The Report

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20090402

Simon Cox presents the current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

He asks what it really means when a Briton commits suicide in Switzerland and probes the myths and reality of the Dignitas organisation.

Simon reveals how Swiss right-to-die organisations have extended their services to yet more controversial areas: helping the mentally ill, or those in pain or depressed, to die.

He examines the process in detail and asks what safeguards exist.

20090416

A government-commissioned inquiry is to deliver its verdict on what led to the catastrophic failures at Mid Staffordshire Hospital.

The Health Secretary has said he is confident that Mid Staffordshire is an isolated case.

Simon Cox investigates whether that's true.

He asks why the failings at Stafford weren't picked up by a host of organisations and whether other hospitals should also be causing concern.

Simon Cox looks ahead to the inquiry into failings at Mid Staffordshire Hospital.

2009052820090531

Simon Cox gets behind the headlines engulfing MPs about their expenses and explores how the system of allowances was allowed to get out of control.

The programme charts the origin of the row back to the enactment of freedom of information laws and reveals how proposed changes, which could have averted the crisis, were repeatedly thwarted by MPs themselves.

Simon Cox explores how the system of MPs expenses was allowed to get out of control.

20090604

Rob Walker travels to Somaliland to uncover the truth behind the hijack and ransom of a Danish ship, and asks who benefits from modern-day piracy.

Rob Walker uncovers the truth behind the hijack and ransom of a Danish ship.

20091008

The RMT union claims to be Britain's fastest-growing trade union; it is also arguably the most confrontational.

The union's favoured tactic of repeated strike ballots has won enviable high rates of pay and annual leave for its members.

It has also earned the RMT general secretary the tag of 'the most hated man in London'.

Simon Cox investigates the RMT's strength, why managers refuse to take it on and the attempts to curb its power.

Simon Cox investigates the strength of the RMT union.

20091015

Rob Walker investigates the Bloody Sunday Inquiry.

What has made it the longest and most expensive inquiry in British legal history?

20091126

Current affairs series which combines original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

Current affairs series.

20091203

Current affairs series which combines original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

Phil Kemp reports.

Current affairs series.

20100211

Business leaders say they face unfair competition following the collapse of the Copenhagen climate summit.

Europe is pushing ahead with tighter controls on greenhouse gases, in stark contrast to the US, China and India.

Simon Cox investigates why the summit failed and assesses the impact on industry in the UK.

Why the Copenhagen climate summit failed and its impact on UK industry.

20100408

Whether it's a case like Baby P or the 'British Fritzl' in Sheffield, the Serious Case Review is always scrutinised for mistakes and who was to blame by the media, politicians and professionals.

They're carried out when children die or are seriously injured as a result of neglect or abuse and are designed to highlight lessons that can be learned by all agencies responsible for keeping children safe.

In the Report this week Simon Cox looks at why many of these reports highlight the same issues over and over again and asks whether attempts to make them more robust will work or are actually misguided.

20100419

The Report investigates the likely impact of public spending cuts on English universities.

They've enjoyed a decade of historically-high funding but as budgets tighten, James Silver asks whether universities have done enough in the days of plenty to prepare for leaner times ahead.

A number of institutions have significant debts and some commentators predict it's only a matter of time before one university goes bust.

Producer: Rob Cave.

20100426

As the Catholic Church struggles to deal with a wave of sex abuse scandals, Radio 4 investigates the Pope's track record in dealing with paedophile priests.

When he was elected, Pope Benedict XVI promised to rid his Church of filth", but he now stands accused of covering up abuse and failing to protect children from paedophile priests.

In The Report this week, Simon Cox examines claims that the Pope mishandled two key cases - the first during his time as Archbishop of Munich and the second while leading the Vatican watchdog responsible for dealing with clerical abuse.

Did the Pope fail to act on key sex abuse cases?"

20100503

The dust from the Icelandic volcano has started to settle, but questions remain in the air.

Were the authorities acting too cautiously when they closed British airspace for six days? Who was really making the decisions, and could it have been sorted out much faster?

The Report this week will trace the story of the volcano and the airspace shut down, with contributions from the regulators, airlines, and a couple who made a nightmare journey back overland - from Morocco.

An in-depth report on the crisis which closed down Europe's skies.

20100506

With the football season drawing to a close, Morland Sanders investigates the financial crisis facing Premiership and Championship clubs.

Many are saddled with huge debts.

One manager says his club's business model of high wages and bonuses simply does not stack up and threatens the viability of the national game.

