Saving Species

Saving Species will broadcast on BBC Radio 4 throughout 2010.

We will be live from the BBC Natural History Unit in Bristol on Tuesdays, reaching out to our wildlife reporters and field biologists in the UK and around the world.

Saving Species will get you close to wildlife and we will share the thrill of being there with you - and through that immersion in the natural world we will explore the world of wildlife conservation.

In this first programme we lead with Purple Emperor Butterflies.

We'll be following their ups and downs all year in a southern English woodland with National Trust entomologist Matthew Oates.

To help us keep an eye on individuals he has named the butterflies, which are caterpillars at the moment, after famous poets.

We know already [Christina] Rossetti has not made it through a bleak midwinter!

We also start our year-long reporting from Australia with Koalas.

We hear from ABC reporter Kim Kleidon who has visited a Koala sanctuary for us and Brett interviews Koala Biologist Bill Ellis from the University of Queensland about his research, revealing how important sound is to Koalas.

As with every week, we'll have a wildlife news round-up, this week gathered by Kelvin Boot, and our out-reach to the Open University, where you can share your observations of wildlife with others on their interactive biodiversity web site iSpot.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Series Editor Julian Hector.

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Episodes

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Sustaining Life20111223

In a special edition of Saving Species, recorded in front of an audience at the University of Bristol, Brett Westwood chairs a discussion about the building tension between the natural world and the burgeoning human population.

Every 2 seconds another child is born.

The human population is now over 7 billion and is projected to rise to 9 billion by 2050.

All these people will need food, water, energy and materials, is that possible? If everyone in the world lived like us in the UK, even at the present level of population, we would need 4 planet's worth of resources to sustain our lifestyles, and as the world gets wealthier and more people attain a western lifestyle, where will those resources come from?

How can a burgeoning population really live with a flourishing natural world?

Not only will more wetlands be drained, more forests destroyed for agriculture and the seas fished even more, the distribution of resources will be unevenly spread around the world.

How will this affect us all in the years to come?

Or is another way possible, where we let go of the systems that drive the processes that destroy nature and learn to live with the natural world, which will mean making sacrifices?

Sustaining Life takes the issue of the human population and nature head on.

The speakers are:

Shiva Vandana - an environmentalist from India; Jacqueline McGlade - Executive Director of the European Environment Agency; Aubrey Manning - Emeritus Professor of Natural History, University of Edinburgh; Jon Bridle, Evolutionary Biologist, Cabot Institute, University of Bristol.

There are guest performances by writer ALK and poet, Miles Chambers.

Saving Species news reporter Kelvin Boot will be presenting some of the themes.

And questions from some of the 800 members of the public who attended the recording of the programme.

Chair Brett Westwood

Producer Mary Colwell

Editor Julian Hector.

The wildlife conservation programme Saving Species discusses human population and nature.

01012010040620100408

Saving Species will broadcast on BBC Radio 4 throughout 2010.

We will be live from the BBC Natural History Unit in Bristol on Tuesdays, reaching out to our wildlife reporters and field biologists in the UK and around the world.

Saving Species will get you close to wildlife and we will share the thrill of being there with you - and through that immersion in the natural world we will explore the world of wildlife conservation.

In this first programme we lead with Purple Emperor Butterflies.

We'll be following their ups and downs all year in a southern English woodland with National Trust entomologist Matthew Oates.

To help us keep an eye on individuals he has named the butterflies, which are caterpillars at the moment, after famous poets.

We know already [Christina] Rossetti has not made it through a bleak midwinter!

We also start our year-long reporting from Australia with Koalas.

We hear from ABC reporter Kim Kleidon who has visited a Koala sanctuary for us and Brett interviews Koala Biologist Bill Ellis from the University of Queensland about his research, revealing how important sound is to Koalas.

As with every week, we'll have a wildlife news round-up, this week gathered by Kelvin Boot, and our out-reach to the Open University, where you can share your observations of wildlife with others on their interactive biodiversity web site iSpot.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Series Editor Julian Hector.

010220100413

We head up this weeks programme with Red-Crowned Cranes, the national bird of Japan and rather wonderfully called the bird of happiness".

Julian Hector interviews Mark Brazil in Japan, an East Asian bird specialist who lives in Hokkaido, the northern island of Japan where the cranes live.

It was late winter when we went to Hokkaido, a time when the cranes are as raucous as they are flamboyant with their displays, calls and dances.

Japanese cranes have a big relevance to Europeans too as we seek to conserve our own crane species and even re-introduce them to wetlands where the species is now extinct.

We'll be following cranes in the far East and nearer to home in the weeks ahead.

We also broadcast our first "Memories Are Made of This" feature, asking older people, in their 70's and 80's, to tell us about abundances of wildlife they remember from the past.

These will be testimonies from naturalists and non-specialists who recall skies darkening with swifts and gardens constantly visited by hedgehogs.

We'll have at least seven of these features before the end of July, linked to the seasons of the year.

As with every week, we'll have a wildlife news round-up, this week gathered by Kelvin Boot and we'll work with our associates in The Open University to see who is sharing what observations about biodiversity on their interactive website iSpot.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Producer: Kirsty Henderson

Editor: Julian Hector"

010320100420

We catch up with the larval poets in this programme.

For much of the year we're following Purple Emperor Butterflies with National Trust Lepidopterist Matthew Oates.

They are still caterpillars - and all named by Matthew after famous poets to help us keep a track of individuals - we're following their fortunes which will hopefully lead to us seeing them as adults.

Purple Emperor butterflies are a truly tree canopy dwelling butterfly with some pretty foul (in human value terms, not wildlife terms) habits as grown-ups - and more about that in later programmes.

We continue our interest in Japanese Red-Crowned Cranes with a further report from Hokkaido in Japan.

And we see how the UK seabird breeding colonies are filling up, especially fulmars, kittiwakes and guillemots.

There has been year on year bad news for British seabirds - many species failing to raise chicks successfully.

Saving Species will be following this story all spring and summer.

And we introduce a new character - the Starved Wood Sedge or, as one person described, A Doogle [from the Magic Roundabout] looking plant".

We find it lurking in the grounds of Charter House, the famous public school in Southern England, and only existing at all because of an inspired conservation programme by school staff and pupils.

We have our usual wildlife news round-up from around the globe gathered this week by Kelvin Boot and we'll check into iSpot, the interactive biodiversity website of The Open University.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Producer: Sheena Duncan

Editor: Julian Hector.

Brett Westwood examines the world of nature and the challenges of wildlife conservation."

010420100427

4/40.

This is the edition of Saving Species where we celebrate the dawn chorus of birds as they sing at first light.

Across the world woodlands, wetlands, farmlands, rivers, deserts, lake sides and gardens - to name only a few habitats - resound with nature's songsters - largely males defending territories and letting the opposite sex know they are still alive! The dawn chorus is still a real spectacle in the UK and over the world, but is it as rich and diverse as it was? Is the dawn chorus as loud as it has been in the past? In our repeating feature Memories Are Made of This" we have gone to Thomas Hardy's cottage in Dorset, the house where we understand he wrote "Far from the Madding Crowd".

Was the dawn chorus very different to his ears than to ours today? We recorded the dawn chorus from Hardy's house during the air-lock-down, thanks to the Icelandic volcanic ash cloud over Europe.

A dawn chorus without aeroplanes - one thing to celebrate about zero air traffic.

Common (European) Crane also feature in this programme.

This Crane species is the bird that has triggered a big collaborative project to re-introduce them to the Somerset Levels.

Eggs are being driven from a wetland in Eastern Germany to the Wildfowl & Wetland Trust reserve at Slimbridge, where they will be incubated and reared for release in August.

We will be with the incubating crane eggs in Slimbridge.

And on another translocation project, we'll be live in Sussex with a Common Cricket catcher - just one of many skilled conservationists re-introducing this rare cricket to a specially prepared nature reserve in the neighbouring county.

And finally we will have our news round-up with Kelvin Boot gathering the wildlife events from around the world.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Producer: Sheena Duncan

Editor: Julian Hector.

Brett Westwood examines the world of nature and the challenges of wildlife conservation."

01052010050420100506

There's a massive leak of crude oil from a BP well in the Gulf of Mexico with many reporting it as the largest slick in history - and the crude is making landfall on the Mississippi Delta, one of the most biodiverse areas in the USA.

We ask wildlife film-maker and author Steve Nicholls, who has been to this wildlife hotspot many times, who and what is most threatened and insight into the natural resilience of such wilderness.

Our regular newshound Kelvin Boot will focus on how the Americans are reporting this story and how the disaster is being dealt with.

Also in the programme, the demise of the Wood Warbler in British woodlands.

This migrant songbird from Africa was one of the key choristers in the British Dawn Chorus.

But there are more Chiffchaffs and Blackcaps.

We ask ornithologist and bird migration expert Ian Newton how the songsters that make up the dawn chorus have changed and why.

And we hope also to bring you the story of the Field Cricket release in southern England - but the running order is a bit fluid at the moment as we watch the developments in the Gulf of Mexico.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Mary Colwell

Series Editor Julian Hector.

Including a first report from North America correspondent Howard Stableford

01062010051120100513

We're keeping an eye on an important Nighitingale story - the British Trust for Ornithology are re-capturing Nighintingales they attached data loggers to last summer.

If they can re-catch these same birds they will be able to decipher the data on the loggers and tell us where these wonderful migrant song birds go to in Africa over winter.

Because of the events in the Mississippi delta we have delayed our first report from Howard Stableford in Costa Rica to this programme.

He visited the rain forest in Costa Rica to see how forest disturbance was impacting on the pollination behaviour of the forest humming birds.

The research, only in its early stages, is showing that the behaviour of the birds does change near forest edges with banana plantations.

But what is the impact on the rainforest regeneration will less enthusiastic humming birds?

We also have the second part of the Field Cricket release into an RSPB reserve in southern England.

The Field cricket has the reputation of being Britain's loudest insect.

We covered their capture in a previous programme and we were there for their translocation.

And we ask, why bother - does anyone care about a cricket?

And if there is room we'll keep you up with our larval poets [baby Purple Emperor Butterfly caterpillars] in Wiltshire with National Trust butterfly man Matthew Oates.

Kelvin Boot will be there with a roundup of global wildlife news - especially the latest in the Gulf of Mexico.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Series Editor: Julian Hector.

Including a report from Costa Rica and an important story about the Nightingale.

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The Black Bear of North America is a common species; over a million of them roam the forests of the mid west and eastern states.

The perception of bears in the United States and Canada is mixed.

To some people bears are revered as an emblem of wildness, perhaps as much as the Bald Eagle.

To others bears are dangerous and a nuisance.

For sure, Black and Brown [Grizzly] bears are different characters.

And only recently, has the more gentle Black Bear been taken off the vermin list of America and been reclassified as big game" - this new classification reduces the hunting season for bears from any-time of year to a six week window.

Saving Species will be following the science and fortunes of Black Bears over the year and in this week's programme we have our first report from the wildwoods of Minnesota and a guaranteed close encounter with this much misunderstood bear.

We broadcast another edition of our "Memories are Made of This" - these are your memories of past abundances of British wildlife.

This week you remember when Lapwings were considerably more numerous than today.

And we'll be talking to the British Trust for Ornithology about their ongoing work retrieving the data loggers they fitted to Nightingales last year.

Where Nightingales go to winter, surprisingly, is still a mystery.

Maybe we will find out in this programme.

Kelvin Boot will be on the show as ever with a global news roundup of other wildlife news.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Mary Colwell

Editor Julian Hector.

