Scotland At Prayer

In 2010 we mark the 450th anniversary of the Reformation, an event which left an indelible legacy in Scottish society.

In a major seven part series, Billy Kay tells the story of the great ecclesiastical traditions which have shaped the history of Christianity in this country - Roman Catholic, Episcopalian and Presbyterian.

In the Highlands we explore the emergence of Evangelicalism in the Free Church and Free Presbyterian Church, and the survival of the tradition in Lewis.

The story of other churches with a long pedigree in the country will be told - the Quakers, the Methodists and the Baptists.

We will recall the great religious revivals which swept through Scotland and the cultural forces which led to the spread of the Brethren churches in places like Ayrshire mining villages and fishing communities on the Moray coast.

We will explore the history of the churches, the faith of the people who belong to them, the local and national identity of their adherents, their influence on politics and culture, the effects of immigration, and the tension between the values of the past and the society of the present.

For a majority of Scots, knowledge of other churches can be scant and based on stereotypes.

This series will reveal the deep historic roots of all of the major Christian denominations in Scotland and explore their relevance to the future of the country.

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0120111226

1/7

Scotland at Prayer

In 2010 we mark the 450th anniversary of the Reformation, an event which left an indelible legacy in Scottish society. In a major seven part series, Billy Kay tells the story of the great ecclesiastical traditions which have shaped the history of Christianity in this country - Roman Catholic, Episcopalian and Presbyterian.

In the Highlands we explore the emergence of Evangelicalism in the Free Church and Free Presbyterian Church, and the survival of the tradition in Lewis. The story of other churches with a long pedigree in the country will be told - the Quakers, the Methodists and the Baptists.

We will recall the great religious revivals which swept through Scotland and the cultural forces which led to the spread of the Brethren churches in places like Ayrshire mining villages and fishing communities on the Moray coast.

We will explore the history of the churches, the faith of the people who belong to them, the local and national identity of their adherents, their influence on politics and culture, the effects of immigration, and the tension between the values of the past and the society of the present.

For a majority of Scots, knowledge of other churches can be scant and based on stereotypes. This series will reveal the deep historic roots of all of the major Christian denominations in Scotland and explore their relevance to the future of the country.

In the first program, we examine the period of the Reformation itself, and the visionary nature of some of the innovations introduced by Knox and Melville. We also counter some of the myths, and discover for example that John Knox was a claret drinking ladies' man who was regarded as one of the countries first linguistic anglicisers!

An Odyssey Production for Radio Scotland

Taking part: Harry Reid, author of Reformation: The Dangerous Birth of the Modern World;

Professor Jane Dawson of Edinburgh University, author of Scotland Re-Formed 1488 - 1587;

Brian M Halloran author of The Scots College Paris 1603 - 1792;

Donald MacLeod, former Principle of the Free Church of Scotland College in Edinburgh;

John MacLeod, journalist and author of Banner in the West;

Edward (Ted) Luscombe, former Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church and Bishop of Brechin;

Canon Emsley Nimmo, Dean of Aberdeen and Orkney

James Halliday, historian

Music from the time of the Scottish Reformation is provided by the Lindores Consort, and an extract from the poetry of the Wedderburn brothers from Dundee is read by Jamie Reid Baxter - both were recorded at a concert in St Salvator's church in Dundee.

Billy Kay tells the story of the Reformation.

012010090620100911

In 2010 we mark the 450th anniversary of the Reformation, an event which left an indelible legacy in Scottish society.

In a major seven part series, Billy Kay tells the story of the great ecclesiastical traditions which have shaped the history of Christianity in this country - Roman Catholic, Episcopalian and Presbyterian.

In the Highlands we explore the emergence of Evangelicalism in the Free Church and Free Presbyterian Church, and the survival of the tradition in Lewis.

The story of other churches with a long pedigree in the country will be told - the Quakers, the Methodists and the Baptists.

We will recall the great religious revivals which swept through Scotland and the cultural forces which led to the spread of the Brethren churches in places like Ayrshire mining villages and fishing communities on the Moray coast.

We will explore the history of the churches, the faith of the people who belong to them, the local and national identity of their adherents, their influence on politics and culture, the effects of immigration, and the tension between the values of the past and the society of the present.

For a majority of Scots, knowledge of other churches can be scant and based on stereotypes.

