The Romantic Road

A ten-part series in which Julian Evans travels through modern-day Europe looking for the literary connections that inspired writers then and now.

A ten-part series in which Julian Evans travels through modern-day Europe investigating literary connections and national idiosyncrasies.

Episodes

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Albania/kosovo2002021020020829

As Julian Evans nears the end of his literary journey through Europe, he visits Albania and Kosovo to investigate the state of the novel in this war-torn corner of the continent.

As the series nears the end of its journey, Julian Evans is in Albania and Kosovo discovering the state of the novel in war-torn Europe discovers that the dominance of the country's Renaissance and classical traditions has encouraged them to look away from the nation's cultural heartlands for their literary inspiration.

Germany20020820

: Julian Evans looks at the work of the early 19th-century author Heinrich von Kleist, whose suicide obscured the real impact of his very modern form of Romanticism.

Sweden2001111120020827

Julian Evans explores the state of novel-writing in Sweden. He visits Stockholm and then ventures away from the capital into the eerie silence of the Norlands.

Julian Evans's series of literary travels across Europe reaches Sweden, where he visits the capital Stockholm, as well as the eerie silence of the Norlands.

The Balkans2002011320020828
The Balkans2002011320020822

Broadcaster and writer Julian Evans continues his exploration of the novel in Europe, visiting the Balkans and the countries of the former Yugoslavia Camilo Jose Cela, Eduardo Mendoza, Javier Marias, Carmen Martin Gaite, Rosa Regas and Antonio Munoz Molina.

Julian Evans explores the novel-writing traditions of the Baltic states, investigating how novelists are helping to shape the identities of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia.

Broadcaster and writer Julian Evans continues his exploration of the novel in Europe, this month visiting the Balkans and the countries of the former Yugoslavia Camilo Jose Cela, Eduardo Mendoza, Javier Marias, Carmen Martin Gaite, Rosa Regas and Antonio Munoz Molina.

The Czech Republic And Slovakia, The20010801

Julian Evans visits Prague and Bratislava in search of the novelists who work in the shadow of Franz Kafka. He meets Czech writers Ivan Klima, Michal Viewegh and Jachym Topal - all of whom have had work translated into English - as well as Slovak satirists Pavel Vilikovsky and Peter Pistanek.

LASTGreat Britain2002031020020830

Julian Evans's series of literary travels across Europe reaches its conclusion as he returns to Great Britain for a studio discussion featuring Antonia Byatt and Philip Hensher.

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A ten-part series in which Julian Evans travels through modern-day Europe looking for the literary connections that inspired writers then and now.

A ten-part series in which Julian Evans travels through modern-day Europe investigating literary connections and national idiosyncrasies.Today, he explores Spain and `Don Quixote' by Cervantes, considered by many to be the first modern novel. First published in 1605, it appeared in English in 1612, then in French and Italian, influencing Sterne, Fielding and Defoe. Contributors include Camilo Jose Cela, Eduardo Mendoza, Javier Marias, Carmen Martin Gaite, Rosa Regas and Antonio Munoz Molina.

Julian Evans travels through modern-day Europe looking for the literary connections that inspired writers then and now. He explores Spain and Don Quixote by Cervantes.

0102France20000521

Today, Julian Evans focuses on the early 18th-century French novelist Lesage.

The picaresque adventures of his hero Gil Blas were translated into English, and their influence on such successors as Fielding and Voltaire are reflected on by French writers of today, who also discuss their own work and its connections with their literary heritage.

0104The Netherlands2000071620010730

Julian Evans travels through modern-day Holland looking for the literary connections that have inspired writers both in the past and the present. While most other European literary worlds live in the shadow of one or more major national writers, how do Dutch novelists feel about a cultural heritage dominated instead by painters? And is there such a thing as Dutch literature at all, given the national capacity for assimilation?

Most other European literatures operate in the shadow of one or more major national figures. So how do today's Dutch novelists feel about a cultural heritage dominated instead by painters? Indeed, is there such a thing as Dutch literature at all given the national capacity for assimilation?