Following the work of seabird ecologists on the Isle of May."

01082010052520100527

8/40.

Howard Stableford is in the presenter seat for this programme and he presides over a particularly birdy programme.

Saving Species is going large on British seabirds.

Naturalist and broadcaster Michael Scott is joining biologists from Edinburgh University on the Isle of May in the Firth of Forth.

The Isle of May is a small dumpy island, eclipsed in grandeur slightly by the nearby Bass Rock - the rock" is the breeding site for Britain's largest seabird, the Gannet.

The gannets will be plunge diving in the seas around the Isle of May, but it's the Puffins, the Guillemots and the Kittiwakes that Michael is going to see together with the rather dinosaurian shags.

Over the recent three years Britain's seabirds have had a tough time surviving themselves let alone raising young.

Their fortunes seem to be different depending where they breed and feed and it's this complex picture Michael will unpack on the Isle of May.

Seabird ecologist Bob Swann is live into the programme from a seabird Colony near Tain, much further north than the Isle of May - a colony he has monitored daily over the last 40 years.

Our other bird species this week is the Spoon-billed Sandpiper.

This bird, which breeds in Myanmar (formally Burma) is down to less than 300 pairs in the world.

The British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) has mounted a major research expedition to find out more about their habits and migration.

They have been to SE Asia catching the birds having practised the scientific techniques on our own wading birds in the Wash Estuary.

We have been out with them and report the latest.

Presented by Howard Stableford

Produced by Mary Colwell

Series Editor: Julian Hector.

Following the work of seabird ecologists on the Isle of May."

01092010060120100603

9/40.

It's a mixed bag in this edition of Saving Species, from all over the world.

Kelvin Boot is going to update you on the big oil spill off the Mississippi Delta.

In recent days there have been significant amounts of oil washed up on beaches and the first images of oiled sea turtles are on public view.

We'll have the latest from the perspective of the wildlife and how resilient the soft sediment coastal habitats of the southern US are.

Sticking with the Americas, we head north to Central America and the rainforests of Costa Rica.

Howard Stableford has been there for Saving Species to meet Oregon State University bioloists working on Humming Birds in the forests.

Howard discovers that the Humming Birds are crucial plant pollinators for the forest, but those birds near the forest edge will head into the banana plantations before the forest, lured there because banana flowers are loaded with nectar, the humming birds food.

What then are the implications for rainforest regeneration without their humming bird pollinators? Howard asks the questions.

We'll also be on the Australian Great Barrier Reef to encounter Sea Snakes.

Our reporter James Brickell is on the reef and files his first report.

And the Spoonbill Sandpiper - a small wading bird that winters in Myanmar and breeds in East Asian Russia, is the subject of emergency research by the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO).

The BTO tell us this bird species is declining by 25% a year.

Why such a steep population decline and what can be done about it.

We hear both from the Wash Estuary in England and from the work in Asia to save it.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Series Editor Julian Hector

Brett Westwood and the team look at work on koala conservation in Australia.

01102010060820100610

10/40.

We catch up with our European Cranes at the Wildlfowl & Wetlands Trust (WWT) centre in Slimbridge.

This is a project shared between WWT, the RSPB, Natural England and the Somerset Wildlife Trust to release cranes back into the wild in the Somerset levels - a wetland where they have been extinct since the 17th century.

The conservation project is building up tempo as the chicks, which were brought over as eggs from Germany, are nearing full size.

Chris Sperring will meet up with our feathered friends in Gloucestershire and see how they are being hardened up to life in the wild.

The plan is to release them into the Somerset Levels in August - Chris Sperring scopes the release site in this programme and asks how the rest of the wildlife might take the re-introduction.

We have a story about Pool Frogs in Norfolk; they are very vocal during the day, which makes them an unusual amphibian in this country.

But they are an introduced species - should they be here? Brett asks the questions.

And we catch up with our Purple Emperor Butterflies, now voracious caterpillars heading to the canopy tops where they will pupate.

Which of the larval poets (remember, the animals we're following are all named after famous welsh poets) are flourishing and which have disappeared? Matthew Oates will be telling us from his secret research site in Wiltshire.

Kelvin Boot will be on the show as ever with news and comment about wildlife making the news from around the world.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Series Editor Julian Hector.

Our first report from the Great Barrier Reef on how its sharks are doing.

01112010061520100617

This episode of Saving Species is being recorded at the Bristol Festival of Nature.

This festival has been running for a number of years and is organised by the Bristol Natural History Consortium (BNHC).

The BNHC is made up of a number of different organisations including the BBC Natural History Unit, two world class universities, Wildscreen (the wildlife film festival), Bristol Zoo, The Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, DEFRA, Natural England, the City Council, Avon Wildlife Trust & Forum for the Future.

This is a special edition of Saving Species where we will promote the BBC Wildlife Fund, the BBC's third charity, which raises money to conserve wildlife around the world.

Biodiversity - the Problem with the Word".

We question the language used in wildlife conservation and with an invited group of experts will discuss whether the words used in wildlife conservation provide understanding and engage the audience.

Do we like words like "sustainability", "ecological services", "climate change", and "favourable status" - And "biodiversity"? What does biodiversity mean?

Language, both visual and spoken will be essential this Sunday Night on BBC1 when the BBC presents a fund raising programme WILD NIGHT IN to raise money for wildlife conservation through the BBC Wildlife Fund.

On the panel and performing infront of a live audience are: Professor Jonathan Silvertown from the Open University, Matthew Oates, Conservationist from the National Trust, Kelvin Boot, naturalist & writer, Paul Evans, Wildlife Writer & Broadcaster and Martin Kiszko, Composer & Poet.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Series Editor: Julian Hector.

Brett Westwood and guests question the language used in wildlife conservation."

01122010062220100624

12/40 We go to India in this edition of Saving Species to report on the last ditch efforts to save the [Griffon-like] Long-billed Vulture.

Gillian Rice, our reporter in India, was told that this vulture has declined from millions of birds in the 1980s to just a handful today.

Three species of vultures have disappeared from whole areas of India, Nepal and Pakistan.

There's now a programme to literally seize the remaining few from the cliffs and bring them into captivity for safety whilst Bombay Natural History Society and the RSPB work on the causes and design a recovery plan to save the species.

We'll bring you the story from India.

We have been keeping an eye on Nightingales for many weeks now with the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO).

These night time songsters, who live in scrubby areas often near water, winter in Africa.

The BTO fitted data loggers onto individuals last summer and have re-captured those individuals this spring.

The BTO are crunching the data and we hope to report the first ever evidence of where our British Nightingales go for the winter.

This information will be invaluable for their conservation.

We hope to catch up with our Black Bears in Minnesota, we might have a new report in from the Great Barrier Reef and we'll have our news hound Kelvin Boot with the latest conservation stories from around the world.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Mary Colwell

Series Editor Julian Hector.

Including a report from India on efforts to save the long-billed vulture.

01132010062920100701

13/40.

We broadcast some feedback from some of you using ispot in this programme.

Ispot is the Open University website where you can tap into the communal expertise of fellow users and identify wildlife you don't know the name of.

A simple photograph taken by you or even a written description of what you have seen uploaded onto the site often gets responses within minutes.

But how does giving something a name help? We find out from you.

We have part two of our Long-Billed and White-Backed Vulture story from India.

Gillian Rice discovers these species have together declined by 99.9% in India.

40+ million to a few thousand in 15 years.

In part two we discover how the RSPB and the Bombay Natural History Society are planning to rescue the populations and what the implications are on human health in an India with vultures on the brink of extinction.

And we'll be back in northern Scotland with Bob Swann and his Fulmars, Guillemots and Kittiwakes he's keeping an eye on for us.

The news might be good news for the Kittiwakes.

And our news hound Kelvin Boot will be on the show with wildlife stories making the news from around the world.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Mary Colwell

Series Editor Julian Hector.

Including feedback from listeners who have used the Open University's Ispot website.

01142010070620100708

14/40.

There is a small patch of Cornwall that some argue is as important to Britain for its wild plants as the Cape is for South Africa.

The Lizard Peninsular on the south coast of Cornwall has a unique geology, degree of dryness and temperature to be a hot spot for plants found nowhere else in Great Britain.

One of those plants is the Pygmy Rush - And it's the Pygmy Rush that is the centre of a big recovery project by conservation organisation, Plantlife.

This small wild plant doesn't like too much competition from other plants, but can exploit the harshest and most brutal ground.

To recreate areas of unforgiving bare ground the conservationists are scarring this important botanical hotspot with 4x4 vehicle tracks to create the furrows this plant can exploit and so flourish.

We will be there to find the plant and to see this extreme form of tough love.

And part three of Gillian Rice's vulture report from India.

Having broken the news that the RSPB and the Indian Conservationists have successfully hatched vultures from eggs in incubators (a first in the world for bird conservation), Gillian reports on how India is ridding the use of Diclofenac in cattle [the drug heavily implicated in poisoning 99.9% of Indias vultures].

And, ominously, we're hearing reports that the use of Diclofenac by vets and farmers is increasing in Africa.

Could African vultures go the same way as the Indian population? We'll find out.

Our newshound Kelvin Boot will be with us with wildlife stories making the news from around the world.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Series Editor Julian Hector.

Including a report from the Lizard Peninsula on a project to save the pygmy rush.

01152010071320100715

15/40.

This week is the 50th anniversary of Jane Goodall's work in Gombe, Tanzania.

Jane Goodall is famous for her work on Chimpanzees and it was 50 years ago when she started her research on a specific population in Africa.

Television, more than radio, has made some individuals from her Chimpanzee study group well known and in this edition of Saving Species, we have a report from Jeremy Bristow who has been out to Gombe to meet Jane Goodall and some of her study animals.

Chimpanzees have been under threat for many years and for many reasons including the bush meat trade, human population increase and the commensurate increase in farmland incursion into their forests as well as diseases that kill Chimpanzees.

Goodall's conservation work, often controversial, over five decades in Africa has raised the profile of the issues impacting on apes in Africa, but many believe her work has influenced conservation beyond Chimpanzees and Tanzania.

Also in the programme: did the Purple Emperor poets fly? We're out and about in Wiltshire with Matthew Oates and bring you the latest news from the pupating Purple Emperor Butterflies.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Series Editor Julian Hector.

Jeremy Bristow visits Jane Goodall in Gombe, Tanzania, to see her chimpanzee study group.

01162010072020100722

17/40.

What is the future for our farmland birds? We have been following the re-introduction of Cirl Buntings into Cornwall: an RSPB led conservation project where Cirl Bunting chicks have been taken from nests in Devon and released on specially selected farms on the Roseland Peninsular.

We sent a reporter down to the West Country to see how it works.

But do planned government cuts on departments like DEFRA impact on this and other conservation work to protect our farmland birds? And will the "Big Society" and "localism" - the policy centre piece of the coalition - and not Government - protect our farmland birds? We will ask the RSPB and, we hope, the minister.

Also in the programme, memories of Butterflies.

And our newshound, Kelvin Boot.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Kirsty Henderson

Series Editor Julian Hector.

Are caravan sites great unsung nature reserves?

01172010072720100729

17/40.

So, how did our British Seabirds do this year? Since the launch of Saving Species in April, we have been following two breeding colonies in Scotland.

We're keeping in touch with the seabird biologists and we'll bring you a snapshot of how this year's season has been from Sutor and the Isle of May.

It looks good this year for Puffins, Kittiwakes and Shags - but remains dire for Fulmars.

