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2013032420130325 (WS)Gareth Mitchell at the BBC Science Africa Festival in Kampala, Uganda asks: how can Afr...
Gareth Mitchell at the BBC Science Africa Festival in Kampala, Uganda asks: how can Africa play a major part in global science?
2013032520130326 (WS)Gareth Mitchell at the BBC Science Africa Festival in Uganda looks at space research -...
Gareth Mitchell at the BBC Science Africa Festival in Uganda looks at space research - a growth area for science in Africa.
How Can Africa Play A Major Part In Global Science?2013032520130331 (WS)Top African researchers discuss the wow factor in science at Makerere University, Uganda.
In the second special science programme from the African Science Festival being held at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda, presenters Gareth Mitchell and Alan Kasujja are joined by Cern particle physicist Professor Jim Virdee, astronomer and head of the Square Kilometre Array project in South Africa, Professor Justin Jonas and engineer at Nasa who designs robotic Mars landers, Dr Ashitey Trebi-Ollennu.
The researchers were all born in Africa and talk about how they were inspired to become scientists. This included rebuilding radios so that they could improve the reception of the World Service and listen to music that was not available in apartheid South Africa.
All these scientists work in areas that are about extremes – travelling to other planets, understanding the origin of the universe and the very stuff of matter. Dr Trebi-Ollennu tries to persuade Alan that it is easy to land on Mars, and Professor Jonas explains how he has found new uses for old mobile phone satellite dishes – as telescopes. And Professor Virdee explains that there is more to do at Cern even though the Higgs boson has been found.
(Image: CGI image showing Mars Curiosity Rover. Credit: Nasa via Associated Press)
2013032620130327 (WS)Gareth Mitchell at the BBC Science Africa Festival in Uganda looks at how Africa is tak...
Gareth Mitchell at the BBC Science Africa Festival in Uganda looks at how Africa is taking control of its health agendas.
Improving African Health2013032620130331 (WS)
20130401 (WS)
How can Africans have better health?

Peter Piot, Director of the London School of Tropical Medicine and Professor of Global Health, Dr Nelson Sewankambo, Professor of Medicine and Principal of the College of Health Sciences at Makerere University, Dr Alex Coutinho, Director of the Infectious Diseases Institute at Makerere University and Professor Pontiano Kaleebu, Director of the MRC Uganda Virus Research Institute in Entebbe, Uganda, have all worked on Aids, either in the discovery of the epidemic or in researching and treating the condition. They are joined by Gareth Mitchell and Alan Kasujja in the tent at Makerere University in front of an audience to talk about three decades of Aids. They also discuss how Uganda is facing a rise in the incidence of non communicable diseases such as heart disease, cancer and stroke as well as neglected tropical infections. They also debate what needs to be done to improve the health of Africans.
2013032720130328 (WS)Gareth Mitchell at the BBC Science Africa Festival in Uganda looks at new and old techn...
Gareth Mitchell at the BBC Science Africa Festival in Uganda looks at new and old technologies changing African food production.
Improving African Agriculture2013032720130328 (WS)
20130330 (WS)
Can Africa feed itself?
Professor David Kabasa, the Principal of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Makerere University, Professor Sam Kyamanywa, the Principal of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at Makerere University, Dr Jimmy Pittchar of ICIPE in Kenya, and Dr Florence Lubwama Kiyimba of Uganda’a National Agricultural Research Organisation are all working to improve the productivity of farming in Africa. They join Gareth Mitchell and Alan Kasujja in the tent at Makerere University in front of an audience to talk about the disconnect between farmers and researchers, and how this can be overcome. They also discuss the place of GM crops in Uganda, a method of farming called push pull in which pests are controlled without the need for externally applied chemicals, and the need to develop ways of processing and marketing surplus crops.
(Image: Children eating rice. Credit: CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
Future Of Science In Africa2013032820130329 (WS)Can Africa become a major player in global science?
Africa contributes very little to knowledge creation at the moment. A panel of scientists discuss how science can grow on the continent with Gareth Mitchell and Alan Kasujja. Professor Lillian Tibatemwa-Ekirikubinza, Deputy Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at Makerere University, Dr Ashitey Trebi-Ollennu , an engineer who build landers that land on Mars, Professor Tejinder Virdee, the leader of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Switzerland, Dr Kotcho Karume, Director of the Goma Volcanic Observatory in the DRC, and Dr Thierry Zomahoun, Executive Director of AIMS – Next Einstein Initiative, based in South Africa, discuss how to improve science education, inspire more people to study science, the infrastructure for research and funding for science.
And Dr Ashitey Trebi-Ollennu demonstrates a robot simply made from LEGO that he uses to teach physics concepts in an interesting way.
Gareth Mitchell at the BBC Science Africa Festival in Uganda discusses the future for h...
Gareth Mitchell at the BBC Science Africa Festival in Uganda discusses the future for high quality global research in Africa.
20130329Reports on the state of science in Africa today.

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