Winterreise has played in their lives.

04Series 11, Schubert's Winterreise20110326

Schubert's Winterreise

Written the year before Schubert's death aged just 31, these 24 songs based on poems by Wilhelm Muller describe a journey that takes us ever deeper into the frozen landscape of the soul. Singers Thomas Hampson, Mark Padmore, Alice Coote and David Pisaro describe the experience of immersing themselves in this music. And Bernard Keefe tells of the time he sang these songs in Hiroshima to survivors of the bomb.

Producer: Rosie Boulton.

Music lovers describe the part that Schubert's Winterreise has played in their lives.

04Series 12, Dear Lord And Father Of Mankind20110906

The words of one of our most loved hymns, Dear Lord and Father of Mankind, were taken from the last six verses of John Greenleaf Whittier's poem, The Brewing of Soma, an attack on ostentatious and overt religious practise. But it wasn't until over fifty years later, that a school master at Repton in Derbyshire had the inspiration to pair it with a tune by Sir Hubert Parry, thus confirming it as a favourite for school assemblies, funerals and weddings. The current Director of Music at Repton, John Bowley, explains how this happened, while composer and conductor Bob Chilcott explains why this was a musical mariage made in heaven.

We hear from those for who whom the hymn has special significance, including the MP from Gloucester, Richard Graham; when briefly imprisoned in a Libyan goal in 1978 he found enormous comfort in the words and tune. Pipe Major Ross Munro remembers recording the piece in the swelting heat of Basra with members if the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards and film director Joe Wright recalls how the inclusion of this hymn was central to the power of his famous scene depicting the evacuation of Dunkirl in his film Atonement.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Exploring one of our favourite hymns, appealing to that 'still small voice of calm'.

04Series 12, Dear Lord And Father Of Mankind20110910

The words of one of our most loved hymns, Dear Lord and Father of Mankind, were taken from the last six verses of John Greenleaf Whittier's poem, The Brewing of Soma, an attack on ostentatious and overt religious practise. But it wasn't until over fifty years later, that a school master at Repton in Derbyshire had the inspiration to pair it with a tune by Sir Hubert Parry, thus confirming it as a favourite for school assemblies, funerals and weddings. The current Director of Music at Repton, John Bowley, explains how this happened, while composer and conductor Bob Chilcott explains why this was a musical marriage made in heaven.

We hear from those for who whom the hymn has special significance, including the MP from Gloucester, Richard Graham; when briefly imprisoned in a Libyan gaol in 1978 he found enormous comfort in the words and tune. Pipe Major Ross Munro remembers recording the piece in the sweltering heat of Basra with members of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards and film director Joe Wright recalls how the inclusion of this hymn was central to the power of his famous scene depicting the evacuation of Dunkirk in his film, Atonement.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Exploring one of our favourite hymns, appealing to that 'still small voice of calm'.

04Series 13, Non, Je Ne Regret Rien20120221

The powerful song, Non, je ne regret rien, made famous by Edith Piaf, is this week's Soul Music.

Written in 1960 by Charles Dumont, in a fit of despair, he gave the music to lyricist Michel Vaucaire, but was surprised by the words he wrote. Dumont thought the song should be about war or revolution. Vaucaire explained he wanted to give the song to Edith Piaf. She was living in Paris at the time, having recently finished her 'suicide tour' during which she had collapsed. At that time, Piaf didn't think much of Charles Dumont and tried to cancel their appointment. But on hearing the song, Piaf told Dumont that with this song, she would sing again.

Contributors include;

Charles Dumont who lives in Paris at the same apartment, with the same piano on which he wrote the song in 1960. He plays the song on the very same piano.

Lord Lamont, who became associated with the song when asked by a reporter which he regretted most - talking about the 'green shoots of recovery' or allegedly singing in the bath after the withdrawal of Britain from the Exchange Rate Mechanism. Lamont famously replied 'Je ne regret rien.'

Christine Bovill, who tours a one-woman show about Piaf's life.

Carolyn Birke, biographer of Piaf.

How the powerful song, Non, Je Ne Regret Rien, revived its singer and became her epitaph.

05 LASTSeries 10, The Emperor20101005

Majestic and moving in equal measure, Beethoven's fifth and final piano concerto, The Emperor, is this week's Soul Music.

Richard McMahon (concert pianist, and teacher at the Royal Welsh School of Music and Drama) plays extracts and discusses the virtuosic demands posed by The Emperor.

Australian film producer, Hal McElroy, talks about using the Adagio (the second movement) to illustrate the classic 1970s film Picnic at Hanging Rock.

That was where Andrew Law - now Chaplain at Malvern College - first heard the piece. He describes the Adagio as being 'one of those pieces of art which it is worth being alive to have heard'.

Concert pianist, James Rhodes, describes how The Emperor was central to his childhood and his developing love of Beethoven's piano music.

Music teacher and singer, Prue Hawthorne, recalls how her father (an amateur clarinetist) labouriously transcribed by hand the horn and clarinet sections of the first movement so they could play along with the record in their living room.

Also contributing is the renowned Beethoven biographer, John Suchet.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Examining the power of Beethoven's fifth piano concerto, The Emperor.

05 LASTSeries 10, The Emperor20101009

Majestic and moving in equal measure, Beethoven's fifth and final piano concerto, The Emperor, is this week's Soul Music.

Richard McMahon (concert pianist, and teacher at the Royal Welsh School of Music and Drama) plays extracts and discusses the virtuosic demands posed by The Emperor.

Australian film producer, Hal McElroy, talks about using the Adagio (the second movement) to illustrate the classic 1970s film Picnic at Hanging Rock.

That was where Andrew Law - now Chaplain at Malvern College - first heard the piece. He describes the Adagio as being 'one of those pieces of art which it is worth being alive to have heard'.

Concert pianist, James Rhodes, describes how The Emperor was central to his childhood and his developing love of Beethoven's piano music.

Music teacher and singer, Prue Hawthorne, recalls how her father (an amateur clarinetist) labouriously transcribed by hand the horn and clarinet sections of the first movement so they could play along with the record in their living room.

Also contributing is the renowned Beethoven biographer, John Suchet.

Examining the power of Beethoven's fifth piano concerto, The Emperor.

05 LASTSeries 11, Mahler's Adagietto20110329

Adagietto from Mahler's 5th Symphony

Mahler wrote his 5th Symphony during the summers of 1901 and 1902. The Adagietto is the 4th movement which is thought to have been inspired by falling in love with Alma who he married around this time. This single movement is Mahler's most well known piece of music. It was famously used in the 1971 Luchino Visconti film Death in Venice And it was also conducted by Leonard Bernstein at the mass at St Patrick's Cathedral, New York on the day of the burial of Robert Kennedy.

In this programme, composer David Matthews explains the significance of this piece in Mahler's output. Psychoanalyst Anthony Cantle describes listening to it with his mother during her last days of dementia. Malcolm Reid tells how this piece signified a change in himself as a young man in the British police force with narrow, racist views, to hearing it in Australia and shifting his to becoming a liberal. And Helen Epstein explains why it was played at her mother's funeral.

Producer, Rosie Boulton.

Music lovers describe the part that Mahler's Adagietto has played in their lives.

05 LASTSeries 12, Let's Face The Music And Dance20110913

The enduring Irving Berlin classic, Let's Face the Music and Dance is celebrated by those for whom it has a special significance. Written in 1932 as one of the dance numbers for Follow The Fleet, a movie starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, it's since taken on a life of it's own, being recorded by hundreds of artists from Diane Krall to Shirley Bassey, Frank Sinatra to Vera Lynn, Ella Fitzgerald to Matt Munroe.

For Sir John Mortimer's widow, Penny, it conjures up the very essence of her husband, who loved life, romance and dancing - even though he was no Fred Astaire , a fact he always deeply regretted.

Lawrence Bergreen , Berlin's biographer and academic Morris Dickstein explain why this song has such a unique place in popular culture and the cabaret singer and composer, Kit Hesketh Harvey explains why the melody continues to haunt us.

We hear from the bride and groom who decided to dance down the aisle to it after their wedding and the redundant welder for whom the song will be forever associated with the demise of our ship building industry. While one insurance executive recalls how the the song became central to their advertising campaign, bringing success to the firm and also placing Nat King Cole's version back in the charts nearly sixty years after it was written.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

An exploration of the enduring Irving Berlin classic.

05 LASTSeries 12, Let's Face The Music And Dance20110917
05 LASTSeries 13, The Hallelujah Chorus20120228

Stirring, emotional and unmistakable: The Hallelujah chorus from Handel's Messiah is the subject of this week's Soul Music.

The Alzheimer's Society runs a group called 'Singing for the Brain'. It's for people with dementia or Alzheimers and their carers who come together to sing in a group. As music is tied so closely to emotional memories, often lyrics and music remain firmly fixed in the brain, even though other memories have died away.

Julia Burton of the Alzheimer's Society recalls the power of the Hallelujah Chorus, as performed at a special event by Singing for the Brain groups in Wiltshire and Dorset.

Mrs Vera Fiton, whose late husband - Ted - had dementia talks about how important the weekly singing group was for both of them. Taking Ted from his care home to 'do the Hallelujah' was a weekly highlight, he enjoyed it so much, Vera recalls, that he'd still be singing in the taxi on the way home.

Carol Pemberton, of the Birmingham-based a capella quintet 'Black Voices', took part in the reopening concert of Birmingham Town Hall in 2007. The programme director suggested they sing The Messiah, but not as Handel intended, rather a daring interpretation arranged by Quincy Jones, called the 'Soulful Messiah'. It's a soul/gospel version which has to be heard to be believed! Carol describes performing it as one of the biggest highs of her career to date.

Jennifer Blakeley runs Alphabet Photography, a photo company based in Niagara Falls in Canada. She came up with the idea of staging a Flash Mob to promote her company. The Hallelujah Chorus had long been a favourite piece, and she - along with her local choir - set up a flash-mob in a local shopping mall. The result was emotional, extraordinary... and achieved so much more than the intended aim to boost her business. Passers by , not linked with the choir, joined in... others cried, emotions ran high. And the resulting You Tube video has now attracted over 37 million hits.

Paul Spicer, composer, conductor and organist, describes the historical backdrop to Handel's exhilirating composition.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Stirring, emotional and unmistakable: The Hallelujah chorus from Handel's Messiah.

05 LASTSeries 13, The Hallelujah Chorus20120303
24Auld Lang Syne2016122720171229 (BBC7)
20161231 (R4)

Soul Music hears stories of love, loss and joy associated with Auld Lang Syne.

It's gone from being an 18th century song about impotence to one of the best known songs all over the world. Most of us have sung Auld Lang Syne at some point in our lives on New Year's Eve, but how many of us know more than a few of the words and anything of its origin and meaning? Soul Music hears the stories behind the song, how it went from being a reflective melancholic Scottish air about the parting of the ways, to the jaunty tune we know today. There are also stories of love, sorrow, hope and joy, emotions that are especially heightened at this time of year.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Stories of love, loss and joy associated with Auld Lang Syne.

It's gone from being an 18th century song about impotence to one of the best known songs all over the world. Most of us have sung Auld Lang Syne at some point in our lives on New Year's Eve, but how many of us know more than a few of the words and anything of its origin and meaning? Soul Music hears the stories behind the song, how it went from being a reflective melancholic Scottish air about the parting of the ways, to the jaunty tune we know today. There are also stories of love, sorrow, hope and joy, emotions that are especially heightened at this time of year.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

0101Elgar's Cello Concerto2000112620011014
20150828 (BBC7)
20150829 (BBC7)

Cellist Julian Lloyd Webber talks about what it is like to play Elgar's concerto, Tim Dinsley discusses the way in which he and his daughter used the piece to support them as she was dying, and Michael Kennedy discusses the impact of the piece.

Julian Lloyd Webber, Michael Kennedy and Tim Dinsley reflect on the impact of Elgar.

4 Extra Debut. Cellist Julian Lloyd Webber, Michael Kennedy and Tim Dinsley reflect on the special impact of Elgar's piece of music. From November 2000.

Julian Lloyd Webber, Michael Kennedy and Tim Dinsley reflect on the impact of Elgar.

Cellist Julian Lloyd Webber, Michael Kennedy and Tim Dinsley reflect on the special impact of Elgar's piece of music. From November 2000.

Cellist Julian Lloyd Webber talks about what it is like to play Elgar's concerto, Tim Dinsley discusses the way in which he and his daughter used the piece to support them as she was dying, and Michael Kennedy discusses the impact of the piece.

0102Abide With Me2000120320011021
20150904 (BBC7)
20150905 (BBC7)

This programme explores why Henry F Lyte's words and William H Monk's tunes have so much significance for the people of Malawi, a railway chaplain, a miner's daughter and a vicar in India.

A look at why Henry F Lyte's words and William H Monk's tune have so much significance.

A look at why Henry F Lyte's words to Abide with Me and William H Monk's tune have so much significance to so many people.

0103Bridge Over Troubled Water2000121020011028
20150911 (BBC7)
20150912 (BBC7)

While this anthem of love and support was an instant hit both here and in the US, the Simon and Garfunkel partnership was becoming less than harmonious.

Despite their hit anthem of love and support, Simon and Garfunkel struck some wrong notes.

Despite their hit 1970 anthem of love and support, Simon and Garfunkel struck some wrong notes. With Paul Gambaccini. From December 2000.

0104The Last Post2000121720011104
20150918 (BBC7)
20150919 (BBC7)

The final bugle call before lights out in barracks has become inextricably linked with death and the act of remembrance.

Among others, a former Japanese prisoner speaks of his memories of the piece.

Officer AD Bridges and a former war prisoner reflect on the impact of the final bugle call

Officer AD Bridges and former WWII prisoner John Wyatt reflect on the impact of the final bugle call before lights out. From December 2000.

0105Silent Night2000122420151225 (BBC7)
20151226 (BBC7)

An exploration of one of the world's most popular Christmas carols.

An exploration of one of the world's most popular Christmas carols, and some of unlikely places where it has been sung. From December 2000.

0105Stille Nacht2000122420011111

Rev Ian Bradley and Professor Richard Watson tell of the carol's history, Pamela Thomas describes hearing it during an execution in Texas, and Edith Stephens tells how, when growing up in Vienna, her nanny sang `Stille Nacht' with her on Christmas Eve and an angel appeared.

0106Beethoven's Ode To Joy2000123120150925 (BBC7)
20150926 (BBC7)

John Suchet, Hans Rhieburg and Susan Greenfield on the impact of Beethoven's Ode to Joy.

John Suchet, Hans Rhieburg and Susan Greenfield reflect on the impact of Beethoven's last symphony 'Ode to Joy'. From December 2000.

0106Ode To Joy2000123120011118

John Suchet describes the writing and performing of Beethoven's last symphony, choral conductor Simon Halsey talks about the difficulties the piece poses for choirs, and Susan Greenfield describes how it transformed a rainy afternoon the first time she heard it.

0107Summertime2001010720011125
20151002 (BBC7)
20151003 (BBC7)

George Gershwin's classic piece is explored by his biographer Rodney Greenburg and opera singers Harolyn Blackwell and Lesley Garrett.

Rodney Greenberg, Harolyn Blackwell and Lesley Garrett reflect on Gershwin's lullaby.

Rodney Greenberg, Harolyn Blackwell and Lesley Garrett reflect on the impact of George Gershwin's classic lullaby. From January 2001.

0108You'll Never Walk Alone:2001011420151009 (BBC7)
20151010 (BBC7)

Carl Davis and Gerry Marsden reflect on the impact of Rodger and Hammerstein's Carousel solo

Carl Davis and Gerry Marsden reflect on the impact of Rodger and Hammerstein's Carousel solo which became an anthem. From January 2001.

0108 LASTYou'll Never Walk Alone2001011420011202
20151009 (BBC7)
20151010 (BBC7)

Composer Carl Davis explains the power of Rodgers and Hammerstein's showstopper, and Gerry Marsden recalls how his recording turned it into a football anthem.

Carl Davis and Gerry Marsden reflect on the impact of Rodger and Hammerstein's Carousel solo

Carl Davis and Gerry Marsden reflect on the impact of Rodger and Hammerstein's Carousel solo which became an anthem. From January 2001.

0201In The Mood2001081420011209
20151016 (BBC7)
20151017 (BBC7)

Paul Tanner, the last surviving member of Glenn Miller's original band, explains how Glenn took a riff recorded by Wingy Manone in 1930 as `Tar Paper Stomp' and worked his magic on it.

Alyn Shipton and trombonist Paul Tanner reflect on the impact of the jitterbug super hit.

4 Extra Debut. Critic Alyn Shipton and Glenn Miller's trombonist Paul Tanner reflect on the impact of the jitterbug super hit. From August 2001.

Critic Alyn Shipton and Glenn Miller's trombonist Paul Tanner reflect on the impact of the jitterbug super hit. From August 2001.

0202The Lark Ascending2001082120011216
20151023 (BBC7)
20151024 (BBC7)

Violinists Tasmin Little and Iona Brown talk about what it is like to play Vaughan Williams's famous evocation of a lark rising in an English summer sky.

Tasmin Little, Iona Brown and Allan Stephenson reflect on Vaughan Williams's work.

Tasmin Little, Iona Brown and Allan Stephenson reflect on the impact of Ralph Vaughan Williams's most English of works. From August 2001.

0203Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye2001082820011223
20151030 (BBC7)
20151031 (BBC7)

Anna Blundy talks about the significance of Cole Porter's song in her life and writing, and Robert Offord describes the effect of singing it at a memorial concert for AIDS victims.

Anna Blundy, Robert Offord and Colin Murray Parkes reflect on Cole Porter's song.

Anna Blundy, Robert Offord and Colin Murray Parkes reflect on the impact of Cole Porter's song of farewell and parting. From August 2001.

0204Zadok2001090420011118
20151106 (BBC7)
20151107 (BBC7)

Handel's anthem, written for the coronation of George II, has become a favourite with choral societies and church choirs around the world.

With Robert King, Guy Wolfenden and Simon Halsey

Simon Halsey reflects on the impact of Handel's Zadok the Priest.

Simon Halsey, Mary Davies and the Duke of Devonshire reflect on the impact of Handel's Zadok the Priest. From September 2001.

0205Over The Rainbow2001091120011125
20151113 (BBC7)
20151114 (BBC7)

How Yip Harburg and Harold Arlen struggled to come up with the opening number in `The Wizard of Oz'.

Reflections on the impact of The Wizard of Oz's 'Over the Rainbow'.

Ernie and Ena Harburg, Jane Horrocks and Steve Nallon reflect on the impact of The Wizard of Oz's 'Over the Rainbow'. From September 2001.

0206Amazing Grace2001091820151120 (BBC7)
20151121 (BBC7)

John Newton's near-death experience at sea prompted his hymn 'Amazing Grace'.

John Newton's near-death experience at sea prompted his hymn 'Amazing Grace'. With Martin Bell, Judy Collins and Bob Zellner. From September 2001.

0206 LASTAmazing Grace2001091820011209
20151120 (BBC7)
20151121 (BBC7)

A near-death experience at sea resulted in John Newton's conversion and, some years later, the writing of `Amazing Grace'.

John Newton's near-death experience at sea prompted his hymn 'Amazing Grace'.

John Newton's near-death experience at sea prompted his hymn 'Amazing Grace'. With Martin Bell, Judy Collins and Bob Zellner. From September 2001.

0301Fever2002110520030723
20151127 (BBC7)
20151128 (BBC7)
20161226 (BBC7)
20161227 (BBC7)

When bass player Max Bennett heard an unknown sing 'Fever' in a small LA nightclub, he knew he had found a new song for the singer he worked for, Peggy Lee.

Peggy's finger-snapping, bass and drums arrangement went on to immortalize the song.

Peggy Lee's daughter Nicki Foster talks about her mother's life and her hit record.

Legendary singer Peggy Lee's daughter Nicki Foster talks about her mother's life and her unforgettable hit record. From November 2002.

4 Extra Debut. Legendary singer Peggy Lee's daughter Nicki Foster talks about her mother's life and her unforgettable hit record. From November 2002.

0302Barber's Adagio2002111220030730
20030926 (R4)

Samuel Barber wrote his Adagio for Strings at the age of 26, little realising that the piece would become America's `national funeral music'.

Leonard Slatkin, Dana Captanino, and James and Sally Sewell describe the effect that this particular piece of music has had on their lives.

0302Barber's Adagio For Strings20151204 (BBC7)
20151205 (BBC7)

Leonard Slatkin on the impact of the adagio that became America's 'national funeral music'

Conductor Leonard Slatkin reflects on the potent impact of the adagio that became America's 'national funeral music'. From November 2002.

0303Moon River2002111920030725
20151211 (BBC7)
20151212 (BBC7)

Written by Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer for the film Breakfast at Tiffany's, Moon River was originally going to be called something quite different.

Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer's film theme for Breakfast at Tiffany's.

Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer's film theme for 'Breakfast at Tiffany's' starring Audrey Hepburn. With Chay Blyth. From November 2002.

0304Kol Nidrei2002112620030801

Cellists Steven Isserlis and Liam Abramson discuss Max Bruch's Kol Nidrei, based on a prayer sung at Yom Kippur.

Series about pieces of music with a powerful emotional impact.

0304Kol Nidrei2003092420030801
20151218 (BBC7)
20151219 (BBC7)

Cellists Steven Isserlis and Liam Abramson discuss Max Bruch's Kol Nidrei, based on a prayer sung at Yom Kippur.

Series about pieces of music with a powerful emotional impact.

Max Bruch's piece for cello is based on Jewish prayer sung at Yom Kippur.

Max Bruch's piece for cello is based on Jewish prayer sung at Yom Kippur and played memorably by Jacqueline du Pre. From November 2002.

0305Somewhere2002120320030808
20160101 (BBC7)
20160102 (BBC7)
20030925 (R4)

Leonard Bernstein's Somewhere, from West Side Story, is a song which holds a special significance for many.

This Utopian song, that yearns for a better world where there is no prejudice was composed by Leonard Bernstein with lyrics by Stephen Sondheim for the 1957 musical West Side Story.

Exploring what Leonard Bernstein's song from 'West Side Story' means to different people.

Exploring what Leonard Bernstein's song from 'West Side Story' means to different people. With Stephen Sondheim. From December 2002.

0306The Pathtique2002121020160108 (BBC7)
20160109 (BBC7)

Anthony Holden and Vassily Sinaisky explore the impact of Tchaikovsky's final symphony.

Biographer Anthony Holden and conductor Vassily Sinaisky explore the cultural impact of Tchaikovsky's final symphony. From December 2002.

0306 LASTPathetique2002121020030724

This piece delighted the composer, yet he died nine days after its premiere.

Biographer Anthony Holden reveals the circumstances of his death while conductor Vassily Sinaisky explains the relevance and importance of the piece to the Russian people.

0401Mad About The Boy2004062920050228
20160115 (BBC7)
20160116 (BBC7)

Noel Coward wrote Mad About the Boy in 1932 for the review, Words and Music, to celebrate the powerful appeal of the silent movie star.

Most recently it's been taken up as a gay anthem.

Sheridan Morley, Sir John Mills, Maria Aitken and Kit Hesketh-Harvey explain why this has become the most recorded number of all Coward's work.

Noel Coward wrote 'Mad About the Boy' to celebrate the appeal of the silent movie star.

4 Extra Debut. Noel Coward wrote 'Mad About the Boy' in 1932 to celebrate the powerful appeal of the silent movie star. From June 2004.

1/5. Mad About the Boy

The series that examines those pieces of music that never fail to touch their audience.

Noel Coward wrote Mad About the Boy in 1932 for the review, Words and Music, to celebrate the powerful appeal of the silent movie star. Most recently it's been taken up as a gay anthem.

0402Swing Low Sweet Chariot2004070620050307
20160122 (BBC7)
20160123 (BBC7)

was one of the spirituals or secret songs of the slaves in the deep south of America, now sung by choirs, rugby fans and pop stars across the globe.

What is the song's universal appeal, and why does its popularity just continue to grow?

An exploration of the spiritual song, from its origins in slavery in America.

An exploration of the spiritual song, from its origins in slavery in America, to its role in English rugby. From July 2004.

0403Stand By Me2004071320050314
20160129 (BBC7)
20160130 (BBC7)

Written by Ben E King in his bedroom on a cheap guitar, Stand By Me went on to establish King as a solo artist, was recorded by Marc Bolan and John Lennon, and even become a title of a film.

Includes interviews with Ben E King and screenwriters Raynold Gideon and Bruce Evans.

Ben E King talks about writing the classic song, and others reflect on its lasting power.

