Scot's History Of Britishness, A

Episodes

EpisodeFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
0120130703

012013070320131226 (RS)

1/5

In the first of a new series, Richard Holloway embarks on a personal quest to understand more about the Scots-British identity. His journey takes him to Skye on the trail of Flora Macdonald where he attempts to solve the seeming conundrum of how Scotland's most famous Jacobite heroine could have become a loyal subject of the Hanoverian British state in later life. He asks whether the concept of national identity we have today would hold true for a Scot living through the wars of the 18th/early 19th century, and he explores the role the Scots played in inventing 'Britishness'. But was there also a dark side to all this - profiting in the miseries caused by empire?

0120130703

1/5

In the first of a new series, Richard Holloway embarks on a personal quest to understand more about the Scots-British identity. His journey takes him to Skye on the trail of Flora Macdonald where he attempts to solve the seeming conundrum of how Scotland's most famous Jacobite heroine could have become a loyal subject of the Hanoverian British state in later life. He asks whether the concept of national identity we have today would hold true for a Scot living through the wars of the 18th/early 19th century, and he explores the role the Scots played in inventing 'Britishness'. But was there also a dark side to all this - profiting in the miseries caused by empire?

0220130710

022013071020131227 (RS)

Richard Holloway explores the strange world of 19th century Scottish Britishness. We meet the British royals who adopted Scottish residences, Scottish religion and Scottish plumage but who wouldn't do the same for Ireland, which theoretically was just as British at the time. Richard finds out about the Scottish radicals who insisted that Britishness meant liberty for all, not just an elite, and who confusingly, were as quick to invoke King Alfred and Magna Carta as the Covenanters and George Buchanan. And if you thought that was confusing, then there are the Scottish patriots who insisted Robert Bruce and William Wallace were heroes for the Union. Yes, you read that correctly. National identity in the past can be very different to today.

0220130710

Richard Holloway explores the strange world of 19th century Scottish Britishness. We meet the British royals who adopted Scottish residences, Scottish religion and Scottish plumage but who wouldn't do the same for Ireland, which theoretically was just as British at the time. Richard finds out about the Scottish radicals who insisted that Britishness meant liberty for all, not just an elite, and who confusingly, were as quick to invoke King Alfred and Magna Carta as the Covenanters and George Buchanan. And if you thought that was confusing, then there are the Scottish patriots who insisted Robert Bruce and William Wallace were heroes for the Union. Yes, you read that correctly. National identity in the past can be very different to today.

0220130710

Richard Holloway explores the strange world of 19th century Scottish Britishness. We meet the British royals who adopted Scottish residences, Scottish religion and Scottish plumage but who wouldn't do the same for Ireland, which theoretically was just as British at the time. Richard finds out about the Scottish radicals who insisted that Britishness meant liberty for all, not just an elite, and who confusingly, were as quick to invoke King Alfred and Magna Carta as the Covenanters and George Buchanan. And if you thought that was confusing, then there are the Scottish patriots who insisted Robert Bruce and William Wallace were heroes for the Union. Yes, you read that correctly. National identity in the past can be very different to today.

0320130717

0320130717

032013071720140101 (RS)

Richard Holloway delves into the history of the Scottish version of Britishness.

In the late 18th and early 19th century, Britishness without rule from Westminster was almost unthinkable. The extensive sovereignty of the imperial parliament was so important that arguably Britain lost its American empire over it. But in the later 19th century and early 20th century, it became evident that the empire, especially the white dominions, couldn't just be governed from London - and then there were the Irish... Parliamentary union with Ireland hadn't worked out quite as expected. But could you still be British, if you had your own parliament and weren't ruled from Westminster? 'Yes' said some and 'No' said others - sounds quite familiar doesn't it?

0320130717

Richard Holloway delves into the history of the Scottish version of Britishness.

In the late 18th and early 19th century, Britishness without rule from Westminster was almost unthinkable. The extensive sovereignty of the imperial parliament was so important that arguably Britain lost its American empire over it. But in the later 19th century and early 20th century, it became evident that the empire, especially the white dominions, couldn't just be governed from London - and then there were the Irish... Parliamentary union with Ireland hadn't worked out quite as expected. But could you still be British, if you had your own parliament and weren't ruled from Westminster? 'Yes' said some and 'No' said others - sounds quite familiar doesn't it?

0420130724

0420130724

042013072420140102 (RS)

The Great Depression, war and loss of empire. Richard Holloway continues to explore the Scots-British identity.

Up until the 1930s, Scots were proud of their dual Scottish/British identity. After the great depression had hammered heavy industry, however, confidence was in as short supply as work on Clydeside. While arguments about Home Rule and independence never went away, they started to simmer down in favour of class solidarity across Great Britain. World War 2 heralded a new version of Britishness in which the nations of the UK all pulled together in what was supposed to be the 'People's War'; and after it, they built the welfare state and nationalised industries, so that a strong UK state could help the worst off. At least that was the theory! As the empire shrank, Britain prided itself on gracefully handing out independence to country after country - that was also the theory - though those newly independent countries may have viewed things differently. At home there was a proud and optimistic sense of Britishness, but was this just a bubble before the realities of post-war economics and shrivelled Great-power status caught up with it? Richard Holloway continues his investigation.

0420130724

The Great Depression, war and loss of empire. Richard Holloway continues to explore the Scots-British identity.

Up until the 1930s, Scots were proud of their dual Scottish/British identity. After the great depression had hammered heavy industry, however, confidence was in as short supply as work on Clydeside. While arguments about Home Rule and independence never went away, they started to simmer down in favour of class solidarity across Great Britain. World War 2 heralded a new version of Britishness in which the nations of the UK all pulled together in what was supposed to be the 'People's War'; and after it, they built the welfare state and nationalised industries, so that a strong UK state could help the worst off. At least that was the theory! As the empire shrank, Britain prided itself on gracefully handing out independence to country after country - that was also the theory - though those newly independent countries may have viewed things differently. At home there was a proud and optimistic sense of Britishness, but was this just a bubble before the realities of post-war economics and shrivelled Great-power status caught up with it? Richard Holloway continues his investigation.

0520130731

05 LAST20130731

05 LAST2013073120140103 (RS)

Richard Holloway continues his personal exploration of the Scots-British identity.

05 LAST20130731

Richard Holloway continues his personal exploration of the Scots-British identity.