And the outgoing Football League chairman has warned that the affairs of some clubs are not transparent, making it impossible to determine who the owners are - and the level of debts on the books.

Producer: Samantha Fenwick.

Investigating the financial crisis facing Premiership and Championship football.

20100520

The deal between the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats to form the UK's first coalition government for almost 70 years was an historic occasion.

At its height the Liberal Democrats were being wooed with offers from both sides and it was unclear who they would embrace.

This week Linda Pressly speaks to those involved to get the inside story of the negotiations and how the deal was finally done.

This week: how the coalition deal between the Tories and the Liberal Democrats was done.

20100527

As the political fallout from the Deepwater Horizon oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico tarnishes BP's reputation in the United States, Simon Cox asks whether the British oil giant could have done more to ensure the safety of its operations.

Five years after BP were landed multi-million dollar fines for a catastrophic explosion at a refinery in Texas, some politicians and environmentalists think BP has not done enough to clean up its act in the US.

The Report also asks whether American federal agencies responsible for policing offshore drilling have given the oil industry too easy a ride.

How good was BP's US safety record before the Deepwater Horizon oil spill?

20100603

The Report examines new ways of funding cancer drugs for the most severe forms of the disease.

As the costs of providing anti cancer treatments rises, Simon Cox investigates the viability of a Conservative promise to provide access to non approved drugs on the NHS.

Producer: Gail Champion.

Simon Cox investigates new funding plans for life-threatening cancer treatments.

20100708

Why are so few captured pirates brought to trial? Each year hundreds of ships are attacked by pirate gangs, many off the coast of Somalia.They target cargo and also passengers and crew who are held for ransom, sometimes for years.

The British couple Paul and Rachel Chandler have been held hostage for over 8 months.

An international Combined Task Force now patrols the region and its ships regularly witness boarding raids and seize pirates, yet most are just released or returned to the Somali shore - probably to participate in further attacks.

In fact across the world fewer than 20 pirates have been successfully convicted of any crime.

In this week's The Report, Simon Cox investigates the highly-charged political, social and legal issues which enable pirates to operate with relative impunity.

Simon Cox investigates why so few captured pirates are brought to trial.

20100715

In a special edition of The Report for Radio 4's London Season, Mukul Devichand asks whether the city's white working class has been left behind.

In cosmopolitan inner London, he finds schools belatedly trying to engage with low achievement in an ethnic minority: the white British population on free school meals.

As central and local government begin to change their approach to the "white working class", Devichand re-tells the history that has seen the oldest community in London slowly move out.

It's a tale of alienation and a dark poverty of aspiration, and a place to ask pointed questions about the dreams and realities of those who feel left out in an increasingly globalised London.

Has London's white working class been left behind?

20100722

Justice Secretary Ken Clarke wants to reduce the prison population by getting more offenders on community sentences.

But magistrates claim the effectiveness of some community punishments is being compromised because of under resourcing.

James Silver travels to Liverpool where one district judge believes the Government needs to do more to ensure courts have the range of community sanctions they need to tackle crime.

Producer: Rob Cave.

The government wants more criminals on community sentences - but are they a soft option?

20100729

The Government says it will turn the NHS "upside down" with its overhaul of health funding in England.

By putting GPs in charge of a sizeable chunk of the health service budget, ministers say it will do away with the need for so many managers.

Simon Cox travels to two areas where GPs are already involved in commissioning services and asks if the scheme will deliver the expected benefits.

Producer: Paul Grant.

What do the NHS reforms mean for health care in England?

20100805

Should the Government cut back on its £300m a year use of methadone to treat drug addicts? Linda Pressly reports on calls, in Scotland and south of the border, to rebalance policy away from 'harm reduction' substitute drug prescribing towards getting addicts clean.

Should the government cut back on its use of methadone to treat drug addiction?

20100812
20100819

Simon Cox examines what happened with the investigation into the death of Ian Tomlinson at last year's G20 protest and asks why no charges have been brought.

Outrage has been expressed at the recent decision of the Crown Prosecution Service not to pursue charges against the policeman that struck Ian Tomlinson minutes before his death.

And the General Medical Council is currently conducting a hearing into the 'fitness to practice' of the pathologist who conducted the first post mortem on Ian Tomlinson.

The programme examines each stage of the investigation, talks to those closely involved with the case, and asks whether the judicial process failed.

Simon Cox investigates the death of Ian Tomlinson at the 2009 G20 protests.

20100826

Meat from the offspring of a cloned cow has been sold and eaten in the UK.