Although we won't be able to give you the whole picture until the biologists have crunched their data later in the autumn, we do have an interview with Francis Daunt and the wonderful pictures brought back by shags wearing cameras.

How can pictures taken by seabirds help bioloists understand the ocean? We'll find out.

We'll be on the Somerset Levels trying to spot the Little Bittern, a rare heron, its very presence a monument we're told to the success of landscape conservation.

And the Harbour Seal, formally called Common Seal - our reporter Tania Dorrity went to meet the marine bioloists from Aberdeen University who study these seals on the sand banks where the seals haul out of the sea.

There will be other stories too from around the world with Kelvin Boot giving us an update on wildlife making the news - he'll be live in the studio.

Presented by Brett Westwood.

The latest news on kittiwakes, shags and fulmars in north-east Scotland.

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18/40 We come back on air with a special feature about swifts recorded in the tower that legendary ornithologist David Lack studied the species.

Over the run of Saving Species we have been making special features about past abundance of animals and plants in the British landscape.

This week we reflect on Swifts.

Swifts are often seen as the bird of the towns and cities.

We hear their "chatting" call as they swirl and hawk in the sky for insects.

Many are now heading south to Africa but that late summer spectacle in the UK is still with us, if you include the swallows and martins as they group up in the sky grabbing their last meal before heading south.

In this programme we hear that nest site availability in the UK is as much an issue for swift survival as the many challenges they face migrating to and wintering in Africa.

In this programme we also hear about Southern Ocean Krill.

And an ancient beast living in the foot prints of cattle in Scotland - The Tadpole Shrimp.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Series Editor Julian Hector.

Featuring news of the challenges swifts and swallows face as they head south for winter.

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19/40 Over August, the European Cranes we have been monitoring in Saving Species have been moved to their new home in the Somerset Levels.

Earlier in the year they were brought over from Germany - still as eggs! - they were then hatched at the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust (WWT) Centre in Slimbridge and hand reared.

Extraordinary efforts have been made not to expose these birds to people and WWT have even taught them to be wary of terrestrial predators by using a wildfowl decoy dog, which looks like a fox.

We are going to be live on the Somerset Levels to witness the release of the European Crane, the first time they have been on the Levels for 400 years.

And they join many other long-legged birds resident in the reedbeds, including the Heron and the Bittern.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Kirsty Henderson

Series Editor Julian Hector.

Including a report from the Somerset Levels to witness the release of the European Crane.

01202010091420100916

20/40 In this weeks Saving Species Joanna Pinnock, armed with a thermometer, visits a compost heap in Cambridgeshire to discover to her great surprise its temperature is way above that of her own body.

Invertebrate ecologist Julian Doberski, himself armed with a microscope, shows Joanna how miniscule amounts of steaming compost contain a wonderous array of tiny critters, all thriving on the free heat generated by the microbes digesting the sugars in the compost.

Here is, we discover, another example of how the little things in the natural world are responsible for turning around dead things and making them available to other wildlife.

And we follow on this theme with a special studio guest who more than ever needs a warm living compost heap to successfully raise her young - the Grass Snake.

Also in the programme how deciphering the life history of the Large Blue Butterfly is helping this very rare insect to increase its range in Southern England.

And we hope to bring you the spectacle of breeding Stellers Sea Lions - the largest "Fur Seal" in the world with a special report from the Aleution Islands in the North Pacific.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Kirsty Henderson

Series Editor Julian Hector.

Reporting on the tiny creatures that writhe and creep in compost heaps.

01212010092120100923

21/40. Saba Douglas-Hamilton reports from Samburu national park in Kenya where she and her family have studied the elephants and lions for decades. Saba sees pressures from all directions impacting on the wildlife. In her first report we hear about the affects of severe flooding after a period of sustained drought on the savannah and get an insight into the elephants within the national park.

And we hear from Mark Brazil in the Aleution Islands (a string of islands streaming off the western tip of Alaska) and his close encounters with Stellers Sea Lions.

And in the UK, culm grassland making a return - the preferred habitat of the Marsh Fritillary.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Series Editor Julian Hector.

Saba Douglas-Hamilton reports from Samburu national park in Kenya.

21/40.

Saba Douglas-Hamilton reports from Samburu national park in Kenya where she and her family have studied the elephants and lions for decades.

Saba sees pressures from all directions impacting on the wildlife.

In her first report we hear about the affects of severe flooding after a period of sustained drought on the savannah and get an insight into the elephants within the national park.

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22/40.

How tough are oceans? Biologists use the word 'resilience'.

In this programme we're devoting our air time to the resilience of oceans.

The Gulf of Mexico spill remains fresh in our minds.

For now the oil leak is plugged and as the weeks and months unfold so the impact of this pollution event will be assessed.

Resilience in an ecological sense means the ability of a wilderness, an ocean, to continue to function in the light of external change.

The sea is made of community upon community of animals, plants and microbes which eat each other, grow on each other, parasitise each other in such a way that nutrient is circulated and populations of species are sustained.

Howard Stableford will be in the Mississippi Delta area gathering information about the resilience of a huge river Delta and its relationship with the sea.

Kelvin Boot will be talking to experts about the sea's ability to rebuff pollution events and human exploitation.

How much flex is in the system? We'll find out.

Presented by Kelvin Boot

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Editor Julian Hector.

Saving Species visits the Mississippi Delta in the aftermarth of the Gulf oil spill.

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23/40.

We go in search of fungi this week with expert Lynn Boddy.

We have reported the importance of microbes before in Saving Species.

"It's the little things that run the world" Arron Bernstein from Harvard University told us.

And fungi belong to that group of little things - except not so little.

It's a fungus that is the largest terrestrial living thing on earth with it's matrix of underground roots [hyphae] spreading across an area the size of a football pitch.

We're in a west Wales woodland looking for the wonderful fruiting bodies, the time of year when the otherwise hidden fungus emerges from the ground with their wonderfully shaped and coloured "spore dispersal units".

We discover the crucial role fungi have in keeping woodlands alive.

We're also back in Africa with a report from Tessa McGregor about the successful conservation of the Grevy's Zebra in the Samburu National Park in Kenya.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Series Editor Julian Hector.

Saving Species goes on a fungus foray in West Wales.

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24/40.

In earlier episodes of Saving Species we followed the life and times of British seabirds on the Isle of May and the Cliffs near Tain, both in Scotland.

We reported good news and bad news in a number of seabird species from both sites at the time they were rearing their chicks: Puffins seemed to be doing alright, Fulmars not so, Kittiwakes not good - but shags in places have had a good year.

Over recent weeks lots of data has been crunched and we have ornithologist Bob Swann telling us how Fulmars, Kittiwakes, Puffins and Shags and other seabirds have done in various places around the UK - and in particular from two colonies he has been monitoring for upwards of 40 years in Scotland.

And we take the plight of British birds story further.

Biologists from Oxford University have been studying the decline in British birds and have come up with work that indicates that bird decline in the UK is an indicator of wider mass extinctions over the world.

What exactly does this mean? And how can British birds inform us about the rest of the world? We will find out.

Also, bees.

We report new research looking at what the Honey Bee waggle dance tells us about nectar sources in gardens and the countryside.

And to a great source of autumn nectar, Ivy, and the Ivy Bee.

Kelvin Boot hunts down this Euro Bee - one of the new visitors to this country linked, we're told, to warmer winters and a super-abundance of Ivy in southern England.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Mary Colwell

Series Editor Julian Hector.

What can the decline in British birds tell us about global extinction levels.

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Brett Westwood reports on migrating birds in the skies over London.

25/40.

In the northern hemisphere autumn is upon the world and the skies are busy with air traffic of the feathered variety.

Bird migration is one of the great natural wonders of the living planet and this is peak time for northern hemisphere birds to head south.

And we're interested in the birds bound for Africa.

Swifts and Swallows, Martins and Warblers, Cuckoos and Nightingales are some of the birds that head for sub-Sahara Africa to winter.

Many have arrived and are living under African skies.

We'll be in London at one of the most historic bird observatories with a special "memories" piece reflecting on a time when London's skies were busy with south-bound avian migrants.

And we'll have a special piece from a sacred forest in Ethiopia, a unique wooded island refuge in a desert of over tilled land - a forest protected by a church and its followers.

We hear from Claire Ozanne from Roehampton University as she and colleagues conduct the first ever wildlife survey of this refuge.

The biologists discover a new bird for Ethiopia and involve the local children in their discoveries.

And we take on the bigger picture; what contribution does religion make to nature conservation at a global level? We have Martin Palmer, CEO of The Alliance of Religion and Conservation (ARC) in the studio.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Mary Colwell

Series Editor Julian Hector.

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How will the UK government's spending review impact of wildlife conservation?

26/40 We hope to bring in fresh reports from Nagoya where governments and conservation organisations from across the world have been meeting in Japan (COP 10) to discuss new biodiversity targets, "trip wires" and "bar heights" to try and arrest the loss of species world-wide.

Simon Stuart, Chair of the Species Survival Commission for the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) will be on the line for Saving Species from the COP.

In Britain, a few days after the announcement of the spending review, are there winners and losers in the world of wildlife conservation? We'll get the points of view from government, agencies and NGOs and see how the government's drive for localism and wildlife conservation is playing out in relation to spending cuts.

And Chris Sperring has his eye on the Fallow Deer in the UK and hopes to bring you the spectacle of their rut.

Presenter - Brett Westwood

Producer - Sheena Duncan

Series Editor - Julian Hector.

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Saving Species visits Islay in Scotland in the company of twenty five thousand geese.

27/40 We're planning this programme to be full of geese.

The UK is a wonderland for wintering wildfowl and it's the spectacle of wintering geese we want to focus on in this programme.

We're planning to be in Norfolk with Joanna Pinnock and Pink Footed Geese and Islay with Michael Scott edging ever closer to Greenland-White Front Geese and Barnacle Geese.

The conservation of these birds is a great saving species success story which links the UK with the Arctic and the geese, with other wildfowl, provide one of the great animal spectacles of the world.

And we'll be there.

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Saving Species witnesses the extraordinary mating behaviour of Koalas in Australia.

28/40.

In the very first programme of Saving Species we had an exclusive report about Koalas.

We heard that factors such as change in habitat use and the felling of their trees were forcing Koalas in many areas of Australia to spend more time on the ground and in doing so the Koalas were being attacked by dogs.

We learnt that Koalas are in peril.

We return to Australia and join ABC reporter Kim Kleidon and Koala Biologist Bill Ellis on St Bee's Island off the Queensland coast.

Bill Ellis leads a research group from the University of Queensland on all aspects of Koala biology but is particularly interested in recording their sounds to decipher their interactions with each other.

And St Bee's is one of his hot spots where the Koalas still live in healthy numbers and in an intact habitat.

We're there because it's a key time in the Koala year - the time when males ascend the trees and bellow for mates.

We've never recorded this - and Saving Species audiences will get exclusive access to this unique behaviour.

Presenter: Brett Westwood

Producer: Sheena Duncan

Series editor: Julian Hector

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This week Saving Species looks into the issues of invasive species.

29/40.

Eagle Owls live in the UK, but should they? These large owls with penetrating orange eyes are formidable predators capable of seizing mammals the size of rabbits.

Eagle Owls occur naturally in Scandinavia.

The large expanses of forests in North West Europe are a large uninterrupted habitat for several owl species and these are also areas with low densities of people.

The Eagle Owls in the UK are largely regarded as invasive species - "aliens" - with most experts believing they are not native to the UK but escapees from private collections.