This series will reveal the deep historic roots of all of the major Christian denominations in Scotland and explore their relevance to the future of the country.Billy Kay tells the story of the Reformation.

Scotland at Prayer

In the first program, we examine the period of the Reformation itself, and the visionary nature of some of the innovations introduced by Knox and Melville.

We also counter some of the myths, and discover for example that John Knox was a claret drinking ladies' man who was regarded as one of the countries first linguistic anglicisers!

An Odyssey Production for Radio Scotland

Taking part: Harry Reid, author of Reformation: The Dangerous Birth of the Modern World;

Professor Jane Dawson of Edinburgh University, author of Scotland Re-Formed 1488 - 1587;

Brian M Halloran author of The Scots College Paris 1603 - 1792;

Donald MacLeod, former Principle of the Free Church of Scotland College in Edinburgh;

John MacLeod, journalist and author of Banner in the West;

Edward (Ted) Luscombe, former Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church and Bishop of Brechin;

Canon Emsley Nimmo, Dean of Aberdeen and Orkney

James Halliday, historian

Music from the time of the Scottish Reformation is provided by the Lindores Consort, and an extract from the poetry of the Wedderburn brothers from Dundee is read by Jamie Reid Baxter - both were recorded at a concert in St Salvator's church in Dundee.

0220111227

2/7

In 2010 we mark the 450th anniversary of the Reformation, an event which left an indelible legacy in Scottish society. In this major seven part series, Billy Kay tells the story of the great ecclesiastical traditions which have shaped the history of Christianity in this country - Roman Catholic, Episcopalian and Presbyterian.

In the second program, The Killing Times we focus on the period from 1590 to 1690, when there was constant struggle between Presbyterian and Episcopalian parties for ascendancy, and it was only with the Glorious Revolution and Revolution Settlement in 1688/1690 that the Presbyterian form of church government was secured and the Church of Scotland as we know it was established.

Before that though, the Presbyterian Covenanters of the South West of Scotland in particular suffered brutal suppression at the hands the Episcopalian led government and the dragoons of the man called John Graham of Claverhouse, known as Bluidy Claverhoose in Ayrshire, and Bonnie Dundee in Episcopalian areas like Angus and the North East. We hear stories from the Killing Times and visit monuments to the martyrs worked on by the descendants of Old Mortality - the Scottish Covenanter Memorials Association which lovingly restores the martyrs gravestones. Billy Kay hails originally from Galston in Ayrshire in the heartland of the Covenanting

Country, so he was aware of this history from an early age.

Among those taking part are historians Dane Love and James Halliday, Professors Jane Dawson and Stewart Jay Brown of Edinburgh University, and Professor Allan Macinnes of Strathclyde University. On a dreich Ayrshire Spring morning Billy also interrupts the work of stonemason, Kevin Roberts who continues the work of Old Mortality, the hero of the novel by Sir Walter Scott.

For a majority of Scots, knowledge of other churches can be scant and based on stereotypes. This series reveals the deep historic roots of all of the major Christian denominations in Scotland and explores their relevance to the future of the country.

An Odyssey Production for Radio Scotland.

Billy Kay tells the story of the Killing Times in the creation of Presbyterian Scotland.

02The Killing Times2010091320100918

In 2010 we mark the 450th anniversary of the Reformation, an event which left an indelible legacy in Scottish society.

In this major seven part series, Billy Kay tells the story of the great ecclesiastical traditions which have shaped the history of Christianity in this country - Roman Catholic, Episcopalian and Presbyterian.

In the second program, The Killing Times we focus on the period from 1590 to 1690, when there was constant struggle between Presbyterian and Episcopalian parties for ascendancy, and it was only with the Glorious Revolution and Revolution Settlement in 1688/1690 that the Presbyterian form of church government was secured and the Church of Scotland as we know it was established.

Before that though, the Presbyterian Covenanters of the South West of Scotland in particular suffered brutal suppression at the hands the Episcopalian led government and the dragoons of the man called John Graham of Claverhouse, known as Bluidy Claverhoose in Ayrshire, and Bonnie Dundee in Episcopalian areas like Angus and the North East.

We hear stories from the Killing Times and visit monuments to the martyrs worked on by the descendants of Old Mortality - the Scottish Covenanter Memorials Association which lovingly restores the martyrs gravestones.

Billy Kay hails originally from Galston in Ayrshire in the heartland of the Covenanting

Country, so he was aware of this history from an early age.