Singer-songwriter Ben E King talks about writing the classic song, and others reflect on its lasting emotional power. From July 2004.

0404Bach's Concerto In D Minor For Two Violins2004072020160205 (BBC7)
20160206 (BBC7)

Terry Waite and Steve Hackett talk about the impact of Bach's music for two violins.

Terry Waite and musician Steve Hackett talk about the emotional impact of Bach's music for two violins. From July 2004.

0404Concerto In D Minor2004072020050321

So little is known about the life of J S Bach yet his music opens up a world of imagination.

The Concerto in D minor is often described as being like a conversation between lovers.

David Gregory of the CBSO, rock guitarist Steve Hackett, and Terry Waite CBE are among those moved by the music of the two violins as they imitate, interrupt and overlap each other in one of Bach's most sublime creations.

0405Like A Rolling Stone2004072720160212 (BBC7)
20160213 (BBC7)

Robbie Robertson, Al Kooper and Greil Marcus reflect on Bob Dylan's iconic song.

Robbie Robertson, Al Kooper and Greil Marcus reflect on Bob Dylan's song that challenged and changed lives. From July 2004.

Series about pieces of music with a powerful emotional impact.

5/5. Like a Rolling Stone

Bob Dylan's signature tune which became the anthem of a generation and scattered all preconceptions of what a pop 45rpm single could achieve. Robbie Robertson, Al Kooper, Greil Marcus and Paula Radice muse on a song that threw down a challenge and changed lives.

0405 LASTLike A Rolling Stone2004072720050328
20160212 (BBC7)
20160213 (BBC7)

Bob Dylan's signature tune which became the anthem of a generation and scattered all preconceptions of what a pop 45rpm single could achieve.

Robbie Robertson, Al Kooper, Greil Marcus and Paula Radice muse on a song that threw down a challenge and changed lives.

Robbie Robertson, Al Kooper and Greil Marcus reflect on Bob Dylan's iconic song.

Robbie Robertson, Al Kooper and Greil Marcus reflect on Bob Dylan's song that challenged and changed lives. From July 2004.

0501Clair De Lune20160219 (BBC7)
20160220 (BBC7)

An exploration of Claude Debussy's music for piano, inspired by a poem about moonlight.

4 Extra Debut. An exploration of Claude Debussy's music for piano, which was inspired by a poem about moonlight. With Phil Cool. From February 2006.

0501Debussy's Clair De Lune2006022820060304

Supposedly inspired by Paul Verlaine's poem of the same name, Clair de Lune, for many people, conjures up the yearning romance of moonlight.

With contributions from comedian Phil Cool; Erica Duggan; harpist Sioned Williams; Debussy expert Richard Langham-Smith; astronomer Heather Couper and composer Elodie Lauten.

The series about music that makes the hairs on the back of your neck stand up.

1/4. Debussy's Clair de Lune

Supposedly inspired by Paul Verlaine's poem of the same name, Clair de Lune, for many people, conjures up the yearning romance of moonlight. With contributions from comedian Phil Cool; Erica Duggan; harpist Sioned Williams; Debussy expert Richard Langham-Smith; astronomer Heather Couper and composer Elodie Lauten.

0502I Vow To Thee My Country2006030720060311
20160226 (BBC7)
20160227 (BBC7)

A hymn that has recently attracted controversy for its patriotism, I Vow To Thee My Country was born just after the First World War.

Vaughn Williams had the inspirational idea to put together the stirring music from Holst's Jupiter movement and the poem written by American ambassador Sir Cecil Spring-Rice, which was found on his desk when he left office.

An exploration of the hymn which stirs patriotism and controversy.

An exploration of the hymn which stirs patriotism and controversy when sung at national events. With Julian Mitchell. From July 2006.

The series about music that makes the hairs on the back of your neck stand up.

2/4. I Vow to Thee My Country

A hymn that has recently attracted controversy for its patriotism, I Vow to Thee My Country was born just after the First World War. Vaughn Williams had the inspirational idea to put together the stirring music from Holst's Jupiter movement and the poem written by American ambassador Sir Cecil Spring-Rice, which was found on his desk when he left office.

0503Old Man River2006031420060318
20160304 (BBC7)
20160305 (BBC7)

flowed out of the 1927 musical Show Boat, and remains with us as both a political anthem of oppressed people and a song of deep comfort.

Sung by a hospital porter, it was the last song that market trader Dave Everett heard before he went into surgery and it calmed his fears.

Tony Benn recalls hearing the great Paul Robeson singing it at the House of Lords Tea Room.

The programme includes interviews with Tony Benn, Paul Robeson Jr and Cleo Laine

Tony Benn, Cleo Laine and Paul Robeson Jr reflect on the emotional power of Ol' Man River.

Tony Benn, Cleo Laine and Paul Robeson Jr reflect on the emotional power of the song from the musical 'Showboat'. From March 2006.

The series about music that makes the hairs on the back of your neck stand up.

3/4. Old Man River

Old Man River flowed out of the 1927 musical Show Boat, and remains with us as both a political anthem of oppressed people and a song of deep comfort.

Sung by a hospital porter, it was the last song that market trader Dave Everett heard before he went into surgery, and it calmed his fears. Tony Benn recalls hearing the great Paul Robeson singing it at the House of Lords Tea Room.

0504 LASTWidor's Toccata2006032120060325
20110715 (BBC7)
20160311 (BBC7)
20160312 (BBC7)
20110715 (R4)

Organist Thomas Trotter dissects the popular piece of wedding music.

Widor's Toccata: Organist Thomas Trotter dissects the popular piece of wedding music.

Ever since Widor's Toccata was included in the marriage service of Princess Margaret in 1960, this display of fireworks at the organ has become a firm favourite for married couples to exit the church by at the end of their wedding ceremonies.

Famous organist Thomas Trotter dissects the intricacies and dispels the myths about playing Widor's Toccata, and organist Daniel Roth explains what it's like to be Widor's direct successor as the present day organist at the St Sulpice in Paris.

display of fireworks at the organ is a favourite for married couples to exit the church by in the UK. From March 2006.

is a favourite for married couples to exit the church by in the UK.

Widor's Toccata is a favourite for married couples to exit the church by in the UK.

Widor's Toccata display of fireworks at the organ is a favourite for married couples to exit the church by in the UK. From March 2006.

The series about music that makes the hairs on the back of your neck stand up.

4/4. Widor's Toccata

0601New York, New York2008010820080112
20160318 (BBC7)
20160319 (BBC7)
20080209 (R4)

Songwriting duo Kander and Ebb wrote the title song for the film.

Unfortunately, the star Robert de Niro didn't like it, so they furiously wrote another one.

John Kander presents the story behind a classic song.

Composer John Kander on the difficulties of writing the famous song, New York, New York.

John Kander presents the story behind the classic song New York, New York. Songwriting duo Kander and Ebb wrote the title song for the film. Unfortunately, the star Robert de Niro didn't like it, so they furiously wrote another one.

0601Series 10, Send In The Clowns20100911

Stephen Sondheim's Send In The Clowns is a classic tune that has inspired moving memories.

0602Finlandia2008011520080119
20160325 (BBC7)
20160326 (BBC7)

Sibelius's glorious orchestral work was adopted by the Finnish people as a symbol of its fight for independence from Russia, and over 100 years later it is still regarded as Finland's second national anthem.

Its popularity is international, both in orchestral form and also in shorter form as the Finlandia Hymn.

Contributors include Sibelius's great-grandson Jaakko Ilves and conductor John Storgards.

Sibelius's work was adopted as Finland's symbol of its fight for independence from Russia.

Sibelius's glorious orchestral work was adopted by the Finnish people as a symbol of its fight for independence from Russia, and over 100 years later it is still regarded as Finland's second national anthem. Its popularity is international, both in orchestral form and also in shorter form as the Finlandia Hymn. Contributors include Sibelius's great-grandson Jaakko Ilves and conductor John Storgards.

Series about pieces of music with a powerful emotional impact.

2/4. Finlandia

0603Tainted Love2008012220080126
20160401 (BBC7)
20160402 (BBC7)

Originally a Motown song written by Ed Cobb and recorded by Gloria Jones, Tainted Love became famous on the Northern Soul scene in the late 1970s.

A classic version was later recorded by Soft Cell.

The Motown song that became a 70s Northern Soul scene favourite, and a huge 80s pop hit.

Series about pieces of music with a powerful emotional impact.

3/4. Tainted Love

Originally a Motown song written by Ed Cobb and recorded by Gloria Jones, Tainted Love became famous on the Northern Soul scene in the late 1970s. A classic version was later recorded by Soft Cell.

0604Spem In Alium2008012920160408 (BBC7)
20160409 (BBC7)

Thomas Tallis's work is one of the most spectacular pieces of choral music ever written.

Thomas Tallis's work is one of the most elaborate and spectacular pieces of choral music ever written. Scored for 40 voices, the piece is best sung and heard in the round in order to appreciate an extraordinary sonic experience. Choral conductor Simon Halsey, Michael Morpurgo and others discuss the music's spine-tingling effect on both performers and listeners.

0604 LASTSpem In Alium2008012920080202
20160408 (BBC7)
20160409 (BBC7)

Thomas Tallis's work is one of the most elaborate and spectacular pieces of choral music ever written.

Scored for 40 voices, the piece is best sung and heard in the round in order to appreciate an extraordinary sonic experience.

Choral conductor Simon Halsey, Michael Morpurgo and others discuss the music's spine-tingling effect on both performers and listeners.

Thomas Tallis's work is one of the most spectacular pieces of choral music ever written.

Thomas Tallis's work is one of the most elaborate and spectacular pieces of choral music ever written. Scored for 40 voices, the piece is best sung and heard in the round in order to appreciate an extraordinary sonic experience. Choral conductor Simon Halsey, Michael Morpurgo and others discuss the music's spine-tingling effect on both performers and listeners.

0701Swan Lake2008092320080927
20160415 (BBC7)
20160416 (BBC7)

The story behind Tchaikovsky's ballet and the impact it has had on those who have heard and danced to it.

The story behind Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake and the impact it has had on audiences.

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

1/4. Swan Lake

0702So What2008093020090103
20160422 (BBC7)
20160423 (BBC7)

Tellling the stories of people whose lives have been changed by Miles Davis' classic track

Telling the stories of some of the people whose lives have been affected by So What, the opening track on Miles Davis' seminal 1959 album Kind of Blue.

The impact of Miles Davis' 'So What' from his record 'Kind of Blue'.

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

2/4. So What

0703Chopin's Ballade No 1 In G Minor2008100720081011
20160506 (BBC7)
20160507 (BBC7)

Pianist Peter Donohoe is one of many people whose lives have been shaped and changed by hearing and playing this technically demanding, emotionally turbulent piece of music.

How lives were shaped by Chopin's technically demanding, emotionally turbulent music.

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

3/4. Chopin's Ballade No 1 in G Minor

0704 LASTWhat A Wonderful World2008101420081018

Louis Armstrong recorded this classic, written especially for him, in 1967, amidst civil rights demonstrations and protests against the Vietnam War.

Was it naive or a powerful anthem for peace?

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

4/4. What A Wonderful World

Louis Armstrong recorded this classic, written especially for him, in 1967, amidst civil rights demonstrations and protests against the Vietnam War. Was it naive or a powerful anthem for peace?

0801Allegri's Miserere2009090120090905
20160513 (BBC7)
20160514 (BBC7)

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

Allegri wrote the chord sequence for his Miserere in the 1630s for use in the Sistine Chapel during Holy Week.

It then went through the hands of a 12-year-old Mozart, Mendelssohn and Liszt until it finally reached England in the early 20th century and got fixed into the version we know today.

The soaring soprano line that hits the famous top C and never fails to thrill has become a firm favourite for concert audiences around the world.

Textile designer Kaffe Fassett, writer Sarah Manguso and conductor Roy Goodman explain how they have all been deeply affected by this beautiful piece of music.

A designer, a writer and a conductor on how they have been affected by Allegri's Miserere.

An exploration of the impact of Allegri's 17th-century music.

Allegri wrote the chord sequence for his Miserere in the 1630s for use in the Sistine Chapel during Holy Week. It then went through the hands of a 12-year-old Mozart, Mendelssohn and Liszt until it finally reached England in the early 20th century and got fixed into the version we know today.

The soaring soprano line that hits the famous top C and never fails to thrill has become a firm favourite for concert audiences around the world. Textile designer Kaffe Fassett, writer Sarah Manguso and conductor Roy Goodman explain how they have all been deeply affected by this beautiful piece of music.

0801Allegri's Miserere20090905
0802The Look Of Love2009090820090912
20160520 (BBC7)
20160521 (BBC7)

Hal David discusses writing The Look of Love, for the soundtrack of the spoof 1967 James Bond film Casino Royale, with Burt Bacharach.

Dusty Springfield's former backing singer, Simon Bell, remembers being on stage at the Albert Hall when Dusty laughed her way through a performance of the song, and musician Jonathan Cohen describes how the samba rhythm underscoring Dusty's smooth vocals combine to make this an enduringly popular love song.

It has been covered many times by artists including Isaac Hayes, Gladys Knight and the French singer Mirielle Mathieu.

This programme hears from people whose personal memories of love and loss are forever linked with The Look of Love.

The story behind this enduring love song and the personal memories forever linked to it.

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

Hal David discusses writing The Look of Love with Burt Bacharach, for the soundtrack of the spoof 1967 James Bond film Casino Royale. This classic track, sung by Dusty Springfield, provided the musical backdrop for a love scene between Peter Sellers and Ursula Andress.

It has been covered many times by artists including Isaac Hayes, Gladys Knight and the French singer Mirielle Mathieu. This programme hears from people whose personal memories of love and loss are forever linked with The Look of Love.

0802The Look Of Love20090912
0803Vaughan Williams' Fantasia On A Theme By Thomas Tallis2009091520090919
20160527 (BBC7)
20160528 (BBC7)

When Vaughan Williams wrote his Tallis Fantasia in 1910, he changed the course of British music.

Here at last was a piece of music which was no longer under the Teutonic influence, but which drew on old English hymn tunes and folk idioms for its themes.

As the string music builds to a climax, interviewees tell how this music has brought solace and hope in times of tragedy and changed the course of their lives.

How the beauty and richness of an orchestral fantasia inspired a young boy.

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

When Vaughan Williams wrote his Tallis Fantasia in 1910, he changed the course of British music. Here at last was a piece of music which was no longer under the Teutonic influence, but which drew on old English hymn tunes and folk idioms for its themes. As the string music builds to a climax, interviewees tell how this music has brought solace and hope in times of tragedy and changed the course of their lives.

0803Vaughan Williams' Fantasia On A Theme, By Thomas Tallis20090915 (BBC7)
20160527 (BBC7)
20160528 (BBC7)

How the beauty and richness of an orchestral fantasia inspired a young boy.

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

When Vaughan Williams wrote his Tallis Fantasia in 1910, he changed the course of British music. Here at last was a piece of music which was no longer under the Teutonic influence, but which drew on old English hymn tunes and folk idioms for its themes. As the string music builds to a climax, interviewees tell how this music has brought solace and hope in times of tragedy and changed the course of their lives.

0804You've Got A Friend2009092220090926
20160603 (BBC7)
20160604 (BBC7)

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

Written by Carole King and made famous by James Taylor, You've Got a Friend won a Grammy Award in 1971.

In this programme people tell how this song has affected their life.

Written by Carole King and made famous by James Taylor, the song won a Grammy in 1971.

Carole King tells the story of her song You've Got a Friend, from her 1971 Tapestry album.

Written by Carole King and made famous by James Taylor, You've Got a Friend won a Grammy Award in 1971. In this programme people tell how this song has affected their life.

0804You've Got A Friend20090926
0805Richard Strauss' Four Last Songs2009100320090929 (BBC7)
20160610 (BBC7)
20160611 (BBC7)

People describe how Richard Strauss' Four Last Songs have brought solace at key moments.

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

Richard Strauss was 84 when he completed his last work. It was the Four Last Songs, which, although about death, convey a sense of calm acceptance. It was written of its time in 1948, but it still touches the hearts of many listeners today.

As the soprano voice delves ever deeper into the richness of the music, interviewees tell how the Four Last Songs have brought calm and beauty at key moments in their lives.

0805 LASTRichard Strauss' Four Last Songs2009092920091003
20160610 (BBC7)
20160611 (BBC7)

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

Richard Strauss was 84 when he completed his last work.

It was the Four Last Songs, which, although about death, convey a sense of calm acceptance.

It was written of its time in 1948, but it still touches the hearts of many listeners today.

As the soprano voice delves ever deeper into the richness of the music, interviewees tell how the Four Last Songs have brought calm and beauty at key moments in their lives.

People describe how Richard Strauss' Four Last Songs have brought solace at key moments.

Richard Strauss was 84 when he completed his last work. It was the Four Last Songs, which, although about death, convey a sense of calm acceptance. It was written of its time in 1948, but it still touches the hearts of many listeners today.

0805 LASTRichard Strauss' Four Last Songs20091003
0901Praise My Soul2010022320160812 (BBC7)
20160813 (BBC7)

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

Based on Psalm 103, this hymn was written by Henry Francis Lyte, who also penned Abide With Me, and is most asssociated with the tune by John Goss - even though the two men never met.

Their hymn has become one of the most popular for weddings, and was used at those of the Queen and Prince Philip and Charles and Camilla.

Increasingly it is also used at funerals, and the widow of DC Stephen Oake, killed while on duty during an anti-terrorist raid, explains why it's so important to her and her family.

It's also the perfect tune for teaching young choristers to sight read music, although these days they often misplace the comma in the line, 'Father like, he tends and spares us'.

The story of Henry Francis Lyte's hymn that never fails to move a congregation.

Their hymn has become one of the most popular for weddings, and was used at those of the Queen and Prince Philip and Charles and Camilla. Increasingly it is also used at funerals, and the widow of DC Stephen Oake, killed while on duty during an anti-terrorist raid, explains why it's so important to her and her family. It's also the perfect tune for teaching young choristers to sight read music, although these days they often misplace the comma in the line, 'Father like, he tends and spares us'.

0902Mendelssohn Violin Concerto2010030220100306
20160819 (BBC7)
20160820 (BBC7)

People tell how Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto has played an important part in their lives.

class="blq-clearfix">

An exploration of the personal and professional impact of the concerto written in 1844.

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

When Mendelssohn wrote his Violin Concerto in 1844 he could hardly have imagined how famous and well loved it would become. In this programme, people tell how it has played an important part in their lives.

Violinist Daniel Hope tells how he got caught practising this concerto secretly locked in the bathroom at school. Harry Atterbury remembers hearing the Mendelssohn for the first time on the night before a Second world War air raid which turned his life upside down. Composer Stephen Pratt describes discovering that his father had played this concerto to cheer fellow soldiers in the jungle in Burma, and explains how this inspired him to write his own violin concerto.

To find out more about Stephen Pratt's Violin Concerto, go to:

http://www.liverpoolphil.com./1132/rlpo-recordings/stephen-pratt-lovebytes.html

The recording of the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto featured in this programme was by violinist Maxim Vengerov with the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra conducted by Kurt Masur. Teldec 4509-90875-2.

When Mendelssohn wrote his Violin Concerto in 1844 he could hardly have imagined how famous and well loved it would become.

In this programme, people tell how it has played an important part in their lives.

Violinist Daniel Hope tells how he got caught practising this concerto secretly locked in the bathroom at school.

Harry Atterbury remembers hearing the Mendelssohn for the first time on the night before a Second world War air raid which turned his life upside down.

Composer Stephen Pratt describes discovering that his father had played this concerto to cheer fellow soldiers in the jungle in Burma, and explains how this inspired him to write his own violin concerto.

0902Mendelssohn Violin Concerto20100306

People tell how Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto has played an important part in their lives.

0902Mendelssohn Violin Concerto *2010030220100306

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

When Mendelssohn wrote his Violin Concerto in 1844 he could hardly have imagined how famous and well loved it would become.

In this programme, people tell how it has played an important part in their lives.

Violinist Daniel Hope tells how he got caught practising this concerto secretly locked in the bathroom at school.

Harry Atterbury remembers hearing the Mendelssohn for the first time on the night before a Second world War air raid which turned his life upside down.

Composer Stephen Pratt describes discovering that his father had played this concerto to cheer fellow soldiers in the jungle in Burma, and explains how this inspired him to write his own violin concerto.

People tell how Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto has played an important part in their lives.

0903Dido's Lament2010030920100313
20160902 (BBC7)
20160903 (BBC7)

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

Dido's Lament is a popular name for a famous aria, 'When I am laid in earth', from the opera Dido and Aeneas by Henry Purcell, with the libretto by Nahum Tate.

Mezzo soprano Sarah Connolly talks about why she finds the piece, sung by the likes of Janet Baker and Emma Kirkby, so extraordinary, and the skill it takes to perform it.

Composer and cellist Philip Shepperd's musical life was transformed when he was part of the rock singer Jeff Buckley's performance of the piece at the 1995 Meltdown Festival.

The power of Purcell's aria, 'When I am laid in earth' explained.

Exploring what Henry Purcell's aria means to different people.

Dido's Lament is a popular name for a famous aria, 'When I am laid in earth', from the opera Dido and Aeneas by Henry Purcell, with the libretto by Nahum Tate. Mezzo soprano Sarah Connolly talks about why she finds the piece, sung by the likes of Janet Baker and Emma Kirkby, so extraordinary, and the skill it takes to perform it. Composer and cellist Philip Shepperd's musical life was transformed when he was part of the rock singer Jeff Buckley's performance of the piece at the 1995 Meltdown Festival.

0903Dido's Lament20100313
0904He's Got The Whole World In His Hands2010031620100320

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

He's Got the Whole World in His Hands is a spiritual song originating in the United States, but it first caught the public's attention when Laurie London took it to the top of the charts in 1958.

In this programme, people describe the place that the song has in their lives.

Including the conductor of a choir for refugees and asylum seekers and the minister who led prayers on President Obama's first day in office.

The programme also includes a performance from Washington Performing Arts Society's Children of the Gospel Choir.

They sang an arrangement of He's Got the Whole World in His Hands made by their conductor and Artistic Director Stanley J Thurston at the National Prayer Service at the Washington National Cathedral on January 21, 2009.

President Barack Obama, Vice President Joseph Biden and their families attended this service and the sermon was given by the Reverend Sharon E Watkins.

People describe the place that He's Got the Whole World in His Hands has in their lives.

0904He's Got The Whole World In His Hands20100320
0905 LASTBach's Goldberg Variations2010032320100327
20160909 (BBC7)
20160910 (BBC7)

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

Bach wrote his Goldberg Variations for harpsichord in the 1740s, but today it's performed by pianists all over the world.

People describe the place these pieces have in their lives, including a neuroscientist from New York, painist Angela Hewitt, a father driving his family through the night in the Australian Outback, and a woman from Oregon whose life was transformed, perhaps even saved, by this music.

People describe the place that Bach's Goldberg Variations have in their lives.

Bach wrote his Goldberg Variations for harpsichord in the 1740s, but today it's performed by pianists all over the world. People describe the place these pieces have in their lives, including a neuroscientist from New York, pianist Angela Hewitt, a father driving his family through the night in the Australian Outback, and a woman from Oregon whose life was transformed, perhaps even saved, by this music.

0905 LASTBach's Goldberg Variations2010032720100323 (BBC7)
20160909 (BBC7)
20160910 (BBC7)

People describe the place that Bach's Goldberg Variations have in their lives.

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

Bach wrote his Goldberg Variations for harpsichord in the 1740s, but today it's performed by pianists all over the world. People describe the place these pieces have in their lives, including a neuroscientist from New York, pianist Angela Hewitt, a father driving his family through the night in the Australian Outback, and a woman from Oregon whose life was transformed, perhaps even saved, by this music.

1001Send In The Clowns2010090720100911
20160916 (BBC7)
20160917 (BBC7)

Stephen Sondheim's song, Send In the Clowns, from the musical 'A Little Night Music' was written late in rehearsals for the actress Glynnis Johns, playing the part of Desiree.

A song of regret and anger, the part has famously been played by Judi Dench, and the song became an independent hit, sung by Judy Collins, Shirley Bassey and Barbra Striesand.

Hannah Waddingham played the youngest ever Desiree in Trevor Nunn's production, and used her memories of an unhappy relationship to inspire her performance.

Stephen Sondheim's Send In The Clowns is a classic tune that has inspired moving memories.

Stephen Sondheim's song was written late in rehearsals for the actress Glynis Johns.