Some argue there is evidence that Eagle Owls once lived in the UK many thousands of years ago and so should be regarded as native.

And there's the rub.

When is a species an invasive one and when has an invaded species become native?

The story of invasive species reaches world-wide.

Species continue to invade islands and mainland habitats with direct consequences on the local ecology.

Climate change is considered a great force for species invasion and people have introduced animal and plant species for centuries, deliberately or not.

The RSPB have successfully eradicated rats from Henderson Island in SE Pacific to save the breeding seabirds there - And on virtually every continent and important archipelago plant and animal eradication programmes occur, but not always with complete support.

Examples of controversial programmes include the Ruddy Duck in England and Wales; Mute Swans in the US; Horses in Australia; and Kiore on Little Barrier Island.

Concerns are normally based around animal welfare.

But concerns can also be based in biodiversity arguments too.

In this programme we discuss whether the eradication of invasive species in any one setting is wildlife conservation.

Amongst others, we talk to Sarah Simons, based in Kenya, from the IUCN's Global Invasive Species Programme and Tim Blackburn from the Zoological Society of London.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Mary Colwell

Series Editor Julian Hector

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How good are the UK's rivers for wildlife?

30/40.

How rich are the UK's rivers and inland waterways for wildlife? The cleaning up of rivers fit for Otters has been reported as being so successful that there are now potential issues of Otters being too numerous in places.

We'll have a special "Memories" piece about how rich British rivers were in the past for wildlife - was it really much better? The come-back of Otters to all but a few UK rivers suggests our rivers are good for wildlife.

And we'll have a fresh report from Mark Brazil who has been to the coastal forests of Brazil on the look out for Gold Lion Tamarins.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Mary Colwell

Series Editor Julian Hector

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Featuring the little known Blue Pimpernel and the Narrow-Headed Ant.

31/40.

We take a look at British farmland and ask how fit it is for wildlife to flourish.

The little known Blue Pimpernel is a diminutive flower of arable land and now very rare.

Early in the autumn we went to the Midlands to find some, and discovered what changes to farming arable land have been needed to allow this wild flower to re-emerge.

We also look for the retreating Narrow-headed Ant, one of many ant species in the UK, but one species that is specifically suffering from land fragmentation.

How can UK and Euro-wide funding schemes help link up farmland habitat to conserve this species and many others? And we ask the bigger questions about the challenges of joining up land and good practice for the good of food supply as well as sustainable wildlife populations.

It's not just about one or two wild flower species and a mini-beast or two, but much more fundamental and wide-ranging ideas of "living landscapes" which implicate both nature and ourselves.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Mary Colwell

Series Editor Julian Hector

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Saving Species comes from the 100 Foot Washes in the company of thousands of swans.

32/40.

This is a special programme in front of an audience from the 100 Foot Washes in Norfolk.

This wonderland of a wetland is refuge to 3000 Bewick's Swans and 700 Whooper Swans during the winter.

The Bewicks have migrated from Arctic Russia and the Whoopers from their Arctic breeding grounds in Iceland.

The programme is being recorded at the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust's bird Observatory at their Welney Centre.

We'll guarantee sound, drama and enlightening conversation from our invited panel and an audience all in the company of these birds that have been said to "carry winter on their wings".

Many would say they love swans, but are the wetlands on which they reside in winter or nest in summer revered to the same extent? Do wetlands have a bad image of "swamps and smelly mud" rather than places of beauty? Does it help they are branded places "rich in biodiversity" and perform "essential ecological services" - do we need to like wetlands to appreciate their value to wildlife and us - do they need to be re-branded? All questions for the panel and audience.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Series Editor Julian Hector

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Saving Species reports from Panama about the plight of Sloths in the Caribbean.

33/40.

We tend to think of Sloths living in the Amazon, but they also live on the islands off the Atlantic coast of Panama.

Linked to a natural history film being broadcast this week on BBC 2 "Decade of Discovery", Saving Species has been sent a report by our team out there about the pressures impacting on the Sloths that live on these islands at the end of the Caribbean chain.

We have the first of our special Ladybird Book series which has been recorded through the year.

Chris Sperring takes the first editions of the famous book series about Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter - published in 1959 - and explores what species have gone, what have arrived and what hasn't changed.

For sure, it's full of surprises.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Series Editor Julian Hector

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Saving Species broadcasts its second Lady-Bird Book wildlife - this week, it's summer!

34/40 In our special series about "Ladybird Book" Britain, it's summer.

What has changed in the 50 years since the first publication of the book? Chris Sperring is out and about finding out for himself and discovers some downs but also some ups.

He's very struck by a picture in the book that portrays Cuckoo's being common place and alighting on the washing lines in gardens.

Cuckoo's are in serious decline and for largely unkown reasons.

But Chris also notes that in his book, written in 1959, it says Sedge Warblers are a rare migrant visitor - as you'll hear, they might not be as numerous as they should be, but most reedbeds of reasonable size and well vegetated ditches, have several pairs - many more than 50 years ago.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Kirsty Henderson

Series Editor Julian Hector

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Saving Species goes to India to investigate a remarkable story about tiger conservation.

35/40 Saving Species sent Matthew Hill to India to investigate a story about tiger conservation.

The story has a direct link to Bristol, the home city of the BBC Natural History Unit, in Mr Ash Pawade - a retired heart surgeon.

Ash Pawade has set up a charity "Hands for Life" which takes volunteer NHS surgeons to Anandwan Hospital in his home state of Chandrapur to provide operations for the poor.

It was when operating on people after alleged tiger attacks that Ash, and Saving Species, learnt about the struggle conservationists are having in the area to conserve tigers, where tigers clearly have the potential to be the neighbours from hell.

Matthew Hill discovers a remarkable story of education and forest conservation driven by the very same people that Ash Pawade treats through his charity.

These are the rural poor.

This is a story of passion for Tigers, compassion for Tigers and People and corruption.

Presented by Matthew Hill

Produced by Mary Colwell

Series Editor Julian Hector.

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In this weeks programme "Top Goose", how BBC geese generated new science.

36/40 In 2008 we broadcast a year long event on BBC Radio 4 following the trials and tribulations of migrating animals as they moved from breeding ground to feeding ground.

One of the great animal characters in "World on the Move" were geese.

We followed Brent, Greenland White-front and Barnacle Geese as they migrated from the UK to the Arctic.

The project "Top Goose", led by Professor Colin Pennycuick of Bristol University, the research staff of the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, with crucial weather data being researched by BBC weatherman Richard Angwin generated new information to science.

"Top Goose" not only mapped the migration with glittering technology, Pennycuik's work, for the first time, was measuring fuel consumption by the geese en route.

The work has been published in a peer reviewed paper, the results are stunning - not just more evidence of the birds orientation skills - but just how well adapted they are to long haul travel.

And we're going to re-live the moment in the Saving Species studio with Colin Pennycuick and see how this break through science about animal flight might be able to inform conservation.

And it's autumn in our series "Lady Bird Book Britain" - 51 years since the first publication of these lovely natural history books.

How has the British Autumn changed? Chris Sperring finds out.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Series Editor Julian Hector.

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How do you move one million starlings from one roost to another? Saving Species finds out.

37/40 In Saving Species over the past year we have reported various stories about animal re-introductions.

The Ladybird Spider was one, the European Crane another - even lions in Zimbabwe.

But how do you move over one million starlings on Bodmin Moor in Cornwall? We don't know! Chris Sperring is grabbing a Saving Species production bag and spending a day or two with the noisy birds and trying to get a handle on the problem - why do they need to be moved and how do you do it? All we know for now is that the huge winter flock of starlings is impacting rather badly on the delicate forest strip they have decided to use as their night roost.

There's a plan to try to shift them to plantation woodland where the damage to the trees by their mass droppings is less important.

There's the reason, but how to do it is another matter.

Join Chris Sperring amongst the winged masses on Bodmin Moor for an intriguing unfolding story in conservation.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Mary Colwell

Series Editor Julian Hector.

01382011011820110120

How did wildlife in Frozen Britain cope in a country that should be a warm winter refuge?

38/40 Britain this winter has suffered another icy blast from the Arctic with night temperatures dropping below minus twenty degrees Celsius in some mountain areas - and even city centre dropping as low as minus eight degrees.

Because of the influence of the temperate seas on the UK coastal marshes and inland habitats, Britain is an internationally important refuge for wildlife moving constantly to avoid the winter weather in mainland Europe, including Russia.

The British and Irish Isles are the last refuge to the south and west before the Atlantic Ocean - there is no where else to go, unless they go due south.

So, what did the birds, insects and marine mammals do - did they still refuge in the UK and Ireland like multiple generations before them? Or did they have the capacity to do something different?

presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Mary Colwell

Series Editor Julian Hector.

01392011012520110127

How should we view wildlife with the wrong appetites and living in the wrong place?

39/40.

Much of the world is farmed and in Britain it's argued that upward of 90% of the land surface, excluding people's gardens, is farmed in one form or another.

And this figure, although large worldwide, nevertheless has a ring of truth about it - wilderness is disappearing.

There are many arguments justifying the importance of wilderness - and they have all been touched upon in one edition or another of Saving Species.

In this programme we are going to concentrate on the importance of farmed land for wildlife, both here in the UK and overseas.

We have our final "Memories" piece remembering the past abundance of the tenacious predators, stoats and weasels.

But we also ask questions about the building global number one agenda: farmland, food security and wildlife.

How should we view wildlife against a backdrop of feeding billions of people?

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Series Editor Julian Hector.

020120110426

Saving Species is back for another year of live broadcasting about the world of wildlife conservation.

We kick off the first programme with a glorious reminder that spring has sprung and the UK's most treasured migrant birds are back - the Swallows.

During the winter a Natural History Unit team visited Nigeria to track down a little known population of wintering swallows - And they found them.

With upward of five million individuals, the sky darkened with the swirling avian spectacle.

And at the time this programme is broadcast most of those birds will be in their European breeding grounds - a considerable number in the UK - And even more specific, we know some go to Norfolk.

We will reveal how we know East Anglia is the destination of some of these West African Swallows.

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our news hound Kelvin Boot - and Matthew Oates finds the Duke of Burgundy butterfly.

Presenter: Brett Westwood

Producer: Sheena Duncan

Editor: Julian Hector.

Five million swallows swirl above rural Nigeria, poised to migrate to Great Britain.

020120110428

Five million swallows swirl above rural Nigeria, poised to migrate to Great Britain.

020220110503

The re-introduction of European beavers into the British countryside continues to be a long and complex consultation process, with many beavers now in large habitat-scale enclosures.

These iconic riverine and wetland mammals, famous for tree felling and lodge building in north America, were part of the British landscape - and many want to see their return.

Saving Species has special access to its own pair of beavers - not literally of course - but we'll be reporting on a male and female from Norway over the coming months from their first release into a large natural enclosure in Devon, observing firsthand how they fashion the habitat around them.

It also kicks off one of Saving Species major themes this year - Rivers and Wetlands.

Sarah Pitt returns to the series with one of several packages she's preparing about "citizen conservation".

And she's been to visit a garden.

Presenter: Brett Westwood

Producer: Mary Colwell

Editor: Julian Hector.

The programme follows a pair of beavers in Devon.

020220110505

The programme follows a pair of beavers in Devon.

020320110510

Latest reports suggest that the population of Mountain Gorillas in forested central Africa is picking up.

This species became emblematic of the plight of endangered species in general with pressures on their habitat, the Gorillas being poached for body parts and family groups broken up and even destroyed.

