Shakespeare Around The Globe

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Episodes

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01Poonam Trivedi20120514

(01/05)

As part of the Shakespeare Unlocked season on the BBC, writers from Sierra Leone, Brazil, India, Iran and China explain why a playwright from sixteenth century Stratford resonates so powerfully in their own countries.

With Eldred Jones, Aimara Resende, Poonam Trivedi, Narguess Farzad and Yong Li Lan.

In this first essay Poonam Trivedi explains how Bollywood helped to make Shakespeare's reputation in India.

These essays explore Shakespeare's place on the global stage; with writers and scholars from around the world explaining his importance within their own culture. There are references to Hamlet and Othello in Iranian literature for example - as well as in African and Chinese works. Othello was first translated into Persian 170 years ago by a Persian prince because the themes of jealousy and honour struck a chord with the Iranian psyche. Authors the world over have recognised a profound affinity between Shakespeare's themes and their own traditional culture, be in it Chinese, Indian or African.

02Narguess Farzad20120515

Episode 02 of 05

As part of the Shakespeare Unlocked season on the BBC, writers from Sierra Leone, Brazil, India, Iran and China explain why a playwright from sixteenth century Stratford resonates so powerfully in their own countries.

With Eldred Jones, Aimara Resende, Poonam Trivedi, Narguess Farzad and Yong Li Lan.

In the second essay in the series, Narguess Farzad explores the continuing hold Shakespeare has in Iran and the Persian speaking world.

These essays explore Shakespeare's place on the global stage; with writers and scholars from around the world explaining his importance within their own culture. There are references to Hamlet and Othello in Iranian literature, for example, as well as in African and Chinese works. Othello was first translated into Persian around 100 years ago by a Persian prince because the themes of jealousy and honour struck a chord with the Iranian psyche. Authors the world over have recognised a profound affinity between Shakespeare's themes and their own traditional culture, be it in Chinese, Indian or African.

03Eldred Jones20120516

Episode 03 of 05

As part of the Shakespeare Unlocked season on the BBC, writers from Sierra Leone, Brazil, India, Iran and China explain why a playwright from sixteenth century Stratford resonates so powerfully in their own countries.

With Eldred Jones, Aimara Resende, Poonam Trivedi, Narguess Farzad and Yong Li Lan.

In this third essay Professor Eldred Jones explains that Shakespeare took from Africa as much as Africa has taken from him.

These essays explore Shakespeare's place on the global stage; with writers and scholars from around the world explaining his importance within their own culture. There are references to Hamlet and Othello in Iranian literature for example - as well as in African and Chinese works. Othello was first translated into Persian 170 years ago by a Persian prince because the themes of jealousy and honour struck a chord with the Iranian psyche. Authors the world over have recognised a profound affinity between Shakespeare's themes and their own traditional culture, be in it Chinese, Indian or African.

04Aimara Resende20120517

Episode x04 of 5

As part of the Shakespeare Unlocked season on the BBC, writers from Sierra Leone, Brazil, India, Iran and China explain why a playwright from sixteenth century Stratford resonates so powerfully in their own countries.

With Eldred Jones, Aimara Resende, Poonam Trivedi, Narguess Farzad and Yong Li Lan.

In the fourth essay of the series Professor Aimara Resende explains Shakespeare's hold on the diverse peoples of South America. And how the Tempest has been used to explain and argue about national identity.

These essays explore Shakespeare's place on the global stage; with writers and scholars from around the world explaining his importance within their own culture. There are references to Hamlet and Othello in Iranian literature, for example, as well as in African and Chinese works. Othello was first translated into Persian 170 years ago by a Persian prince because the themes of jealousy and honour struck a chord with the Iranian psyche. Authors the world over have recognised a profound affinity between Shakespeare's themes and their own traditional culture, be in it Chinese, Indian or African.

Episode 5 of 05

05 LASTYong Li Lan20120518

Episode x05 of 5

As part of the Shakespeare Unlocked season on the BBC, writers from Sierra Leone, Brazil, India, Iran and China explain why a playwright from sixteenth century Stratford resonates so powerfully in their own countries.

With Eldred Jones, Aimara Resende, Poonam Trivedi, Narguess Farzad and Yong Li Lan.

In the final essay in the series Yong Li Lan gives a unique insight into how popular Shakespeare remains in China and South East Asia. She talks about the way his work is interpreted and staged in the region.

These essays explore Shakespeare's place on the global stage; with writers and scholars from around the world explaining his importance within their own culture. There are references to Hamlet and Othello in Iranian literature, for example, as well as in African and Chinese works. Othello was first translated into Persian 170 years ago by a Persian prince because the themes of jealousy and honour struck a chord with the Iranian psyche. Authors the world over have recognised a profound affinity between Shakespeare's themes and their own traditional culture, be in it Chinese, Indian or African.

Episode 5 of 05