Stephen Sondheim's song, Send In the Clowns, from the musical 'A Little Night Music' was written late in rehearsals for the actress Glynis Johns, playing the part of Desiree. A song of regret and anger, the part has famously been played by Judi Dench, and the song became an independent hit, sung by Judy Collins, Shirley Bassey and Barbra Striesand. Hannah Waddingham played the youngest ever Desiree in Trevor Nunn's production, and used her memories of an unhappy relationship to inspire her performance.

1002Ma Vlast2010091420100918
20160923 (BBC7)
20160924 (BBC7)

At the core of Czech cultural identity is this week's piece - Ma Vlast by Bedrich Smetana.

Written in the late

19th century, it's a series of six symphonic poems.

For a western audience the most popular and best loved is Vltava, a soundscape which conjures up vivid images of the river which runs through Prague.

Jan Kaplan is a Czech born film-maker who has lived in the UK since 1968.

He describes the 'educational concerts' he had to attend as a young boy when - bored to tears - he would endure long performances of Smetana's music.

However, as an adult living in exile, his experience of Czech culture was tinged with a remote sense of patriotism and he grew to appreciate his national composer.

When - following the 1989 Velvet revolution - he was eventually able to return home, he witnessed one of the most famous and moving performances of Ma Vlast at Smetana Hall in 1990.

Also at that concert was musicologist, Professor Jan Smaczny, who describes his memories of that evening, and explains the history and mythology portrayed in Ma Vlast.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Ma Vlast by Bedrich Smetana has become an integral part of Czech culture.

At the core of Czech cultural identity is this week's piece - Ma Vlast by Bedrich Smetana. Written in the late 19th century, it's a series of six symphonic poems. For a western audience the most popular and best loved is Vltava, a soundscape which conjures up vivid images of the river which runs through Prague.

Jan Kaplan is a Czech born film-maker who has lived in the UK since 1968. He describes the 'educational concerts' he had to attend as a young boy when - bored to tears - he would endure long performances of Smetana's music. However, as an adult living in exile, his experience of Czech culture was tinged with a remote sense of patriotism and he grew to appreciate his national composer. When - following the 1989 Velvet revolution - he was eventually able to return home, he witnessed one of the most famous and moving performances of Ma Vlast at Smetana Hall in 1990.

by Bedrich Smetana has become an integral part of Czech culture.

1003Faure Requiem2010092120100925
20160930 (BBC7)
20161001 (BBC7)

"He wanted it to be something that's consoling and helpful.

It's the end of their lives where they can rest in peace".

World renowned choral conductor Sir David Willcocks, shares his personal reflections on the Faure Requiem alongside those for whom the music has comforted and inspired.

Known for its peaceful and hopeful nature the Faure Requiem has been called 'The lullaby of death'.

Whilst Gabriel Faure himself never spoke directly about what inspired his interpretation of the Requiem, author and biographer Jessica Duchen has speculated that it may have been born out of his experience as a soldier during the Franco-Prussian war.

In this edition of Soul music, personal stories of conflict and deliverance are shared from across the decades.

Reaching from the beaches of Normandy to the plains of Afghanistan and into the skies of Salisbury.

Faure composed the first version of the work, which he called "un petit Requiem" with five movements, of which the Pie Jesu and In Paradisum have become arguably the most popular.

"Everything I managed to entertain by way of religious illusion I put into my Requiem, which moreover is dominated from beginning to end by a very human feeling of faith in eternal rest.".

Sir David Willcocks' personal reflections on the Faure Requiem.

David Willcocks and others reflect on the inspirational impact of Fauré's Requiem.

"He wanted it to be something that's consoling and helpful. It's the end of their lives where they can rest in peace". World renowned choral conductor Sir David Willcocks, shares his personal reflections on the Faure Requiem alongside those for whom the music has comforted and inspired. Known for its peaceful and hopeful nature the Faure Requiem has been called 'The lullaby of death'. Whilst Gabriel Faure himself never spoke directly about what inspired his interpretation of the Requiem, author and biographer Jessica Duchen has speculated that it may have been born out of his experience as a soldier during the Franco-Prussian war. In this edition of Soul music, personal stories of conflict and deliverance are shared from across the decades. Reaching from the beaches of Normandy to the plains of Afghanistan and into the skies of Salisbury. Faure composed the first version of the work, which he called "un petit Requiem" with five movements, of which the Pie Jesu and In Paradisum have become arguably the most popular. "Everything I managed to entertain by way of religious illusion I put into my Requiem, which moreover is dominated from beginning to end by a very human feeling of faith in eternal rest.".

1004How Great Thou Art2010092820101002
20161007 (BBC7)
20161008 (BBC7)

The enduring popularity of the hymn, How Great Thou Art is explored in this series that examines those pieces of music that never fail to move us.

Based on a Swedish poem by Carl Gustav Boberg, the hymn was written by the British missionary Stuart Hine in 1949.

It subsequently become an Elvis Presley classic and as the country and western star , Connie Smith explains, it's the piece she always sings to close her show, the stirring lyrics and soaring melody having the ability to move and inspire audiences of all ages and backgrounds.

We also hear from George Beverly Shea, now a hundred and one but with clear memories of singing it at hundreds of Billy Graham crusades.

Examining the power of the hymn How Great Thou Art.

The enduring popularity of the hymn, How Great Thou Art is explored in this series that examines those pieces of music that never fail to move us. Based on a Swedish poem by Carl Gustav Boberg, the hymn was written by the British missionary Stuart Hine in 1949.

1005The Emperor2010100520161014 (BBC7)
20161015 (BBC7)

Examining the power of Beethoven's fifth piano concerto, The Emperor.

Majestic and moving in equal measure, Beethoven's fifth and final piano concerto, The Emperor, is this week's Soul Music.

Richard McMahon (concert pianist, and teacher at the Royal Welsh School of Music and Drama) plays extracts and discusses the virtuosic demands posed by The Emperor.

Australian film producer, Hal McElroy, talks about using the Adagio (the second movement) to illustrate the classic 1970s film Picnic at Hanging Rock.

That was where Andrew Law - now Chaplain at Malvern College - first heard the piece. He describes the Adagio as being 'one of those pieces of art which it is worth being alive to have heard'.

Concert pianist, James Rhodes, describes how The Emperor was central to his childhood and his developing love of Beethoven's piano music.

Music teacher and singer, Prue Hawthorne, recalls how her father (an amateur clarinetist) labouriously transcribed by hand the horn and clarinet sections of the first movement so they could play along with the record in their living room.

Also contributing is the renowned Beethoven biographer, John Suchet.

1005 LASTThe Emperor2010100520101009
20161014 (BBC7)
20161015 (BBC7)

Majestic and moving in equal measure, Beethoven's fifth and final piano concerto, The Emperor, is this week's Soul Music.

Richard McMahon (concert pianist, and teacher at the Royal Welsh School of Music and Drama) plays extracts and discusses the virtuosic demands posed by The Emperor.

Australian film producer, Hal McElroy, talks about using the Adagio (the second movement) to illustrate the classic 1970s film Picnic at Hanging Rock.

That was where Andrew Law - now Chaplain at Malvern College - first heard the piece.

He describes the Adagio as being 'one of those pieces of art which it is worth being alive to have heard'.

Concert pianist, James Rhodes, describes how The Emperor was central to his childhood and his developing love of Beethoven's piano music.

Music teacher and singer, Prue Hawthorne, recalls how her father (an amateur clarinetist) labouriously transcribed by hand the horn and clarinet sections of the first movement so they could play along with the record in their living room.

Also contributing is the renowned Beethoven biographer, John Suchet.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Examining the power of Beethoven's fifth piano concerto, The Emperor.

That was where Andrew Law - now Chaplain at Malvern College - first heard the piece. He describes the Adagio as being 'one of those pieces of art which it is worth being alive to have heard'.

1101Mozart's Clarinet Quintet2011030120110305
20161021 (BBC7)
20161022 (BBC7)

Written in 1789, two years before Mozart's death, this first ever work for string quartet plus clarinet remains a firm favourite for music lovers around the world.

In this programme Professor Paul Robertson describes how his wife played this piece to him whilst he lay in a coma.

Clarinettist Peter Furniss tells of the solace the slow movement provided his mother as she lay dying.

And Alex Smith explains the importance of this piece in his work to help children with autism, Asperger's, dyslexia and other childhood disorders.

Music lovers describe the impact that Mozart's Clarinet Quintet has had on their lives.

Mozart's Clarinet Quintet

Written in 1789, two years before Mozart's death, this first ever work for string quartet plus clarinet remains a firm favourite for music lovers around the world. In this programme Professor Paul Robertson describes how his wife played this piece to him whilst he lay in a coma. Clarinettist Peter Furniss tells of the solace the slow movement provided his mother as she lay dying. And Alex Smith explains the importance of this piece in his work to help children with autism, Asperger's, dyslexia and other childhood disorders.

1102Simple Gifts2011030820110312
20161028 (BBC7)
20161029 (BBC7)

Simple Gifts started life as a Shaker Hymn and became incorporated into the hymn Lord of the Dance and Aaron Copland's ballet suite Appalachian Spring.

In this programme, Nora Guthrie describes the central place this tune has played throughout her life.

Pete Lashley tells how he heard it unexpectedly whilst touring in New Zealand.

Michael Carter explains why his father chose this tune for his famous hymn "Lord of the Dance" and Scott Malchus describes running a marathon whilst listening to this music.

Producer, Rosie Boulton.

Music lovers describe the important place the tune Simple Gifts has had in their lives.

In this programme, Nora Guthrie describes the central place this tune has played throughout her life. Pete Lashley tells how he heard it unexpectedly whilst touring in New Zealand. Michael Carter explains why his father chose this tune for his famous hymn "Lord of the Dance" and Scott Malchus describes running a marathon whilst listening to this music.

started life as a Shaker Hymn and became incorporated into the hymn Lord of the Dance and Aaron Copland's ballet suite Appalachian Spring.

1103The Impossible Dream2011031520110319
20161104 (BBC7)
20161105 (BBC7)

In this series that explores those pieces of music that never fail to move us, this week we feature, 'The Impossible Dream', a song that talks of the resilience of the human spirit.

It tells the story of a quest and it's had a surprising journey of it's own.

It was originally composed for the 1965 musical The Man of La Mancha which was inspired by Miguel de Cervantes story of Don Quixote.

The music was written by Mitch Leigh and the lyrics by Joe Darion.

Now in his 80's Leigh explains how his first writing partner was W H Auden and talks about why this particular piece struck a chord with African American friends at that time.

Generations on, international Soprano Lesley Garrett recalls how this song inspired her childhood dreams in Doncaster, Yachtsman of the Year Geoff Holt talks about how this song carried him across the Atlantic on one of the most important voyages of his life and former advertising executive Rob Chew explains how this piece is helping him face lifes biggest challenge.

Producer Nicola Humphries.

Lesley Garrett and yachtsman Geoff Holt on the inspiring song, The Impossible Dream.

In this series that explores those pieces of music that never fail to move us, this week we feature, 'The Impossible Dream', a song that talks of the resilience of the human spirit. It tells the story of a quest and it's had a surprising journey of it's own. It was originally composed for the 1965 musical The Man of La Mancha which was inspired by Miguel de Cervantes story of Don Quixote. The music was written by Mitch Leigh and the lyrics by Joe Darion. Now in his 80's Leigh explains how his first writing partner was WH Auden and talks about why this particular piece struck a chord with African American friends at that time. Generations on, international Soprano Lesley Garrett recalls how this song inspired her childhood dreams in Doncaster, Yachtsman of the Year Geoff Holt talks about how this song carried him across the Atlantic on one of the most important voyages of his life and former advertising executive Rob Chew explains how this piece is helping him face lifes biggest challenge.

1104Schubert's Winterreise2011032220110326
20161111 (BBC7)
20161112 (BBC7)

Schubert's Winterreise

Written the year before Schubert's death aged just 31, these 24 songs based on poems by Wilhelm Muller describe a journey that takes us ever deeper into the frozen landscape of the soul.

Singers Thomas Hampson, Mark Padmore, Alice Coote and David Pisaro describe the experience of immersing themselves in this music.

And Bernard Keefe tells of the time he sang these songs in Hiroshima to survivors of the bomb.

Producer: Rosie Boulton.

Music lovers describe the part that Schubert's Winterreise has played in their lives.

Written the year before Schubert's death aged just 31, these 24 songs based on poems by Wilhelm Müller describe a journey that takes us ever deeper into the frozen landscape of the soul. Singers Thomas Hampson, Mark Padmore, Alice Coote and David Pisaro describe the experience of immersing themselves in this music. And Bernard Keefe tells of the time he sang these songs in Hiroshima to survivors of the bomb.

1105Mahler's Adagietto2011032920161118 (BBC7)
20161119 (BBC7)

Music lovers describe the part that Mahler's Adagietto has played in their lives.

Adagietto from Mahler's 5th Symphony

Mahler wrote his 5th Symphony during the summers of 1901 and 1902. The Adagietto is the 4th movement which is thought to have been inspired by falling in love with Alma who he married around this time. This single movement is Mahler's most well known piece of music. It was famously used in the 1971 Luchino Visconti film Death in Venice And it was also conducted by Leonard Bernstein at the mass at St Patrick's Cathedral, New York on the day of the burial of Robert Kennedy.

In this programme, composer David Matthews explains the significance of this piece in Mahler's output. Psychoanalyst Anthony Cantle describes listening to it with his mother during her last days of dementia. Malcolm Reid tells how this piece signified a change in himself as a young man in the British police force with narrow, racist views, to hearing it in Australia and shifting his to becoming a liberal. And Helen Epstein explains why it was played at her mother's funeral.

Producer, Rosie Boulton.

1105 LASTMahler's Adagietto2011032920110402
20161118 (BBC7)
20161119 (BBC7)

Adagietto from Mahler's 5th Symphony

Mahler wrote his 5th Symphony during the summers of 1901 and 1902.

The Adagietto is the 4th movement which is thought to have been inspired by falling in love with Alma who he married around this time.

This single movement is Mahler's most well known piece of music.

It was famously used in the 1971 Luchino Visconti film Death in Venice And it was also conducted by Leonard Bernstein at the mass at St Patrick's Cathedral, New York on the day of the burial of Robert Kennedy.

In this programme, composer David Matthews explains the significance of this piece in Mahler's output.

Psychoanalyst Anthony Cantle describes listening to it with his mother during her last days of dementia.

Malcolm Reid tells how this piece signified a change in himself as a young man in the British police force with narrow, racist views, to hearing it in Australia and shifting his to becoming a liberal.

And Helen Epstein explains why it was played at her mother's funeral.

Producer, Rosie Boulton.

Music lovers describe the part that Mahler's Adagietto has played in their lives.

Mahler wrote his 5th Symphony during the summers of 1901 and 1902. The Adagietto is the 4th movement which is thought to have been inspired by falling in love with Alma who he married around this time. This single movement is Mahler's most well known piece of music. It was famously used in the 1971 Luchino Visconti film Death in Venice And it was also conducted by Leonard Bernstein at the mass at St Patrick's Cathedral, New York on the day of the burial of Robert Kennedy.

In this programme, composer David Matthews explains the significance of this piece in Mahler's output. Psychoanalyst Anthony Cantle describes listening to it with his mother during her last days of dementia. Malcolm Reid tells how this piece signified a change in himself as a young man in the British police force with narrow, racist views, to hearing it in Australia and shifting his to becoming a liberal. And Helen Epstein explains why it was played at her mother's funeral.

1201Mendelssohn's Octet2011081620110820
20161202 (BBC7)
20161203 (BBC7)

This exploration of the impact that Mendelssohn's Octet has had on different people's lives, demonstrates the healing power of music in a variety of situations around the world.

Mendelssohn wrote his Octet for double string quartet in 1825 when he was only 16 years old.

Despite his youth, this is a mature and brilliant piece of music described in this programme by the interviewees as "carnivalesque", "a romp", "a party".

Choreographer Bill T Jones describes the way in which the Octet showed his company how to keep living during the onslaught of AIDS in the 80's.

Cellist Raphael and violinist Elizabeth Wallfisch talk about falling in love whilst learning this music in the 70's.

South Korean Lisa Kim tells a story about going on tour with the New York Philharmonic to North Korea and her intense fear and mistrust being replaced by wonder when they played the Octet with a North Korean Quartet.

And Matthew Trusler describes the importance of playing this work after the death of his son.

The recording of the Mendelssohn Octet featured in the programme is by the Emerson String Quartet on Deutsche Gramophon.

Exploring the impact that Mendelssohn's Octet has had on different people's lives.

Mendelssohn wrote his Octet for double string quartet in 1825 when he was only 16 years old. Despite his youth, this is a mature and brilliant piece of music described in this programme by the interviewees as "carnivalesque", "a romp", "a party".

Choreographer Bill T Jones describes the way in which the Octet showed his company how to keep living during the onslaught of AIDS in the 80's. Cellist Raphael and violinist Elizabeth Wallfisch talk about falling in love whilst learning this music in the 70's. South Korean Lisa Kim tells a story about going on tour with the New York Philharmonic to North Korea and her intense fear and mistrust being replaced by wonder when they played the Octet with a North Korean Quartet. And Matthew Trusler describes the importance of playing this work after the death of his son.

1202Wichita Lineman2011082320110827
20161209 (BBC7)
20161210 (BBC7)

, the ultimate country/pop crossover track, is the subject of this week's Soul Music.

David Crary is a lineman from Oklahoma.

He describes his job - storm-chasing to mend fallen power-lines; travelling on 'dirt roads, gravel roads, paved roads...

up in the farmlands of Illinois and Missouri...

down south in the Swamplands...

it ain't nothing to swerve in the middle of the road in your bucket-truck to miss an alligator '.

He recalls the first time he heard Wichita Lineman, travelling in the back of his family's Station Wagon, listening to the radio...

thinking that being a lineman 'must be a cool job' if someone's written a song about it.

Also a part-time musician, David has recorded his own version of the song which sums up his working life...

on the road, working long hours, away from his wife and six kids.

Wichita Lineman was written by Jimmy Webb for the Country star Glen Campbell.

It tells the story of a lonely lineman in the American midwest, travelling vast distances to mend power and telephone lines.

Released in 1968 it's an enduring classic, crossing the boundary between pop and country.

It's been covered many times, but it's Glen Campbell's version which remains the best loved and most played.

Johnny Cash also recorded an extraordinary and very raw version.

Peter Lewry, a lifelong Cash fan, describes how this recording came about, towards the end of Cash's career.

Meggean Ward's father was a lineman in Rhode Island...

her memories of seeing him in green work trousers, a plaid shirt and black boots, wrapping his cracked hands in bandages every morning before setting off to climb telephone poles are interwoven forever with Wichita Lineman...

as a child she always felt the song was written for her father, who else?

Glen Campbell also gave an interview for this programme.

Shortly after the interview was recorded, Campbell went public about his diagnosis of Alzheimer's.

His contribution to the programme is brief, and includes an acoustic performance of the song.

It was a real privilege to record this, appropriately enough, down the line.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Wichita Lineman - the ultimate country/pop track, an enduring classic on UK and US radio.

People reflect on the emotional impact of the country-pop crossover track.

Wichita Lineman, the ultimate country/pop crossover track, is the subject of this week's Soul Music.

David Crary is a lineman from Oklahoma. He describes his job - storm-chasing to mend fallen power-lines; travelling on 'dirt roads, gravel roads, paved roads... up in the farmlands of Illinois and Missouri... down south in the Swamplands... it ain't nothing to swerve in the middle of the road in your bucket-truck to miss an alligator '.

He recalls the first time he heard Wichita Lineman, travelling in the back of his family's Station Wagon, listening to the radio... thinking that being a lineman 'must be a cool job' if someone's written a song about it. Also a part-time musician, David has recorded his own version of the song which sums up his working life... on the road, working long hours, away from his wife and six kids.

Wichita Lineman was written by Jimmy Webb for the Country star Glen Campbell. It tells the story of a lonely lineman in the American midwest, travelling vast distances to mend power and telephone lines.

Released in 1968 it's an enduring classic, crossing the boundary between pop and country. It's been covered many times, but it's Glen Campbell's version which remains the best loved and most played.

Johnny Cash also recorded an extraordinary and very raw version. Peter Lewry, a lifelong Cash fan, describes how this recording came about, towards the end of Cash's career.

Meggean Ward's father was a lineman in Rhode Island... her memories of seeing him in green work trousers, a plaid shirt and black boots, wrapping his cracked hands in bandages every morning before setting off to climb telephone poles are interwoven forever with Wichita Lineman... as a child she always felt the song was written for her father, who else?

Glen Campbell also gave an interview for this programme. Shortly after the interview was recorded, Campbell went public about his diagnosis of Alzheimer's. His contribution to the programme is brief, and includes an acoustic performance of the song. It was a real privilege to record this, appropriately enough, down the line.

1203Spiegel Im Spiegel2011083020110903
20161216 (BBC7)
20161217 (BBC7)

Exploring the impact that Estonian composer Arvo Pärt's piece for piano and violin Spiegel im Spiegel has had on people's lives.

Written in 1978, just prior to his departure from Estonia, Arvo Pärt's Spiegel im Spiegel is musically minimal, yet produces a serene tranquillity.

It's in F major in 6/4 time, with the piano playing rising crotchet triads and the violin playing slow scales, alternately rising and falling, of increasing length, which all end on the note A.

The score of the piece looks deceptively simple, but as violinist, Tasmin Little explains, it's one of the most difficult pieces to perform because the playing has to simply be perfect, or the mood is lost.

"Spiegel im Spiegel" in German literally can mean both "mirror in the mirror" as well as "mirrors in the mirror", referring to the infinity of images produced by parallel plane mirrors.

The programme contains an interview with visual artist Mary Husted who heard this work and was inspired to produce a set of collages called "Spiegel im Spiegel" which in a round about way, led to her long lost son tracing her for the first time in his life.

Exploring the impact of Arvo Pärt's Spiegel im Spiegel on listener's lives.

Exploring the impact of Arvo Pärt's Spiegel im Spiegel on listeners' lives.

Exploring the impact that Estonian composer Arvo Pärt's piece for piano and violin Spiegel im Spiegel has had on people's lives.

Written in 1978, just prior to his departure from Estonia, Arvo Pärt's Spiegel im Spiegel is musically minimal, yet produces a serene tranquillity.

It's in F major in 6/4 time, with the piano playing rising crotchet triads and the violin playing slow scales, alternately rising and falling, of increasing length, which all end on the note A. The score of the piece looks deceptively simple, but as violinist, Tasmin Little explains, it's one of the most difficult pieces to perform because the playing has to simply be perfect, or the mood is lost.

"Spiegel im Spiegel" in German literally can mean both "mirror in the mirror" as well as "mirrors in the mirror", referring to the infinity of images produced by parallel plane mirrors.

The programme contains an interview with visual artist Mary Husted who heard this work and was inspired to produce a set of collages called "Spiegel im Spiegel" which in a round about way, led to her long lost son tracing her for the first time in his life.

1204Dear Lord And Father Of Mankind2011090620110910
20161230 (BBC7)
20161231 (BBC7)

The words of one of our most loved hymns, Dear Lord and Father of Mankind, were taken from the last six verses of John Greenleaf Whittier's poem, The Brewing of Soma, an attack on ostentatious and overt religious practise.

But it wasn't until over fifty years later, that a school master at Repton in Derbyshire had the inspiration to pair it with a tune by Sir Hubert Parry, thus confirming it as a favourite for school assemblies, funerals and weddings.

The current Director of Music at Repton, John Bowley, explains how this happened, while composer and conductor Bob Chilcott explains why this was a musical marriage made in heaven.

We hear from those for who whom the hymn has special significance, including the MP from Gloucester, Richard Graham; when briefly imprisoned in a Libyan gaol in 1978 he found enormous comfort in the words and tune.

Pipe Major Ross Munro remembers recording the piece in the sweltering heat of Basra with members of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards and film director Joe Wright recalls how the inclusion of this hymn was central to the power of his famous scene depicting the evacuation of Dunkirk in his film, Atonement.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Exploring one of our favourite hymns, appealing to that 'still small voice of calm'.

The current Director of Music at Repton, John Bowley, explains how this happened, while composer and conductor Bob Chilcott explains why this was a musical mariage made in heaven.

We hear from those for who whom the hymn has special significance, including the MP from Gloucester, Richard Graham; when briefly imprisoned in a Libyan goal in 1978 he found enormous comfort in the words and tune.

Pipe Major Ross Munro remembers recording the piece in the swelting heat of Basra with members if the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards and film director Joe Wright recalls how the inclusion of this hymn was central to the power of his famous scene depicting the evacuation of Dunkirl in his film Atonement.