Ian Redmond, one of the pioneering Mountain Gorilla scientists who brought this issue to the world media returns regularly to the area.

This time he has returned with Saving Species recording equipment and in the company of the head of Interpol.

We get the latest from the area and how the international community tackles the complex issue of poaching and trade in endangered species.

It also fires up another major theme in this year's Saving Species run, that of woodlands and forests.

We'll have Ian Redmond in the studio and we'll hear reports from Woodlands in the UK.

Presenter: Brett Westwood

Producer: Mary Colwell

Editor: Julian Hector.

We report from Congo, where the head of Interpol has been taken to see mountain gorillas.

020320110512

We report from Congo, where the head of Interpol has been taken to see mountain gorillas.

020420110517

The public out cry that ensued following the UK governments announcement it was to sell off state owned woodlands to private owner ship triggered a U-turn in government policy.

Woodlands were in the fore of everyone's minds and the topic of conversation up and down the land.

It was the biodiversity value of woodlands that became a crucial argument - and public access to the health giving and recreational world woodlands provide.

But now the government have scrapped plans to sell off their woodlands, is the problem over? Saving Species will be looking into the value and issues conserving British woodlands through the year - And in this programme through the lives of Blue Tits, Long-Tailed Tits and Black Caps fighting to raise their young discovers there are reasons why caterpillars and other insect larvae aren't nearly so numerous as they should be.

Presenter: Brett Westwood

Producer: Mary Colwell

Editor: Julian Hector.

The wildlife value of UK woods triggered a government U-turn in 2010, but is it over?

020420110519

The wildlife value of UK woods triggered a government U-turn in 2010, but is it over?

020520110524

5/30 The National Trust is hosting a BioBlitz on the Wraxall Estate near Bristol and Saving Species will be there.

A BioBlitz is a building phenomenon where local communities get together with naturalists and "blitz" an area with hand lenses and guide books endeavouring to identify all the animals and plants in a given place.

Their data is then uploaded to a central data base.

Tyntsfield - the stately home of Lord Wraxall on the Wraxall Estate is thought by some to be one of the finest Victorian homes in the country, with Victorian methods being used to manage the estate by Lord Wraxall until his death in recent years.

It's likely the BioBlitz will yield great results.

One of the benefits of joining a BioBlitz is to gain skills in observation, recording and naming living things.

Saving Species asks a panel of experts "where will tomorrow's naturalists come from?" - some believe a loss of connection with nature is eroding this skill.

We will have a guest from the Field Studies Council, Presenter and Naturalist Mike Dilger, The National Trust and poet Miles Chambers.

And of course an audience of BioBlitzers!

Presenter: Brett Westwood

Producer: Sheena Duncan

Editor: Julian Hector.

Saving Species asks the question, "where are tomorrows naturalists going to come from"?

020520110526

Saving Species asks the question, "where are tomorrows naturalists going to come from"?

020620110531

6/30 Jennifer Owen has published a book about her life long study of the wildlife she has observed in her ordinary garden.

Owen hasn't described hundreds; she has described thousands of species that live in a complex web of ecological relationships within her garden walls.

Sarah Pitt meets Jennifer and kick starts a mini series of "Citizen Conservation" within Saving Species.

We'll also be asking the Royal Horticultural Society how they encourage the natural world to flourish in gardens.

Brett Westwood has been out and about with Matthew Oates in search of the Wood White Butterfly.

The Wood White is one of Britain's rarest butterflies and so far seems to have enjoyed the sunny spring.

Presenter: Joanna Pinnock

Producer: Sheena Duncan

Editor: Julian Hector.

Sarah Pitt talks to Jennifer Owen about her life-long study of the wildlife in her garden.

020620110602

Sarah Pitt talks to Jennifer Owen about her life-long study of the wildlife in her garden.

020720110607

7/30 This week's Saving Species explores the mysteries of bird migration.

Many birds undertake extraordinary long distance migrations to find favourable conditions and resources for feeding and breeding.

Chris Sperring is in Somerset finding out about the fortune of the pied flycatcher, a summer visitor to this country which migrates from Africa to breed in woodlands on the Western and South West side of the UK.

Scientists are ringing chicks to try and monitor when the adults breed and the numbers of chicks that survive and leave the nest.

With adult pied flycatchers arriving earlier due to milder Spring seasons, they may be out of sync with the vital food supply of caterpillars they need for their chicks when they hatch.

Is this the reason behind the declines in population numbers over recent years?

Presenter: Brett Westwood

Producer: Sheena Duncan

Editor: Julian Hector.

Saving Species explores the mysteries of bird migration.

020720110609

Saving Species explores the mysteries of bird migration.

020820110614

8/30 Britain is internationally important for seabird species.

There are colonies of Gannets, Fulmars, Manx Shearwaters, Puffins, Guillemots, Razor Bills, Greater Black-backed Gulls and Storm Petrels to name just a few.

In recent years there have been reports that the breeding success of British seabirds is in decline although unusually cold winters in the last two years might have slowed this decline.

To find out the latest about the UK's seabird populations Brett Westwood will be on the Farne Islands, with guests - And live with the National Trust from the Long Nanny Arctic Tern colony.

Kelvin Boot will be in the Saving Species studio in Bristol.

Presenter: Kelvin Boot

Producer: Mary Colwell

Editor: Julian Hector.

Brett Westwood broadcasts live from Long Nanny, an Arctic Tern colony in Northumberland.

020820110616

Brett Westwood broadcasts live from Long Nanny, an Arctic Tern colony in Northumberland.

020920110621

9/30 As part of our mini-series "Citizen Conservation", produced and presented by Sarah Pitt, we feature the conservation of Dormice.

In woods up and down the country local conservation groups are taking responsibility for monitoring and managing the habitat and nest sites of these small mammals.

Together with sophisticated annual counts of their population, the expert placement of nest boxes and management of their woodland habitat - who are these conservationists? How much do we rely on our community of amateur naturalists to look after our natural heritage?

We also have a report from Michael Scott who has joined an expedition to explore the status of whales off the British coast.

Presenter: Brett Westwood

Producer: Mary Colwell

Editor: Julian Hector.

Saving Species presents one of Britain's most beloved species, the doormouse.

020920110623

9/30 As part of our mini-series "Citizen Conservation", produced and presented by Sarah Pitt, we feature the conservation of Dormice.

In woods up and down the country local conservation groups are taking responsibility for monitoring and managing the habitat and nest sites of these small mammals.

Together with sophisticated annual counts of their population, the expert placement of nest boxes and management of their woodland habitat - who are these conservationists? How much do we rely on our community of amateur naturalists to look after our natural heritage? We hear that looking after scrubland is one of the most important measures to look after this creature.

We continue our reporting of seabirds with a a piece recorded on location on Canna near the Isle of Skye by Bob Swann on Manx Shearwater.

And we hope to bring you Large Blue Butterflies.

Presenter: Brett Westwood

Producer: Mary Colwell

Editor: Julian Hector.

Saving Species presents one of Britain's most beloved species, the dormouse.

021020110628

10/30 This week in the Saving Species studio we have Lucy Hawkes visiting who is a biologist working on the Bar-Headed Goose.

The Bar-Headed goose is famous for its high altitude migration, climbing from the lowlands of India, over and above the highest peaks of the Himalayas, to their breeding grounds on the high altitude grasslands of Outer Mongolia.

Lucy's work is already showing that the migration of these extraordinary birds is different to that "famed" view, although no less spectacular.

These geese "...are at the edge of what they can do..".

The high altitude grasslands are inherently fragile and therefore sensitive to global climate change.

And the Bar-Headed Goose is part of that complex and sensitive ecology - with a phenomenal migration thrown in.

We also talk to Daniel Pauly, a leading marine biologist from University of British Columbia, about his take on the state of global oceans - and get out with Michael Scott on an Earth Watch expedition looking for whales around the British coastline.

Presenter: Brett Westwood

Producer: Mary Colwell

Editor: Julian Hector.

The Bar-Headed Goose breeds on the highest plateaus of the Himalayas, but are they safe?

021020110630

The Bar-Headed Goose breeds on the highest plateaus of the Himalayas, but are they safe?

021120110705

11/30 The Green Turtle is one of nature's great travellers, migrating from feeding grounds to breeding grounds traversing the oceans of the world.

Like so many species reported in the series, Green Turtles are in decline.

Our reporter James Brickell reports from the Great Barrier Reef with biologists who are both trying to understand the natural history of these magnificent creatures and help in their conservation.

And we have turtle biologist Brendan Godley from Exeter University live in the studio.

We'll have an update from the two Beavers we're following in Devon - Chris Sperring has been down to visit the site and to see the Beavers.

And how is Chris the Cuckoo doing? We'll be spying in on his migration south.

Presenter: Brett Westwood

Producer: Sheena Duncan

Editor: Julian Hector.

Saving Species reports from the Great Barrier Reef on the conservation of green turtles.

021120110707

Saving Species reports from the Great Barrier Reef on the conservation of green turtles.

021220110712

12/ 30 Wild Boar are one of the icons of wildness in Europe's woods - and they are on the up.

There have been recent reports of family's of Wild Boar running freely through the suburbs of Berlin such is their success and opportunistic roaming.

What is leading to the flourishing populations of Wild Boar and what role do they have in the wild wood ecology? Saving Species is in Sweden with biologist Sofie Lindblom who studies these social creatures that have more in common with people than first meets the eye.

Presenter: Brett Westwood

Producer: Sheena Duncan

Editor: Julian Hector.

Wild Boar are running amuck in Europe and Saving Species has a report from Sweden.

021320110719

13/ 30 Chris Sperring this week interviews Jeremy Biggs from the charity Pond Life about how well we are doing looking after the wildlife that live in ponds.

Ponds are small wetlands caricatured by frogs, water lilies and dragonflies but they are much more as Biggs says.

Over the years BBC programmes have broadcast how the classic village pond as a centre piece to the village green have been in decline - And the conservation of ponds has been one of the key Biodiversity Action Plans (BAP) on the government list of species and habitats to return to favourable status post Rio de Janeiro Convention on Biodiversity.

So, how well have we done in saving our ponds?

Presenter: Brett Westwood

Producer: Mary Colwell

Editor: Julian Hector.

Saving Species asks how well we're doing looking after our ponds and their inhabitants.

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14/30 Chris the cuckoo is south bound, heading for Africa - but where exactly is he? We visit the British Trust for Ornithology's HQ in East Anglia and find out latest progress of him and his compatriots.

We also have a report about the UK Lady Bird Survey being conducted by the Biological Records Centre.

Over recent years we have heard much about the invasive harlequin ladybird pushing out our native species - but is this really the case.

And how easy is it to see all the ladybrid species found in the British Isles? We'll be encouraging you to join in and if you don't know your ladybirds, why not use ispot.

We also feature Tree Sparrows with a report in the field from northern England and an interview with the RSPB on why we should care about this species in particular.

Presenter: Brett Westwood

Producer: Sheena Duncan

Editor: Julian Hector.

Chris, the Africa-bound Cuckoo; and the UK Ladybird Survey.

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15/30 Butterflies and swifts are the subject of this weeks Saving Species, presented by Brett Westwood.

The Wailing Wall in Jerusalem is the oldest known nesting site in the world for the common swift but numbers are falling there and elsewhere - why and what is being done to help? Find out more about swift towers and chick rescue schemes as conservationists battle to help save them.

And Brett discovers more about the private life of the beautiful woodland butterfly the Silver Washed Fritillary, a specialist woodland species that brightens any shady glade.