Nadene Ghouri investigates how it happened and asks whether anyone is likely to be at risk.

She traces the animal's journey from Wisconsin in the US to a dairy herd in the Scottish Highlands, and finds out how the international market in animal embryos made it all possible.

Producer: Monica Soriano.

Nadene Ghouri investigates how meat from the offspring of a cloned cow was eaten in the UK

20100902

Britain's controversial extradition laws will be in focus again today, as courts decide on America's request for a Kent buinessman, Christopher Tappin, to face charges on selling batteries to Iran.

In The Report this week, Mukul Devichand investigates who can be sent abroad to face trial and finds that high profile requests from America are just the tip of the iceburg.

The system allows over 40 countries to request British citizens without a full hearing of the evidence against them and a third of European requests come from just one country: Poland.

Mukul explores claims that Britain's courts are being flooded by requests for petty criminals - for example, the man being extradited to Poland for stealing 20 chocolate bars.

Former Home Secretary David Blunkett helped push these laws through in the years after the 9/11 attacks, but in a remarkably frank exchange, he tells The Report that he now "regrets" aspects of the law -- and discusses the need for change.

Mukul Devichand investigates who can be extradited to face trials abroad.

20100909

Thousands of disappointed youngsters who failed to gain a university place last month are now swelling the ranks of the NEET's: under 24's not in employment, education or training.

As Ministers draw up plans for major public spending cuts to be announced next month, and with long term youth unemployment figures already on the rise, how will these young people fair? Connexions, the specialised information and advice service has already been severely reduced in some parts of the country.

The Government has promised more apprenticeships, but will employers take up the offer? Can Further Education colleges cope with the increased demand for places.

Is a generation of young people being shut out of the jobs market? Morland Sanders reports.

Producer: Andy Denwood.

Are young people being shut out of the jobs market? Morland Sanders investigates.

20100916

It is a year since Abdelbaset Ali al-Megrahi was released from a Scottish jail on compassionate grounds.

Since then voices here and abroad have questioned how ill he really was, if money and oil were the real reasons for his release and whether he was in fact guilty of causing the Lockerbie tragedy.

James Silver looks into the claims and investigates why they have emerged.

James Silver looks into the theories surrounding the release of Abdelbaset Ali al-Megrahi.

20100923

As millions of Britons receive letters telling them the news they've paid either too much or too little tax in recent year, Simon Cox investigates what's gone wrong at Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs.

According to the Government, a new computer system has, for the first time, been able to reconcile the ordinary citizen's tax affairs and give an accurate estimate of what he or she owes the state.

But is that the whole story?

The Report examines reveals how delays in the complex IT project, and swingeing job cuts have led to mountains of unanswered correspondence, and almost £4 billion of miscalculations on tax owed to the Exchequer.

Producer: Rob Cave.

How did the man from the Revenue get millions of Britons' tax codes so wrong?

20100930

The plan to build an Islamic Centre near Ground Zero has polarised the US and become a key political issue.

Linda Pressly explores the fallout.

Could it change America?

How the plan to build an Islamic Centre near Ground Zero has polarised America.

20101007

There were an estimated 12 million incidents of anti-social behaviour in England and Wales last year but only about a quarter were reported to the police.

Now there's evidence that in some areas those calls are not taken seriously enough, with the emphasis on more 'serious' crime.

As forces brace themselves for large spending cuts, Jane Dodge asks whether the policing of anti-social behaviour will suffer.

The Chief Inspector of Constabulary in England and Wales, Sir Denis O'Connor said in its latest report, that it's time to 'reclaim some neighbourhoods'.

He warned chief constables to think carefully before making cuts as they could tip some areas into a spiral of economic and social decline, and said that what's needed are feet on the street.

But critics claim this is scaremongering in an attempt to save frontline jobs.

We hear from those on the receiving end of anti-social behaviour and those trying to stop it: the victims who become prisoners in their own homes and about the few extreme cases which have resulted in death.

Some express frustration with the lack of police action.

So how can anti social behaviour be tackled when budgets are tight? To get an insight into the challenges of juggling resources and meeting the public expectations we spend time with two forces in the North of England both with very different approaches to anti-social behaviour.

Producer: Samantha Fenwick.

Anti-social behaviour: Jane Dodge reports on how well our streets are policed.

20101014

Original insights into major news stories and topical investigations.

20101118

Simon Cox looks at airline security in the wake of the East Midlands Airport parcel bomb find and asks what more can be done by the aviation industry to prevent terrorist attacks.