Exploring the hymn which sets John Greenleaf Whittier's poem to music by Hubert Parry.

The words of one of our most loved hymns, Dear Lord and Father of Mankind, were taken from the last six verses of John Greenleaf Whittier's poem, The Brewing of Soma, an attack on ostentatious and overt religious practise. But it wasn't until over fifty years later, that a school master at Repton in Derbyshire had the inspiration to pair it with a tune by Sir Hubert Parry, thus confirming it as a favourite for school assemblies, funerals and weddings. The current Director of Music at Repton, John Bowley, explains how this happened, while composer and conductor Bob Chilcott explains why this was a musical mariage made in heaven.

We hear from those for who whom the hymn has special significance, including the MP from Gloucester, Richard Graham; when briefly imprisoned in a Libyan gaol in 1978 he found enormous comfort in the words and tune. Pipe Major Ross Munro remembers recording the piece in the swelting heat of Basra with members of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards and film director Joe Wright recalls how the inclusion of this hymn was central to the power of his famous scene depicting the evacuation of Dunkirk in his film, Atonement.

1205Let's Face The Music And Dance2011091320170106 (BBC7)
20170107 (BBC7)

Exploring the emotional impact of the classic Irving Berlin song.

The enduring Irving Berlin classic, Let's Face the Music and Dance is celebrated by those for whom it has a special significance. Written in 1932 as one of the dance numbers for Follow The Fleet, a movie starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, it's since taken on a life of it's own, being recorded by hundreds of artists from Diane Krall to Shirley Bassey, Frank Sinatra to Vera Lynn, Ella Fitzgerald to Matt Munroe.

For Sir John Mortimer's widow, Penny, it conjures up the very essence of her husband, who loved life, romance and dancing - even though he was no Fred Astaire , a fact he always deeply regretted.

Lawrence Bergreen , Berlin's biographer and academic Morris Dickstein explain why this song has such a unique place in popular culture and the cabaret singer and composer, Kit Hesketh Harvey explains why the melody continues to haunt us.

We hear from the bride and groom who decided to dance down the aisle to it after their wedding and the redundant welder for whom the song will be forever associated with the demise of our ship building industry. While one insurance executive recalls how the the song became central to their advertising campaign, bringing success to the firm and also placing Nat King Cole's version back in the charts nearly sixty years after it was written.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

1205 LASTLet's Face The Music And Dance2011091320110917
20170106 (BBC7)
20170107 (BBC7)

The enduring Irving Berlin classic, Let's Face the Music and Dance is celebrated by those for whom it has a special significance.

Written in 1932 as one of the dance numbers for Follow The Fleet, a movie starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, it's since taken on a life of it's own, being recorded by hundreds of artists from Diane Krall to Shirley Bassey, Frank Sinatra to Vera Lynn, Ella Fitzgerald to Matt Munroe.

For Sir John Mortimer's widow, Penny, it conjures up the very essence of her husband, who loved life, romance and dancing - even though he was no Fred Astaire , a fact he always deeply regretted.

Lawrence Bergreen , Berlin's biographer and academic Morris Dickstein explain why this song has such a unique place in popular culture and the cabaret singer and composer, Kit Hesketh Harvey explains why the melody continues to haunt us.

We hear from the bride and groom who decided to dance down the aisle to it after their wedding and the redundant welder for whom the song will be forever associated with the demise of our ship building industry.

While one insurance executive recalls how the the song became central to their advertising campaign, bringing success to the firm and also placing Nat King Cole's version back in the charts nearly sixty years after it was written.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

An exploration of the enduring Irving Berlin classic.

Exploring the emotional impact of the classic Irving Berlin song.

The enduring Irving Berlin classic, Let's Face the Music and Dance is celebrated by those for whom it has a special significance. Written in 1932 as one of the dance numbers for Follow The Fleet, a movie starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, it's since taken on a life of it's own, being recorded by hundreds of artists from Diane Krall to Shirley Bassey, Frank Sinatra to Vera Lynn, Ella Fitzgerald to Matt Munroe.

We hear from the bride and groom who decided to dance down the aisle to it after their wedding and the redundant welder for whom the song will be forever associated with the demise of our ship building industry. While one insurance executive recalls how the the song became central to their advertising campaign, bringing success to the firm and also placing Nat King Cole's version back in the charts nearly sixty years after it was written.

1301Baker Street20120318
20120131 (BBC7)
20170113 (BBC7)
20170114 (BBC7)

A celebration of Gerry Rafferty's popular solo hit, Baker Street.

Gerry Rafferty's glorious and instantly recognisable hit, Baker Street is the subject of this week's Soul Music.

Rafferty died last year (on January 4th 2011) at the age of 63, leaving behind a widely respected musical legacy. The most popular of his tracks is, arguably, Baker Street:

His daughter Martha Rafferty recalls hearing her father develop the melody in the attic of their Glasgow home; the sound of him picking-out the tune on his acoustic guitar would drift through the push-up attic-door, filling the rest of the house with what would become his biggest hit. She describes the inspiration for the lyrics: a book called 'The Outsider' by Colin Wilson which Rafferty was reading at the time. It's about the sense of disconnection from the world that artists often feel. Martha regards Baker Street as the lyrical version of that book.

Other contributors include:

Musician and founder member of Stealer's Wheel, Rab Noakes. He describes how the legal wrangling which followed the break-up of Stealer's Wheel inspired the creation of Baker Street. "Winding your way down on Baker Street, light in your head and dead on your feet, well another crazy day, you'll drink the night away and forget about everything". Although Rafferty was living in Scotland at the time, he had to endure long meetings at his lawyers, and Baker Street was where he'd meet friends and drink, and sing, and talk the night away. The lyrics explore the conflicting thoughts and pressures Rafferty faced: he wanted to continue with his music, but - as Martha says - he had a young family to support and there was pressure to get a 'normal job'.

Singer-songwriter Betsy Cook whose former husband, the late Hugh Murphy, produced Baker Street, plays through the melody on her keyboard and describes what makes the song work musically. She also recalls the emotional impact of hearing it played at Hugh Murphy's funeral.

For poet, Ian McMillan, Baker Street provided the sound track to his student years; and busker Gavin Randle plays it often on Brighton pier with a backdrop of murmurating starlings, a setting sun, and passers-by dancing arm in arm.

Martha Rafferty's interview at the start of the programme is illustrated by an acoustic version of the track played especially for Soul Music by the guitarist Hugh Burns. He played on the original recording, and explains how he achieved the stirring guitar solo at the end of the record.

Also included in the programme is the original demo version of Baker Street, on which Gerry Rafferty plays the famous sax solo on guitar. It was released late last year on a Collector's Edition of the City to City album.

Producer: Karen Gregor (whose first decision when starting work on the programme was not to mention the Bob Holness/saxophone riff urban myth... so there is no word of it anywhere in the programme...!).

Musician and founder member of Stealer's Wheel, Rab Noakes. He describes how the legal wrangling which followed the break-up of Stealer's Wheel inspired the creation of Baker Street. "Winding your way down on Baker Street, light in your head and dead on your feet, well another crazy day, you'll drink the night away and forget about everything". Although Rafferty was living in Scotland at the time, he had to endure long meetings at his lawyers, and Baker Street was where he'd meet friends and drink, and sing, and talk the night away. The lyrics explore the conflicting thoughts and pressures Rafferty faced: he wanted to continue with his music, but - as Martha says - he had a young family to support and there was pressure to get a 'normal job'.

1301Gerry Rafferty's Baker Street2012013120120318

Gerry Rafferty's glorious and instantly recognisable hit, Baker Street launches the new series of Soul Music.

Rafferty died just over a year ago (on January 4th 2011) at the age of 63, and to mark the anniversary we're celebrating his most popular hit.

His daughter Martha Rafferty recalls hearing her father develop the melody in the attic of their Glasgow home; the sound of him picking-out the tune on his acoustic guitar would drift through the push-up attic-door, filling the rest of the house with what would become his biggest hit. She describes the inspiration for the lyrics: a book called 'The Outsider' by Colin Wilson which Rafferty was reading at the time. It's about the sense of disconnection from the world that artists often feel. Martha regards Baker Street as the lyrical version of that book.

Other contributors include:

Musician and founder member of Stealer's Wheel, Rab Noakes. He describes how the legal wrangling which followed the break-up of Stealer's Wheel inspired the creation of Baker Street. "Winding your way down on Baker Street, light in your head and dead on your feet, well another crazy day, you'll drink the night away and forget about everything". Although Rafferty was living in Scotland at the time, he had to endure long meetings at his lawyers, and Baker Street was where he'd meet friends and drink, and sing, and talk the night away. The lyrics explore the conflicting thoughts and pressures Rafferty faced: he wanted to continue with his music, but - as Martha says - he had a young family to support and there was pressure to get a 'normal job'.

Singer-songwriter Betsy Cook whose former husband, the late Hugh Murphy, produced Baker Street, plays through the melody on her keyboard and describes what makes the song work musically. She also recalls the emotional impact of hearing it played at Hugh Murphy's funeral.

For poet, Ian McMillan, Baker Street provided the sound track to his student years; and busker Gavin Randle plays it often on Brighton pier with a backdrop of murmurating starlings, a setting sun, and passers-by dancing arm in arm.

Martha Rafferty's interview at the start of the programme is illustrated by an acoustic version of the track played especially for Soul Music by the guitarist Hugh Burns. He played on the original recording, and explains how he achieved the stirring guitar solo at the end of the record.

Also included in the programme is the original demo version of Baker Street, on which Gerry Rafferty plays the famous sax solo on guitar. It was released late last year on a Collector's Edition of the City to City album.

Producer: Karen Gregor (whose first decision when starting work on the programme was not to mention the Bob Holness/saxophone riff urban myth... so there is no word of it anywhere in the programme...!).

A celebration of Gerry Rafferty's popular solo hit, Baker Street.

Gerry Rafferty's glorious and instantly recognisable hit, Baker Street is the subject of this week's Soul Music.

Rafferty died last year (on January 4th 2011) at the age of 63, leaving behind a widely respected musical legacy. The most popular of his tracks is, arguably, Baker Street:

1302Gresford, The Miners' Hymn2012020720170120 (BBC7)
20170121 (BBC7)

The haunting melancholy of Gresford, the Miners' Hymn, is the music explored in this week's programme.

Written by a former miner, Robert Saint, to commemorate the Gresford pit disaster in 1934 it has been played at mining events ever since; most notably at the famous Durham Miners' Gala.

Contributors to the programme include:

(note: since the programme was broadcast, we've been contacted by the daughter of the man who wrote the words to Gresford: his name was George Leslie Lister and he wrote the words in 1970).

Albert Rowlands, now 91, was working in the lamp-room of Gresford colliery when there was a devastating underground explosion. His father was among the men lost.

Peter Crookston is the author of 'The Pitmen's Requiem' a book which explores the history of the great northern coalfield and the life of Robert Saint.

Robert Saint's grandson, David Saint, is the acting principal of the Birmingham Conservatoire and organist at St. Chad's Cathedral in Birmingham. Playing through Gresford on the cathedral organ, he explains what makes the piece work at an emotional level.

Cecil Peacock is a former miner, musician and music teacher. Illustrated by his own rendition of Gresford, he recalls playing Gresford at the funerals of 83 miners who died following the Easington Colliery disaster in 1951.

Max Roberts is the Director of the hugely successful play, The Pitmen Painters, which tells the story of a group of miners in the 1930s who studied art and whose work became internationally renowned. He talks about why he decided to use the hymn Gresford - sung wonderfully in harmony - at the end of the play.

Roy Dickinson attended the famous Durham Miners' Gala every year. As a small boy he was overwhelmed when he walked into the vast space of Durham Cathedral... hung with miners' banners proclaiming socialist slogans... with Gresford as the musical backdrop... bringing tears to the most hardened of miners' eyes.

Canon David Griffiths is a former miner, and was once the priest of Gresford Parish Church. He commissioned a painting to commemorate the disaster and the men who lost their lives.

With thanks to Trevor Sutherland and the Llay Welfare band who kindly allowed us to use their version of Gresford to illustrate David Griffiths' interview.

Producer: Karen Gregor

NB: Some sources say that 266 men lost their lives, some say 265. The figure given in the official report of the Public Inquiry by HM Inspector of mines is 265, which is why this number was quoted in the programme.

This quote from Peter Crookston's book 'The Pitmen's Requiem' provides clarity (thanks to Mr Crookston for permission to quote):

Of the 261 men killed by the explosion in the Dennis Section of the mine, at 2 am on Saturday 22 September 1934, only 11 bodies were recovered. All had died from poisoning by carbon monoxide, a gas known to miners as afterdamp, which is formed following an explosion of firedamp. Three members of a rescue brigade died from the same cause later that day as they tried to find survivors.

'Fire followed the explosion,' wrote the Chief Inspector of Mines, 'and more particularly an extensive fire in the main intake airway.which was fought continuously and unavailingly until the evening of the following day, by which time it was certain that all men unaccounted for must be dead and the conditions as regards the presence of inflammable gas had become imminently dangerous.'

Both shafts of the colliery were capped and sealed off. For three days after the explosion other explosions followed as fire raged through the gas-filled section of the mine, one of them killing a surface worker when he was hit by debris blown out through a capping seal. This brought the total number of dead to 265.

A man died months later and the miners' union said he had also been a victim of the disaster, so his name was put on the memorial in Wales, which is where the figure 266 comes from. But for those actually killed by the explosion, its aftermath and the gas, the figure is 265.

Exploration of the haunting melancholy of Gresford, the Miners' Hymn, by Robert Saint.

1302The Miners' Hymn2012020720120211

The haunting melancholy of Gresford, the Miners' Hymn, is the music explored in this week's programme.

Written by a former miner, Robert Saint, to commemorate the Gresford pit disaster in 1934 it has been played at mining events ever since; most notably at the famous Durham Miners' Gala.

Contributors to the programme include:

Albert Rowlands, now 91, was working in the lamp-room of Gresford colliery when there was a devastating underground explosion. His father was among the men lost.

Peter Crookston is the author of 'The Pitmen's Requiem' a book which explores the history of the great northern coalfield and the life of Robert Saint.

Robert Saint's grandson, David Saint, is the acting principal of the Birmingham Conservatoire and organist at St. Chad's Cathedral in Birmingham. Playing through Gresford on the cathedral organ, he explains what makes the piece work at an emotional level.

Cecil Peacock is a former miner, musician and music teacher. Illustrated by his own rendition of Gresford, he recalls playing Gresford at the funerals of 83 miners who died following the Easington Colliery disaster in 1951.

Max Roberts is the Director of the hugely successful play, The Pitmen Painters, which tells the story of a group of miners in the 1930s who studied art and whose work became internationally renowned. He talks about why he decided to use the hymn Gresford - sung wonderfully in harmony - at the end of the play.

Roy Dickinson attended the famous Durham Miners' Gala every year. As a small boy he was overwhelmed when he walked into the vast space of Durham Cathedral... hung with miners' banners proclaiming socialist slogans... with Gresford as the musical backdrop... bringing tears to the most hardened of miners' eyes.

Canon David Griffiths is a former miner, and was once the priest of Gresford Parish Church. He commissioned a painting to commemorate the disaster and the men who lost their lives.

With thanks to Trevor Sutherland and the Llay Welfare band who kindly allowed us to use their version of Gresford to illustrate David Griffiths' interview.

Producer: Karen Gregor

NB: Some sources say that 266 men lost their lives, some say 265. The figure given in the official report of the Public Inquiry by HM Inspector of mines is 265, which is why this number was quoted in the programme.

This quote from Peter Crookston's book 'The Pitmen's Requiem' provides clarity (thanks to Mr Crookston for permission to quote):

Of the 261 men killed by the explosion in the Dennis Section of the mine, at 2 am on Saturday 22 September 1934, only 11 bodies were recovered. All had died from poisoning by carbon monoxide, a gas known to miners as afterdamp, which is formed following an explosion of firedamp. Three members of a rescue brigade died from the same cause later that day as they tried to find survivors.

'Fire followed the explosion,' wrote the Chief Inspector of Mines, 'and more particularly an extensive fire in the main intake airway.which was fought continuously and unavailingly until the evening of the following day, by which time it was certain that all men unaccounted for must be dead and the conditions as regards the presence of inflammable gas had become imminently dangerous.'

Both shafts of the colliery were capped and sealed off. For three days after the explosion other explosions followed as fire raged through the gas-filled section of the mine, one of them killing a surface worker when he was hit by debris blown out through a capping seal. This brought the total number of dead to 265.

A man died months later and the miners' union said he had also been a victim of the disaster, so his name was put on the memorial in Wales, which is where the figure 266 comes from. But for those actually killed by the explosion, its aftermath and the gas, the figure is 265.

Exploration of the haunting melancholy of Gresford, the Miners' Hymn, by Robert Saint.

1303Rachmaninov, 2nd Piano Concerto2012021420170127 (BBC7)
20170128 (BBC7)

Exploration of how Rachmaninov's Second Piano Concerto touches and changes people's lives.

Rachmaninov's 2nd Piano Concerto, which was famously featured in David Lean's film "Brief Encounter", is one of the world's most popular pieces of classical. In this programme people describe the way in which Rachmaninov's 2nd Piano Concerto has touched and shaped their lives. The programme features a pianist from Taiwan whose memories of a repressive childhood were dispelled by the emotions contained within this music. Plus a story from an acclaimed pianist from Argentina who was told she would never play the piano again after a serious car accident, but who has recently performed this piece in New York. And finally an account of the place that this piece of passionate and heartfelt music played in the life of John Peel and his family, told by his wife Sheila Ravenscroft.

The concerto is also given historical and musical context in the programme by pianists Peter Donohoe and Howard Shelley.

Producer: Rosie Boulton.

1303Rachmaninov's 2nd Piano Concerto2012021420120218
20170127 (BBC7)
20170128 (BBC7)

which was famously featured in David Lean's film "Brief Encounter", is one of the world's most popular pieces of classical. In this programme people describe the way in which Rachmaninov's 2nd Piano Concerto has touched and shaped their lives. The programme features a pianist from Taiwan whose memories of a repressive childhood were dispelled by the emotions contained within this music. Plus a story from an acclaimed pianist from Argentina who was told she would never play the piano again after a serious car accident, but who has recently performed this piece in New York. And finally an account of the place that this piece of passionate and heartfelt music played in the life of John Peel and his family, told by his wife Sheila Ravenscroft.

The concerto is also given historical and musical context in the programme by pianists Peter Donohoe and Howard Shelley.

Producer: Rosie Boulton.

An exploration of how Rachmaninov's 2nd Piano Concerto touches and changes people's lives.

Exploration of how Rachmaninov's Second Piano Concerto touches and changes people's lives.

Rachmaninov's 2nd Piano Concerto, which was famously featured in David Lean's film "Brief Encounter", is one of the world's most popular pieces of classical. In this programme people describe the way in which Rachmaninov's 2nd Piano Concerto has touched and shaped their lives. The programme features a pianist from Taiwan whose memories of a repressive childhood were dispelled by the emotions contained within this music. Plus a story from an acclaimed pianist from Argentina who was told she would never play the piano again after a serious car accident, but who has recently performed this piece in New York. And finally an account of the place that this piece of passionate and heartfelt music played in the life of John Peel and his family, told by his wife Sheila Ravenscroft.

1304Non, Je Ne Regret Rien2012022120120325
20170203 (BBC7)
20170204 (BBC7)

The powerful song, Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien, made famous by Edith Piaf, is this week's Soul Music.

Written in 1960 by Charles Dumont, in a fit of despair, he gave the music to lyricist Michel Vaucaire, but was surprised by the words he wrote. Dumont thought the song should be about war or revolution. Vaucaire explained he wanted to give the song to Edith Piaf. She was living in Paris at the time, having recently finished her 'suicide tour' during which she had collapsed. At that time, Piaf didn't think much of Charles Dumont and tried to cancel their appointment. But on hearing the song, Piaf told Dumont that with this song, she would sing again.

Contributors include;

Charles Dumont who lives in Paris at the same apartment, with the same piano on which he wrote the song in 1960. He plays the song on the very same piano.

Lord Lamont, who became associated with the song when asked by a reporter which he regretted most - talking about the 'green shoots of recovery' or allegedly singing in the bath after the withdrawal of Britain from the Exchange Rate Mechanism. Lamont famously replied 'Je ne regrette rien.'

Christine Bovill, who tours a one-woman show about Piaf's life.

Carolyn Birke, biographer of Piaf.

How the powerful song, Non Je Ne Regrette Rien, revived its singer and became her epitaph.

The powerful song, Non, je ne regret rien, made famous by Edith Piaf, is this week's Soul Music.

Lord Lamont, who became associated with the song when asked by a reporter which he regretted most - talking about the 'green shoots of recovery' or allegedly singing in the bath after the withdrawal of Britain from the Exchange Rate Mechanism. Lamont famously replied 'Je ne regret rien.'

How the powerful song, Non, Je Ne Regret Rien, revived its singer and became her epitaph.

An exploration of the emotional impact of the song made famous by French singer Edith Piaf

Contributers include;

1304Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien20120325
20120221 (BBC7)
20170203 (BBC7)
20170204 (BBC7)

An exploration of the emotional impact of the song made famous by French singer Edith Piaf

The powerful song, Non, je ne regrette rien, made famous by Edith Piaf, is this week's Soul Music.

Written in 1960 by Charles Dumont, in a fit of despair, he gave the music to lyricist Michel Vaucaire, but was surprised by the words he wrote. Dumont thought the song should be about war or revolution. Vaucaire explained he wanted to give the song to Edith Piaf. She was living in Paris at the time, having recently finished her 'suicide tour' during which she had collapsed. At that time, Piaf didn't think much of Charles Dumont and tried to cancel their appointment. But on hearing the song, Piaf told Dumont that with this song, she would sing again.

Contributers include;

Charles Dumont who lives in Paris at the same apartment, with the same piano on which he wrote the song in 1960. He plays the song on the very same piano.

Lord Lamont, who became associated with the song when asked by a reporter which he regretted most - talking about the 'green shoots of recovery' or allegedly singing in the bath after the withdrawal of Britain from the Exchange Rate Mechanism. Lamont famously replied 'Je ne regrette rien.'

Christine Bovill, who tours a one-woman show about Piaf's life.

Carolyn Birke, biographer of Piaf.

Contributors include;

How the powerful song, Non Je Ne Regrette Rien, revived its singer and became her epitaph.

1305The Hallelujah Chorus20120228 (BBC7)
20170217 (BBC7)
20170218 (BBC7)

Exploration of the emotional impact of The Hallelujah chorus from Handel's 1742 oratorio.

Stirring, emotional and unmistakable: The Hallelujah chorus from Handel's Messiah is the subject of this week's Soul Music.

The Alzheimer's Society runs a group called 'Singing for the Brain'. It's for people with dementia or Alzheimers and their carers who come together to sing in a group. As music is tied so closely to emotional memories, often lyrics and music remain firmly fixed in the brain, even though other memories have died away.

Julia Burton of the Alzheimer's Society recalls the power of the Hallelujah Chorus, as performed at a special event by Singing for the Brain groups in Wiltshire and Dorset.

Mrs Vera Fiton, whose late husband - Ted - had dementia talks about how important the weekly singing group was for both of them. Taking Ted from his care home to 'do the Hallelujah' was a weekly highlight, he enjoyed it so much, Vera recalls, that he'd still be singing in the taxi on the way home.

Carol Pemberton, of the Birmingham-based a capella quintet 'Black Voices', took part in the reopening concert of Birmingham Town Hall in 2007. The programme director suggested they sing The Messiah, but not as Handel intended, rather a daring interpretation arranged by Quincy Jones, called the 'Soulful Messiah'. It's a soul/gospel version which has to be heard to be believed! Carol describes performing it as one of the biggest highs of her career to date.

Jennifer Blakeley runs Alphabet Photography, a photo company based in Niagara Falls in Canada. She came up with the idea of staging a Flash Mob to promote her company. The Hallelujah Chorus had long been a favourite piece, and she - along with her local choir - set up a flash-mob in a local shopping mall. The result was emotional, extraordinary... and achieved so much more than the intended aim to boost her business. Passers by , not linked with the choir, joined in... others cried, emotions ran high. And the resulting You Tube video has now attracted over 37 million hits.

Paul Spicer, composer, conductor and organist, describes the historical backdrop to Handel's exhilarating composition.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

1305 LASTThe Hallelujah Chorus2012022820120303
20170217 (BBC7)
20170218 (BBC7)

Stirring, emotional and unmistakable: The Hallelujah chorus from Handel's Messiah is the subject of this week's Soul Music.