Among those taking part are historians Dane Love and James Halliday, Professors Jane Dawson and Stewart Jay Brown of Edinburgh University, and Professor Allan Macinnes of Strathclyde University.

On a dreich Ayrshire Spring morning Billy also interrupts the work of stonemason, Kevin Roberts who continues the work of Old Mortality, the hero of the novel by Sir Walter Scott.

For a majority of Scots, knowledge of other churches can be scant and based on stereotypes.

This series reveals the deep historic roots of all of the major Christian denominations in Scotland and explores their relevance to the future of the country.

An Odyssey Production for Radio Scotland.

Billy Kay tells the story of the Killing Times in the creation of Presbyterian Scotland.

0320111229

3/7

In 2010 we mark the 450th anniversary of the Reformation, an event which left an indelible legacy in Scottish society. In this major seven part series, Billy Kay tells the story of the great ecclesiastical traditions which have shaped the history of Christianity in this country.

In the third programme, The Faithful Remnant, we explore the history of Episcopalianism since the Reformation, and in particular its association with the Jacobite cause in the Risings of 1715 and 1745. It is ironic that a church often referred to erroneously as the English Church, was a target for the Duke of Cumberland's forces after Culloden, who burned Episcopal chapels to the ground on their road south. The Episcopal tradition was particularly strong in the North and North East of Scotland and we visit churches in Strathnairn, Aberdeen and Cruden Bay to hear stories of how they survived the persecution of the Jacobite era, yet retained a strong local Piskie identity - in the North East much of this was expressed in a vigorous Scots vernacular tradition which we celebrate in the work of Bishop John Skinner, a correspondent of Burns and author of the poem Tullochgorum. In the 19th century we will hear of its closer links to the Anglican tradition, but also its successes in the slums of Dundee. We also hear how the Jacobite spirit in the church survives and one contributor, Allan Macinnes points out that the historic Episcopalian heartland coincides with the SNP political heartland today!

Among those taking part are Professor Allan Macinnes of Strathclyde University, Gerald Stranraer Mull author of "A Church for Scotland" , former Primus and Bishop of Brechin, Ted Luscombe, Gavin Sprott , Marna Cruikshank from Cruden Bay and Canon Emsley Nimmo of St Margaret's Aberdeen.

For a majority of Scots, knowledge of other churches can be scant and based on stereotypes. This series reveals the deep historic roots of all of the major denominations in Scotland and explores their relevance to the future of the country.

An Odyssey Production for Radio Scotland.

Billy Kay tells the story of the Scottish Episcopal Church since the Glorious Revolution.

03The Faithful Remnant2010092020100925

In 2010 we mark the 450th anniversary of the Reformation, an event which left an indelible legacy in Scottish society.

In this major seven part series, Billy Kay tells the story of the great ecclesiastical traditions which have shaped the history of Christianity in this country.

In the third programme, The Faithful Remnant, we explore the history of Episcopalianism since the Reformation, and in particular its association with the Jacobite cause in the Risings of 1715 and 1745.

It is ironic that a church often referred to erroneously as the English Church, was a target for the Duke of Cumberland's forces after Culloden, who burned Episcopal chapels to the ground on their road south.

The Episcopal tradition was particularly strong in the North and North East of Scotland and we visit churches in Strathnairn, Aberdeen and Cruden Bay to hear stories of how they survived the persecution of the Jacobite era, yet retained a strong local Piskie identity - in the North East much of this was expressed in a vigorous Scots vernacular tradition which we celebrate in the work of Bishop John Skinner, a correspondent of Burns and author of the poem Tullochgorum.

In the 19th century we will hear of its closer links to the Anglican tradition, but also its successes in the slums of Dundee.

We also hear how the Jacobite spirit in the church survives and one contributor, Allan Macinnes points out that the historic Episcopalian heartland coincides with the SNP political heartland today!

Among those taking part are Professor Allan Macinnes of Strathclyde University, Gerald Stranraer Mull author of "A Church for Scotland" , former Primus and Bishop of Brechin, Ted Luscombe, Gavin Sprott , Marna Cruikshank from Cruden Bay and Canon Emsley Nimmo of St Margaret's Aberdeen.

For a majority of Scots, knowledge of other churches can be scant and based on stereotypes.

This series reveals the deep historic roots of all of the major denominations in Scotland and explores their relevance to the future of the country.

