Six Places That Changed The World

Tied to the 60th anniversary of VJ Day, a series examining the global consequences of crucial events in six places around the end of the Second World War.

Presented by Gavin Esler, who is joined by international politicians, diplomats, economists and historians.

Episodes

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20050815

Tied to the 60th anniversary of VJ Day, a series examining the global consequences of crucial events in six places around the end of the Second World War. Presented by Gavin Esler, who is joined by international politicians, diplomats, economists and historians.

1/6. Hiroshima

The use of the atomic bomb which helped to bring such a devastating end to the conflict in the Far East. [Rpt of today 9.00am] Then Weather.

Tied to the 60th anniversary of VJ Day, a series examining the global consequences of crucial events in six places around the end of the Second World War. Presented by Gavin Esler, who is joined by international politicians, diplomats, economists and historians.

1/6. Hiroshima

The use of the atomic bomb, which helped to bring such a devastating end to the conflict in the Far East and a final conclusion to the Second World War. Debating the event are former NATO General Secretary Lord Robertson and former Japanese Foreign Affairs Minister Koji Watanabe.

20050822

Series examining the global consequences of crucial events in six places around the end of the Second World War. 2/6: The summit at Yalta in February 1945.

Series examining the global consequences of crucial events in six places around the end of the Second World War. 2/6: The summit at Yalta in February 1945. [Rpt of today 9.00am] Then Weather.

20050829

In San Francisco's opera house exactly 60 years ago, the United Nations was founded. Led by the victorious Second World War allies, 50 countries met to set up an organisation which it was hoped would prevent the great wars of the past century from happening again. But do failures in Rwanda, Srebrenica and Iraq suggest the institution is no longer able to cope with the conflicts of the modern world? Will countries ever put the greater good above their own interests?

Gavin Esler explores the past and the future of the UN.

In San Francisco's opera house exactly 60 years ago the United Nations was founded. Led by the victorious Second World War allies, 50 countries met to set up an organisation which it was hoped would prevent the great wars of the past century from happening again. But do failures in Rwanda, Srebrenica and Iraq suggest the institution is no longer able to cope with the conflicts of the modern world? Will countries ever put the greater good above their own interests?

Gavin Esler explores the past and the future of the UN. Then Weather.

20050905

Gavin Esler explores the influence of six decisive events on postwar history.

4/6. Delhi

Midnight on August 14th, 1947, in Delhi. The British pulling out of India was not the first act of decolonisation, but it was the biggest. It marked the moment when Britain gave up the brightest diamond in the imperial crown, and the beginning of the end for the European empires.

Gavin explores what it meant to move into a world without empire. Among those joining him will be Vikram Seth, Niall Ferguson and Sir Sonny Ramphal.

Gavin Esler explores the influence of six decisive events on postwar history.

4/6. Delhi

Midnight on August 14th, 1947, in Delhi. The British pulling out of India was not the first act of decolonisation, but it was the biggest. It marked the moment when Britain gave up the brightest diamond in the imperial crown, and the beginning of the end for the European empires.

Gavin explores what it meant to move into a world without empire. Among those joining him will be Vikram Seth, Niall Ferguson and Sir Sonny Ramphal.

Then Weather.

20050912

Gavin Esler explores the influence of six decisive events on postwar history.

5/6. Bretton Woods

In July 1944, high up in the mountains of Bretton Woods in New Hampshire, delegates from 44 countries gathered together to plan the restoration of the liberal world economy, shattered by the Great Depression of the 1930s. They created two new institutions: the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank.

Gavin Esler discusses the work of these two institutions and their impact on the world's poor.

He's joined by former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker and the economist Lord Robert Skidelsky, the biographer of John Maynard Keynes, co-architect of Bretton Woods.

Gavin Esler explores the influence of six decisive events on postwar history.

5/6. Bretton Woods

In July 1944, high up in the mountains of Bretton Woods in New Hampshire, delegates from 44 countries gathered together to plan the restoration of the liberal world economy, shattered by the Great Depression of the 1930s. They created two new institutions: the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank.

Gavin Esler discusses the work of these two institutions and their impact on the world's poor.

He's joined by former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker and the economist Lord Robert Skidelsky, the biographer of John Maynard Keynes, co-architect of Bretton Woods. Then Weather.

20050919

Gavin Esler explores decisive events in postwar history.

6/6. Geneva

Six years after the end of the Second World War, a million refugees were still adrift in Europe. The result was a United Nations conference on Refugees, held in the Swiss city of Geneva in July 1951. But the decisions taken there have created serious aftershocks for the world even today. From Australia to Britain, from Darfur to Haiti, what to do about refugees, asylum seekers and immigrants remains a thorny political question.

Gavin is joined by refugee experts and advocates from around the world.

Gavin Esler explores decisive events in postwar history.