The Alzheimer's Society runs a group called 'Singing for the Brain'. It's for people with dementia or Alzheimers and their carers who come together to sing in a group. As music is tied so closely to emotional memories, often lyrics and music remain firmly fixed in the brain, even though other memories have died away.

Julia Burton of the Alzheimer's Society recalls the power of the Hallelujah Chorus, as performed at a special event by Singing for the Brain groups in Wiltshire and Dorset.

Mrs Vera Fiton, whose late husband - Ted - had dementia talks about how important the weekly singing group was for both of them. Taking Ted from his care home to 'do the Hallelujah' was a weekly highlight, he enjoyed it so much, Vera recalls, that he'd still be singing in the taxi on the way home.

Carol Pemberton, of the Birmingham-based a capella quintet 'Black Voices', took part in the reopening concert of Birmingham Town Hall in 2007. The programme director suggested they sing The Messiah, but not as Handel intended, rather a daring interpretation arranged by Quincy Jones, called the 'Soulful Messiah'. It's a soul/gospel version which has to be heard to be believed! Carol describes performing it as one of the biggest highs of her career to date.

Jennifer Blakeley runs Alphabet Photography, a photo company based in Niagara Falls in Canada. She came up with the idea of staging a Flash Mob to promote her company. The Hallelujah Chorus had long been a favourite piece, and she - along with her local choir - set up a flash-mob in a local shopping mall. The result was emotional, extraordinary... and achieved so much more than the intended aim to boost her business. Passers by , not linked with the choir, joined in... others cried, emotions ran high. And the resulting You Tube video has now attracted over 37 million hits.

Paul Spicer, composer, conductor and organist, describes the historical backdrop to Handel's exhilirating composition.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Stirring, emotional and unmistakable: The Hallelujah chorus from Handel's Messiah.

Exploration of the emotional impact of The Hallelujah chorus from Handel's 1742 oratorio.

Paul Spicer, composer, conductor and organist, describes the historical backdrop to Handel's exhilarating composition.

1401Dvorak's New World Symphony2012082820120901
20170224 (BBC7)
20170225 (BBC7)

Anti-apartheid campaigner Albie Sachs on the Largo from Dvorak's New World Symphony.

While for many, it will be always associated with brown bread, the Largo from Dvorak's New World Symphony is an enduring a piece that never fails to move and inspire. We hear from the anti- apartheid campaigner Albie Sachs, who explains that through whistling the theme while in solitary confinement, he was able to make contact with the wider world and kept his spirit and hope alive.

Margaret Caldicott recalls the important role the piece played in her mother's life while in a Japanese prisoner of war camp.

Producer Lucy Lunt.

1402Beethoven's Violin Concerto2012090420120908
20170303 (BBC7)
20170304 (BBC7)

An exploration of how Beethoven's Violin Concerto has touched and changed people's lives.

Beethoven's Violin Concerto in D major Opus 61 was written in 1806, but was not a success at its premiere. 200 years on and this Concerto is regarded as one of the greatest pieces ever written for the violin. This programme explores ways in which the Beethoven Violin Concerto has touched and shaped people's lives. Writer Kelly Cherry describes her father loving this piece and still remembering it even when he had Alzheimers. Violinist Robert Gupta talks about this piece being the music which cemented his friendship with Nathaniel Ayers - a moment which changed Robert's life. Joe Quigley remembers hearing the Concerto at a crucial point in his life whilst living in a monastery. Devorina Gamalova recalls being entranced by this music as a child. And violinist Christian Tetzlaff talks about what it's like to play the Beethoven Violin Concerto.

Producer: Rosie Boulton.

in D major Opus 61 was written in 1806, but was not a success at its premiere. 200 years on and this Concerto is regarded as one of the greatest pieces ever written for the violin. This programme explores ways in which the Beethoven Violin Concerto has touched and shaped people's lives. Writer Kelly Cherry describes her father loving this piece and still remembering it even when he had Alzheimers. Violinist Robert Gupta talks about this piece being the music which cemented his friendship with Nathaniel Ayers - a moment which changed Robert's life. Joe Quigley remembers hearing the Concerto at a crucial point in his life whilst living in a monastery. Devorina Gamalova recalls being entranced by this music as a child. And violinist Christian Tetzlaff talks about what it's like to play the Beethoven Violin Concerto.

1403The Skye Boat Song2012091120120915
20170310 (BBC7)
20170311 (BBC7)

For many hearing The Skye Boat Song brings back a wealth of childhood memories, as the words "Speed Bonnie Boat Like a Bird on the Wing" tell the story of the escape of Bonnie Prince Charlie, dressed as a maid to the Isle of Skye, after this defeat at the battle of Culloden.

Originally written by Sir Harold Boulton and Anne MacLeod back in the 1870's, we explore the beauty of this song and how it continues to touch people's lives across the world in very different ways.

Contributors in this programme include:

The Queen's Piper, who has played this tune in happy and sad times, recalls playing it outside the Queen's window and leading Princess Margaret's cortege. A New Zealand artist shares his memories of time spent with his father, and the sound of him whistling the song on their way home as dusk fell. A sailor from the Isle of Skye, describes his connection with the spirituality of piece and the Loch on which he sails.

Acclaimed violinist Tasmin Little shares her own arrangement of the piece and explains why it works so well musically. An Australian mum, tells how important this song has been in connecting with the two girls she has adopted from China. Gaelic Singer Maggie MacInnes tells the history of the piece.

The programme includes music by Julian Lloyd Webber, The Corries and Pete Lashley.

Producer - Rachel Matthews.

Exploring how this song from the 1870s continues to touch people's lives across the world.

For many hearing The Skye Boat Song brings back a wealth of childhood memories, as the words "Speed Bonnie Boat Like a Bird on the Wind" tell the story of the escape of Bonnie Prince Charlie, dressed as a maid to the Isle of Skye, after this defeat at the battle of Culloden.

1404Brothers In Arms2012091820130127
20170317 (BBC7)
20170318 (BBC7)

An exploration into the enduring appeal of the Dire Straits Class, Brothers in Arms.

Although thought to have been written by Mark Knoffler in response to the Falklands war in the mid 80's, it's a piece that people now associate with many other conflicts ; military, personal and social.

Dire Straits bass player, John Illsley explains why it remains such a special piece for the band, while Marines chaplain, Nigel Beardsley, recalls the important part it's played in the lives of so many soldiers in Iran and Afghanistan and why it's now often heard at military funerals.

The Irish playwright, Sam Millar describes why he based a very personal play around the song and Snuffy Walden, music director of the hit American TV show, The West Wing, talks about how the series writer, Aaron Sorkin insisted on it being used in its entirety during a crucial episode.

Prof Alan Moore of Surrey University explains how it's Knopfler's brilliant use of harmony that gives the song the sense of yearning that has made it into one of the most enduring pop songs of the last century.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

The enduring appeal of the Dire Straits classic is explored by those touched by the piece.

An exploration into the enduring appeal of the Dire Straits classic, Brothers in Arms.

Although thought to have been written by Mark Knopfler in response to the Falklands war in the mid 80's, it's a piece that people now associate with many other conflicts ; military, personal and social.

1405Bach's St Matthew Passion2012092520170324 (BBC7)
20170325 (BBC7)

An exploration of how Bach's St Matthew Passion touches and changes people's lives.

Bach's St Matthew Passion was written in 1727 and was probably first performed as part of the Good Friday Service at Thomaskirche in Leipzig. This programme explores ways in which Bach's St Mattew Passion touches and changes people's lives. Guitarist Andrew Schulman describes what happened when he was played this music whilst he was in a coma. James Jacobs talks about the St Matthew Passion providing solace in difficult times during childhood. And singer Emma Kirkby, conductor Paul Spicer and musical historian Simon Heighes explore how the music works and what it's like to perform.

Producer: Rosie Boulton.

1405 LASTBach's St Matthew Passion2012092520120930
20170324 (BBC7)
20170325 (BBC7)

was written in 1727 and was probably first performed as part of the Good Friday Service at Thomaskirche in Leipzig. This programme explores ways in which Bach's St Mattew Passion touches and changes people's lives. Guitarist Andrew Schulman describes what happened when he was played this music whilst he was in a coma. James Jacobs talks about the St Matthew Passion providing solace in difficult times during childhood. And singer Emma Kirkby, conductor Paul Spicer and musical historian Simon Heighes explore how the music works and what it's like to perform.

Producer: Rosie Boulton.

An exploration of how Bach's St Matthew Passion touches and changes people's lives.

Bach's St Matthew Passion was written in 1727 and was probably first performed as part of the Good Friday Service at Thomaskirche in Leipzig. This programme explores ways in which Bach's St Matthew Passion touches and changes people's lives. Guitarist Andrew Schulman describes what happened when he was played this music whilst he was in a coma. James Jacobs talks about the St Matthew Passion providing solace in difficult times during childhood. And singer Emma Kirkby, conductor Paul Spicer and musical historian Simon Heighes explore how the music works and what it's like to perform.

Bach's St Matthew Passion was written in 1727 and was probably first performed as part of the Good Friday Service at Thomaskirche in Leipzig. This programme explores ways in which Bach's St Mattew Passion touches and changes people's lives. Guitarist Andrew Schulman describes what happened when he was played this music whilst he was in a coma. James Jacobs talks about the St Matthew Passion providing solace in difficult times during childhood. And singer Emma Kirkby, conductor Paul Spicer and musical historian Simon Heighes explore how the music works and what it's like to perform.

1501Peggy Lee's Is That All There Is?2013020520130209
20170331 (BBC7)
20170401 (BBC7)

Those who love the Leiber and Stoller song find it inspirational rather than cynical.

Is That All There Is, the Leiber and Stoller song made famous by Peggy Lee, is based upon a short story by Thomas Mann called 'Disillusionment', but those who know and love it feel it's inspirational rather than a cynical, world weary musical take on existentialism and the futility of life.

Soul Music finds the compelling individual stories behind our collective love of music.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

The impact of the song written by Leiber and Stoller, inspired by the writer Thomas Mann.

1502Beethoven's Fifth Symphony2013021220170407 (BBC7)
20170408 (BBC7)

More than just 'da da da dum': Beethoven's 5th Symphony is this week's Soul Music.

It accompanied Sir Robin Knox-Johnston on the regular Bombay to Basra route he sailed during his early days in the Merchant Navy.

Archaeologist and crime novelist, Dana Cameron, spent many a long day in a dark, lonely basement analysing artefacts from a merchant's house in Salem, Massachusetts. A CD player was often her only companion and Beethoven's 5th buoyed her through these arduous days working towards her PhD

And for conductor, Christopher Gayford, it was the piece which provided a breakthrough in his musical life. Recalling the time he spent rehearsing it with the Sheffield Youth Orchestra - for a tour in East Germany - he describes the build up to one of the most memorable performances of his career.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

More than just 'da da da dum', how Beethoven's famous symphony touched people's lives.

1503She Moved Through The Fair2013021920130223
20170414 (BBC7)
20170415 (BBC7)

The Irish traditional song She Moved Through The Fair is well loved and well recorded by many. To some it is a ghost story that tells of unfulfilled longings and of hopes and aspirations cut short. Sinead O' Connor and others talk about the haunting beauty of this ancient song and of why its imagery is carved into their souls.

Sinead O'Connor and others talk about the haunting beauty of this ancient song.

1504Pergolesi's Stabat Mater2013022620130302
20170428 (BBC7)
20170429 (BBC7)

The Stabat Mater's imagines the sufferings of the Virgin Mary at the foot of the cross, and Pergolesi's eighteen-century setting remains a choral favourite.

Pam Self tells the moving story of how this piece unites her and her friend Helen Vaughan, both during life and after.

Soprano Catherine Bott reflects on the piece's themes.

The Stabat Mater has been reinterpreted many times over the years: Sasha Lazard recalls singing it in the school choir, before later taking the melody and transforming it into a dance version for her album 'The Myth of Red' rechristening it 'Stabat Mater IXXI' in the wake of the September 11th attacks.

Victor Alcantara also sang it as a boy, before returning to the piece as an adult and transforming it into a jazz opus.

Composer and Conductor Paul Spicer examines the musical tensions in the piece, likening its opening to "a heartbeat."

Professor Anthony DelDonna recalls a performance of the Stabat Mater in his hometown of Naples, and reflects on the moment which reaffirmed his his faith.

Producer: Toby Field

Researcher: Nicola Humphries.

Soprano Catherine Bott talks about performing it with James Bowman at St Pancras station for the BBC series 'Why Beauty Matters'.

The Stabat Mater has been reinterpreted many times over the years, and Sasha Lazard tells how she sang it in the school choir, before taking the melody and produced a dance version for her album 'The Myth of Red.'

Victor Alcantara also sung it as a boy, returning to it as an adult and transforming it into a jazz opus.

Soul Music finds the compelling individual stories behind our collective love of music.

The Stabat Mater hymn imagines the sufferings of the Virgin Mary at the foot of the cross.

The Stabat Mater's imagines the sufferings of the Virgin Mary at the foot of the cross, and Pergolesi's eighteen-century setting remains a choral favourite.

Pam Self tells the moving story of how this piece unites her and her friend Helen Vaughan, both during life and after.

Soprano Catherine Bott reflects on the piece's themes.

The Stabat Mater has been reinterpreted many times over the years: Sasha Lazard recalls singing it in the school choir, before later taking the melody and transforming it into a dance version for her album 'The Myth of Red' rechristening it 'Stabat Mater IXXI' in the wake of the September 11th attacks.

Victor Alcantara also sang it as a boy, before returning to the piece as an adult and transforming it into a jazz opus.

Composer and Conductor Paul Spicer examines the musical tensions in the piece, likening its opening to "a heartbeat."

Professor Anthony DelDonna recalls a performance of the Stabat Mater in his hometown of Naples, and reflects on the moment which reaffirmed his his faith.

Producer: Toby Field
Researcher: Nicola Humphries.

1505Shipbuilding2013030520170616 (BBC7)

The Robert Wyatt song from 1982, written by Elvis Costello and Clive Langer.

The song from 1982 was written by Elvis Costello and Clive Langer for Robert Wyatt and has been recorded in several versions by Elvis Costello himself, Suede, June Tabor, Hue and Cry, Tamsin Archer and The Unthanks.

The blend of subtle lyrics and extraordinary music makes this a political song like no other. It transcends the particular circumstances of its writing: the Falklands War and the decline of British heavy industry, especially ship-building.

Clive Langer and Elvis Costello describe how the song came to be written and how the legendary jazz trumpeter and flugelhorn player, Chet Baker, came to perform on Costello's version.

Richard Ashcroft is a philosopher who wants the song, which he describes as a kind of secular hymn, played at his funeral because it gives a perfect expression of how he believes we should think about life. Not being able to feel the emotion of the song would, he feels, be like being morally tone-deaf. If you don't like this song, he'd find it hard to be your friend.

The song's achingly beautiful final couplet about "diving for pearls" makes the MP Alan Johnson cry and has also inspired an oral history and migrant integration project in Glasgow. Chris Gourley describes how the participants found a way to overcome their lack of English and communicate through a shared understanding of ship-building practice.

Other contributors include Hopi Sen, a political blogger who was an unusually political child, and the Mercury Prize winning folk group The Unthanks. They toured their version to towns with ship-building connections as part of a live performance of a film tracing the history of British ship-building using archive footage.

Producer: Natalie Steed.

1505 LASTShipbuilding2013030520130317
20170616 (BBC7)

The song from 1982 was written by Elvis Costello and Clive Langer for Robert Wyatt and has been recorded in several versions by Elvis Costello himself, Suede, June Tabor, Hue and Cry, Tamsin Archer and the Unthanks.

Its blend of subtle lyrics and extraordinary music makes this a political song like no other. It transcends the particular circumstances of its writing: the Falklands War and the decline of British heavy industry, especially ship-building.

Clive Langer and Elvis Costello describe how the song came to be written and how the legendary jazz trumpeter and flugelhorn player, Chet Baker came to perform on Costello's version.

Richard Ashcroft is a philosopher who wants the song, which he describes as a kind of secular hymn, played at his funeral because it gives a perfect expression of how he believes we should think about life. Not being able to feel the emotion of the song would, he feels, be like being morally tone-deaf. If you don't like this song, he'd find it hard to be your friend.

The song's achingly beautiful final couplet about "diving for pearls" makes the MP Alan Johnson cry and has also inspired an oral history and migrant integration project in Glasgow. Chris Gourley describes how the participants found a way to overcome their lack of English and communicate through a shared understanding of ship-building practice.

Other contributors include Hopi Sen, a political blogger who was an unusually political child, and the Mercury Prize winning folk group The Unthanks. They toured their version to towns with ship-building connections as part of a live performance of a film tracing the history of British ship-building using archive footage.

Producer: Natalie Steed.

Richard Ashcroft is a philosopher who wants the song, which he describes as a kind of secular hymn, played at his funeral because it gives a perfect expression of how he believes we should think about life. Not being able to feel the emotion of the song would, he feels, would be like being morally tone-deaf. If you don't like this song, he'd find it hard to be your friend.

The song's achingly beautiful final couplet about "diving for pearls" makes the MP Alan Johnson cry and has also inspired an oral history and migrant integration project in Glasgow. Chris Gourlay describes how the participants found a way to overcome their lack of English and communicate through a shared understanding of ship building practice.

Other contributors include Hopi Sen, a political blogger who was an unusually political child and the Mercury Prize winning folk group The Unthanks who toured their version to towns with shipbuilding connections as part of a live performance of a film tracing the history of British shipbuilding using archive footage.

The Robert Wyatt song from 1982, written by Elvis Costello and Clive Langer.

The song from 1982 was written by Elvis Costello and Clive Langer for Robert Wyatt and has been recorded in several versions by Elvis Costello himself, Suede, June Tabor, Hue and Cry, Tamsin Archer and The Unthanks.

The blend of subtle lyrics and extraordinary music makes this a political song like no other. It transcends the particular circumstances of its writing: the Falklands War and the decline of British heavy industry, especially ship-building.

Clive Langer and Elvis Costello describe how the song came to be written and how the legendary jazz trumpeter and flugelhorn player, Chet Baker, came to perform on Costello's version.

Richard Ashcroft is a philosopher who wants the song, which he describes as a kind of secular hymn, played at his funeral because it gives a perfect expression of how he believes we should think about life. Not being able to feel the emotion of the song would, he feels, be like being morally tone-deaf. If you don't like this song, he'd find it hard to be your friend.

The song's achingly beautiful final couplet about "diving for pearls" makes the MP Alan Johnson cry and has also inspired an oral history and migrant integration project in Glasgow. Chris Gourley describes how the participants found a way to overcome their lack of English and communicate through a shared understanding of ship-building practice.

Other contributors include Hopi Sen, a political blogger who was an unusually political child, and the Mercury Prize winning folk group The Unthanks. They toured their version to towns with ship-building connections as part of a live performance of a film tracing the history of British ship-building using archive footage.

Producer: Natalie Steed.

1601Lili Marlene2013070220130706
20170512 (BBC7)

A new series of SOUL MUSIC begins with stories of love, loss and friendship through the WWII favourite Lili Marlene, made famous by Marlene Dietrich and sung by soldiers on both sides.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

The impact of wartime favourite 'Lili Marlene', made famous by Marlene Dietrich.

1602Rodrigo's Concierto De Aranjuez For Guitar2013070920130713
20170519 (BBC7)

Written by Joaquin Rodrigo in 1939, the Concierto de Aranjuez is a guitar classic. It was written amid the chaos of the Spanish Civil War, and in circumstances of poverty and personal tragedy. This programme explores how the piece touches and changes people's lives.

The composer's daughter Cecilia Rodrigo explains how the blind composer was inspired by the fountains and gardens of the palace of Aranjuez. Nelício Faria de Sales recounts an unforgettable performance deep inside one of Brazil's largest caves, while David B Katague remembers how the piece got him through a difficult period of separation from his family in the Philippines.

Guitarist Craig Ogden explains the magic of the piece for a performer, and actor Simon Callow recalls how hearing the piece was a formative experience for him during his schooldays, when it turned rural Berkshire into a piece of Spain.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.

How Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez for classical guitar touches people's lives.

Written by Joaquin Rodrigo in 1939, the Concierto de Aranjuez is a guitar classic. It was written amid the chaos of the Spanish Civil War, and in circumstances of poverty and personal tragedy. This programme explores how the piece touches and changes people's lives.

The composer's daughter Cecilia Rodrigo explains how the blind composer was inspired by the fountains and gardens of the palace of Aranjuez. Nelício Faria de Sales recounts an unforgettable performance deep inside one of Brazil's largest caves, while David B Katague remembers how the piece got him through a difficult period of separation from his family in the Philippines.

Guitarist Craig Ogden explains the magic of the piece for a performer, and actor Simon Callow recalls how hearing the piece was a formative experience for him during his schooldays, when it turned rural Berkshire into a piece of Spain.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.

1603Make Me A Channel Of Your Peace2013071620130720
20170526 (BBC7)

The hymn 'Make Me a Channel of Your Peace' found its way into weddings, funerals and school assemblies and in this week's 'Soul Music' we hear how it has also embedded itself into the hearts of peace campaigners, charity workers and reformed alcoholics.

The simplicity of this hymn often belies the challenges at its heart. Its lyrics call for unconditional love and forgiveness in the toughest situations. The words are based on a poem which has often been attributed to St Francis of Assisi. However, Franciscan Historian, Dr Christian Renoux, suggests it was most likely to have been written by an anonymous French noble women.

The poem travelled across the globe with translations published during the first and second world wars, subsequently bringing inspiration to public figures ranging from Mother Theresa to President Roosevelt.

In 1967 it caught the eye of South African born musician and 'yogi' Sebastian Temple who put these words to its most famous musical arrangement. It's Sebastian's version that was played at Princess Diana's funeral and that has also touched the hearts of millions worldwide.

Mathew Neville of children's charity 'World Vision' recalls his encounter with this hymn in the Democratic Republic of Congo, whilst closer to home Wendy and Colin Parry share their memories of this music and the role it played in remembering their son Tim, who was killed in the 1993 Warrington Bombings.

In Minnesota former lawyer Mike Donohue reflects on how this hymn has guided him on a journey through alcohol abuse and dementia and Sarah Hershberg remembers her good friend Sebastian Temple, who first played this simple hymn in her front room before it went on to travel the world.

Exploring the hymn that inspires campaigners, charity workers and reformed alcoholics.

The hymn 'Make Me a Channel of Your Peace' found its way into weddings, funerals and school assemblies and in this week's 'Soul Music' we hear how it has also embedded itself into the hearts of peace campaigners, charity workers and reformed alcoholics.

The simplicity of this hymn often belies the challenges at its heart. Its lyrics call for unconditional love and forgiveness in the toughest situations. The words are based on a poem which has often been attributed to St Francis of Assisi. However, Franciscan Historian, Dr Christian Renoux, suggests it was most likely to have been written by an anonymous French noble women.

The poem travelled across the globe with translations published during the first and second world wars, subsequently bringing inspiration to public figures ranging from Mother Theresa to President Roosevelt.

In 1967 it caught the eye of South African born musician and 'yogi' Sebastian Temple who put these words to its most famous musical arrangement. It's Sebastian's version that was played at Princess Diana's funeral and that has also touched the hearts of millions worldwide.

Mathew Neville of children's charity 'World Vision' recalls his encounter with this hymn in the Democratic Republic of Congo, whilst closer to home Wendy and Colin Parry share their memories of this music and the role it played in remembering their son Tim, who was killed in the 1993 Warrington Bombings.

In Minnesota former lawyer Mike Donohue reflects on how this hymn has guided him on a journey through alcohol abuse and dementia and Sarah Hershberg remembers her good friend Sebastian Temple, who first played this simple hymn in her front room before it went on to travel the world.

1604Don't Leave Me This Way2013072320130727
20170602 (BBC7)

was written in the early 1970s by songwriters Huff, Gamble and Gilbert who were the composers behind the famous black American Philadelphia Sound. It was first performed by Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes, featuring Teddy Pendergrass on lead vocals, and later became a hit for Thelma Houston and the Communards. As the title suggests, the song is all about longing, yearning and loss. Remarkable stories in this edition of Soul Music reflect the pain expressed in this soul classic, including one told by Dr Dan Gottlieb, a quadriplegic therapist who befriended Teddy Pendergrass after he became paralysed in a car accident. Sharon Wachsler recalls dancing to the version made famous by The Communards in 1986 before a devastating illness left her housebound and reliant on her beloved service dog Gadget, who gave her a reason to keep going. When he died, the song was the only way she could express her grief over his loss. The Reverend Richard Coles, formerly of The Communards, talks about the significance of Don't Leave Me This Way as a dancefloor anthem for young gay men in the 1980s that was later to become associated with the AIDS epidemic that took so many of their lives.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Exploration of the disco anthem of yearning, pain and loss.