A look at aviation security in the wake of the parcel bomb found at East Midlands Airport.

20101125

Mukul Devichand investigates the truth about housing benefit, why the Government wants to cap it, and what effect that might have on our cities.

The truth about housing benefit and why the Government wants to cap it.

20101209

Simon Cox assesses the implications of the ruling that stripped former Immigration Minister and Labour MP, Phil Woolas of his Oldham East and Saddleworth seat.

Simon Cox assesses the implications of the Phil Woolas case.

20101223

Investigation and insight into a current topical issue.

20101230

Linda Pressly reports on the protests against tax avoidance which caused disruption at stores across Britain in the run-up to Christmas.

She finds out how the group behind the protests, UK Uncut, was formed and how it has used social media to connect protestors and to organise more than 50 demonstrations all over the UK.

She also investigates UK Uncut's claims that the Government could avoid making deep public spending cuts by targeting rich individuals and big businesses that legally avoid paying billions of pounds a year in tax.

Who are the people behind UK Uncut? What is the basis for their claims? And do they really have the answer to the UK's fiscal woes? The programme includes interviews with the founding members of UK Uncut, with Richard Murphy of the Tax Justice Network, John Whiting from the Office of Tax Simplification and Treasury Minister David Gauke.

Linda Pressly reports on UK Uncut's campaign against big businesses that avoid tax.

20110106

As three Pakistan cricketers face an International Cricket Council tribunal in Dubai over allegations of match fixing, The Report looks at the threat of corruption to cricket.

Betting on sport is hugely popular in Asia, and even where its banned, millions of pounds worth of bets are taken by illegal bookmakers.

Betting syndicates - of both punters and bookmakers - are believed to be behind the efforts to bribe players in the UK.

We hear claims that the English county game is currently being targeted by bookmakers from India, on the lookout for vulnerable players, perhaps with a gambling addiction or a debt.

Adrian Goldberg explores this murky world, and asks if players and the authorities are doing enough to protect players from the lure of handsome rewards for not playing by the rules.

Producer: Paul Grant.

As the tribunal into match fixing allegations opens, we investigate corruption in cricket.

20110113

The revelation that the man responsible for Sweden's first suicide bombing had lived and studied in Luton provided the latest link between the Bedfordshire town and terrorist activity.

The accusation that Luton has become a 'hotbed of extremism' dates back to the late 1990s, when it was claimed that one of the men alleged to be involved with a terrorist plot in Yemen in 1998 had lived in the town.

Links with Luton have also been cited in other major planned terrorist atrocities since, including the fertiliser bomb plot of 2003 which aimed to blow up British nightclubs and shopping centres, and the July 7th London bombings.

The Report investigates whether Luton has a problem with militant Islam and if it is doing enough to stop its young residents from being radicalised.

The programme will also ask why Luton has also proved fertile territory for the extreme right.

The English Defence League was born in Luton in the spring of 2009 in response to the abuse faced by members of the Royal Anglian Regiment who had returned from a tour of duty in Afghanistan by a small group of extremist Muslim protestors.

Phil Kemp will speak to community leaders who reject the impression painted of their town as a divided place.

Phil Kemp asks if Luton deserves its reputation as a 'hotbed of extremism'.

20110127

The current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

The series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations

20110210

Consumer credit is growing ever tighter.

Prices are rising, wages are being frozen, jobs being lost.

Times are tough and increasingly people who are finding themselves short of cash are heading to the internet to secure quick and easy but very, very expensive short term loans.

Cyberspace has proved the perfect breeding ground for smart young loan entrepreneurs who are capitalizing on lax regulation and consumer need to build a multi million pound industry.

And with interest rates running as high as nearly 3000% APR, a new generation of online borrowers, many from the middle class, are slipping ever deeper into debt.

Phil Kemp investigates the growing market for high-cost lending amid growing calls for the industry to face tougher regulation.

Getting money online is fast, easy and very expensive.

Too easy? Phil Kemp investigates.

20110217

Midwives have been in short supply in England for years.

Why aren't there enough and what effect is this having on hospitals and pregnant women?

Why is there a shortage of midwives in England and what is the effect on pregnant women?

20110303

The recent uprisings in Libya have came after 42 years of dictatorship under Colonel Muammar Gaddafi.

Hugh Miles examines Libya's changing relationship with the West, talks to Libyan opposition activists and asks, "How did we get here?"

Hugh Miles is an award winning writer and broadcaster.

