Shostakovich (1906 - 75)

show more detailshow less detail

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
Comments
01Holy Fool20060911

Donald Macleod talks to Brian Morton, author of a new book on Shostakovich, about how the composer managed to survive under the communist regime by playing a part - that of the 'yurodivy' or Holy Fool.
A selection of The Fool's Songs from King Lear
David Wilson Johnson (baritone)
City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra
Mark Elder (conductor)
Overture on Russian and Kirghiz Themes
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Enrique Batiz (conductor)

Piano Quintet in Gm, Op 57
Beaux Arts Trio
Menahem Pressler (piano)
Isidore Cohen (violin)
Peter Wiley (cello)
with Eugene Drucker (violin)
Lawrence Dutton (viola).

02Stalin20060912

Donald Macleod talks to author and broadcaster Brian Morton about the way Shostakovich satirised Stalin in his music, and the consequences of the disastrous night when Stalin walked out before the end of Shostakovich's opera Lady Macbeth of Mtensk.
Symphony No 9, first movement Allegro
Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra
Mariss Jansons (conductor)

Excerpts - Lady Macbeth of the Mtensk District
Galina Vishnevskaya (soprano)
Nicolai Gedda (tenor)
Dimiter Petkov (bass)
Ambrosian Opera Chorus
London Philharmonic Orchestra
Mstislav Rostropovich (conductor)

String Quartet No 3 in F, Op 73
Fitzwilliam String Quartet.

03Dsch20060913

Donald Macleod and Brian Morton talk about the musical monogram DSCH used by Shostakovich - and the events surrounding the composer's second fall from grace in 1948.
String Quartet 8 in Cm, Op 110
Borodin String Quartet

Symphony No 15 - 1st movement; Allegretto
London Philharmonic Orchestra
Bernard Haitink (conductor)

Two of the 24 Preludes and Fugues - No 13 in F sharp and No 24 in Dm
Tatiana Nikolaeva (piano).

04Jewish Music20060914

Jewish folk music made a powerful impression on Shostakovich, because of its capacity to appear happy whilst being essentially tragic. 'There should always be two layers in music', he once said.
Donald Macleod looks at the way in which Shostakovich used Jewish folk songs and themes in his own music.
Excerpt from Rothschild's violin
Bronze....Sergei Leiferkus (baritone)
Rothschild....Konstantin Pluzhnikov (tenor)
Chakhkes....Ilya Levinsky (tenor)
Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra
Gennady Rozhdestvensky (conductor)
From Jewish Poetry, Op 79a
Luba Orgonasova (soprano)
Nathalie Stutzmann (mezzo-soprano)
Philip Langridge tenor)
Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Neeme Järvi (conductor)

Piano Trio No 2
Beaux Arts Trio
Menahem Pressler (piano)
Isidore Cohen (violin)
Peter Wiley (cello).

05 LASTDeath20060915

Donald Macleod and Brian Morton talk about Shostakovich's preoccupation with death in his later works.
O Delvig, Delvig - from Symphony No 14, Op 135
John Tomlinson (bass)
BBC National Orchestra of Wales
Mark Wigglesworth (conductor)

Viola Sonata
Yuri Bashmet (viola)
Sviatoslav Richter (piano)
Suite on verses by Michelangelo Buonarroti, Op 145a
Love, Separation, and Immortality
Dietrich Fischer-Diskau (baritone)
Berlin Radio Symphony orchestra
Vladimir Ashkenazy (conductor).