Brett also gets an update on Chris, the Saving Species cuckoo that is making its way to its wintering area in Africa.

The first time ever cuckoos have been tracked on their epic journey, helping us understand more about this icon of spring.

Presenter: Brett Westwood

Producer: Mary Colwell

Editor: Julian Hector.

Saving Species reports from the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem on the conservation of swifts.

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Saving Species reports from the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem on the conservation of swifts.

021620110906

16/30 For three generations the Helmerick's have lived in their homestead on the North Slope of Alaska.

They are a true frontier family who built their home, called Colville Village, on the edge of tundra.

Over the generations this remarkable family have linked the various components of this highly dispersed Arctic community by delivering post using their modified tundra planes.

Jim Helmerick, now in his 70's, has continued the family's keen observation of Arctic wildlife and harbours fascinating facts about how the Arctic is changing.

Finding nesting Loons, Eider Ducks and getting close to Bears Saving Species reports on the unique observations of the Helmerick Family.

Presenter: Brett Westwood

Producer: Mary Colwell

Editor: Julian Hector.

Saving Species reports from the Arctic, this week the inexorable rise of the sea.

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Saving Species reports from the Arctic, this week the inexorable rise of the sea.

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17/30 Howard Stableford reports for Saving Species from the Sierra Nevada Mountain range in California.

Howard is looking for Pikas, a ubiquitous small mammal that tunnels underground in its high altitude grasslands.

They are found throughout the world and the biologists from Arizona State University who study the Pika on the Tibetan Plateau in the Himalayas report declining populations.

Pikas are given the biological status of a key-stone species - important, essential even, to the whole ecology - and yet in Tibet we are told these mammals are being poisoned, regarded as a pest species.

We speak to the biologist from the U.S.

and a spokesperson from China.

We also hear from Sarah Pitt who has been looking for Water Voles

And the first Saving Species report from the North Slope of Alaska where the conservation of the Spectacled Eider is a key priority with 96% declines reported in Alaska of this amazing duck..

Presenter: Brett Westwood

Producer: Sheena Duncan

Editor: Julian Hector.

Saving Species is in the Mountains looking for the small burrowing mammal, the Pika.

021720110915

Saving Species is in the Mountains looking for the small burrowing mammal, the Pika.

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18/30 The Spectacled Eider duck is extraordinary.

As our American collaborator said "this is no regular duck"! The whole of the global population winter on the ice in the Bering Sea - a sight few people have seen, but as you can see from the photograph is as spectacular as seeing hundreds and thousands of penguins on ice.

And of course this is the Arctic where seeing mass aggregations of birds on ice is not common at all.

With reported 96% decline in the population that breeds in Alaska, the Spectacled Eider, a US endangered species, has become an important focus of conservation research.

Julian Hector went to the "Slope" at 70 degrees north where some of the Alaskan population of "specs" breed.

In this second report Saving Species discovers why the biologists of the U.S Geological Survey are putting so much effort into tracking the males, females and juveniles of this species for several years.

Closer to home, Tessa McGregor reports from Scotland on the future of the Slender Scotch Burnet Moth.

And we have Right Whales in the show, encountered off Cape Cod and a report on the work in the Atlantic trying to accurately assess their numbers, individuals and movements.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Editor Julian Hector.

Saving Species reports from the North Slope of Alaska to find the Spectacled Eider duck.

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Saving Species reports from the North Slope of Alaska to find the Spectacled Eider duck.

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19/30 We have our third report from the tundra of the Alaskan North Slope.

At 70 degrees north this is where the land stops and the Arctic Ocean begins.

During the short summer breeding season the flat vastness is alive with the sounds and the activity of breeding birds, Caribou, Bears and Foxes.

Also on "the slope" is a building oil industry sending a wave of development down from the north, bringing with it infrastructure, people and inevitable disturbance.

This is also a part of the world where climate change is having a large impact, with tundra flooding, ice melt and animal breeding time tables all showing signs of change.

There are more Red Foxes and more Grizzly Bears - all having their impact on the breeding success of Arctic specialities such as Yellow-billed Loon, Spectacled Eider and Bar-tailed Godwit.

Saving Species reports from the Arctic about the future health of species visiting the Alaskan tundra to breed.

Also in the programme: Kelvin Boot is live from an international conference in Plymouth about the variety of "little things that run the ocean" - phyto and zoo plankton.

Plankton are the small, often drifting, plants and animals that are the basis of all food chains and supply the earth with much of our oxygen - And take in global amounts of carbon dioxide.

Kelvin will be there with the world experts.

Presented by Joanna Pinnock

Produced by Mary Colwell

Editor Julian Hector.

We report from the Alaskan North Slope about the future of the Arctic as we know it.

021920110929

19/30 We have our third report from the tundra of the Alaskan North Slope.

At 70 degrees north this is where the land stops and the Arctic Ocean begins - the place where Saving Species has been reporting the work of U.S.

Geological Survey biologist Matt Sexson on Spectacled Eiders.

Spectacled Eiders breed in Arctic Russia and Alaska and uniquely winter as a single global population on the sea ice of the Bering Sea.

Little is know about their migration.

Zoo vets Maria Spriggs and Gwen Myers of Mesker Park Zoo Indiana and Columbus Zoo Ohio respectively, provide the clinical support in the field.

So what is conservation medicine and is there an increasing role for vets in the wider world of saving wildlife in our increasingly stressed planet? Julian Hector spoke to them in Alaska about "One Health", where the health of wildlife, people, wilderness, habitats and domestic animals are seen as one entity.

Also in the programme: we hear from the British Trust for Ornithology about a UK garden bird disease getting into Europe.

And whilst the BTO are on the line we hope to find out about the Cuckoos they are tracking heading south into Africa.

And Kelvin Boot is live from Aberdeen at an international conference on marine biodiversity -

And we acknowledge the death this week of Professor Wangari Maathai, a Kenyan woman who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004 for her work teaching women to plant trees.

Wangari Maathai believed the destruction of the natural world was directly linked to sustained poverty in Kenya.

Presented by Joanna Pinnock

Produced by Mary Colwell

Editor Julian Hector.

Zoo vets talk about the role of conservation medicine in saving wildlife.

022020111004

20/30 The Logger-head Turtle is one of the great leviathans of the sea.

Once described as being the size of a small car, although not strictly true, this does indicate the basic proportions.

Marine Biologists from Florida have been following the movements of individuals for some time and discovered, not surprisingly, that these creatures have some purpose in their ocean travels.

Howard Stableford is visiting the researchers, hoping to find a Logger-head Turtle and finding out how effective species conservation can be in the ocean far away from sight of land.

Also in the programme.

Joanna Pinnock discovers the Fen Raft Spider and plans to translocate individuals into fen lacking the spider.

And our fourth report from the Arctic - two zoo vets collaborating with the US Geological Survey explain to Julian Hector the idea of "One Health" and why zoo vets are well positioned to develop conservation medicine.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Mary Colwell

Editor Julian Hector.

Saving Species is in Florida with marine biologists working on the loggerhead turtle.

022020111006

20/30 The Pika is a small mammal that lives in the high altitude grasslands in mountain ranges from Japan, through central Asia and North America.

Andrew Smith and his team of field biologists from Arizona State University has studied the Pika for many years on the Tibetan Plateau.

It's in Tibet, he claims, they are wrongly blamed for the degrading of the grasslands by the Chinese.

We have been to see Andrew Smith and have a reply from the Chinese Academy of Science.

Also in the programme: Kelvin Boot reports the status of polar plankton from a meeting (about plankton) in Plymouth.

And the Curlew - the piping call of which contributes to the soundscape of uplands in summer and estuaries in winter, are seriously in decline in Ireland, SW Scotland and Wales.

By how much and why we will find out.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Mary Colwell

Editor Julian Hector.

The Pika, a small mountain mammal, is blamed for the degradation of grassland.

022120111011

21/30 It wasn't long ago that German news papers were reporting Wild Boar roaming freely around the suburbs of Berlin.

A native species of European woodlands, Wild Boar is a historically common species both in Europe and in the UK.

Changes to woodland management and the clear felling of many forests left wild populations of Boar in several places in tatters.

Now it appears the pendulum is swinging the other way - in some places at least.

we have a special report from Sweden by Sofie Lindblom from a part of the world where research into Wild Boar behaviour and natural history is important in a country that is largely forested.

And Brett Westwood heads off him self to find Boar in the UK.

Also in the programme: Brankley Pastures.

A project which aims to restore woodland from farmland over a time scale of 500 years! Staffordshire Wildlife Trust aim to create a wood pasture landscape on farmland surrounding an existing fragment at Needwood Forest.

Wood pasture is a rare habitat created when Medieval people grazed animals in woodland and combines ancient trees, pollards and flower-rich meadows.

To speed up the process of colonisation on ancient woodland insects, the Trust have imported mature oak trunks and this is when Brett Westwood visited to understand more about a project with such a huge timescale.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Editor Julian Hector.

Wild Boar in Europe and the UK are the big topic in this edition.

022120111013

21/30 The Bar-Headed Goose, according to research biologist Lucy Hawkes, "is at the limit of what a goose can do".

Lucy Hawkes, from Bangor University, studies this remarkable bird on its breeding grounds in Outer Mongolia on the grassy plateaus.

Her work has largely been concerned with how they get back and forth to their breeding grounds from their south Indian wintering areas.

But how does studying the migration of the Bar-Headed Goose help inform their conservation.

Lucy, recently back from the field in the Himalayas is in the Saving Species studio.

Also in the programme: The re-intruduction of the Fen Raft Spider into a restored marshland in Suffolk.

Chris Sperring went to see the spiderlings "lowering themselves from their test tube [home] by a thread" into the wild.

A wonderful story of animal husbandry, habitat restoration and the science of re-introduction.

And where has Chris the Cuckoo ended up, or is he still heading south.

We'll have the BTO live in the programme to bring us up to date with the Cuckoos on the move.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Editor Julian Hector.

Saving Species catches up with the work in Outer Mongolia on the Bar-Headed Goose.

022220111018

Red Kites have been successfully re-introduced into Wales in recent times and now they are spreading naturally and quickly into England.

They are no longer a large bird of prey never to be seen in the UK - they can be seen from cars, from trains - and country walks.

They have even been seen soaring above the city of Bristol.

And go to the right part of mid Wales, swirling masses of them can be seen soaring above farms.

Red Kites are charismatic birds.

They are large with a forked tail and have a rich rusty red tone to their plumage.

Being scavengers they can attract large crowds of paying tourists watching them soaring and swooping down for meat routinely put out for them.

The Red Kite is now contributing to the economy.

Clearly the Red Kite has taken to the UK landscape well - and they are a conservation success story and a valuable part of the UK's ecological landscape.

But, can success go wrong? Could there be a time when there are too many Red Kites - or is there room for everybody?

And continuing the theme of "when does wildlife conservation become a problem" - we report from the coast and the behaviour of Herring Gulls.

Herring Gulls, with their characteristic cry typical of the UK seaside soundscape, can become very habituated to people having picnics on the beach.

They stalk and seize their moment to grab a sandwich - a nuisance yes, but Herring Gulls are in decline and have been put in to the Red Data Book of threatened species.

What light do the stories of the Red Kite and the Herring Gull shed on our changing relationship with nature?

Presenter Brett Westwood

Producer Mary Colwell

Editor Julian Hector.

Saving Species asks if success with species conservation can ever become a problem.

022220111020

Saving Species asks if success with species conservation can ever become a problem.

