Roxburgh's Russia

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Episodes

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01Paradise Lost?1997072519970727

A four-part series with BBC Moscow correspondent Angus Roxburgh.

1: `Paradise Lost?'.

Why are so many Russians nostalgic about the old Soviet system? Angus Roxburgh travels to the city of Krasnodar to find out.

He talks to ordinary Russians about their lives before and after Communism and discovers that some think of the old days as a sort of Garden of Eden, a world of childlike innocence removed from the real world.

But he also finds that many are unhappy with their lives in the modern Russia.

1: `Paradise Lost?' Angus Roxburgh presents a four-part series which examines modern Russia. he also finds that many are unhappy with their lives in the modern Russia.

A four-part examination of modern Russia with Angus Roxburgh.

1: Paradise Lost? Why are so many Russians nostalgic about the old Soviet system? BBC Moscow correspondent Angus Roxburgh travels to the city of Krasnodar to find out. Producer Tony Grant

Repeated Sunday 6.15pm

Paradise Lost?The first of four programmes in which Angus Roxburgh examines modern Russia. Repeated from Friday

02Punishment And Crime1997080119970803

BBC Moscow correspondent Angus Roxburgh looks at crime, corruption and the Mafia in post-Communist Russia. He visits a grim labour camp which holds eight thousand convicts, many of whom have been imprisoned for petty crimes, and discovers that many of the more serious criminals are still at large.

A four-part series which examines modern Russia. 2: `Punishment and Crime'. BBC Moscow correspondent Angus Roxburgh looks at crime, corruption and the Mafia in post-Communist Russia. He visits a grim labour camp which holds eight thousand convicts, many of whom have been imprisoned for petty crimes, and discovers that many of the more serious criminals are still at large. He questions the attempts to bring them to justice, and meets one of the policemen responsible for clearing up the city's organised crime.

Afour-part series which examines modern Russia.

2:Punishment and Crime

BBC Moscow correspondent Angus Roxburgh looks at corruption in post-Communist Russia. He visits a labour camp which holds 8,000 convicts, many of whom have committed petty crimes, and discovers that many of the more serious criminals are still at large.

Producer Tony Grant. Repeated Sunday 6.15pm

Angus Roxburgh presents a four-part series which examines modern

Russia. 2: Punishment and Crime Repeated from Friday

03Russia's Intelligentsia: Superfluous Again1997080819970810

Whatever happened to the influential Russian intelligentsia, the authors and poets, playwrights and artists - the sort of people who inspired every major social change in Russia in the past two hundred years? Angus Roxburgh finds that the intelligentsia no longer contributes to Russian politics. Its representatives remain brilliant, humane, witty, concerned and engaged. But when it comes down it, they are impotent and redundant - a guiding light which everyone respects and admires and then ignores.

A four-part series on modern Russia. 3: Russia's Intelligentsia:

Superfluous Again. Angus Roxburgh asks why writers and artists no longer contribute to Russian politics. Producer Tony Grant

Repeated Sunday 6.15pm

Angus Roxburgh presents a four-part examination of Russia. 3: Russia's Intelligentsia: Superfluous Again Repeated from Friday

04 LASTEternal Russia1997081519970817

How do Russians see themselves now that the country, shorn of its Communist past, is preparing for a new millennium? Angus Roxburgh takes part in a chat show on Russian television which attempts to answer the question.

The last in the four-part series which examines modern Russia.

4: Eternal Russia. How do Russians see their country as it prepares for a new millennium? Angus Roxburgh takes part in a Russian chat show which attempts to answer the question. Producer Tony Grant. Repeated Sunday 6.15pm

The last in the four-part series on modern Russia. 4: Eternal Russia

Repeated from Friday 9.45am