An Odyssey Production for Radio Scotland.

Billy Kay tells the story of the Scottish Episcopal Church since the Glorious Revolution.

0420120102

The True Faith Preserved

In 2010 we mark the 450th anniversary of the Reformation, an event which left an indelible legacy in Scottish society. In The True Faith Preserved we trace the fortunes of the Roman Catholic Church here, from its proscription at the time of the Reformation, its persecution and precarious survival in the intervening years and its reinvigoration through Irish immigration in the 19th century and Polish immigration in recent years.

Scotland now has 750,000 adherents, but in the early 1800's there were more Catholics on the tiny Isle of Eriskay than there were in the whole of Strathclyde! Yet a native Scottish catholic tradition survived in pockets in places like Barra in the North West and Glenlivet in the North East. Billy visits the "hidden seminary" of Scalan in the Braes of Glenlivet where so-called "Heather Priests" were educated in surroundings that were Spartan but perfect for the training of young men who would lead a tough life practicing an outlawed religion. Such was the shortage of priests, that in Barra in 1697 one was held hostage by the local men...."they swore that they would sooner burn their boats than let another priest leave in one". From Barra, the renowned Gaelic singer Flora McNeill recalls the Catholic traditions of the island that go back to the time of St Columba.

Other contributors include Fr. Brian M Halloran author of Scottish Secular Priests 1580 - 1653, John Watts author of Scalan The Forbidden College, Peter Kearney of the Scottish Catholic Media Office, Rennie and Agnes McOwan from St Ninian's Stirling, and Professor John Haldane of St Andrews University.

As Rennie McOwan says in the programme, relations between the Catholic Church and the Protestant denominations nowadays is excellent, and if Sectarianism survives, it is among the unchurched. Professor Haldane reminds us however, how bitter it could be in West Central Scotland in the recent past. He himself is a catholic convert but as a small boy, his Protestant grandfather told him that the reason the Pope wore long robes was to hide his cloven feet!!

For a majority of Scots, knowledge of other churches can be scant and based on stereotypes. This series reveals the deep historic roots of all the major denominations in Scotland and explores their relevance to the future of the country.

An Odyssey Production for Radio Scotland.

Billy Kay traces the history of Roman Catholicism.

04The True Faith Preserved2010092720101002

In 2010 we mark the 450th anniversary of the Reformation, an event which left an indelible legacy in Scottish society.

In The True Faith Preserved we trace the fortunes of the Roman Catholic Church here, from its proscription at the time of the Reformation, its persecution and precarious survival in the intervening years and its reinvigoration through Irish immigration in the 19th century and Polish immigration in recent years.

Scotland now has 750,000 adherents, but in the early 1800's there were more Catholics on the tiny Isle of Eriskay than there were in the whole of Strathclyde! Yet a native Scottish catholic tradition survived in pockets in places like Barra in the North West and Glenlivet in the North East.

Billy visits the "hidden seminary" of Scalan in the Braes of Glenlivet where so-called "Heather Priests" were educated in surroundings that were Spartan but perfect for the training of young men who would lead a tough life practicing an outlawed religion.

Such was the shortage of priests, that in Barra in 1697 one was held hostage by the local men...."they swore that they would sooner burn their boats than let another priest leave in one".

From Barra, the renowned Gaelic singer Flora McNeill recalls the Catholic traditions of the island that go back to the time of St Columba.

Other contributors include Fr.

Brian M Halloran author of Scottish Secular Priests 1580 - 1653, John Watts author of Scalan The Forbidden College, Peter Kearney of the Scottish Catholic Media Office, Rennie and Agnes McOwan from St Ninian's Stirling, and Professor John Haldane of St Andrews University.

As Rennie McOwan says in the programme, relations between the Catholic Church and the Protestant denominations nowadays is excellent, and if Sectarianism survives, it is among the unchurched.

Professor Haldane reminds us however, how bitter it could be in West Central Scotland in the recent past.

He himself is a catholic convert but as a small boy, his Protestant grandfather told him that the reason the Pope wore long robes was to hide his cloven feet!!

For a majority of Scots, knowledge of other churches can be scant and based on stereotypes.

This series reveals the deep historic roots of all the major denominations in Scotland and explores their relevance to the future of the country.

An Odyssey Production for Radio Scotland.

