The Rock And Poll Years

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
0101Roy Hudd Tunes In To 19592000011120000415

Five programmes mixing pop and politics to capture the atmosphere and chart the course of general election campaigns which changed the country. 1: Roy Hudd tunes in to 1959, when Harold Macmillan became Supermac and Cliff Richard got a Livin' Doll.

0102Ned Sherrin Tunes In To 19642000011820000422

Five programmes mixing pop and politics to capture the atmosphere and chart the course of general election campaigns which changed the country.

2: Ned Sherrin tunes in to 1964, when the Beatles conquered America and Roy Orbison yearned for a `Pretty Woman'.

The Tories thought Sir Alec Douglas Home was the man to lead the country into the Swinging Sixties, but Labour's Harold Wilson was determined to stop him.

0103Gyles Brandreth Returns To 19702000012520000429

Five programmes mixing pop and politics to capture the atmosphere and chart the course of general election campaigns which changed the country.

3: Gyles Brandreth returns to 1970, when the man with the pipe, Prime Minister Harold Wilson, took on the man with the boat, Ted Heath.

Mungo Jerry's hit `In the Summertime' topped the charts, and Wilson was confident of victory.

0104Miles Kington Tunes In To 19792000020120000506

Five programmes mixing pop and politics to capture the atmosphere and chart the course of general election campaigns which changed the country. 4: Miles Kington tunes in to 1979, when PM Jim Callaghan was battling not just the unions and the Winter of Discontent but also the new Tory leader Margaret Thatcher. Blondie were in the charts with `Sunday Girl', as were Simon and Garfunkel with `Bright Eyes'.

0105 LASTSandi Toksvig Remembers 19872000020820000513

A mix of pop and politics captures the atmosphere and charts the course of general election campaigns which changed the country.

Sandi Toksvig remembers 1987, when Living in a Box was in the charts and a cupboard in Knightsbridge sold for a small fortune.

Margaret Thatcher had been in Downing Street for eight years, and challenging her were Labour's Neil Kinnock and the two Davids - Owen and Steel - of the Alliance.

0201Humphrey Lyttelton Recalls 195520010303

Five programmes mixing pop and politics to capture the atmosphere and chart the course of general election campaigns.

Humphrey Lyttelton recalls 1955, when Winston Churchill finally stood down as PM.

His successor, Anthony Eden, immediately called an election.

Up against him was Clement Attlee, heading a hopelessly divided Labour Party.

Meanwhile, rock 'n' roll had its first real chart success.

0202Warren Mitchell Recalls 196620010310

Five programmes mixing pop and politics to capture the atmosphere and chart the course of general election campaigns.

Warren Mitchell recalls 1966, when, having clung to office for over a year following the narrowest of victories, Harold Wilson called an election.

Everyone thought the result was a forgone conclusion, except the new Conservative leader, Ted Heath

0203Tim Rice Looks Back On 197420010317

Five programmes mixing pop and politics to capture the atmosphere and chart the course of general election campaigns. Tim Rice looks back on 1974, when the oil crisis and strikes were bringing the country to a standstill, and Ted Heath decided to call a snap general election. In the charts were Mud, Sweet and Suzi Quatro, who showed that they, at least, had energy to spare.

0204George Cole Remembers The Campaign Of 198320010324

The fourth of five programmes mixing pop and politics to capture the atmosphere of general election campaigns. George Cole remembers the campaign of 1983, with Margaret Thatcher apparently invincible following the Falklands victory and Michael Foot cruelly mocked by the press for looking like a scarecrow.

0205 LASTCarol Thatcher Recalls The Election Of 199220010331

The last of five programmes mixing pop and politics to capture the atmosphere and chart the course of general election campaigns. Carol Thatcher recalls the election of 1992, which John Major called 15 months after Margaret Thatcher's fall. Neil Kinnock had transformed himself and the Labour Party, which was ahead in the polls, but then it went horribly wrong.