Don't Leave Me This Way was written in the early 1970s by songwriters Huff, Gamble and Gilbert who were the composers behind the famous black American Philadelphia Sound. It was first performed by Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes, featuring Teddy Pendergrass on lead vocals, and later became a hit for Thelma Houston and the Communards. As the title suggests, the song is all about longing, yearning and loss. Remarkable stories in this edition of Soul Music reflect the pain expressed in this soul classic, including one told by Dr Dan Gottlieb, a quadriplegic therapist who befriended Teddy Pendergrass after he became paralysed in a car accident. Sharon Wachsler recalls dancing to the version made famous by The Communards in 1986 before a devastating illness left her housebound and reliant on her beloved service dog Gadget, who gave her a reason to keep going. When he died, the song was the only way she could express her grief over his loss. The Reverend Richard Coles, formerly of The Communards, talks about the significance of Don't Leave Me This Way as a dancefloor anthem for young gay men in the 1980s that was later to become associated with the AIDS epidemic that took so many of their lives.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

1605Elgar's Dream Of Gerontius2013073020170609 (BBC7)

How Elgar's poignant choral work has touched and changed people's lives.

How the choral work The Dream of Gerontius, by Elgar, has touched and changed people's lives.
We hear from Terry Waite for whom it was the first piece of music he heard as a hostage in the Lebanon, after four years in solitary confinement.
Music writer and broadcaster Stephen Johnson describes how Elgar's own fragile emotional state is written into the music, which describes the journey taken by a dying man.
Singer Catherine Wyn-Rogers explains how Elgar's music helped her come to terms with the loss of her parents.
Martin Firth recalls a life-enhancing performance of the piece in Bristol cathedral.
Jude Kelly, artistic director of the South Bank Centre, explains how she experienced the choir in this piece as a 'spiritual army' when she performed it at university.
Martyn Marsh describes how the music brought him to a realisation about how he would like to end his days.
And Robin Self recalls a life-changing performance of this piece, which enabled him to grieve for his son.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.

1605 LASTThe Dream Of Gerontius2013073020130811
20170609 (BBC7)

How the choral work The Dream of Gerontius, by Elgar, has touched and changed people's lives. Singer Catherine Wyn-Rogers explains how Elgar's music helped her come to terms with the loss of her parents. Robin Self recalls a life-changing performance of this piece, which enabled him to grieve for his son. And Stephen Johnson describes how Elgar's own fragile emotional state is written into the music, which describes the journey taken by a dying man.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.

How the choral work The Dream of Gerontius, by Elgar, has touched and changed people's lives.

We hear from Terry Waite for whom it was the first piece of music he heard as a hostage in the Lebanon, after four years in solitary confinement.

Music writer and broadcaster Stephen Johnson describes how Elgar's own fragile emotional state is written into the music, which describes the journey taken by a dying man.

Singer Catherine Wyn-Rogers explains how Elgar's music helped her come to terms with the loss of her parents.

Martin Firth recalls a life-enhancing performance of the piece in Bristol cathedral.

Jude Kelly, artistic director of the South Bank Centre, explains how she experienced the choir in this piece as a 'spiritual army' when she performed it at university.

Martyn Marsh describes how the music brought him to a realisation about how he would like to end his days.

And Robin Self recalls a life-changing performance of this piece, which enabled him to grieve for his son.

How Elgar's poignant choral work has touched and changed people's lives.

How the choral work The Dream of Gerontius, by Elgar, has touched and changed people's lives.
We hear from Terry Waite for whom it was the first piece of music he heard as a hostage in the Lebanon, after four years in solitary confinement.
Music writer and broadcaster Stephen Johnson describes how Elgar's own fragile emotional state is written into the music, which describes the journey taken by a dying man.
Singer Catherine Wyn-Rogers explains how Elgar's music helped her come to terms with the loss of her parents.
Martin Firth recalls a life-enhancing performance of the piece in Bristol cathedral.
Jude Kelly, artistic director of the South Bank Centre, explains how she experienced the choir in this piece as a 'spiritual army' when she performed it at university.
Martyn Marsh describes how the music brought him to a realisation about how he would like to end his days.
And Robin Self recalls a life-changing performance of this piece, which enabled him to grieve for his son.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.

1701Strange Fruit2013112620131130
20170505 (BBC7)

Soul Music examines the harrowing stories behind the song made famous by Billie Holiday.

"Southern trees bear a strange fruit, blood on the leaves and blood at the root..." Billie Holiday's famous song expresses the horror and anguish of those communities subjected to a campaign of lynching in the American South. Soul Music hears the stories of people whose relatives were lynched by white racists and of the various forms of grief, anger and reconciliation that have followed. These include the cousin of teenager Emmett Till, whose killing in 1955 for whistling at a white woman, added powerful impetus to the civil rights movement.

Despite its association with the deep south, the song was actually composed in 1930's New York by a Jewish schoolteacher, Abel Meeropol. Meeropol adopted the children of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg after they were executed in 1953 as Soviet spies. One of those children, Robert, talks of his adopted father's humanity and his belief that the Rosenberg's were killed in a 'state sanctioned lynching by the American government'. For him, Strange Fruit is a comforting reminder of his adopted father's passionate belief in justice and compassion.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

"Southern trees bear a strange fruit, blood on the leaves and blood at the root..." Billie Holiday's famous song expresses the horror and anguish of those communities subjected to a campaign of lynching in the American South. Soul Music hears the stories of people whose relatives were lynched by white racists and of the various forms of grief, anger and reconciliation that have followed. These include the cousin of teenager Emmett Till, whose killing in 1955 for whistling at a white woman, added powerful impetus to the civil rights movement.

Despite its association with the deep south, the song was actually composed in 1930's New York by a Jewish schoolteacher, Abel Meeropol. Meeropol adopted the children of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg after they were executed in 1953 as Soviet spies. One of those children, Robert, talks of his adopted father's humanity and his belief that the Rosenberg's were killed in a 'state sanctioned lynching by the American government'. For him, Strange Fruit is a comforting reminder of his adopted father's passionate belief in justice and compassion.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

1702Gymnopdie No 12013120320170623 (BBC7)

Pascal Rogé leads us through a personal and musical journey of Erik Satie's Gymnopédies.

From the seat of a concert hall piano, Pascal Rogé, one of the world's greatest interpreters of French piano music, leads us through a personal and musical journey of Erik Satie's Gymnopédies. You may not immediately know the title but in hearing just the first few notes you are most likely to know the music.

Erik Satie's Gymnopédies are a collection of short, atmospheric pieces of which Gymnopédie No.1 is perhaps the most popular. Music historian and author Mark Prendergast has studied Satie's work and reveals the complex character of the man who revolutionised the 19th century classical music of Europe. Melbourne based artist Colin Duncan reflects on the music's 'physical form which takes you into space and time' and for him inspired a body of work created in brail. Murder Mystery writer Cathy Ace remembers how this meditative music could shut out the noise of the city as she sped around London in her old brown mini, whilst Mathematician and author Ian Stewart explores the mathematics of this special piece and how music can touch our soul.

1702Gymnopedie No 12013120320131207
20170623 (BBC7)

From the seat of a concert hall piano, Pascal Rogé, one of the world's greatest interpreters of French piano music, leads us through a personal and musical journey of Erik Satie's Gymnopédies. You may not immediately know the title but in hearing just the first few notes you are most likely to know the music.

Erik Satie's Gymnopédies are a collection of short, atmospheric pieces of which Gymnopédie No.1 is perhaps the most popular. Music historian and author Mark Prendergast has studied Satie's work and reveals the complex character of the man who revolutionised the 19th century classical music of Europe. Melbourne based artist Colin Duncan reflects on the music's 'physical form which takes you into space and time' and for him inspired a body of work created in brail. Murder Mystery writer Cathy Ace remembers how this meditative music could shut out the noise of the city as she sped around London in her old brown mini, whilst Mathematician and author Ian Stewart explores the mathematics of this special piece and how music can touch our soul.

Pascal Rogé leads us through a personal and musical journey of Erik Satie's Gymnopédies.

From the seat of a concert hall piano, Pascal Rogé, one of the world's greatest interpreters of French piano music, leads us through a personal and musical journey of Erik Satie's Gymnopédies. You may not immediately know the title but in hearing just the first few notes you are most likely to know the music.

Erik Satie's Gymnopédies are a collection of short, atmospheric pieces of which Gymnopédie No.1 is perhaps the most popular. Music historian and author Mark Prendergast has studied Satie's work and reveals the complex character of the man who revolutionised the 19th century classical music of Europe. Melbourne based artist Colin Duncan reflects on the music's 'physical form which takes you into space and time' and for him inspired a body of work created in brail. Murder Mystery writer Cathy Ace remembers how this meditative music could shut out the noise of the city as she sped around London in her old brown mini, whilst Mathematician and author Ian Stewart explores the mathematics of this special piece and how music can touch our soul.

1703Can't Take My Eyes Off You2013121020131214
20170630 (BBC7)

Few songs can claim to be - quite literally - as far reaching as the 1967 classic 'Can't Take My Eyes off You'. In this edition of Radio 4's 'Soul Music', we hear from former astronaut Christopher Ferguson who heard this song as an early morning wake-up call aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. And from mum of two Michelle Noakes who sang this classic piece to the baby she was told she may never be able to carry. We also hear from the honeymoon couple whose marriage proposal began with a hundred strong 'flash mob' performance of this track and from Frankie Valli himself, who reflects on one of the most moving performances he ever gave when he sang 'Can't Take My Eyes off You' to a crowd of recently returned Vietnam Veterans. DJ Mark Radcliff recalls the many artists since Valli that have covered this song (not least his mum as she sang along to the Andy Williams version) and composer Bob Gaudio tells us how this now universally famous piece of music began life in a room over looking Central Park with a melody originally penned for a children's nursery rhyme.

Producer: Nicola Humphries.

Frankie Valli and others share their memories of the classic song.

Few songs can claim to be - quite literally - as far reaching as the 1967 classic 'Can't Take My Eyes off You'. In this edition of Radio 4's 'Soul Music', we hear from former astronaut Christopher Ferguson who heard this song as an early morning wake-up call aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. And from mum of two Michelle Noakes who sang this classic piece to the baby she was told she may never be able to carry. We also hear from the honeymoon couple whose marriage proposal began with a hundred strong 'flash mob' performance of this track and from Frankie Valli himself, who reflects on one of the most moving performances he ever gave when he sang 'Can't Take My Eyes off You' to a crowd of recently returned Vietnam Veterans. DJ Mark Radcliff recalls the many artists since Valli that have covered this song (not least his mum as she sang along to the Andy Williams version) and composer Bob Gaudio tells us how this now universally famous piece of music began life in a room over looking Central Park with a melody originally penned for a children's nursery rhyme.

Producer: Nicola Humphries.

1704Brahms' German Requiem2013121720170707 (BBC7)

How Brahms' German Requiem, written as a tribute to his mother and designed to comfort the grieving, has touched and changed peoples lives.

Stuart Perkins describes how the piece arrived at the right time in his life, after the death of his aunt.

Axel Körner, Professor of Modern History at University College London, explains the genesis of the work and how the deaths of Brahms' friends and family contributed to the emotional power of the piece.

Daniel Malis and Danica Buckley recall how the piece enabled them to cope with the trauma of the Boston marathon bombings.

Simon Halsey, Chief Conductor of the Berlin Radio Choir, explores how Brahms' experience as a church musician enabled him to distil hundreds of years of musical history into this dramatic choral work.

For Imani Mosley, the piece helped her through a traumatic time in hospital. Rosemary Sales sought solace in the physical power of Brahms' music after the death of her son. And June Noble recounts how the piece helped her find her voice and make her peace with her parents.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.

How Brahms's work, a tribute to his mother, has touched and changed people's lives.

How Brahms' German Requiem, written as a tribute to his mother and designed to comfort the grieving, has touched and changed peoples lives.

Stuart Perkins describes how the piece arrived at the right time in his life, after the death of his aunt.

Axel Körner, Professor of Modern History at University College London, explains the genesis of the work and how the deaths of Brahms' friends and family contributed to the emotional power of the piece.

Daniel Malis and Danica Buckley recall how the piece enabled them to cope with the trauma of the Boston marathon bombings.

Simon Halsey, Chief Conductor of the Berlin Radio Choir, explores how Brahms' experience as a church musician enabled him to distil hundreds of years of musical history into this dramatic choral work.

For Imani Mosley, the piece helped her through a traumatic time in hospital. Rosemary Sales sought solace in the physical power of Brahms' music after the death of her son. And June Noble recounts how the piece helped her find her voice and make her peace with her parents.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.

1705Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas2013122420161223 (BBC7)
20161224 (BBC7)

The story of the melancholic song, first performed by Judy Garland in 1944.

Soul Music tells the story of the song, Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas, and talks to people for whom it has special meaning.

'Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas', was first performed by Judy Garland in the 1944 MGM musical Meet Me In St Louis', for the now famous scene in which Garland and her seven year old sister, played by Margaret O'Brien are downcast about the prospect of moving away from their beloved home.

Garland asked the composer, Hugh Martin to modify his original lyric, explaining it to be too depressing for her to sing, or the audience to hear.

Martin's collaborator and friend, John Fricke, explains the importance this song had for the composer and the joy he experienced in hearing it covered by every major artist since, from Frank Sinatra to Chrissie Hynde, Punk band Fear to Cold Play, Rod Stewart to James Taylor.

It's clear that the song's enduring power lies in a beautiful melody with a melancholic feel that sums up our emotional ambivalence to the Christmas season. We hear from those who have a special connection to the song.

Producer Lucy Lunt.

1705 LASTHave Yourself A Merry Little Christmas2013122420131228
20161223 (BBC7)
20161224 (BBC7)

Soul Music tells the story of the song, Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas, and talks to people for whom it has special meaning.

'Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas', was first performed by Judy Garland in the 1944 MGM musical Meet Me In St Louis', for the now famous scene in which Garland and her seven year old sister, played by Margaret O'Brien are downcast about the prospect of moving away from their beloved home.

Garland asked the composer, Hugh Martin to modify his original lyric, explaining it to be too depressing for her to sing, or the audience to hear.

Martin's collaborator and friend, John Fricke, explains the importance this song had for the composer and the joy he experienced in hearing it covered by every major artist since, from Frank Sinatra to Chrissie Hynde, Punk band Fear to Cold Play, Rod Stewart to James Taylor.

It's clear that the song's enduring power lies in a beautiful melody with a melancholic feel that sums up our emotional ambivalence to the Christmas season. We hear from those who have a special connection to the song.

Producer Lucy Lunt.

The story of the melancholic song, first performed by Judy Garland in 1944.

1801Rhapsody In Blue2014040120170714 (BBC7)

"I'm convinced it's the best thing ever written and recorded in the history of things written and recorded" - Moby.

Rhapsody in Blue was first heard exactly 90 years ago when it premiered on February 12, 1924, in New York's Aeolian Hall. Through its use at the opening of Woody Allen's 'Manhattan' it has become synonymous with the city that inspired its creation. But for people around the world, George Gershwin's "experiment in modern music" has become imbued with the most personal of memories.

LA based screen writer Charles Peacock reflects on how this piece has become entwined with his life and how, on an evening at the Hollywood Bowl this music "healed him". When Adela Galasiu was growing up in communist Romania, Rhapsody in Blue represented "life itself, as seen through the eyes of an optimist". For world speed champion Gina Campbell, the opening of that piece will forever remind her of the roar of the Bluebird's ignition as it flew through the "glass like stillness of the water" and brings back the memories of her father, the legendary Donald Campbell - it was played at his funeral when he was finally laid to rest decades after his fatal record attempt on Coniston Lake.

Featuring interviews with Professor of Music Howard Pollock and musician Moby.

Soul Music examines Gershwin's 'experiment in modern music', 90 years after its premiere.

"I'm convinced it's the best thing ever written and recorded in the history of things written and recorded" - Moby.

Rhapsody in Blue was first heard exactly 90 years ago when it premiered on February 12, 1924, in New York's Aeolian Hall. Through its use at the opening of Woody Allen's 'Manhattan' it has become synonymous with the city that inspired its creation. But for people around the world, George Gershwin's "experiment in modern music" has become imbued with the most personal of memories.

LA based screen writer Charles Peacock reflects on how this piece has become entwined with his life and how, on an evening at the Hollywood Bowl this music "healed him". When Adela Galasiu was growing up in communist Romania, Rhapsody in Blue represented "life itself, as seen through the eyes of an optimist". For world speed champion Gina Campbell, the opening of that piece will forever remind her of the roar of the Bluebird's ignition as it flew through the "glass like stillness of the water" and brings back the memories of her father, the legendary Donald Campbell - it was played at his funeral when he was finally laid to rest decades after his fatal record attempt on Coniston Lake.

Featuring interviews with Professor of Music Howard Pollock and musician Moby.

1802Crazy2014040820170721 (BBC7)

"It's the kind of music that makes you feel like you're just hurting so good"

People of different ages reflect on why the pop country classic 'Crazy' made famous by Patsy Cline brings out such strong emotions in them, including a young woman mourning the loss of a father's love after divorce, broadcaster Fiona Phillips on losing her father to Alzheimers and 87 year old Wayne Rethford who as a young man in 1961 met Patsy Cline and two years later happened upon the crash site where she died after her plane came down in a heavy storm in Tennessee.

"That music becomes embedded in your soul" he says.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

People of all ages reflect on their love of this simple song, made famous by Patsy Cline.

"It's the kind of music that makes you feel like you're just hurting so good"

People of different ages reflect on why the pop country classic 'Crazy' made famous by Patsy Cline brings out such strong emotions in them, including a young woman mourning the loss of a father's love after divorce, broadcaster Fiona Phillips on losing her father to Alzheimers and 87 year old Wayne Rethford who as a young man in 1961 met Patsy Cline and two years later happened upon the crash site where she died after her plane came down in a heavy storm in Tennessee.

"That music becomes embedded in your soul" he says.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

1803Something Inside So Strong2014041520170728 (BBC7)

Labi Siffre wrote Something Inside So Strong in 1984. Widely believed to have been inspired by seeing film footage from South Africa, of young blacks being shot at by white policeman, he now reveals that the lyrics were also informed by the oppression he had experienced as a homosexual.

The song has been taken up by individuals and groups around the world who have suffered from discrimination. The Choir With No Name in Birmingham, made up of homeless singers, always close their concerts with the song. Choir members explain why it's so important to them, giving them a sense of pride and dignity.

The American singer Suede, talks about the power she finds in the song and the South African singer, Lira talks about making a special recording of it for the birthday of Nelson Mandela, as it was one of his favourite pieces. We hear how Celtic football fans sing it as an act of solidarity with their beleaguered manager, Neil Lennon.

In his first interview for over a decade Siffre explains how he still sings the songs as he tries to put his life back together after the death of his partner, Peter.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

This Labi Siffre anthem has been taken up by many groups who suffer from discrimination.

Labi Siffre wrote Something Inside So Strong in 1984. Widely believed to have been inspired by seeing film footage from South Africa, of young blacks being shot at by white policeman, he now reveals that the lyrics were also informed by the oppression he had experienced as a homosexual.

The song has been taken up by individuals and groups around the world who have suffered from discrimination. The Choir With No Name in Birmingham, made up of homeless singers, always close their concerts with the song. Choir members explain why it's so important to them, giving them a sense of pride and dignity.

The American singer Suede, talks about the power she finds in the song and the South African singer, Lira talks about making a special recording of it for the birthday of Nelson Mandela, as it was one of his favourite pieces. We hear how Celtic football fans sing it as an act of solidarity with their beleaguered manager, Neil Lennon.

In his first interview for over a decade Siffre explains how he still sings the songs as he tries to put his life back together after the death of his partner, Peter.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

1804Myfanwy2014042220170804 (BBC7)

The hauntingly beautiful Welsh song Myfanwy is the choice of this week's Soul Music contributors who range from a Welsh woman living in Sicily for whom the song represents 'hiraeth', a longing or homesickness for Wales to singer Cerys Matthews and members of the Ynysowen choir started in Aberfan after the mining disaster. An ex soldier recalls digging through the rubble for survivors with lines from the song playing in his head "Give me your hand, my sweet Myfanwy", and a man remembers his brother who was tragically killed in India.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

A range of people explain what the hauntingly beautiful Welsh song 'Myfanwy' means to them

The hauntingly beautiful Welsh song Myfanwy 'is in the air in Wales' according to singer Cerys Matthews. She along with others discuss what the melodic tale of unrequited love means to them. They include a Welsh woman living in Sicily for whom the song represents 'hiraeth', a longing or homesickness for Wales and another who believes it expresses the 'wounded soul of the Welsh'. A man remembers how his late brother and he used to sing it in pubs in North Wales and how the song symbolises the unrequited love he felt for him. Members of the Ynysowen choir, started after the mining disaster in Aberfan as a way of dealing with the emotion, talk about the song's power, and an ex soldier recalls digging for survivors with lines from it playing in his head "Give me your hand, my sweet Myfanwy".

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

1805Adagio In G Minor2014042920170811 (BBC7)

Albinoni's Adagio may be wrongly attributed but it still never fails to move us.

Albinoni's Adagio in G Minor, is one of the most popular and moving pieces of music but, as academic and composer Andrew Gant explains, it wasn't written by Albinoni and is now attributed to the twentieth century Italian composer, Giazotto.

Award-winning veteran BBC foreign correspondent, Malcolm Brabant recalls the ' cellist of Sarajevo', Vedran Smailovic, playing it everyday for weeks amidst the wreckage of the beautiful city, as Serbian gunfire raged around.

Virginia McKenna explains how the piece became so special to her and her late husband, Bill Travers, who died twenty years ago this month, the piece was played at the beginning and end of his memorial service.

And TV producer, Gareth Gwenlan reveals why it was chosen as the theme for the character played by Wendy Craig, in the seventies sitcom, Butterflies.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

1805 LASTAlbinoni's Adagio In G Minor20140429

, is one of the most popular and moving pieces of music but, as academic and composer Andrew Gant explains, it wasn't written by Albinoni and is now attributed to the twentieth century Italian composer, Giazotto.

Award-winning veteran BBC foreign correspondent, Malcolm Brabant recalls the ' cellist of Sarajevo', Vedran Smailovic, playing it everyday for weeks amidst the wreckage of the beautiful city, as Serbian gunfire raged around.

Virginia McKenna explains how the piece became so special to her and her late husband, Bill Travers, who died twenty years ago this month, the piece was played at the beginning and end of his memorial service.

And TV producer, Gareth Gwenlan reveals why it was chosen as the theme for the character played by Wendy Craig, in the seventies sitcom, Butterflies.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

1901A Shropshire Lad2014111120170818 (BBC7)

"Into my heart an air that kills

From yon far country blows:

What are those blue remembered hills,

What spires, what farms are those?

That is the land of lost content,

I see it shining plain,

The happy highways where I went

And cannot come again."

So wrote the poet AE Housman lamenting the loss of his brother in the Boer war in his epic poem A Shropshire Lad. It harks back to a simple idyllic rural way of life that is forever changed at the end of the nineteenth century as hundreds of country boys go off to fight and never return. George Butterworth adapted his words to music in 1913 just before the outbreak of the Great War. This edition of Soul Music hears from those whose lives continue to be touched by the loss of so many young men between 1914 and 1918. Broadcaster Sybil Ruscoe recalls visiting her Great Uncle's grave in a military cemetery in France with Butterworth's Rhapsody as the soundtrack to her journey. A concert at Bromsgrove School in Worcestershire where Housman was a pupil remembers the former schoolboys killed in action, and singer Steve Knightley discusses and performs his adaptation of The Lads In Their Hundreds as part of the centenary commemorations. The Bishop of Woolwich connects his love of the countryside and Butterworth's music with his father's battered copy of Housman's poems which comforted him while held captive in Singapore during the Second World War.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Exploring the emotional impact of George Butterworth's rhapsody inspired by the Great War.

"Into my heart an air that kills
From yon far country blows:
What are those blue remembered hills,
What spires, what farms are those?
That is the land of lost content,
I see it shining plain,
The happy highways where I went
And cannot come again."