Billy Kay traces the history of Roman Catholicism.

The True Faith Preserved

0520120103

When the Gospel Came

In 2010 we mark the 450th anniversary of the Reformation, an event which left an indelible legacy in Scottish society. In When the Gospel Came Billy Kay tells the story of the Evangelical tradition in the Highlands, giving particular emphasis to the Isle of Lewis which is often regarded as a last bastion of austere Calvinism. When you realise however that the first great awakening in Lewis took place over two hundred years after the Reformation in the religious revivals of the 1820's you begin to realise that the gospel is perhaps late in leaving Lewis, because it was very late in arriving there.

Among those Billy speaks to are the journalist John MacLeod, the author of a book on the religious history of Lewis and Harris, Banner in the West - John stresses the distinctive new identity that was forged through Evangelicalism. Donald MacLeod, former Principle of the Free Church of Scotland College in Edinburgh, talks about the public disparagement that plagues "Wee Frees" - usually by people who have no idea what the Free Church stands for. We hear from Mrs Mor MacLeod who was born in 1914 and describes what it was like as a child in a strict Presbyterian Sabbath observing community - her memories are nothing but positive, she still feels her generation were in no way restricted by adherence to their faith. We speak to ministers from the Free Presbyterian Church on the island, David Campbell, John Tallach and Allan MacColl and hear how their communities continue traditions that once were widespread in Scotland, but which hang on in the Western Isles. The infallibility of the bible is one example, the singing of only the metrical psalms as opposed to hymns is another....we hear the surging power of the Gaelic psalms, and understand their emotive potency. We hear about the role of the Gaelic language in the rise of Highland evangelicalism, and the various churches' focus on sustaining the language.

Professor Allan Macinnes of Strathclyde University however belongs to a softer Episcopalian strand in Highland society, and does not hold back in his criticism of a Free Church funeral he attended which gave no comfort to a grieving family. "If this is religion", he says, "I want nothing to do with it" He contrasts the Evangelicals way of dealing with death, with what he regards as the warmth and comfort of his own Episcopal tradition.

For a majority of Scots, knowledge of other churches can be scant and based on stereotypes. This series reveals the deep historic roots of all the major denominations in Scotland and explores their relevance to the future of the country.

An Odyssey Production for Radio Scotland.

Billy Kay tells the story of the Evangelical Protestant tradition in the Highlands.

05When The Gospel Came2010100420101009

In 2010 we mark the 450th anniversary of the Reformation, an event which left an indelible legacy in Scottish society.

In When the Gospel Came Billy Kay tells the story of the Evangelical tradition in the Highlands, giving particular emphasis to the Isle of Lewis which is often regarded as a last bastion of austere Calvinism.

When you realise however that the first great awakening in Lewis took place over two hundred years after the Reformation in the religious revivals of the 1820's you begin to realise that the gospel is perhaps late in leaving Lewis, because it was very late in arriving there.

Among those Billy speaks to are the journalist John MacLeod, the author of a book on the religious history of Lewis and Harris, Banner in the West - John stresses the distinctive new identity that was forged through Evangelicalism.

Donald MacLeod, former Principle of the Free Church of Scotland College in Edinburgh, talks about the public disparagement that plagues "Wee Frees" - usually by people who have no idea what the Free Church stands for.

We hear from Mrs Mor MacLeod who was born in 1914 and describes what it was like as a child in a strict Presbyterian Sabbath observing community - her memories are nothing but positive, she still feels her generation were in no way restricted by adherence to their faith.

We speak to ministers from the Free Presbyterian Church on the island, David Campbell, John Tallach and Allan MacColl and hear how their communities continue traditions that once were widespread in Scotland, but which hang on in the Western Isles.

The infallibility of the bible is one example, the singing of only the metrical psalms as opposed to hymns is another....we hear the surging power of the Gaelic psalms, and understand their emotive potency.

We hear about the role of the Gaelic language in the rise of Highland evangelicalism, and the various churches' focus on sustaining the language.

Professor Allan Macinnes of Strathclyde University however belongs to a softer Episcopalian strand in Highland society, and does not hold back in his criticism of a Free Church funeral he attended which gave no comfort to a grieving family.

"If this is religion", he says, "I want nothing to do with it" He contrasts the Evangelicals way of dealing with death, with what he regards as the warmth and comfort of his own Episcopal tradition.

