Songs Of The Sky

Episodes

First
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
2004053120041122

Adam Fowler travels to alaska to explore the mystery and magic of the aurora borealis or Northern Lights. Through interviews, featuring natural radio recordists, scientists, native alaskan folklore, music and poetry, Adam investigates whether the lights really do make an audible sound. Adam's journey starts in the heart of alaska's gold mining territory and on to a winterised Winnebago where Adam follows in pursuit of the VLF enthusiasts, who have located the perfect aurora listening and viewing spot, twenty miles down an icy road. At the University of alaska's Geophysical Institute, Fairbanks, scientists disagree as to whether noises associated with the aurora can be heard by the human ear. Dr Charles Wilson, Emeritus Professor in Physics, thinks people 'hear' the aurora because of cross talk between the optical and aural nerve, "it is a physiological reaction to a dynamic light display." Dr Charles Deehr, an aurora forecaster at the Geophysical Institute disagrees, "I used to be sceptical, but on Nov 8th 1998 I dropped the 'cross talk' theory, when I witnessed a spectacular aurora display in Gold Stream Valley, to hear it I had to close my eyes." Adam speaks to native alaskans who believe the lights have a spiritual force and claim to be able to hear the Northern Lights.

2004053120041122

Adam Fowler travels to alaska to explore the mystery and magic of the aurora borealis or Northern Lights. Through interviews, featuring natural radio recordists, scientists, native alaskan folklore, music and poetry, Adam investigates whether the lights really do make an audible sound. Adam's journey starts in the heart of alaska's gold mining territory and on to a winterised Winnebago where Adam follows in pursuit of the VLF enthusiasts, who have located the perfect aurora listening and viewing spot, twenty miles down an icy road. At the University of alaska's Geophysical Institute, Fairbanks, scientists disagree as to whether noises associated with the aurora can be heard by the human ear. Dr Charles Wilson, Emeritus Professor in Physics, thinks people 'hear' the aurora because of cross talk between the optical and aural nerve, "it is a physiological reaction to a dynamic light display." Dr Charles Deehr, an aurora forecaster at the Geophysical Institute disagrees, "I used to be sceptical, but on Nov 8th 1998 I dropped the 'cross talk' theory, when I witnessed a spectacular aurora display in Gold Stream Valley, to hear it I had to close my eyes." Adam speaks to native alaskans who believe the lights have a spiritual force and claim to be able to hear the Northern Lights.

20041122

Adam Fowler travels to Alaska to explore the mystery and magic of the Aurora Borealis, or Northern Lights. Do the lights really make an audible sound?