022320111025

Four years in the making, months and months of gruelling filming in both the Antarctic and Arctic, this week BBC1 airs the Natural History Units latest wildlife landmark Frozen Planet.

The series Executive Producer Alastair Fothergill will be in the Saving Species studio to talk about the series and especially recounting the experience taking Sir David Attenborough down to the Antarctic ice shelf - a lasting experience Alastair tells us that portrays the change under way in the Antarctic.

And our embedded reporter in the Middle East Matt Heywood reports on the conservation effort to save marine turtles in the region and protect the beaches on which they lay their eggs.

Presenter Brett westwood

Producer Sheena Duncan

Editor Julian Hector.

Saving Species talks to wildlife film-maker Alastair Fothergill about his series on BBC1.

022320111027

Saving Species talks to wildlife film-maker Alastair Fothergill about his series on BBC1.

022420111101

24/30 This weeks Saving Species is recorded in front of an audience at the National Botanic Garden of Wales.

And the programme has a theme - fungi.

It's at this time of year that many of us see the fruiting bodies of fungi, the "mushroom", but so much more goes on underground and in the leaf litter.

On the panel we have fungi expert Professor Lynne Boddy of Cardiff University and Rosie Plumer, the Director of the National Botanic Garden of Wales.

Delivering some specially written prose is writer and broadcaster Paul Evans and a special report from naturalist Ray Woods.

And of course questions from the audience.

Presenter Brett Westwood

Producer Sheena Duncan

Editor Julian Hector.

With Brett Westwood.

From the National Botanic Garden of Wales.

022420111103

With Brett Westwood.

From the National Botanic Garden of Wales.

022520111108

25/30 Saving Species reports from Tampa Bay on studies following the movements and whereabouts of Sea Horses.

How is it the males have been left "holding the baby" and why does understanding how the female has got out of rearing off spring help in the conservation of the species.

We are also in the historic Italian town of Assisi, home of Saint Francis, the founder of the men's Catholic order the Franciscans and the female order St Clare - he is famously the patron saint of animals and the environment.

We are reporting from a meeting taking place in Assisi where many world faiths are coming together to make pledges towards conserving the natural world.

Can the Taoists in China make a difference to the unsustainable trade in endangered species for Chinese medicine - And what does religion in general bring to the wildlife conservation table?

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Sheena Duncan

Editor Julian Hector.

Is there any point in tagging a sea horse to see where it goes?

022520111110

Is there any point in tagging a sea horse to see where it goes?

022620111115

26/30 Assisi in Italy is the town most strongly associated with Saint Francis - the patron saint of the environment.

A fitting place for a unique gathering of world faiths and members of the global conservation community.

They were there to inspire one another and find ways of working more closely together to protect the natural world.

Karen Partridge joined the delegates and speakers in Assisi and will be in the studio to talk about the upsum of this special meeting of minds.

And we're bring you an exclusive report and an encounter with a bird that is on the brink of extinction.

A last ditch effort by two major UK wildlife organisations and collaborators in Russia might, in the long term, turn the fortunes of this most beautiful migrant bird.

The Spoon-billed Sandpiper.

Come to a special of recording of Saving Species at Bristol University on 28th November.

Click on the "get a ticket" link below for details and a free ticket.

Presented by brett Westwood

Produced by Mary Colwell

Editor Julian Hector.

We report from Assisi in Italy where world religions have come together to save wildlife.

022620111117

We report from Assisi in Italy where world religions have come together to save wildlife.

022720111122

27/30 This week the programme is all about trees and forests.

In the UK this is national tree week.

We have a story where a 500 year plan is being rolled out to restore ancient woodland in the British landscape.

We also have a report from Italy on the success of designating a forest "sacred" to save it.

And the Monkey Puzzle tree.

A report from Michael Scott on the importance of the genetic diversity of Monkey Puzzles in Scottish gardens and parks to the Chile, the native country of this species.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Mary Colwell

Editor Julian Hector.

This week Saving Species is all about trees and forests.

022720111124

27/30 This week the programme is all about trees and forests.

In the UK this is national tree week.

We have a story where a 500 year plan is being rolled out to restore ancient woodland in the British landscape.

We also have a report from Italy on the success of designating a forest "sacred" to save it.

And the Monkey Puzzle tree.

A report from Michael Scott on the importance of the genetic diversity of Monkey Puzzles in Scottish gardens and parks to the Chile, the native country of this species.

Presented by Brett Westwood

Produced by Mary Colwell

Editor Julian Hector.

This week Saving Species is all about trees and forests.

022820111129

28/30 In this weeks Saving Species we are crossing continents.

We're in South Africa on the trail of the Africa Penguin with Michael Scott.

This species is famous for inhabiting Robben Island but it also lives and breeds on the mainland where it shares the space beak by jowl with people.

The Africa Penguin is in decline on the mainland - the people there love them, so the reasons for their decline are not obvious.

Michael Scott will find out.

And we're also in Brazil with Mark Brazil who is exploring the white-water and black-water flooded Amazon forest.

This is the time of year that Grey Seals give birth to their young and play out all the antics with beach masters as the females come into season to kick off the next years pregnancy.

We hope to be live with the action and cover how well this most British of seals is doing.

Presenter Kelvin Boot

Producer Sheena Duncan

Editor Julian Hector.

What is the problem with the African penguin? Saving Species reports from South Africa.

022820111201

What is the problem with the African penguin? Saving Species reports from South Africa.

022920111206

Examining the world of nature and the challenges of wildlife conservation.

022920111208

Examining the world of nature and the challenges of wildlife conservation.

0230 LAST20111213

Examining the world of nature and the challenges of wildlife conservation.

0230 LAST20111215

Examining the world of nature and the challenges of wildlife conservation.

03012012090420120906

Brett Westwood looks back at the summer of 2012. How did the wet summer affect wildlife?

030120120904

Saving Species is back for another year of live broadcasting about the world of wildlife conservation, presented by Brett Westwood. We kick off the first programme with look back at the summer of 2012. At the time this programme is broadcast many of our summer migrants will already be heading south to Africa. But how did they fare over the summer? This summer has been one of the wettest on record, has this affected our wildlife? We look at some of the winners and losers in the battle for survival.

Also in the programme - Saving Species heads to Dungeness in Kent where a long term project is underway to return the short haired bumblebee to Britain. This formerly widespread bee was last recorded in 1988 and declared extinct in 2000. Queen bees collected from Sweden have been released in specially prepared farmland and Joanna Pinnock was there to witness this memorable day.

At the opposite end of the country, Chris Sperring reports from Devon where he joined a public night-time safari to look for one of our most enigmatic and enlightening beetles, the glow-worm. Devon last conducted a country wide survey in 1999. Glow worms have declined across the rest of Britain, but have Devon's glow worms declined since the last survey was completed?

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open University's iSpot.

030120120904

Brett Westwood looks back at the summer of 2012. How did the wet summer affect wildlife?

030220120911

Saving Species presented by Brett Westwood this week has a flavour of the night about it. Bats are both loved and loathed by the public, but their plight in an increasingly urbanised Britain is the focus of this week's programme.

Professor John Altringham from Leeds University has spent much of his academic career looking at the role of evolution, especially in bats, and how this shapes the form and physiology of animals for locomotion, in particular for swimming and flying. But in a rapidly changing World, evolution is struggling to cope, so can we as humans do anything to help flying animals like bats cope with an increasingly built up environment?

Brett Westwood heads off to a Worcestershire woodland in the hope of seeing one of the rarest mammals in the UK, and a UK Biodiversity Action Plan priority species, the Bechstein's bat. Here he joins James Hitchcock who is part of the National Bat Monitoring Programme which began in 2007.

Over the years many tortoises have been a special pet to families across the Globe. However the Sulcata tortoise is now of global concern and to discover more of the conservation efforts to return this species in the wild, Helen Scales travels to Senegal to see the pioneering work by Tomas Diagne.

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open Universities iSpot.

Producer : Sheena Duncan

Presenter : Brett Westwood

Editor : Julian Hector.

03022012091120120913

Saving Species presented by Brett Westwood this week has a flavour of the night about it. Bats are both loved and loathed by the public, but their plight in an increasingly urbanised Britain is the focus of this week's programme.

Professor John Altringham from Leeds University has spent much of his academic career looking at the role of evolution, especially in bats, and how this shapes the form and physiology of animals for locomotion, in particular for swimming and flying. But in a rapidly changing World, evolution is struggling to cope, so can we as humans do anything to help flying animals like bats cope with an increasingly built up environment?

Brett Westwood heads off to a Worcestershire woodland in the hope of seeing one of the rarest mammals in the UK, and a UK Biodiversity Action Plan priority species, the Bechstein's bat. Here he joins James Hitchcock who is part of the National Bat Monitoring Programme which began in 2007.

Over the years many tortoises have been a special pet to families across the Globe. However the Sulcata tortoise is now of global concern and to discover more of the conservation efforts to return this species in the wild, Helen Scales travels to Senegal to see the pioneering work by Tomas Diagne.

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open Universities iSpot.

Producer : Sheena Duncan

Presenter : Brett Westwood

Editor : Julian Hector.

030220120911

Saving Species presented by Brett Westwood this week has a flavour of the night about it. Bats are both loved and loathed by the public, but their plight in an increasingly urbanised Britain is the focus of this week's programme.

Professor John Altringham from Leeds University has spent much of his academic career looking at the role of evolution, especially in bats, and how this shapes the form and physiology of animals for locomotion, in particular for swimming and flying. But in a rapidly changing World, evolution is struggling to cope, so can we as humans do anything to help flying animals like bats cope with an increasingly built up environment?

Brett Westwood heads off to a Worcestershire woodland in the hope of seeing one of the rarest mammals in the UK, and a UK Biodiversity Action Plan priority species, the Bechstein's bat. Here he joins James Hitchcock who is part of the National Bat Monitoring Programme which began in 2007.

Over the years many tortoises have been a special pet to families across the Globe. However the Sulcata tortoise is now of global concern and to discover more of the conservation efforts to return this species in the wild, Helen Scales travels to Senegal to see the pioneering work by Tomas Diagne.

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open Universities iSpot.

Producer : Sheena Duncan

Presenter : Brett Westwood

Editor : Julian Hector.

03032012091820120920

Saving Species presented by Brett Westwood this week poses the question; with increasing pressures to develop our land for housing, transport and industry, is there still room for Britain's wildlife to flourish?

Recently the Government set out proposals to extend development rights into the Green Belt as an aid to economic growth. While some sectors of the economy welcome this move, others such as conservation groups predict a backlash of public opinion similar to that of the recent Government plans to sell off public woodland. Could other sites such as brown-field, be developed in preference?

To investigate this Brett Westwood discovers the importance of brown-field sites on a visit to Canvey Wick in the Thames Estuary accompanied by Sarah Henshall, Brownfield Manager from the charity, Buglife. Here in the 40 years since the industry moved out, the biodiversity contained within this SSSI is staggering, including iconic species like the shrill carder bee. But can lessons learned here be used in brown-field sites across the United Kingdom? And is the negative connotations of the word brown-field even one of the problems in degrading these areas as wildlife hot-spots, in preference for development.

And we hear from Dr Chris Baines who discusses whether the plans to build a London to Birmingham high speed rail link could actually benefit wildlife in the longer term.

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open University's iSpot.

Producer : Mary Colwell

Presenter : Brett Westwood

Editor : Julian Hector.

Is it going to be brownfield sites that will provide the room for wildlife to flourish?

Saving Species presented by Brett Westwood this week poses the question; with increasing pressures to develop our land for housing, transport and industry, is their still room for Britain's wildlife to flourish?