He is the author of Al Jazeera - How Arab TV News Challenged the World.

Hugh Miles explores the history of Britain's relationship with Libya.

20110324

The real story behind cases involving evangelical Christians and the Equalities legislation.

Is it just about faith versus gay equality, or are there other factors involved?

The story behind cases involving evangelical Christians and the Equalities legislation.

20110331

Simon Cox investigates the problems that donations from Arab countries are creating for British universities.

Simon Cox investigates overseas donations to British universities.

20110407

On 5 May, the whole of the UK goes to the polls to vote in a referendum for the first time since 1975.

Voters will be asked to decide whether they want to replace the existing "first past the post system" to elect MPs to the House of Commons with the "alternative vote" system.

It is a referendum that will see some unlikely alliances forming on either side of the campaign, with some the UK's largest trades unions lining up alongside senior Conservative party politicians to push for a "no" vote, while those advocating a "yes" come not only from established parties like the Liberal Democrats and some sections of the Labour Party, but also smaller parties like the Green Party.

But with such a complex mix of interested parties, how much do we know about who is bankrolling the campaigns and what their agendas are? Reporter James Silver investigates the campaign groups and private individuals pumping millions of pounds into the contest and asks whether the rules around disclosure of donations are as robust as those for general elections.

James Silver investigates the voting change referendum campaigns.

20110414

The current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

Series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

20110421

The stricken Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan missed scheduled safety inspections weeks before the disaster.

The Japanese regulation system stands accused of failing to take the risk of an extreme natural disaster seriously enough, and of a lack of openness with the public.

Britain's own regulatory body which oversees nuclear power plants has just relaunched itself after years of concern that it has been secretive, understaffed and overstretched.

In recent years the government's Chief Nuclear Inspector says he has struggled to recruit new staff and that the Nuclear Safety Inspectorate faced major challenges to ensure old nuclear plants are run safely.

As the Office for Nuclear Regulation takes on the challenge of ensuring Britain's nuclear power plants are run safely, Andy Denwood investigates whether its up to the job.

Producer Ian Muir-Cochrane.

20110428

In the 21st century age of digital technology, is it still really necessary to have a paper census costing the British taxpayer 482 million pounds and taking nine years to plan? In opposition, the Conservative Party was highly critical of the census.

So, as the dominant partner in a coalition government, could they be about to abolish it? Reporter James Silver investigates the options for a replacement survey of the nation and reveals how some proposed changes could result in more goverment intrusion.

James Silver investigates whether this year's census will be the last of its kind.

20110505

Tunisia was the focus of international attention when popular protest helped to topple the country's autocratic leader and triggered a wave of demonstrations across the region.

But what happens next? Linda Pressley travels to Tunisia and meets those vying for political and business influence in its more open society.

Amongst those she speaks to are Sheikh Rachid Ghannouchi, leader of Tunisia's largest Islamist party and, until recently, a resident of Hemel Hempstead.

Linda Pressley travels to Tunisia to examine the progress of its transition to democracy.

20110512

In the aftermath of the conflicts in North Africa a new wave of migrants is heading to Europe, but the 27 member states are divided over how to share the responsibility.

Simon Cox explores the growing dispute and asks whether it could result in changes to the EU's fundamental principle of open borders and how it deals with migration in the future.

Reporter: Simon Cox

Producer: Gail Champion.

Why Europe is divided by the latest influx of refugees from the conflicts in North Africa.

20110519

Was the Easter riot in Bristol a sign of increased opposition to the expansion of supermarkets? Hundreds of people took to the street - some throwing missiles - several police officers were injured and there was serious damage to the new Tesco Express.

There'd been a vocal and longstanding campaign against the store by some local people and concern about the impact on independent retailers.

Many applications from the big four are now for smaller and town centre stores, and in the constant battle to maintain or increase market share the supermarkets are looking at sites which previously would have been of less interest.

In some places this has lead to vociferous opposition challenging those local people and traders who support the retail development.

Phil Kemp asks just how well does the planning process reflect the views of residents and businesses and make for a fair debate? With such controversy about the effect the multiples have on the economics of local communities, how is a balance struck between support for and against a new store?

Producer: Andy Denwood

Reporter: Phil Kemp.

Was the Bristol Tesco riot a sign of increased opposition to supermarket expansion?

20110526

The current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

Simon Cox asks if the emergency services have learnt the lessons of incidents like 7/7.

20110707

Patient safety has become a growing concern for the NHS.

And significant numbers of clinicians are aware of failings in care.