For a majority of Scots, knowledge of other churches can be scant and based on stereotypes.

This series reveals the deep historic roots of all the major denominations in Scotland and explores their relevance to the future of the country.

An Odyssey Production for Radio Scotland.

Billy Kay tells the story of the Evangelical Protestant tradition in the Highlands.

0620120104

Children of the Reformation

In 2010 we mark the 450th anniversary of the Reformation, an event which left an indelible legacy in Scottish society. In Children of the Reformation, Billy Kay explores the history of some of the smaller denominations with a long pedigree in Scotland e.g. the Quakers of the 17th century, the Methodists of the 18th century and the Congregationalist who continued the Covenanting tradition of the West of Scotland. The great Labour leader Keir Hardie was himself influenced by the demotic popular evangelism of the Congregationalists in Ayrshire.

We also trace the story of the Baptist and Brethren denominations, and their popularity in our mining and fishing communities - one commentator suggests that the Brethren appealed to men working in dangerous conditions as they offered a guarantee of salvation in the afterlife. Sabbatarianism is now associated with the Western Isles, but we discover that a few decades ago the same atmosphere prevailed in places as far apart as Peterhead and Galston.

The smaller churches thrived during the great Evangelical religious revivals which swept through Scotland every few decades of the 19th and 20th centuries. We hear the beautiful Moody and Sankey hymns which became part of popular culture following the Revival of the 1870's and the voices of women from the fishing communities of Nairn and Lossiemouth that Billy recorded 30 years ago for his oral history series Odyssey. They used to sing hymns like When the Mists have Rolled Away, Will Your Anchor Hold, and the Sands of Time are Sinking as they gutted fish during the herring boom.

The Quakers always had a strong social conscience - many of their businesses were founded on Temperance principles and offered alternatives to alcohol...hence Rowntrees, Cadburys ad Bewlays. In Dundee, the Braithwaites are coffee and tea merchants, and June Braithwaite recalls the work done by the church for the poor bairns in the city. At one time there were so many Methodist Sunday Schools in Glasgow that they organised their own league for their football teams! We hear children's memories of the Seaside Missions and the songs they learned - complete with actions - there and in the Evangelistic Halls.

For a majority of Scots, knowledge of other churches can be scant and based on stereotypes. This series reveals the deep historic roots of all the major denominations in Scotland and explores their relevance to the future of the country.

An Odyssey Production for Radio Scotland.

Billy Kay tells the story of the Quakers, Methodists, Baptists and Brethren.

06Children Of The Reformation2010101120101016

In 2010 we mark the 450th anniversary of the Reformation, an event which left an indelible legacy in Scottish society.

In Children of the Reformation, Billy Kay explores the history of some of the smaller denominations with a long pedigree in Scotland e.g.

the Quakers of the 17th century, the Methodists of the 18th century and the Congregationalist who continued the Covenanting tradition of the West of Scotland.

The great Labour leader Keir Hardie was himself influenced by the demotic popular evangelism of the Congregationalists in Ayrshire.

We also trace the story of the Baptist and Brethren denominations, and their popularity in our mining and fishing communities - one commentator suggests that the Brethren appealed to men working in dangerous conditions as they offered a guarantee of salvation in the afterlife.

Sabbatarianism is now associated with the Western Isles, but we discover that a few decades ago the same atmosphere prevailed in places as far apart as Peterhead and Galston.

The smaller churches thrived during the great Evangelical religious revivals which swept through Scotland every few decades of the 19th and 20th centuries.

We hear the beautiful Moody and Sankey hymns which became part of popular culture following the Revival of the 1870's and the voices of women from the fishing communities of Nairn and Lossiemouth that Billy recorded 30 years ago for his oral history series Odyssey.

They used to sing hymns like When the Mists have Rolled Away, Will Your Anchor Hold, and the Sands of Time are Sinking as they gutted fish during the herring boom.

The Quakers always had a strong social conscience - many of their businesses were founded on Temperance principles and offered alternatives to alcohol...hence Rowntrees, Cadburys ad Bewlays.

In Dundee, the Braithwaites are coffee and tea merchants, and June Braithwaite recalls the work done by the church for the poor bairns in the city.

At one time there were so many Methodist Sunday Schools in Glasgow that they organised their own league for their football teams! We hear children's memories of the Seaside Missions and the songs they learned - complete with actions - there and in the Evangelistic Halls.