030420120925

Can the world's marine environments remain healthy and functioning under the influence of man, from pollution to over fishing and climate change? In Saving Species this week, Brett Westwood looks in depth at some of the issues and research being carried out into the species which depend upon this often abused natural resource.

Our reporter Helen Scales travels to the Gambia, where issues of oyster overfishing are having a devastating effect not only on the native oysters that were once plentiful in this area but also the coastal mangrove swamps which are now under threat. Can local community efforts being put into action reverse this environmental problem?

In Florida, Howard Stableford joins marine researchers for an evening on a sandy beach. Shunning the bright lights and partying tourists he follows the fortunes of loggerhead turtles coming to breed along this stretch of coastline. In a race against time, climate change is having a destabilising effect on the sex ratio of turtle hatchlings and therefore poses a real threat to the long term viability of the species.

And closer to home, we look at the 2012 breeding season of some of our breeding seabirds. How have they fared this summer which has seen unseasonal summer storms batter our coastline at a time when many seabird researchers are discovering a mixed picture in terms of breeding success? So what are the causes of this instability?

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open University's iSpot.

Producer : Sheena Duncan

Presenter : Brett Westwood

Editor : Julian Hector.

030520121002

In this episode of Saving species we focus on the issues facing our rivers and freshwater systems. The Shropshire Wildlife Trust this year highlight them by sailing a currach down the Severn. John Hughes from the Trust joins Brett Westwood on the water to give them a perfect otter's eye view of the issues facing our crowded countryside and ever increasing demands on this natural resource.

Elsewhere in the programme Brett Westwood attends the Environmental Change Research Centre conference on freshwater biodiversity at University College London. Mingling with delegates from across Europe, Brett hears about the steps being taken to understand the role of wildlife in modern freshwater habitats.

Dr Elizabeth Chadwick runs the Cardiff University Otter Project. Using post mortem tissues collected from this top predator she is showing how our increasing otter population is coping with different levels of contamination in freshwater in England and Wales.

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open Universities iSpot.

Producer : Mary Colwell

Presenter : Brett Westwood

Editor : Julian Hector

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Autumn is a time when the animal world is on the move with specific threats to survival.

In this episode of Saving Species we focus on the issues facing bird migrants as they move around our shores. Joanna Pinnock travels to a swallow roost in southern england, where overnight she joins the British Trust for Ornithology to trap and ring swallows as they gather in a mass roost to head south. So how have the swallows and other summer migrants done this year? To find our Paul Stancliffe of the BTO explains what is happening at the roost sight and how their research influences our understanding of the birds needs

However as swallows fly south, other migrants arrive into our country from the North. Winter Thrushes, redwing and fieldfare are a familiar sight in the winter countryside arriving now from Scandinavia. But are we doing enough for them, are our hedgerows able to provide enough food?

And Howard Stableford joins Yadira Galindo from the San Diego Zoo in America to investigate the issues of wind farms and the use of new technology to assist Californian Condors to avoid collision with the blades as the birds migrate.

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open Universities iSpot.

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Birds of prey numbers are rising in the UK, but not every countryside user welcomes this.

Before the nineteenth century many bird of prey species were a common sight in our towns and cities, with red kites being frequent scavengers in the City of London. The rise of game shooting from the mid 1800's and changes in agricultural practices saw many birds of prey populations begin to seriously decline. After the World War Two, increased use of agricultural pesticides; pesticides that gradually built up in the ecosystems of birds of prey, finally tipped the balance and many of our once familiar birds of prey such as the peregrine and red kite were slowly driven to near extinction in Britain.

In the 1950's and 60's the tide turned, with the outlawing of certain pesticides; and this along with changing attitudes to what our British countryside was for meant that many of our birds of prey have increased dramatically over the last half century, with some conservationists stating that their recovery is one of the glories of 21st century Britain.

All birds of prey are protected by law, and 2012 saw public opinion reversing a Government plan to allow research into buzzard control to reduce the so-called 'significant' effect of buzzards on pheasant shoots. For this Saving Species, Brett Westwood discusses what does the science and the ecology of birds of prey reveal about their needs and how does this fit in to the landuse in which they live.

0309Citizen Science / Giant Harvestman2012103020121101

Brett Westwood explores the growing phenomenon of citizen science.

Recently the term Citizen Science has evolved to describe amateurs working with professionals at public events such as Bioblitz events, which were first held in 1996 in Washington DC. These involve an intense period of biological surveying within a defined area and so Brett Westwood travels to Oxford to attend the World's first Urban Bioblitz and find out for himself what over 1000 coordinated events in one weekend hope to achieve.

But can the amateur really add to the science? Many scientific communities, such as an academic study by Jeremy Thomas (Professor of Ecology at Oxford) and colleagues acknowledged that without the input from these amateur wildlife watchers much of today's understanding of the natural world would be impossible. Brett Westwood discusses this with Dr Helen Roy who has recently been asked to review the benefit of amateur observations for the scientific community.

Meanwhile, Andrew Dawes travels to Sheffield to meet Paul Richards, an invertebrate specialist, who recently found a species of giant harvestman measuring 20 centimetres across at his local bioblitz. But what effect is this alien species having on the native harvestmen, as well as on flora and fauna?

And Sarah Pitt joins Daniel Hargreaves on the shores of Blagdon Lake in Somerset as he goes in search of the Nathusius' pipistrelle - a small species of bat rarely seen in many parts of the UK.

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open Universities iSpot.

Producer : Mary Colwell

Presenter : Brett Westwood

Editor : Julian Hector

0310Wildcats And Tooth Fungi2012110620121108

A look at two rare species - the Scottish wildcat and the bearded tooth fungus.

Scottish wildcats are seen as an iconic emblem of the unspoilt wilderness of Scotland. It has been suggested that there may be fewer than one hundred pure bred wildcat in Scotland, with some studies concluding that this species may actually be rarer that the Amur tiger or even extinct as a genetic species. Saving Species reporter Karen Partridge travels to Scotland to meet Kerry Kilshaw from the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, University of Oxford; in the hope of finding one of the last wildcats for herself and in doing so looks at the role genetics is playing in preserving this species.

Professor Lynne Boddy from Cardiff University travels to the New Forest in search of a very rare fungus, the bearded tooth fungus (Hericium erinaceus). This species is commonly grown commercially however in the wild it is one of the rarest fungi's in the UK and it's importance in the woodland ecosystem as a wood-recycling fungus is giving conservationists cause for concern.

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open University's iSpot.

0311Goliath Grouper, Asiatic Lion, Turkmenistan2012111320121115

Brett Westwood reports on goliath groupers in the Caribbean and the Asiatic Lion of India.

This week on Saving Species we look at some of the international stories which have caught our attention, from Asia to the Caribbean.

Reporter Mark Brazil travels the Sasan Gir sanctuary in India to report of the plight of the last lions in Asia. With an increasing human population in India requiring more and more land for agriculture, the Asiatic lion was brought to near extinction. In 1972 a sanctuary was set up and from a few lions the sanctuary holds about 30 individuals.

In the Caribbean, goliath groupers are huge, majestic fish from the Caribbean sea. At up to 2.5m they are outsized only by the few remaining sharks and they are critically endangered across their range due to historical overfishing. Goliaths are now strictly protected in Florida. Helen Scales meets her first wild goliaths in the company of Dr Sarah Frias-Torres from ORCA (Ocean Research and Conservation Association) who is studying many aspects of these huge fish including a survey of scuba divers that she hopes will show that a goliath is worth more alive than dead.

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open University's iSpot.

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Brett Westwood examines the world of nature and the challenges of wildlife conservation.

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Brett Westwood examines the world of nature and the challenges of wildlife conservation.

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Brett Westwood reports from the Scottish Natural Heritage conference in Edinburgh.

Scotland's five year Species Action Framework programme ended in March 2012. This unique programme has advanced conservation and management action for 32 of Scotland's select species - including beaver, red squirrel, sea eagle, capercaillie, freshwater pearl mussel, great yellow bumblebee and woolly willow and invasive non-native species such as North American signal crayfish.

For Saving Species Brett Westwood travels up to the Scottish Natural Heritage conference in Edinburgh to discuss the results of this 5 year programme with the movers and shakers in Scotlands wildlife conservation.

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open University's iSpot.

0315Re-wildling / Devonshire Beavers2012121120121213

Can the process of urbanisation of the British countryside be reversed through rewilding?

Many conservationists say that the British countryside is too crowded and managed to be of real benefit to our native wildlife. For Saving Species this week Brett Westwood takes a close look at this premise and asks the question, can some areas of our managed landscape be returned to their former glory and therefore become hotspots to support our native wildlife?

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open University's iSpot.

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Saving Species takes a seasonal look at wildlife now that winter is well and truly with us

In the bleak midwinter the days are short and nights are long so how does our native wildlife survive in light of diminishing food reserves. For this Saving Species, Brett Westwood head off into the winter landscape to discover more about the conservation work being done to understand the needs of our wildlife at this time of year.

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open University's iSpot.

0317British Overseas Territories2012122520121227

Howard Stableford is in the chair for this Christmas Day Saving Species. On this day our thoughts are about spending time at home with our family, so for this week's episode Howard is looking at the UK's extended family with a programme on conservation in some of the British Overseas Territories.

We report on the news that a rare and highly endangered frog from Monserrat and Dominica in the Caribbean has successfully bred in London Zoo. Ed Drewitt discusses with Dr Ian Stephen this last chance conservation effort to save the Mountain chicken frog threatened with the Chytrid fungus; a disease fatal to 2/3 of all amphibians.

From tropical seas to the windswept island of S Georgia where the largest rat eradication project in the world is about to happen. Team Rat set off in January to save the albatrosses and petrels that nest on the sub-Antarctic eden from being eaten by rodents.

Howard discusses the establishment of marine conservation areas around the overseas territories with Alistair Gammell of the PEW Foundation. Overseas Territories are not just the land itself, it includes the seas that surround them for 200 nautical miles and include some of the richest seas in the world. Howard then questions the DEFRA Minister for Biodiversity, Richard Benyon, what the UK plans to do to help protect the precious places that make up British Overseas Territories.

Presenter Howard Stableford

Producer Mary Colwell

Editor Julian Hector.

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Howard Stableford looks at conservation issues in some of the British Overseas Territories

Howard Stableford is in the chair for this Christmas Day Saving Species. On this day our thoughts are about spending time at home with our family, so for this week's episode Howard is looking at the UK's extended family with a programme on conservation in some of the British Overseas Territories.

We report on the news that a rare and highly endangered frog from Monserrat and Dominica in the Caribbean has successfully bred in London Zoo. Ed Drewitt discusses with Dr Ian Stephen this last chance conservation effort to save the Mountain chicken frog threatened with the Chytrid fungus; a disease fatal to 2/3 of all amphibians.

From tropical seas to the windswept island of S Georgia where the largest rat eradication project in the world is about to happen. Team Rat set off in January to save the albatrosses and petrels that nest on the sub-Antarctic eden from being eaten by rodents.

Howard discusses the establishment of marine conservation areas around the overseas territories with Alistair Gammell of the PEW Foundation. Overseas Territories are not just the land itself, it includes the seas that surround them for 200 nautical miles and include some of the richest seas in the world. Howard then questions the DEFRA Minister for Biodiversity, Richard Benyon, what the UK plans to do to help protect the precious places that make up British Overseas Territories.

Presenter Howard Stableford

Producer Mary Colwell

Editor Julian Hector.