The Romans In Britain

Six-part outdoor series.

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Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971101]

Six-part series on the Roman legacy. 1: Let's Look at the Evidence. Guy, It's Overto You... Historian and archeologist Guy de la Bedoyere asks why the Romans would want to invade Britain and what the Britons made of the first European Community. Producer Jonathan Ruffle

Repeated tomorrow 8.30pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971101]

Unknown: Guy de la Bedoyere

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971102]

Repeated from yesterday 4pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971108]

2: What Have the Romans Ever Done for Us? Historian and archeologist Guy de la Bedoyere finds out about the Romano-British from their letters, medicine chests, food and even their methods of contraception. Producer Jonathan Ruffle

Repeated tomorrow 8.30pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971109]

Six-part series with Guy de la Bedoyere. 2: What Have the Romans Ever Done for Us?

Repeated from yesterday 4pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971109]

Unknown: Guy de la Bedoyere.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971115]

A six-part series on the Roman legacy. 3: All Roads Lead to, and from, Rome

Historian and archaeologist Guy de la Bedoyere discovers how Roman

Britain was part of the first EU and sent lead to Pompeii. Producer Jonathan Ruffle

Repeated tomorrow 8.30pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971115]

Unknown: Guy de La Bedoyere

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971116]

Six-part series with historian and archaeologist Guy de la Bedoyere. 3: All Roads Lead to, and from, Rome' Repeated from yesterday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971116]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971122]

Six-part outdoor series.

4: The Land of the Giants. Historian and archaeologist Guy de la Bedoyere reveals how Roman Britain would have looked - not mud huts, but skyscrapers, Mediterranean temples and huge villas.

Producer Jonathan Ruffle

Repeated tomorrow 8.30pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971122]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971123]

Six-part outdoor series with historian and archaeologist Guy de la Bedoyere. 4: The Land of the GiantsRepeated from yesterday 4pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971123]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971129]

Six-part outdoor series.

5:Hadrian's Wall Wasn't Built in a Day Historian and archaeologist Guy de la Bedoyere asks how the Romans took on the job of building a wall straight across this island. Producer Jonathan Ruffle

Repeated tomorrow 8.30pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971129]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971130]

Six-part outdoor series with historian and archaeologist Guy de la Bedoyere. 5: Hadrian's Wall Wasn't Built in a DayRepeated from yesterday 4pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971130]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971206]

The last of six outdoor programmes. The End of Roman Britain: Infamy, Infamy, They've All Got It In for Me Historian and archaeologist

Guy de la Bedoyere investigates the year AD 410 - widely regarded as the year in which the Romans left Britain.

Producer Jonathan Ruffle

Repeated tomorrow 8.30pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971206]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971207]

The last of six outdoor programmes. Repeated from yesterday 4pm

01Let's Look At The Evidence. Guy, It's Over To You...1997110119971102

Historian and archaeologist Guy de la Bedoyere asks why the Romans would want to invade Britain, what the Britons made of the first European Community with its single currency, and what archaeology can tell us about these ancestors of ours.

02What Have The Romans Ever Done For Us?1997110819971109

Historian and archeologist Guy de la Bedoyere finds out about the Romano-British from their letters, medicine chests, food and even their methods of contraception. He also discovers the remarkable ruler of the very first British Empire.

03All Roads Lead To, And From, Rome1997111519971116

Historian and archaeologist Guy de la Bedoyere discovers how Roman Britain was part of the first EU, enjoyed food off Mediterranean plates and sent lead to Pompeii.

04The Land Of The Giants1997112219971123

Historian and archaeologist Guy de la Bedoyere reveals how Roman Britain would have looked - not mud huts, but skyscrapers, Mediterranean temples and villas the size of hypermarkets.

05Hadrian's Wall Wasn't Built In A Day1997112919971130

Historian and archaeologist Guy de la Bedoyere asks how the Romans took on the job of building a wall straight across this island nearly 1,900 years ago and visits the remains of this military machine, stretched out like a snake across the countryside.

06 LASTThe End Of Roman Britain: Infamy, Infamy, They've All Got It In For Me1997120619971207

Historian and archaeologist Guy de la Bedoyere investigates the year 410 - widely regarded as the year in which the Romans left Britain - and discovers a fascinating picture of a people trying to remain Roman for as long as they could.

01Becoming Roman2004111420110824

Historian Bettany Hughes looks at our first contacts with the Romans and how people loved or resented their new overlords.

Our relationship with the Romans used to be a cosy one - once we saw them as our fellow imperialists who civilised 'us natives', and a jolly good thing too.

Even now that some of that 'special relationship' has persisted.

We love discoveries of forts and towns and baths, and we're lot less impressed by a nice British round house.

Yet perhaps 97% of our ancestors would have been living in those roundhouses, many of them turning up their noses at Roman culture beyond the odd bit of bracelet or pottery.

Where we do pay attention to the native British, it's to the freedom fighters like Boudicca and Caractacus, but we rarely think about ordinary life under occupation or the culture shock of suddenly finding yourself living in a Roman town.

Roman towns would have looked as alien to our ancestors as the dizzying streetscapes of Bladerunner with their tall rectangular stone buildings, cacophony of languages and intimidatingly foreign way of life.