0105Denmark20000917

In the land that produced Soren Kierkegaard and Hans Anderson, Evans looks at whether modern novels are inspired by existential awareness or fairy-tale narratives.

0106Portugal2000111920010731

Evans talks to writers including Nobel prize winner Jose Saramago about the effect on Portuguese literature of being both physically and emotionally between Spain and the Atlantic.

Julian Evans travels through modern-day Portugal investigating literary connections and national idiosyncrasies. He talks to writers including Nobel Prize winner Jose Saramago about the effect on Portuguese literature of being both physically and emotionally between Spain and the Atlantic.

0107Austria20001210

From a concentration camp on the Yugoslavian border, via Freud's study and the coffee houses of Vienna, Evans goes in search of the Austrian novel's past and future and investigates Robert Musil's sprawling inter-war masterpiece `A Man without Qualities'.

0108Czechoslovakia20010121

Evans visits Prague and Bratislava in search of the novelists who work in the shadow of Franz Kafka. He meets the Czech writers Ivan Klima, Michal Viewegh and Jachym Topal - all of whom have had work translated into English - as well as the Slovak satirists Pavel Vilikovsky and Peter Pistanek.

0109Italy2001021820020823

Julian visits the border city of Trieste, one-time home of 20th-century novelist Italo Svevo.

Rather than visit the cultural centres of Florence, Venice, Milan and Rome, Evans visits the border city of Trieste, one-time home of the early-20th-century novelist Italo Svevo. From his conversations with contemporary Italian writers, he discovers that the dominance of the country's Renaissance and classical traditions has encouraged them to look away from the nation's cultural heartlands for their literary inspiration.

0110 LASTGreece2001031820020826

Julian Evans explores the state of novel-writing in Greece.

His ends his odyssey in Greece, a country with a narrative tradition stretching back to Homer but to whose culture the novel is a relative newcomer. Evans talks to modern Greek novelists and runs across some old friends in the form of Byron and Cervantes.

02Iceland20011014

Julian Evans's literary odyssey across Europe reaches Iceland, whose sagas prefigure the novel and where writing has blossomed in the 50 years since independence include Gudberger Bergsson, Olafur Gunnarsson, Svava Jakobsdottir, Thor Vilhjalmsson and Einar Mar Gundmundsson.

0201Russia2001040820010803

Taking as his starting point Alexander Pushkin - author of the verse-novel `Eugene Onegin' - Evans talks to writers in St Petersburg and Moscow about their debt to the great Russian writers of the 19th-century and about how their work has been shaped by the massive changes that have taken place in Russia over the past 100 years.

Julian Evans travels across modern-day Russia. Taking as his starting point Alexander Pushkin - author of the verse-novel `Eugene Onegin' - Evans talks to writers in St Petersburg and Moscow about their debt to the great Russian writers of the 19th century, and how their work has been shaped by the massive changes that have taken place in Russia over the past 100 years.

0202The Ukraine20010527

Evans explores how novelists in the former Soviet republic are taking on the challenge of attempting to forge a national identity after centuries in the shadow of Russia and the Russian literary tradition. He also investigates how writers cope with the practical business of making money in a country which, until recently, has suffered spiralling inflation and zero economic growth.

0203Poland2001061720000618

Evans explores Polish writers and writing, from the satires of Witold Gombrowicz, whose work was censored by Nazis, Stalinists and Communists, to the poetry of Nobel Prize-winner Czeslaw Milosz. He investigates the distinctive character of Polish novels and looks at the effect that censorship has had on the nation's literature during much of the 20th century / 3: Germany. Today, Julian Evans looks at the work of the early 19th-century author Heinrich von Kleist, whose dramatic suicide obscured the real impact of his very modern form of Romanticism.

0204Hungary20010708

Evans explores the writings of the early-20th-century poet and novelist Dezso Kosztolanyi, whose stories have been widely admired for their strong psychological analysis and for their insight into the Hungarian national character. He investigates Kosztolanyi's influence on succeeding generations and is joined by the contemporary writers Peter Esterhazy, Peter Nades, Andras Forgach and Magda Szaba.