So wrote the poet AE Housman lamenting the loss of his brother in the Boer war in his epic poem A Shropshire Lad. It harks back to a simple idyllic rural way of life that is forever changed at the end of the nineteenth century as hundreds of country boys go off to fight and never return. George Butterworth adapted his words to music in 1913 just before the outbreak of the Great War. This edition of Soul Music hears from those whose lives continue to be touched by the loss of so many young men between 1914 and 1918. Broadcaster Sybil Ruscoe recalls visiting her Great Uncle's grave in a military cemetery in France with Butterworth's Rhapsody as the soundtrack to her journey. A concert at Bromsgrove School in Worcestershire where Housman was a pupil remembers the former schoolboys killed in action, and singer Steve Knightley discusses and performs his adaptation of The Lads In Their Hundreds as part of the centenary commemorations. The Bishop of Woolwich connects his love of the countryside and Butterworth's music with his father's battered copy of Housman's poems which comforted him while held captive in Singapore during the Second World War.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

1902Plaisir D'amour / Can't Help Falling In Love With You:2014111820170825 (BBC7)

Marianne Faithfull recalls the French love song that went on to inspire Elvis's 60s hit.

In this week's Soul Music Marianne Faithfull recalls the French Love song which went on to inspire Elvis's 60's hit, 'I Can't Help Falling in Love with You'.

'Plaisir d'Amour' is the classical French love song which somehow found its way through 18th century orchestration (Hector Berlioz) and 1960's folk revival, to an unexpected re-invention into the Elvis hit 'I Can't' Help Falling in Love with You'.

It's been recorded by Marianne Faithfull and busked on the streets of Paris by 'The Gruffalo' author Julia Donaldson. It has also touched the lives of former American Military Academy Freshman Andrew Scott and recently married couple Henry (76) and Christine Wallace (82) who fell in love on a moonlit New Year's Eve.

Written in 1784 by Jean-Paul-Égide Martini, Plaisir d'Amour muses on the pleasures and pains of love and was inspired by a poem which appears in Jean-Pierre Claris de Florian's novel 'Célestine'.

For 17 year old Marianne Faithfull it was a song of innocence, recorded in a tiny booth in the old Decca studios whilst happily pregnant with her first child. Meanwhile, author Julia Donaldson and husband Malcolm busked it on the streets of Paris. It was the summer of 1969 and police hid in alleyways, still fearful of students following the 1968 riots.

As the classical French melody was adopted by Elvis and transformed into 'I Can't Help Falling in Love with You', West Point Military Academy Freshman Andrew Scott learnt to pick it's tune on guitar. It's a song that went on to win the heart of his wife of now 20 years. For Henry and Christine Wallace, it summed everything up "It was what I was looking for, someone to share my life and the words 'take my whole life too was in tune with what I wanted'.

Produced By Nicola Humphries.

1902Plaisir D'amour/can't Help Falling In Love With You20141118

In this week's Soul Music Marianne Faithfull recalls the French Love song which went on to inspire Elvis's 60's hit, 'I Can't Help Falling in Love with You'.

'Plaisir d'Amour' is the classical French love song which somehow found its way through 18th century orchestration (Hector Berlioz) and 1960's folk revival, to an unexpected re-invention into the Elvis hit 'I Can't' Help Falling in Love with You'.

It's been recorded by Marianne Faithfull and busked on the streets of Paris by 'The Gruffalo' author Julia Donaldson. It has also touched the lives of former American Military Academy Freshman Andrew Scott and recently married couple Henry (76) and Christine Wallace (82) who fell in love on a moonlit New Year's Eve.

Written in 1784 by Jean-Paul-Égide Martini, Plaisir d'Amour muses on the pleasures and pains of love and was inspired by a poem which appears in Jean-Pierre Claris de Florian's novel 'Célestine'.

For 17 year old Marianne Faithfull it was a song of innocence, recorded in a tiny booth in the old Decca studios whilst happily pregnant with her first child. Meanwhile, author Julia Donaldson and husband Malcolm busked it on the streets of Paris. It was the summer of 1969 and police hid in alleyways, still fearful of students following the 1968 riots.

As the classical French melody was adopted by Elvis and transformed into 'I Can't Help Falling in Love with You', West Point Military Academy Freshman Andrew Scott learnt to pick it's tune on guitar. It's a song that went on to win the heart of his wife of now 20 years. For Henry and Christine Wallace, it summed everything up "It was what I was looking for, someone to share my life and the words 'take my whole life too was in tune with what I wanted'.

Produced By Nicola Humphries.

1903Gracias A La Vida2014112520170901 (BBC7)

- thank you to life - is a song that means a lot to many people around the world. Recorded by artists as diverse as Joan Baez and the magnificent Mercedes Sosa, the song reflects the bittersweet nature of life's joys and sadnesses. To the people of Chile where it was written in 1966 by Violetta Parra, it has become an anthem that brings people together in times of trouble. One man who was tortured and imprisoned under the Pinochet regime in 1973 recalls how playing the song on guitar in prison for other inmates helped keep their spirits and hopes alive under the most brutal circumstances. Australian writer and actor Ailsa Piper recalls being gifted the words to Gracias A La Vida by a fellow walker along one of the holy routes in Spain, and how the song has become a poignant reminder of the fragility of life.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

The Latin American anthem to life is explored through personal stories.

Gracias A La Vida - thank you to life - is a song that means a lot to many people around the world. Recorded by artists as diverse as Joan Baez and the magnificent Mercedes Sosa, the song reflects the bittersweet nature of life's joys and sadnesses. To the people of Chile where it was written in 1966 by Violetta Parra, it has become an anthem that brings people together in times of trouble. One man who was tortured and imprisoned under the Pinochet regime in 1973 recalls how playing the song on guitar in prison for other inmates helped keep their spirits and hopes alive under the most brutal circumstances. Australian writer and actor Ailsa Piper recalls being gifted the words to Gracias A La Vida by a fellow walker along one of the holy routes in Spain, and how the song has become a poignant reminder of the fragility of life.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

1904There Is A Light That Never Goes Out2014120220170908 (BBC7)

The Smiths' 'There Is A Light That Never Goes Out' is explored through personal stories. Released in 1986 on 'The Queen Is Dead' album, it has become an anthem of hope, loss and love. As a teenager, Andy listened to it with his father, as he drove him to work. They had a moment of connection, and when his father died suddenly a few weeks later, the song took on huge significance. When her young son was ill, Sharon Woolley drew strength from this music as she sat by his bedside in the small hours of the morning. For comic artist Lucy Knisley, the song got her through a bad break-up with her long-term boyfriend - and it's meaning changed for her when unexpected events unfolded.

Exploring the lasting emotional impact of The Smiths' 1986 anthem of hope, loss and love.

The Smiths' 'There Is A Light That Never Goes Out' is explored through personal stories. Released in 1986 on 'The Queen Is Dead' album, it has become an anthem of hope, loss and love. As a teenager, Andy listened to it with his father, as he drove him to work. They had a moment of connection, and when his father died suddenly a few weeks later, the song took on huge significance. When her young son was ill, Sharon Woolley drew strength from this music as she sat by his bedside in the small hours of the morning. For comic artist Lucy Knisley, the song got her through a bad break-up with her long-term boyfriend - and it's meaning changed for her when unexpected events unfolded.

1905La Boheme2014120920170915 (BBC7)

Opera director John Copley CBE reflects on his lifelong relationship with La Boheme.

"La Boheme is a work of genius, for me it's the perfect opera. There's not a bar or a word or anything you'd want to alter. It just gets to you" - Opera Director John Copley CBE.

For the final programme in this series of Soul Music, we venture back into the Parisian winter of Puccini's beloved 'La Boheme' where legendary Opera Director John Copley CBE reflects on his 40 years of bringing this tale of friendship, love and loss to the stage of the Royal Opera House. Alongside his memories of sharing pasta with a young Pavarotti we hear the stories from those whose lives have been touched by - and often reflect - the essence of this most popular of operas.

From the romantic gesture of a probationary constable serenading his soon to be bus conductress wife in 1950's Torquay to the moment that a devoted husband passed away - La Boheme has touched the lives of opera lovers around the world.

Featuring interviews with author Mavis Cheek and opera devotees Ray Tabb and Nancy Rossi.

Produced by Nicola Humphries.

1905 LASTLa Boheme20141209

"La Boheme is a work of genius, for me it's the perfect opera. There's not a bar or a word or anything you'd want to alter. It just gets to you" - Opera Director John Copley CBE.

For the final programme in this series of Soul Music, we venture back into the Parisian winter of Puccini's beloved 'La Boheme' where legendary Opera Director John Copley CBE reflects on his 40 years of bringing this tale of friendship, love and loss to the stage of the Royal Opera House. Alongside his memories of sharing pasta with a young Pavarotti we hear the stories from those whose lives have been touched by - and often reflect - the essence of this most popular of operas.

From the romantic gesture of a probationary constable serenading his soon to be bus conductress wife in 1950's Torquay to the moment that a devoted husband passed away - La Boheme has touched the lives of opera lovers around the world.

Featuring interviews with author Mavis Cheek and opera devotees Ray Tabb and Nancy Rossi.

Produced by Nicola Humphries.

2001Hallelujah2015041420170922 (BBC7)

Leonard Cohen's 'Hallelujah' took him years to write. It originally had as many as 80 verses. Recorded for his 'Various Positions' album, it was almost ignored when first released in 1984. Only Bob Dylan saw its true worth and would play it live. John Cale eventually recorded a version which was heard by an obscure musician called Jeff Buckley.

The song has been covered by hundreds of artists including Rufus Wainwright, K.D.Lang and Alexandra Burke.

We hear from those whose relationship with the song is deep and profound: singer Brandi Carlisle listened to it over and over again as a troubled teenager; it became a sound-track to James Talerico falling in love and Jim Kullander made a connection with the song after the death of his wife.

How an obscure track on a Leonard Cohen album became a global anthem.

Leonard Cohen's 'Hallelujah' took him years to write. It originally had as many as 80 verses. Recorded for his 'Various Positions' album, it was almost ignored when first released in 1984. Only Bob Dylan saw its true worth and would play it live. John Cale eventually recorded a version which was heard by an obscure musician called Jeff Buckley.

The song has been covered by hundreds of artists including Rufus Wainwright, kd lang and Alexandra Burke.

We hear from those whose relationship with the song is deep and profound: singer Brandi Carlisle listened to it over and over again as a troubled teenager; it became a sound-track to James Talerico falling in love and Jim Kullander made a connection with the song after the death of his wife.

2002Bach Cello Suite No 1 In G Major2015042120170929 (BBC7)

Bach's Cello Suite No I in G major is one of the most frequently performed and recognisable solo compositions ever written for cello. Yet it was virtually unknown for almost two hundred years until the Catalan cellist, Pablo Casals discovered an edition in a thrift shop in Barcelona. Casals became the first to record it and the suites are now cherished by musicians across the globe.

The world renowned cellist, Steven Isserlis describes his relationship with the piece and why it still surprises and excites him. Fellow cellists Richard Jenkinson and Jane Salmon talk about the challenge of playing it and we hear from the Dominic Martens, a member of the National Youth Orchestra and his teacher, Nick Jones as they explore the piece together.

Garden designer Julie Moir Messervy, describes how Yo-Yo Ma's recording inspired her to design The Toronto Music Garden and doctor Heidi Kimberly explains why she chose the piece for her wedding and why she believes the suite to have healing powers.

While historian and author, Eric Siblin, reveals the extraordinary history of the suites and why some still argue that they was written by Bach's second wife Anna Magdalena.

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Leading cellists explain the power of Bach's Cello Suite No 1 in G Major.

Bach's Cello Suite No I in G major is one of the most frequently performed and recognisable solo compositions ever written for cello. Yet it was virtually unknown for almost two hundred years until the Catalan cellist, Pablo Casals discovered an edition in a thrift shop in Barcelona. Casals became the first to record it and the suites are now cherished by musicians across the globe.

The world renowned cellist, Steven Isserlis describes his relationship with the piece and why it still surprises and excites him. Fellow cellists Richard Jenkinson and Jane Salmon talk about the challenge of playing it and we hear from the Dominic Martens, a member of the National Youth Orchestra and his teacher, Nick Jones as they explore the piece together.

Garden designer Julie Moir Messervy, describes how Yo-Yo Ma's recording inspired her to design The Toronto Music Garden and doctor Heidi Kimberly explains why she chose the piece for her wedding and why she believes the suite to have healing powers.

While historian and author, Eric Siblin, reveals the extraordinary history of the suites and why some still argue that they was written by Bach's second wife Anna Magdalena.

Producer Lucy Lunt.

2003First Cut Is The Deepest2015042820171006 (BBC7)

The story behind the Cat Stevens song, and the memories people associate with it.

Long before it was a worldwide hit for Rod Stewart, the Cat Stevens song 'First Cut is the Deepest' made a name for the former Ike and Tina Turner backing singer, PP Arnold. In an interview for Soul Music she describes the emotional connection she felt to the lyrics, having emerged from an abusive marriage shortly before recording it.

Also contributing to the programme is the song's original producer, Mike Hurst. He describes how he achieved the huge 'wall of sound' production using double drums, a huge string section, and a harp instead of a guitar to play the signature riff at the the start of the track.

There are many personal stories associated with the track: Carsten Knauff recalls a childhood sweetheart - his first true love - and explains why the Cat Stevens' version brings back bitter-sweet memories for him.

Rosemarie Purdy saw PP Arnold give an extraordinary live rendition at a club in Portsmouth in 1967. Never before had she seen such a heartfelt, emotionally charged performance. It's something she's never forgotten.

The Sheryl Crow version reminds Rachel Batson of a very difficult phase in her life; it's a song she says reflects her own faith journey.

And former Radio Caroline DJ, Keith Hampshire, describes the circumstances that led to him having a No.1 hit with the song in Canada. It was the first time 'First Cut' reached No.1 anywhere in the world.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Long before it was a worldwide hit for Rod Stewart, the Cat Stevens song 'First Cut is the Deepest' made a name for the former Ike and Tina Turner backing singer, PP Arnold. In an interview for Soul Music she describes the emotional connection she felt to the lyrics, having emerged from an abusive marriage shortly before recording it.

Also contributing to the programme is the song's original producer, Mike Hurst. He describes how he achieved the huge 'wall of sound' production using double drums, a huge string section, and a harp instead of a guitar to play the signature riff at the the start of the track.

There are many personal stories associated with the track: Carsten Knauff recalls a childhood sweetheart - his first true love - and explains why the Cat Stevens' version brings back bitter-sweet memories for him.

Rosemarie Purdy saw PP Arnold give an extraordinary live rendition at a club in Portsmouth in 1967. Never before had she seen such a heartfelt, emotionally charged performance. It's something she's never forgotten.

The Sheryl Crow version reminds Rachel Batson of a very difficult phase in her life; it's a song she says reflects her own faith journey.

And former Radio Caroline DJ, Keith Hampshire, describes the circumstances that led to him having a No.1 hit with the song in Canada. It was the first time 'First Cut' reached No.1 anywhere in the world.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

2004Scarborough Fair2015050520171013 (BBC7)

Soul Music explores the mystery and emotional ties of folk song Scarborough Fair.

"Tomorrow we're going in search of a song and in search of a dream of England which has travelled right around the world" - Will Parsons

No one can be sure of the true origins of the song Scarborough Fair. It's a melody of mystery, of voices of old, of ancient days. It's travelled through land and time, drawing singers and listeners in where ever they maybe.

For Will Parsons and Guy Hayward it's a song that has inspired a pilgrimage through a landscape that is embodied in the lyrics. Setting off from Whitby Abbey, they journey to Scarborough on foot, sensing the song as they go, learning to sing it, interpreting it in a new way just as thousands of traditional singers have done throughout time.

This too is the landscape of Martin Carthy, the 'father of folk' who has made his home along the Yorkshire coast. It was from this legendary singer that Paul Simon first learnt Scarborough Fair, creating a version that came to represent a generation continuing its journey far and wide, weaving its spell in many different guises, never truly being pinned down.

Decades on Harpist Claire Jones recorded a version of her own. Arranged by her husband, the composer Chris Marshall, hers is a very personal journey through unexpected illness to recovery. Whilst for Mike Masheder it is a song that brings memories of his wife Sally, who approached the journey of life with love and equanimity.

"It can change or stay the same. And the more it changes, the more it stays the same" - Martin Carthy

Produced by Nicola Humphries
With expert contribution from Sandra Kerr, musician and lecturer at Newcastle University School of Arts and Culture.

"Tomorrow we're going in search of a song and in search of a dream of England which has travelled right around the world" - Will Parsons

No one can be sure of the true origins of the song Scarborough Fair. It's a melody of mystery, of voices of old, of ancient days. It's travelled through land and time, drawing singers and listeners in where ever they maybe.

For Will Parsons and Guy Hayward it's a song that has inspired a pilgrimage through a landscape that is embodied in the lyrics. Setting off from Whitby Abbey, they journey to Scarborough on foot, sensing the song as they go, learning to sing it, interpreting it in a new way just as thousands of traditional singers have done throughout time.

This too is the landscape of Martin Carthy, the 'father of folk' who has made his home along the Yorkshire coast. It was from this legendary singer that Paul Simon first learnt Scarborough Fair, creating a version that came to represent a generation continuing its journey far and wide, weaving its spell in many different guises, never truly being pinned down.

Decades on Harpist Claire Jones recorded a version of her own. Arranged by her husband, the composer Chris Marshall, hers is a very personal journey through unexpected illness to recovery. Whilst for Mike Masheder it is a song that brings memories of his wife Sally, who approached the journey of life with love and equanimity.

"It can change or stay the same. And the more it changes, the more it stays the same" - Martin Carthy

Produced by Nicola Humphries

With expert contribution from Sandra Kerr, musician and lecturer at Newcastle University School of Arts and Culture.

2005The Lord Is My Shepherd2015051220171020 (BBC7)

Howard Goodall and Selina Scott explore the lasting impact of the hymn based on Psalm 23.

This much-loved hymn based on Psalm 23 has been set to music many times, including Brother James' Air and Crimond. The Queen requested the Crimond version at her wedding. Harriet Bowes Lyon's tells the story that her mother, Lady Margaret Colville, ( formerly Lady Margaret Egerton) taught the descant to the Queen and Princess Margaret, and was summoned to sing it when, two days before the wedding, the descant music could not be found. Howard Goodall, who wrote a new setting for 'The Vicar of Dibley' describes how he composed it in a taxi. Selina Scott says that the Crimond always puts her in mind of her Scottish grandmother.

This much-loved hymn based on Psalm 23 has been set to music many times, including Brother James' Air and Crimond. The Queen requested the Crimond version at her wedding. Harriet Bowes Lyon's tells the story that her mother, Lady Margaret Colville, ( formerly Lady Margaret Egerton) taught the descant to the Queen and Princess Margaret, and was summoned to sing it when, two days before the wedding, the descant music could not be found. Howard Goodall, who wrote a new setting for 'The Vicar of Dibley' describes how he composed it in a taxi. Selina Scott says that the Crimond always puts her in mind of her Scottish grandmother.

2005 LASTThe Lord Is My Shepherd20150512

This much-loved hymn based on Psalm 23 has been set to music many times, including Brother James' Air and Crimond. The Queen requested the Crimond version at her wedding. Harriet Bowes Lyon's tells the story that her mother, Lady Margaret Colville, ( formerly Lady Margaret Egerton) taught the descant to the Queen and Princess Margaret, and was summoned to sing it when, two days before the wedding, the descant music could not be found. Howard Goodall, who wrote a new setting for 'The Vicar of Dibley' describes how he composed it in a taxi. Selina Scott says that the Crimond always puts her in mind of her Scottish grandmother.

2101Mr Blue Sky2015112420171027
20171027 (BBC7)
20151128 (R4)

An exploration of the impact of ELO's 1978 off-beam classic, Mr Blue Sky.

ELO's brilliantly off-beam classic, Mr Blue Sky, is explored in this week's Soul Music.

It was released as a single in 1978, having first appeared on the ELO album 'Out of the Blue' in 1977. Written by Jeff Lynne, it was a no.6 hit in the UK, and has endured on the radio airwaves ever since.

Contributing to the programme:

Tracey Collinson whose husband, Nigel, loved the track tells of the meaning it has for her.

Musicologist, Allan Moore, discusses the anomolous use of the word 'blue': usually associated with downbeat emotions, this is a peculiar subversion of that cultural norm with the word 'blue' conjuring happiness and good weather.

Tremayne Crossley and his friend, Jo Milne, tell the extraordinary story of how Jo heard music for the first time. This track played an important role in that event.

For Dr. Sam Illingworth, Mr Blue Sky will always take him back to the low-flying research-flights he made over the wetlands, greenlands and seas of the Arctic Circle with the shadow of the BAE146 plane beneath him and clear blue skies above.

The children of King's St. Albans in Worcester sang the track that features at the end of the programme.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

ELO's brilliantly off-beam classic, Mr Blue Sky, is explored in this week's Soul Music.

It was released as a single in 1978, having first appeared on the ELO album 'Out of the Blue' in 1977. Written by Jeff Lynne, it was a no.6 hit in the UK, and has endured on the radio airwaves ever since.

Contributing to the programme:

Tracey Collinson whose husband, Nigel, loved the track tells of the meaning it has for her.

Musicologist, Allan Moore, discusses the anomolous use of the word 'blue': usually associated with downbeat emotions, this is a peculiar subversion of that cultural norm with the word 'blue' conjuring happiness and good weather.

Tremayne Crossley and his friend, Jo Milne, tell the extraordinary story of how Jo heard music for the first time. This track played an important role in that event.

For Dr. Sam Illingworth, Mr Blue Sky will always take him back to the low-flying research-flights he made over the wetlands, greenlands and seas of the Arctic Circle with the shadow of the BAE146 plane beneath him and clear blue skies above.

The children of King's St. Albans in Worcester sang the track that features at the end of the programme.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Contributors explain what ELO's brilliantly off-beam classic means to them.

2102Nkosi Sikelel' Iafrika20151201

Nkosi Sikelel iAfrica (Lord Bless Africa) is a song that runs through the very soul of South African life.

It was originally composed in 1897 by Enoch Sontonga, a Xhosa clergyman at a Methodist mission school near Johannesburg who is said to have been inspired by the melody of John Parry's 'Aberystwyth', a hymn that would've been shared by Welsh missionary's at that time. It went on to travel the African continent but most significantly it became one of the defining symbols of a united South Africa - a country that still holds this song at it's heart.

Having travelled through the country's Christian congregations it soon rang out from meetings and protest rallies throughout the apartheid era eventually becoming the unofficial anthem of the ANC (African National Congress Party). At a time of great hardship and pain, it was a song that offered hope and encouragement to millions of South Africans.

Having being sentenced to life imprisonment, Nkosi Sikelel iAfrica was the song that Nelson Mandela will have heard being sung out by his supporters as he and his fellow ANC members were driven away to Robben Island. Decades later it was the hymn that he would use to unify his country as it was adapted into the South African National Anthem.

Featuring interviews with: Albert Mazibuko of Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Lord Joel Joffe, author

Sindiwe Magona, Edward Griffiths - former CEO of South African Rugby during the 1995 World Cup, music journalist Robin Denslow and the Za Foundation's Zakhele Choir.

**We're sorry that due to copyright restrictions, if you are listening abroad, you will not be able to listen to this programme.**

Produced in Bristol by Nicola Humphries.

2103Mack The Knife2015120820171110 (BBC7)

The Brecht/Weill song Mack the Knife written for The Threepenny Opera in 1928.

The Brecht/Weill song, 'Mack The Knife' first appeared in 'The Threepenny Opera' in Berlin in 1928. Sung about the criminal MacHeath, the 'play with music' is based on John Gay's 'The Beggar's Opera', who was inspired by the real-life English highwayman, Jack Sheppard.

The song became a hit when performed in 1959 by Bobby Darin. Ella Fitzgerald famously forgot the words when performing live in Berlin in 1960 and her improvised version won a Grammy.

Suzi Quatro talks about how she performed it with her father as a child, playing bongos to accompany him, and Lenny Kaye from the Patti Smith Group recalls how he and Patti did a version of 'Mack The Knife' at their first ever performance together at St Marks Church in New York on 10th February 1971, as it was Brecht's birthday.
Film-maker Malcolm Clark tells the story of the song's first public performer, Kurt Gerron, an actor and director, who took the song into the darkest places of the Third Reich.

The Brecht/Weill song, 'Mack The Knife' first appeared in 'The Threepenny Opera' in Berlin in 1928. Sung about the criminal MacHeath, the 'play with music' is based on John Gay's 'The Beggar's Opera', who was inspired by the real-life English highwayman, Jack Sheppard.