Nor do we think about the most important woman in early Roman Britain, the dazzling ruler of most of Yorkshire - the pro-Roman Cartimandua, queen of the Brigantes who built one of our largest prehistoric sites at Stanwick and who caused an international incident when she ditched her husband for his armour bearer.

Her canny but failed experiment in client state-building would set the future for the whole of the North of England.

She was a much bigger player than Boudicca.

It's up in the North that we see occupation in shockingly modern terms, as those enormous Roman armies set up permanent home, sucking the local areas almost dry and becoming the law of the land.

Up here, occupation bites.

Bettany Hughes considers how much people loved or resented the Romans during occupation.

01Becoming Roman20101024

Historian Bettany Hughes looks at our first contacts with the Romans and how people loved or resented their new overlords.

Our relationship with the Romans used to be a cosy one - once we saw them as our fellow imperialists who civilised 'us natives', and a jolly good thing too.

Even now that some of that 'special relationship' has persisted.

We love discoveries of forts and towns and baths, and we're lot less impressed by a nice British round house.

Yet perhaps 97% of our ancestors would have been living in those roundhouses, many of them turning up their noses at Roman culture beyond the odd bit of bracelet or pottery.

Where we do pay attention to the native British, it's to the freedom fighters like Boudicca and Caractacus, but we rarely think about ordinary life under occupation or the culture shock of suddenly finding yourself living in a Roman town.

Roman towns would have looked as alien to our ancestors as the dizzying streetscapes of Bladerunner with their tall rectangular stone buildings, cacophony of languages and intimidatingly foreign way of life.

Nor do we think about the most important woman in early Roman Britain, the dazzling ruler of most of Yorkshire - the pro-Roman Cartimandua, queen of the Brigantes who built one of our largest iron age settlements at Stanwick and who caused an international incident when she ditched her husband for his armour bearer.

Her canny but failed experiment in client state-building would set the future for the whole of the North of England.

She was a much bigger player than Boudicca.

It's up in the North that we see occupation in shockingly modern terms, as those enormous Roman armies set up permanent home, sucking the local areas almost dry and becoming the law of the land.

Up here, occupation bites.

Bettany Hughes considers how much people loved or resented the Romans during occupation.

02 LASTThe Birth Of The Britons2004112120110826

Historian Bettany Hughes investigates the shocking dislocation of the end of Roman rule in Britain.

Traditionally it's said that Roman rule ended in the year 410: 1600 years ago, when the Roman emperor Honorius supposedly told us to fend for ourselves, but it's much more complicated than that.

Britain became embroiled in a series of revolts by imperial usurpers which weren't so much 'Romans Go Home' but 'Emperor come here!' and it all went very badly wrong.

It's hard to imagine London closing for business, becoming a ghost town whose citizens have fled, with a choice of growing their own veg in the countryside or becoming bully boys for a local war leader, but that's exactly what happened when Roman rule collapsed in Britain.

Londoners left strange thank-you gifts for the gods as they closed the city down - like the Draper's Lane hoard of copper pots and sacrifices, which we'll be investigating.

The usurper emperors accidentally brought a systems collapse to tipping point.

In the maelstrom that followed, pagan Anglo Saxons who'd originally been Roman mercenaries were joined by new immigrants from their Germanic homelands and a lot of eastern Romano-Brits decided that they were the future, while others desperately clung to their Roman Christian ways.

But in Wales, Cornwall and Devon, they looked aghast at this barbarism.

An early form of devolution, and a boost in local power (legend says from the rebel emperor Magnus Maximus), led the West to hold on proudly to their Roman identity, fending off Saxons and assimilated Saxon 'wannabes' all the way till the medieval campaigns of Edward I.

Edward might have thought of himself as the true heir of Rome but to the Welsh he was nothing more than the last barbarian.

Historian Bettany Hughes investigates the end of Roman rule in Britain.

02 LASTThe Birth Of The Britons20101031

Historian Bettany Hughes investigates the shocking dislocation of the end of Roman rule in Britain.

Traditionally it's said that Roman rule ended in the year 410: 1600 years ago, when the Roman emperor Honorius supposedly told us to fend for ourselves, but it's much more complicated than that.

Britain became embroiled in a series of revolts by imperial usurpers which weren't so much 'Romans Go Home' but 'Emperor come here!' and it all went very badly wrong.

It's hard to imagine London closing for business, becoming a ghost town whose citizens have fled, with a choice of growing their own veg in the countryside or becoming bully boys for a local war leader, but that's exactly what happened when Roman rule collapsed in Britain.

Londoners left strange thank-you gifts for the gods as they closed the city down - like the Draper's Lane hoard of copper pots and sacrifices, which we'll be investigating.

The usurper emperors accidentally brought a systems collapse to tipping point.

In the maelstrom that followed, pagan Anglo Saxons who'd originally been Roman mercenaries were joined by new immigrants from their Germanic homelands and a lot of eastern Romano-Brits decided that they were the future, while others desperately clung to their Roman Christian ways.

But in Wales, Cornwall and Devon, they looked aghast at this barbarism.

An early form of devolution, and a boost in local power (legend says from the rebel emperor Magnus Maximus), led the West to hold on proudly to their Roman identity, fending off Saxons and assimilated Saxon 'wannabes' all the way till the medieval campaigns of Edward I.

Edward might have thought of himself as the true heir of Rome but to the Welsh he was nothign more than the last barbarian.

Historian Bettany Hughes investigates the end of Roman rule in Britain.