For a majority of Scots, knowledge of other churches can be scant and based on stereotypes.

This series reveals the deep historic roots of all the major denominations in Scotland and explores their relevance to the future of the country.

An Odyssey Production for Radio Scotland.

Billy Kay tells the story of the Quakers, Methodists, Baptists and Brethren.

07 LAST20120105

The Last Word

In 2010 we mark the 450th anniversary of the Reformation, an event which left an indelible legacy in Scottish society. In the final programme of Scotland at Prayer The Last Word , Billy Kay reaffirms the cultural legacy of the Reformation,

explores the shared identity of Christians in an increasingly secular society and looks to the future of the churches.

The positive cultural legacies of the Scottish Reformation are still with us....the democratic principles, the social welfare, the precocious ideal of mass educational provision, community singing, community identity through local parishes etc etc.

One of the unforeseen negative impacts however stemmed from the availability in the early days of an English rather than a full Scots translation of the bible and the native Scots tongue is still neglected.

Another negative aspect that has improved dramatically in recent times is hostility between the major denominations. More and more, Scottish Christians are realising that the enemies of their faith are those who profess aggressive secularism rather than those who adhere to other denominations. Evangelical Protestants here stress their admiration for the moral stance of the Roman Catholic church for example. Unlike the comparative unity of the Catholic Church, however, Presbyterians have had a history of schism, and we hear that there is a grave danger of that in the near future because of issues like the acceptance of homosexual clergy.

Despite its numerical decline, several commentators highlight the continued importance and relevance of the national church - Harry Reid points out that the Kirk has something like 40,000 elders, and suggests that all the political parties in Scotland would dearly love to have such a huge number of committed members.

We contrast the decline of the Kirk in Scotland and all of the churches in Western Europe with the thriving Presbyterian church in far flung places like Africa and Korea, and we hear the moving sound of the 100th Psalm sung in the Tumbuka language by the congregation of the Presbyterian kirk at Ekwendeni in Malawi -an event remembered fondly by Billy.

There the profound faith of the people was striking and the series ends with people from different churches expressing their own deep sense of faith and its meaning to them and their families. Some of them ask if nowadays we need to re-evangelise Scotland and create a second Reformation?

An Odyssey Production for Radio Scotland.

Billy Kay reaffirms the cultural legacy of the Reformation.

07 LASTThe Last Word2010101820101023

In 2010 we mark the 450th anniversary of the Reformation, an event which left an indelible legacy in Scottish society.

In the final programme of Scotland at Prayer The Last Word , Billy Kay reaffirms the cultural legacy of the Reformation,

explores the shared identity of Christians in an increasingly secular society and looks to the future of the churches.

The positive cultural legacies of the Scottish Reformation are still with us....the democratic principles, the social welfare, the precocious ideal of mass educational provision, community singing, community identity through local parishes etc etc.

One of the unforeseen negative impacts however stemmed from the availability in the early days of an English rather than a full Scots translation of the bible and the native Scots tongue is still neglected.

Another negative aspect that has improved dramatically in recent times is hostility between the major denominations.

More and more, Scottish Christians are realising that the enemies of their faith are those who profess aggressive secularism rather than those who adhere to other denominations.

Evangelical Protestants here stress their admiration for the moral stance of the Roman Catholic church for example.

Unlike the comparative unity of the Catholic Church, however, Presbyterians have had a history of schism, and we hear that there is a grave danger of that in the near future because of issues like the acceptance of homosexual clergy.

Despite its numerical decline, several commentators highlight the continued importance and relevance of the national church - Harry Reid points out that the Kirk has something like 40,000 elders, and suggests that all the political parties in Scotland would dearly love to have such a huge number of committed members.

We contrast the decline of the Kirk in Scotland and all of the churches in Western Europe with the thriving Presbyterian church in far flung places like Africa and Korea, and we hear the moving sound of the 100th Psalm sung in the Tumbuka language by the congregation of the Presbyterian kirk at Ekwendeni in Malawi -an event remembered fondly by Billy.

There the profound faith of the people was striking and the series ends with people from different churches expressing their own deep sense of faith and its meaning to them and their families.

Some of them ask if nowadays we need to re-evangelise Scotland and create a second Reformation?

An Odyssey Production for Radio Scotland.

Billy Kay reaffirms the cultural legacy of the Reformation.