6/6. Geneva

Six years after the end of the Second World War, a million refugees were still adrift in Europe. The result was a United Nations conference on refugees, held in the Swiss city of Geneva in July 1951. But the decisions taken there have created serious aftershocks for the world even today. From Australia to Britain, from Darfur to Haiti, what to do about refugees, asylum seekers and immigrants remains a thorny political question.

Gavin is joined by refugee experts and advocates from around the world. Then Weather.

0101Hiroshima20050815

Tied to the 60th anniversary of VJ Day, a series examining the global consequences of crucial events in six places around the end of the Second World War.

Presented by Gavin Esler, who is joined by international politicians, diplomats, economists and historians.

The use of the atomic bomb, which helped to bring such a devastating end to the conflict in the Far East and a final conclusion to the Second World War.

Debating the event are former NATO General Secretary Lord Robertson and former Japanese Foreign Affairs Minister Koji Watanabe.

0101Hiroshima20050815

Tied to the 60th anniversary of VJ Day, a series examining the global consequences of crucial events in six places around the end of the Second World War.

Presented by Gavin Esler, who is joined by international politicians, diplomats, economists and historians.

The use of the atomic bomb, which helped to bring such a devastating end to the conflict in the Far East and a final conclusion to the Second World War.

Debating the event are former NATO General Secretary Lord Robertson and former Japanese Foreign Affairs Minister Koji Watanabe.

010220050822

The summit at Yalta in February 1945.

010220050822

The summit at Yalta in February 1945.

010320050829

In San Francisco's opera house exactly 60 years ago the United Nations was founded.

Led by the victorious Second World War allies, 50 countries met to set up an organisation which it was hoped would prevent the great wars of the past century from happening again.

But do failures in Rwanda, Srebrenica and Iraq suggest the institution is no longer able to cope with the conflicts of the modern world? Will countries ever put the greater good above their own interests?

Gavin Esler explores the past and the future of the UN.

010320050829

In San Francisco's opera house exactly 60 years ago the United Nations was founded.

Led by the victorious Second World War allies, 50 countries met to set up an organisation which it was hoped would prevent the great wars of the past century from happening again.

But do failures in Rwanda, Srebrenica and Iraq suggest the institution is no longer able to cope with the conflicts of the modern world? Will countries ever put the greater good above their own interests?

Gavin Esler explores the past and the future of the UN.

0104Delhi20050905

Midnight on August 14th, 1947, in Delhi.

The British pulling out of India was not the first act of decolonisation, but it was the biggest.

It marked the moment when Britain gave up the brightest diamond in the imperial crown, and the beginning of the end for the European empires.

Gavin explores what it meant to move into a world without empire.

Among those joining him will be Vikram Seth, Niall Ferguson and Sir Sonny Ramphal.

0104Delhi20050905

Midnight on August 14th, 1947, in Delhi.

The British pulling out of India was not the first act of decolonisation, but it was the biggest.

It marked the moment when Britain gave up the brightest diamond in the imperial crown, and the beginning of the end for the European empires.

Gavin explores what it meant to move into a world without empire.

Among those joining him will be Vikram Seth, Niall Ferguson and Sir Sonny Ramphal.

0105Bretton Woods20050912

In July 1944, high up in the mountains of Bretton Woods in New Hampshire, delegates from 44 countries gathered together to plan the restoration of the liberal world economy, shattered by the Great Depression of the 1930s.

They created two new institutions: the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank.

Gavin Esler discusses the work of these two institutions and their impact on the world's poor.

He's joined by former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker and the economist Lord Robert Skidelsky, the biographer of John Maynard Keynes, co-architect of Bretton Woods.

0105Bretton Woods20050912

In July 1944, high up in the mountains of Bretton Woods in New Hampshire, delegates from 44 countries gathered together to plan the restoration of the liberal world economy, shattered by the Great Depression of the 1930s.

They created two new institutions: the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank.

Gavin Esler discusses the work of these two institutions and their impact on the world's poor.

He's joined by former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker and the economist Lord Robert Skidelsky, the biographer of John Maynard Keynes, co-architect of Bretton Woods.

0106 LASTGeneva20050919

Six years after the end of the Second World War, a million refugees were still adrift in Europe.

The result was a United Nations conference on refugees, held in the Swiss city of Geneva in July 1951.

But the decisions taken there have created serious aftershocks for the world even today.

From Australia to Britain, from Darfur to Haiti, what to do about refugees, asylum seekers and immigrants remains a thorny political question.

Gavin is joined by refugee experts and advocates from around the world.

0106 LASTGeneva20050919

Six years after the end of the Second World War, a million refugees were still adrift in Europe.

The result was a United Nations conference on refugees, held in the Swiss city of Geneva in July 1951.

But the decisions taken there have created serious aftershocks for the world even today.

From Australia to Britain, from Darfur to Haiti, what to do about refugees, asylum seekers and immigrants remains a thorny political question.

Gavin is joined by refugee experts and advocates from around the world.