The song became a hit when performed in 1959 by Bobby Darin. Ella Fitzgerald famously forgot the words when performing live in Berlin in 1960 and her improvised version won a Grammy.

Suzi Quatro talks about how she performed it with her father as a child, playing bongos to accompany him, and Lenny Kaye from the Patti Smith Group recalls how he and Patti did a version of 'Mack The Knife' at their first ever performance together at St Marks Church in New York on 10th February 1971, as it was Brecht's birthday.

Film-maker Malcolm Clark tells the story of the song's first public performer, Kurt Gerron, an actor and director, who took the song into the darkest places of the Third Reich.

2104Nimrod2015121520171117 (BBC7)

Composer and conductor Paul Spicer explores the impact of Edward Elgar's Nimrod.

Edward Elgar's incomparable Nimrod, and the part it plays in people's lives, is explored this week:

Composed as part of the Enigma Variations in the latter part of the 19th century, Nimrod was inspired by Elgar's friend and music editor, Augustus Jaeger.

In an interview for this programme, Jaeger's granddaughter, Gillian Scully, talks about her grandfather and describes hearing her own granddaughter playing Nimrod at a school concert.

It wasn't what Elgar intended, but Nimrod is now - and, probably, forever - associated with Remembrance. The Right Reverend Nigel McCulloch - National Chaplain to the Royal British Legion - talks about hearing it played at the Festival of Remembrance in the Royal Albert Hall stirring memories of his own father who died in WW2, and serving as a reminder of all those lost or injured in war.

Margaret Evison's son, Lieutenant Mark Evison of the Welsh Guards, was killed in Afghanistan in 2009. Nimrod played an important part in his funeral which was held at The Guard's Chapel in London.

For Lord Victor Adebowale, Chief Executive of the charity Turning Point, Nimrod is a piece that reminds him of his father and the struggles he had as a Nigerian immigrant to the UK.

Composer and conductor, Paul Spicer, plays through Nimrod at the piano exploring why it is a piece that stirs such deep emotions.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Edward Elgar's incomparable Nimrod, and the part it plays in people's lives, is explored this week:

Composed as part of the Enigma Variations in the latter part of the 19th century, Nimrod was inspired by Elgar's friend and music editor, Augustus Jaeger.

In an interview for this programme, Jaeger's granddaughter, Gillian Scully, talks about her grandfather and describes hearing her own granddaughter playing Nimrod at a school concert.

It wasn't what Elgar intended, but Nimrod is now - and, probably, forever - associated with Remembrance. The Right Reverend Nigel McCulloch - National Chaplain to the Royal British Legion - talks about hearing it played at the Festival of Remembrance in the Royal Albert Hall stirring memories of his own father who died in WW2, and serving as a reminder of all those lost or injured in war.

Margaret Evison's son, Lieutenant Mark Evison of the Welsh Guards, was killed in Afghanistan in 2009. Nimrod played an important part in his funeral which was held at The Guard's Chapel in London.

For Lord Victor Adebowale, Chief Executive of the charity Turning Point, Nimrod is a piece that reminds him of his father and the struggles he had as a Nigerian immigrant to the UK.

Composer and conductor, Paul Spicer, plays through Nimrod at the piano exploring why it is a piece that stirs such deep emotions.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

2105 LASTFairytale Of New York2015122220171215 (BBC7)

The tragi-comic tale of love gone sour and shattered dreams eloquently depicted in the Christmas classic Fairytale of New York is the focus of this edition of Soul Music. James Fearnley, pianist with The Pogues recounts how the song started off as a transatlantic love story between an Irish seafarer missing his girl at Christmas before becoming the bittersweet reminiscences of the Irish immigrant down on his luck in the Big Apple, attempting to win back the woman he wooed with promises of 'cars big as bars and rivers of gold'.

Gaelic footballer Alisha Jordan came to New York to play football aged 17 from County Meath in Ireland. Despite being dazzled by the glamour and pace of New York City, she missed her family and friends and stencilled the words 'Fairytale of New York' on her apartment wall as an affirmation of her determination to make the most of her new life in the city. When she was later attacked on the street by a stranger, the words came to signify her battle to recover and not to

let the horrific facial injuries she suffered defeat her or her ambition to captain her football team.

Rachel Burdett posted the video of the song onto her friend Michelle's social media page to let her know she was thinking of her and praying for her safe return when Michelle went missing suddenly one December. Stories of redemption and of a recognition that Christmas is often not the fairytale we are sold, told through a seasonal favourite.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

The stories behind 1988's 'Fairytale of New York' by the Pogues.

The tragi-comic tale of love gone sour and shattered dreams eloquently depicted in the Christmas classic Fairytale of New York is the focus of this edition of Soul Music. James Fearnley, pianist with The Pogues recounts how the song started off as a transatlantic love story between an Irish seafarer missing his girl at Christmas before becoming the bittersweet reminiscences of the Irish immigrant down on his luck in the Big Apple, attempting to win back the woman he wooed with promises of 'cars big as bars and rivers of gold'.

Gaelic footballer Alisha Jordan came to New York to play football aged 17 from County Meath in Ireland. Despite being dazzled by the glamour and pace of New York City, she missed her family and friends and stencilled the words 'Fairytale of New York' on her apartment wall as an affirmation of her determination to make the most of her new life in the city. When she was later attacked on the street by a stranger, the words came to signify her battle to recover and not to
let the horrific facial injuries she suffered defeat her or her ambition to captain her football team.
Rachel Burdett posted the video of the song onto her friend Michelle's social media page to let her know she was thinking of her and praying for her safe return when Michelle went missing suddenly one December. Stories of redemption and of a recognition that Christmas is often not the fairytale we are sold, told through a seasonal favourite.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

2201Bring Him Home20160405

, from Les Miserables, is a beautiful and moving prayer-in-song that has developed meaning and identity outside the hit musical.

Taking part in the programme:

The celebrated tenor, Alfie Boe, has sung this many times in the West End and on Broadway; he discusses what the song means to him.

Herbert Kretzmer talks about the agonising process of writing the lyrics.

The Greater Manchester Police Male Voice Choir recorded a version especially for the programme; one of their members describes singing Bring Him Home at the funeral of PC Dave Phillips in November 2015.

The original Cosette, from Les Miserables, Rebecca Caine now sings this song - written for a male voice - regularly as part of international recitals.

And for Becky Douglas it will forever be a reminder of her daughter whose death inspired the foundation of a leprosy charity.

Jeremy Summerly, Director of Music at St Peter's College, Oxford plays through the piece and describes why it moves us emotionally.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

2202Sukiyaki (ue O Muite Arukou)2016041220171124 (BBC7)

Personal stories of the 1960s Japanese hit song Sukiyaki (Ue o Muite Arukou).

Memories of a prison camp in the Arizona desert, a tsunami and a plane crash are stirred by the bittersweet Japanese song Sukiyaki, a huge global hit of the 1960s.

Originally released in Japan with the title 'Ue o Muite Arukou' ('I Look Up As I Walk'), the song was retitled 'Sukiyaki' (the name for a type of beef stew) for international release. It went to No 1 in the USA, Canada and Australia and placed in the top 10 of the UK singles chart. With melancholy lyrics set to a bright and unforgettable melody, it has since been covered hundreds of times in countless languages.

California peach farmer Mas Masumoto tells the story of his family's internment in an Arizona relocation camp following the bombing of Pearl Harbor and explains what the song meant to him and many other Japanese-Americans in the years after WWII. Violinist and composer Diana Yukawa plays the song as a way to remember her father, who died in the same plane crash that killed Kyu Sakamoto, the original singer of 'Sukiyaki'. Michael Bourdaghs, author of 'Sayonara Amerika, Sayonara Nippon', talks about the songwriting team behind the song (Rokusuke Ei, Hachidai Nakamura and Kyu Sakamoto), and the surprising roots of the song in the Japanese protest movement of the early 1960s.

Janice-Marie Johnson of A Taste of Honey talks about writing an English version of the song and how she interpreted the Japanese lyrics. Gemma Treharne-Foose speaks about her experience of travelling to Japan from her home in the Rhondda Valleys, and what the song came to mean to her. And we hear the story of how Ue o Muite Arukou became a 'prayer for hope' following the devastating earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan in March 2011 from musician Masami Utsunomiya.

Producer: Mair Bosworth.

Memories of a prison camp in the Arizona desert, a tsunami and a plane crash are stirred by the bittersweet Japanese song Sukiyaki, a huge global hit of the 1960s.

Originally released in Japan with the title 'Ue o Muite Arukou' ('I Look Up As I Walk'), the song was retitled 'Sukiyaki' (the name for a type of beef stew) for international release. It went to No 1 in the USA, Canada and Australia and placed in the top 10 of the UK singles chart. With melancholy lyrics set to a bright and unforgettable melody, it has since been covered hundreds of times in countless languages.

California peach farmer Mas Masumoto tells the story of his family's internment in an Arizona relocation camp following the bombing of Pearl Harbor and explains what the song meant to him and many other Japanese-Americans in the years after WWII. Violinist and composer Diana Yukawa plays the song as a way to remember her father, who died in the same plane crash that killed Kyu Sakamoto, the original singer of 'Sukiyaki'. Michael Bourdaghs, author of 'Sayonara Amerika, Sayonara Nippon', talks about the songwriting team behind the song (Rokusuke Ei, Hachidai Nakamura and Kyu Sakamoto), and the surprising roots of the song in the Japanese protest movement of the early 1960s.

Janice-Marie Johnson of A Taste of Honey talks about writing an English version of the song and how she interpreted the Japanese lyrics. Gemma Treharne-Foose speaks about her experience of travelling to Japan from her home in the Rhondda Valleys, and what the song came to mean to her. And we hear the story of how Ue o Muite Arukou became a 'prayer for hope' following the devastating earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan in March 2011 from musician Masami Utsunomiya.

Producer: Mair Bosworth.

2203The Way You Look Tonight2016041920171201 (BBC7)

was made popular by Fred Astaire in the 1936 film, Swing Time.

'The Way You Look Tonight' was written by Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields for the 1936 film 'Swing Time'. Sung by Fred Astaire to Ginger Rodgers while she was washing her hair, the song won an Oscar. It's been recorded by Frank Sinatra and Billie Holiday. Sarah Woodward, daughter of actor Edward, recalls how age seven, she watched him sing it on The Morecambe and Wise Christmas Show with his 'angelic' voice; theatre director Michael Bawtree remembers the song being his father's favourite, and being distraught when he broke the gramophone record as a five year old; and Glaswegian singer Eddie Toal describes making an album of jazz songs, including 'The Way You Look Tonight' to remember his late wife, Irene.

'The Way You Look Tonight' was written by Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields for the 1936 film 'Swing Time'. Sung by Fred Astaire to Ginger Rodgers while she was washing her hair, the song won an Oscar. It's been recorded by Frank Sinatra and Billie Holiday. Sarah Woodward, daughter of actor Edward, recalls how age seven, she watched him sing it on The Morecambe and Wise Christmas Show with his 'angelic' voice; theatre director Michael Bawtree remembers the song being his father's favourite, and being distraught when he broke the gramophone record as a five year old; and Glaswegian singer Eddie Toal describes making an album of jazz songs, including 'The Way You Look Tonight' to remember his late wife, Irene.

2204Mozart's Requiem2016042620171208 (BBC7)

How Mozart's Requiem, written when he was dying, has touched and changed people's lives.

How Mozart's Requiem, written when he was dying, has touched and changed people's lives.

Crime writer Val McDermid recalls how this music helped her after the loss of her father. Hypnotist Athanasios Komianos recounts how the piece took him to the darker side of the spirit world. And a friend of ballet dancer Edward Stierle, Lissette Salgado-Lucas, explains how Eddie turned his struggle with HIV into a ballet inspired by Mozart's music.

Basement Jaxx used the Requiem in their live shows and on their album Scars - Felix Buxton reveals his love for Mozart and the divine nature of the Requiem.

And Mozart expert Cliff Eisen takes us inside the composer's world: how the orchestra and choir conjure visions of funerals, beauty, hellfire and the confusion of death. He recounts how Mozart was commissioned to write the piece by a nobleman who may have intended to pass off the work as his own. The stern challenge faced by people trying to complete the piece are described by composer Michael Finnissy, who himself wrote a completion of the work.

The Requiem was performed at the funerals of many heroic figures - Beethoven, Napoleon and J F Kennedy, among others. Gordana Blazinovic remembers one extraordinary performance during the horrors of the Bosnian war - a show of defiance and grief from the ruins of Sarajevo City Hall.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.

Crime writer Val McDermid recalls how this music helped her after the loss of her father. Hypnotist Athanasios Komianos recounts how the piece took him to the darker side of the spirit world. And a friend of ballet dancer Edward Stierle, Lissette Salgado-Lucas, explains how Eddie turned his struggle with HIV into a ballet inspired by Mozart's music.

Basement Jaxx used the Requiem in their live shows and on their album Scars - Felix Dexter reveals his love for Mozart and the divine nature of the Requiem.

And Mozart expert Cliff Eisen takes us inside the composer's world: how the orchestra and choir conjure visions of funerals, beauty, hellfire and the confusion of death. He recounts how Mozart was commissioned to write the piece by a nobleman who may have intended to pass off the work as his own. The stern challenge faced by people trying to complete the piece are described by composer Michael Finnissy, who himself wrote a completion of the work.

The Requiem was performed at the funerals of many heroic figures - Beethoven, Napoleon and J F Kennedy, among others. Gordana Blazinovic remembers one extraordinary performance during the horrors of the Bosnian war - a show of defiance and grief from the ruins of Sarajevo City Hall.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.

2204 LASTMozart's Requiem20160426

How Mozart's Requiem, written when he was dying, has touched and changed people's lives.

Crime writer Val McDermid recalls how this music helped her after the loss of her father. Hypnotist Athanasios Komianos recounts how the piece took him to the darker side of the spirit world. And a friend of ballet dancer Edward Stierle, Lissette Salgado-Lucas, explains how Eddie turned his struggle with HIV into a ballet inspired by Mozart's music.

Basement Jaxx used the Requiem in their live shows and on their album Scars - Felix Dexter reveals his love for Mozart and the divine nature of the Requiem.

And Mozart expert Cliff Eisen takes us inside the composer's world: how the orchestra and choir conjure visions of funerals, beauty, hellfire and the confusion of death. He recounts how Mozart was commissioned to write the piece by a nobleman who may have intended to pass off the work as his own. The stern challenge faced by people trying to complete the piece are described by composer Michael Finnissy, who himself wrote a completion of the work.

The Requiem was performed at the funerals of many heroic figures - Beethoven, Napoleon and J F Kennedy, among others. Gordana Blazinovic remembers one extraordinary performance during the horrors of the Bosnian war - a show of defiance and grief from the ruins of Sarajevo City Hall.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.

2205Feed The Birds2016050320160507 (R4)

was written for the film Mary Poppins by Richard and Robert Sherman.

'Feed The Birds' was written by Richard and Robert Sherman for the 1964 film Mary Poppins. Composer Richard Sherman recalls how the song was a Walt Disney favourite and long after the film was over, Walt would call him down into his office in the late afternoon, gaze out of the window and say 'Play it.' Karen Dotrice, who played Jane Banks in the original film, describes the experience of hearing the song sung by Julie Andrews. Lawyer Eli McCann describes how re-watching Mary Poppins a few years ago, one snowy afternoon in Salt Lake City, was a turning point in his life, and teacher Marie Barteld remembers her love of 'Feed The Birds' as a child, and how she took the words of the song literally - much to her mother's consternation.

2301A Change Is Gonna Come, By Sam Cooke20161011

Soul Music explores a song that has become synonymous with the American Civil Rights Movement, Sam Cooke's A Change Is Gonna Come released in December 1964 two weeks after he was shot dead in Los Angeles. Contributors include Sam Cooke's brother LC, singer Bettye Lavette who sang it for Barack Obama at his inaugural ceremony and civil rights activists from the Freedom Summer of 64, Jennifer Lawson and Mary King.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

2302Jerusalem20161018

"Jerusalem" has become a quintessentially middle-class and very English song, but it is held in the hearts and memories of people from different backgrounds and cultures.

There is a bit of cricket - Aggers discusses England's stunning and unexpected victory in the 2005 Ashes. Jerusalem reminds of that extraordinary summer.

We hear from Pamela Davenport, the daughter of a man who felt that the words of Jerusalem highlighted inequality in society; lack of money prevented him fulfilling his academic potential and he died in a care home that didn't care well enough for him.

For the American poet, Ann Lauterbach, the unusual and little-known Paul Robeson version was the theme-tune to her escape from the difficult years of Nixon and Vietnam to 1960s London.

The singer, Janet Shell, recalls the burial of her Great Uncle who was killed during World War One, but whose body was only discovered in 2009.

Susanne Sklar - a scholar of William Blake - discusses the inspiration behind the words of the poem. Probably, she says, he wrote them while awaiting his trial for sedition; he was in trouble for fighting with a soldier who had urinated in his garden.

The composer and writer, Paul Spicer, plays, sings and talks through the tune which was composed by Sir Hubert Parry.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

2303The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face20161025

Memories of first love, first borns and loss are stirred by The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face, the timeless love song written by Ewan MacColl for Peggy Seeger, and made famous by Roberta Flack.

The activist and folk musician Peggy Seeger tells the story of her first meeting with Ewan MacColl, which would inspire him to write the song, and talks about what the song means to her today. MacColl's biographer Ben Harker explains why this song is so different from much of Ewan's other work.

Julie Young talks about singing the song to her son Reagan, who had severe complex needs following a cardiac arrest as a baby, and the writer Louise Janson speaks about what the song came to mean to her as she set out on the path to becoming a mother on her own.

Writer and academic Jason King tells the story of how Roberta Flack came to cover this ballad by a Scottish folk musician, and how it catapulted her to fame. And Kandace Springs, a singer and pianist from Nashville, Tennessee, records her version of the song and talks about why the song is one of the greatest love songs of all time.

Produced by Mair Bosworth.

2304 LASTThe Star-spangled Banner20161101

America's national anthem was written by a lawyer, Francis Scott Key, after watching the British navy bombing Fort McHenry in 1814. It was set to an English social men's club song and recognized as the national anthem in 1889. Notoriously difficult to sing, and traditionally played at public sports events and orchestral concerts, the anthem has inspired emotion and attracted controversy. We hear from Dr John Carlos who along with Dr Tommie Smith, raised their fists on the Olympic podium in the Mexico City Olympics in 1968 as the anthem was played; Jose Feliciano who sang the anthem at the 1968 World series and provoked criticism; Conrad Netting IV who discovered the truth about his fighter pilot father's history which led him to a cemetery in Normandy; writer Crista Cloutier who associated it with Obama's election; members of the Coldstream Guards band who played the anthem at the changing of the Guard at Buckingham Palace the day after 9/11 and Leon Hendrix, Jimi's brother, who was in the army at the time of Woodstock, and was put on 'potato peeling duty' because of the 'dishonourable' version his brother had played.

America's national anthem was written by a lawyer, Francis Scott Key, after watching the British navy bombing Fort McHenry in 1814. It was set to an English social men's club song and recognized as the national anthem in 1889. Notoriously difficult to sing, and traditionally played at public sports events and orchestral concerts, the anthem has inspired emotion and attracted controversy. We hear from Dr John Carlos who along with Dr Tommie Smith, raised their fists on the Olympic podium in the Mexico City Olympics in 1968 as the anthem was played; Jose Feliciano who sang the anthem at the 1968 World series and provoked criticism; Conrad Netting IV who discovered the truth about his fighter pilot father's history which led him to a cemetery in Normandy; members of the Coldstream Guards band who played the anthem at the changing of the Guard at Buckingham Palace the day after 9/11 and Leon Hendrix, Jimi's brother, who was in the army at the time of Woodstock, and was put on 'potato peeling duty' because of the 'dishonourable' version his brother had played.

2401Siegfried Idyll20170531

Wagner's celebration of paternal love, written as a birthday gift for his wife.

Wagner's peaceful Siegfried Idyll was written to thank his wife after the birth of his son Siegfried. On her birthday, she awoke to find an orchestra on her staircase performing the music for the first time. It is music which celebrates family relationships, and Soul Music hears from people whose lives and relationships have been touched and changed by this remarkable piece.

Cellist Nick Trygstad explains how the music conjures up scenes of domestic life and helped him cope with his homsickness when he arrived in the UK. Karen West recalls a 50th birthday treat - a trip across lake Lucerne with her father, to visit Wagner's villa. For Tim Reynish, the music has a special connection with his son - when William was born he recreated the first performance on the staircase of his Birmingham home; many years later he conducted the music at his son's memorial concert. And Roberto Paternostro recalls an historic performance in Germany, when he took a group of Israeli musicians to perform Wagner's music for the first time at Bayreuth - the opera house built by Wagner, and later frequented by Adolf Hitler.

Produced by Melvin Rickarby.

2402You Are My Sunshine20170607

The country song turned children's favourite is told through people's experiences.

You Are My Sunshine was written in or around 1939 and was adopted by the then Governor of Louisiana, Jimmy Davies who recorded and used it as his campaign theme song. It has since been recorded by more than four hundred artists from Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash to Aretha Franklin and Bryan Ferry. A mother and daughter tell their story of how the song helped the daughter's recovery after a catastrophic car crash, and how it has come to symbolise her struggle to rebuild her life after being in a coma for several months. A resident of "Tornado Alley" and author of The Mercy of The Sky tells the story of a devastating tornado that hit a town in Oklahoma in 2013 killing several schoolchildren, but how all the toddlers in a nearby daycare centre survived. The staff comforted them by singing You Are My Sunshine as the storm destroyed the building. And pensioner Alice Kennedy fondly recalls a friend from the Irish Pensioners Choir in London who used to sing the song and add his own cheeky lyrics.

Producer: Maggie Ayre

Music historian: Paul Kingsbury.

2403Who Knows Where The Time Goes?20170614

Memories of the much-loved song Who Knows Where the Time Goes? written by Sandy Denny.

Sandy Denny was just 19 years old when she wrote 'Who Knows Where the Time Goes?', her much-loved song about the passing of time. Soul Music tells the story behind the song and speaks to people for whom it has special meaning.

The record producer Joe Boyd and founder member of Fairport Convention Simon Nicol remember Sandy and her music. We speak to musicians who have covered the song, including folk legend Judy Collins and the singer Rufus Wainwright, about what the song means to them. And we hear from people whose lives have been touched by the song, including the singer-songwriter Ren Harvieu, who suffered a back break in a freak accident and found strength in the song during her recovery. And neuroscientist and best-selling author David Eagleman explains why the years seem to fly past ever more quickly as we grow older. Also featuring contributions from Sandy Denny's biographer Mick Houghton and Dr Richard Elliott, Senior Lecturer in Music at Newcastle University.

Producer: Mair Bosworth.

25Redemption Song20171227

How Bob Marley's Redemption Song has inspired generations around the world.

"If you've never heard of Bob Marley then you must be living under a rock" - Neville Garrick, Bob Marley's Art Director and friend.

At the time he wrote 'Redemption Song', circa 1979, Bob Marley had been diagnosed with the cancer in his toe that later took his life. It is considered one of his greatest works and continues to inspire generations of Marley fans across the world.

For Grammy Award Winning artist John Legend, it's become an anthem for addressing the criminal justice system of America whilst in Palestine, for 'Musicians without Borders' practitioner Ahmed al 'Azzeh it's a song that inspires him to work towards a better life. For Jamaican Poet Laureate Lorna Goodison, it is a reminder to continue Marley's call to 'sing these songs of freedom' and for Bob Scott, it will forever be heard in memory of his nephew Dominick who lost his life during the 2004 Tsunami.
Featuring interviews with Neville Garrick and Wailers Guitarist Don Kinsley.
Produced by Nicola Humphries.

2501O Holy Night20171220

How the carol O Holy Night touched the lives of the archbishop of York and Katie Melua.

"O' Holy Night, the stars are brightly shining..." and so begins the gentle carol of reflection that has touched the lives of listeners around the world.

For The Archbishop of York, Dr John Sentamu, it's the carol that lifted his spirits as he lay in a London hospital battling pneumonia. It is also the hymn that inspired a fellow patient to find faith. In Philadelphia it is the song that outreach worker Asteria Vives sang when she took Christmas to the homeless, whilst for singer and songwriter Katie Melua it's the carol that awoke her love of music as an 8 year old child in Belfast. And for Tymara Walker it's the Christmas family favourite which went viral when she sang it on a Washington subway, eventually reaching a worldwide audience of over 5 million.

Featuring choral conductor and composer Bob Chilcott.
Producer: Nicola Humphries.