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A Year In The Life: The Beatles 6220121119

Roger McGough tells the story of the pivotal breakthrough year for the newly mop-topped Liverpool beat combo, via 12 interlinked recollections from those who knew and worked alongside them in 1962.

An Audience With John Lydon2012112420121125 (WS)

The former lead singer of The Sex Pistols answers your questions.

Gideon Coe and an audience of 150 people in central London put their questions to the singer and performer John Lydon, the former lead singer of The Sex Pistols.

The programme explores John's return to live work as his group PIL reformed after a break of 20 years, with questions regarding his favourite places to play and the recent controversy surrounding his concerts in Israel.

He also talks candidly about his reflections on the punk fashions of the seventies and his feeling about the death of Sex Pistols manager Malcolm McLaren. John was not adverse to exploring the song writing process to some of his best known songs and revealed that his Sex Pistols anthem God Save The Queen, is often misunderstood and was not condemning the Royal Family but merely questioning their role.

Through out the programme John Lydon is to the point, honest and very entertaining making this one of programme a revealing kind of music programme and one not to miss.

So take your seats alongside presenter Gideon Coe and get to know one of contemporary music’s leading figures a little better in An Audience With John Lydon.

(Image: John Lydon of the Sex Pistols. Credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

Beatleland2012112020121123
20121126 (WS)

The Beatles left Liverpool in 1962 to conquer the world, but it never left them. Craig Charles heads home to find out what they took with them and the legacy they left behind. Every day, tourists beat a path to Lennon and McCartney's childhood homes, restored to their 1950s glory by English Heritage. From Albert Dock to Mathew Street, Beatle memorials are ever present: Penny Lane and Strawberry Field, The Jacaranda, The Casbah and The Cavern where the group learned its trade, The Grapes and Ye Cracke, where the young Beatles would sit over a pint of cider and Gambier Terrace, where John Lennon shared a flat with fellow art student Stu Sutcliffe. The Beatles connection is worth an estimated £20 million a year to the local economy. (Image: The gates of Strawberry Field in Liverpool. Credit: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

The Beatles left Liverpool in 1962 to conquer the world, but it never left them. Craig Charles heads home to find out what they took with them and the legacy they left behind. Every day, tourists beat a path to Lennon and McCartney's childhood homes, restored to their 1950s glory by English Heritage. From Albert Dock to Mathew Street, Beatle memorials are ever present: Penny Lane and Strawberry Field, The Jacaranda, The Casbah and The Cavern where the group learned its trade, The Grapes and Ye Cracke, where the young Beatles would sit over a pint of cider and Gambier Terrace, where John Lennon shared a flat with fellow art student Stu Sutcliffe.

The Beatles connection is worth an estimated £20 million a year to the local economy.

(Image: The gates of Strawberry Field in Liverpool. Credit: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

The Beatles left Liverpool in 1962 to conquer the world, but it never left them. Craig Charles heads home to find out what they took with them and the legacy they left behind.

Every day, tourists beat a path to Lennon and McCartney's childhood homes, restored to their 1950s glory by English Heritage. From Albert Dock to Mathew Street, Beatle memorials are ever present: Penny Lane and Strawberry Field, The Jacaranda, The Casbah and The Cavern where the group learned its trade, The Grapes and Ye Cracke, where the young Beatles would sit over a pint of cider and Gambier Terrace, where John Lennon shared a flat with fellow art student Stu Sutcliffe.

Paul Mccartney At The Bbc20121121

Johnnie Walker presents a portrait of Sir Paul drawn from BBC archive interviews and performances. The programme starts with the break-up of The Beatles and traces McCartney's career as a solo artist up to the present.

It's made up entirely of rare BBC archive interviews and performances, and presents a fascinating picture of one of Britain's greatest musicians.

Among other treats we hear Sir Paul deconstructing Band On The Run for a Radio 2 TV advert and recording a session at Abbey Road.

(Image: Sir Paul McCartney at BBC Radio 1)

The Magical Mystery Tour20121122

The television film called Magical Mystery Tour was devised, written and directed by The Beatles. It has a significant place in the history of The Beatles - not least, because it was viewed by many as the group's first failure.

Paul Gambaccini presents a programme revealing the story behind the making of Magical Mystery Tour. The documentary also examines the group's activities during 1967 before they spent most of the final four months working on Magical Mystery Tour.

It was a momentous year. In February, The Beatles issued the single Penny Lane/Strawberry Fields Forever, accompanied by two adventurous and surreal promotional films for those songs. On 1 June, their LP Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band was released, which instantly received critical acclaim and huge sales. They performed All You Need Is Love on the first global TV show linking five continents by satellite.

They first met the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi in the last week of August 1967. While learning about Transcendental Meditation with him in North Wales, they received the shocking news of the sudden death of their manager Brian Epstein. Two weeks later they began filming Magical Mystery Tour.

The programme features new interviews with Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr. John Lennon and George Harrison are represented by rare archive interviews recorded during the shooting and editing of the film in September and October 1967. Film directors Peter Fonda, Terry Gilliam and Martin Scorsese discuss Magical Mystery Tour and there are comments from many of those who worked on or participated in the film.

(Image: The Beatles - Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr and John Lennon. Credit: PA)

The Stones By The Stones2012112320121124 (WS)
20121125 (WS)

Paul Sexton marks 50 years since the first gig by the Rolling Stones.

It's 50 years since the first gig by the rhythm and blues obsessed teenagers who turned into the greatest rock 'n' roll band in the world. As the Rolling Stones hit the live stage again and release the new compilation album GRRR!, journalist and broadcaster Paul Sexton marks the occasion by digging into his extensive interview archive with the rock heroes.

Paul has been interviewing the Stones since the early 1990s, and in this show he selects some of his own favourite moments spent in their convivial company. It features revealing and often very amusing conversations recorded around the world - in rehearsals in Toronto, backstage in Amsterdam, in London and New York hotels, even in Keith Richards' living room in Connecticut.

Highlights include Mick Jagger describing the caricature of his on-stage image that his friends laugh about; Charlie Watts on how he forgot the band's catalogue of songs; Ronnie Wood on his shopping trip when they played in Shanghai; and Keith's hilarious story of the band's post-gig attempt to escape from screaming fans across the rooftops of Chester.

We will also hear what Charlie thinks of Mick, how Ronnie once invited Paul to Amsterdam's red light district, Keith on the the madness of 'Exile On Main St' era and Mick on their record-breaking show on the beach in Rio.

The anecdotes are accompanied by a great selection of Stones hits and album tracks, forming a rare insight into the professional and private lives of some true rock legends.

(Image: The Rolling Stones (circa 1963). Credit: Chris Ware/Keystone Features/Getty Images)