Yet when they raise concerns, some find themselves facing allegations themselves and can find themselves suspended from their jobs.

They may end up at home on full pay for years at considerable cost to the taxpayer.

In some cases clinicians have highlighted serious concerns which, had they been listened to, might have averted subsequent tragedies.

In The Report today Simon Cox hears the stories of whistleblowers in the NHS.

He asks why their bosses sometimes ignore their concerns and investigates the use of gagging orders and other methods aimed at stopping whistleblowing clinicians from telling their stories.

Producer: Rosamund Jones.

The Report investigates why some NHS whistleblowers end up suspended from their jobs.

20110714

On June 7, after discovering 6 exam paper errors, the examination regulator OFQUAL wrote to all the examination boards to ask them to double check the remaining exam papers to make sure there were no more errors.

They replied assuring the regulator that thorough quality checks had been done to "make sure there are no undetected errors in the remaining papers".

The regulator then made a public statement to students that "everything that can be done has been done to prevent any further errors on question papers".

Following this statement three more errors were discovered.

10 mistakes in total, affecting up to 250,000 students.

The Report asks what is going on with the UK exam system and how can students be reassured that in August they will get the grades that they deserve?

The Report asks why so many mistakes were found on exam papers this summer.

20110804

Politicians say they are committed to a 'science led' approach to tackling TB in cattle, but as a new badger culling trial is announced in England and the proposed cull in Wales is abandoned by the new Labour Government while the evidence is reviewed, Nick Ravenscroft assesses the impact - on farmers and badgers - of what some say is a decade of indecision.

Producer: Gail Champion.

The battle over badger culling and the controversy of how to tackle TB in cattle.

20110811

Following the massacre in Norway and amid concerns over contacts between the killer and supporters of the English Defence League, the Government is reviewing its policing of right wing terrorism.

The atrocity has prompted a furious debate about whether those who fear the 'Islamisation' of Britain - using what some say is inflamatory language - bear any responsibility for fuelling violent extremism.

James Silver reports from areas where are relations between muslim and white working class communties are often poor and asks whether the aftermath of the killings have inflamed tensions further.

Are the English Defence League right to suggest that the threat from right wing terrorism in the UK could grow?

Producer: Samantha Fenwick.

After the massacre in Norway, James Silver reports on anti-Muslim extremism in the UK.

20110901
20110908

This week Bill Law investigates how backbench Conservative MP Nadine Dorries has reignited the abortion debate.

She argues that abortion providers should not be allowed to offer pre-abortion counselling because they stand to gain financially if the woman goes ahead with a termination.

The campaign is backed by Christian charities which want to see the number of abortions carried out in Britain dramatically reduced.

The Report looks at how the evangelical Christian movement is finding ways to shape public policy in this and other areas and asks whether Christianity is becoming an increasingly influential force in British politics.

Producer: Lucy Proctor.

The Report investigates how a backbench MP has reignited the abortion debate.

20110929

Linda Pressly investigates the deaths at Stepping Hill hospital in Stockport which are being blamed on contaminated saline drips.

Linda Pressly investigates the saline contamination at Stepping Hill Hospital.

20111006

The rate of school exclusions, both permanent and fixed term, has fallen over the past decade as successive governments have sought to keep children in education.

Samantha Washington goes behind the figures and finds that an apparent success story masks systemic failures.

Some students are being unofficially and illegally excluded without access to education.

The Department of Education has estimated that thousands of excluded students go missing from school rolls.

And where alternative provision for excluded pupils is provided, it operates in "a largely uninspected and unregulated sector." (OFSTED, June 2011) The costs are high, not only for the children but for society - many of those who are excluded never get an education, never work and all too often wind up in jail.

Sam Washington investigates the real story behind falling school exclusion rates.

20111117

In the first of a new series of The Report, Simon Cox investigates the events of late October when an Occupy London protest led to the closure of St Paul's Cathedral, the resignation of key clerics and threats of legal action.

Simon Cox investigates the real story behind the St Paul's protests.

20111208

It seems barely a day goes by without further damaging revelations about the UK Border Agency, the organisation which oversees Britain's immigration and customs operation.

The recent disclosure that security checks were lowered at UK ports, allegedly without Ministerial consent, cost Brodie Clark, former Head of the Border Agency, his job.

But behind the headlines, what's really going on in immigration halls up and down the land? In this week's The Report, Simon Cox investigates the under fire UK Border Agency.

Can the public have confidence that it's now being run and managed properly? Are British ports now safe and secure?

Simon Cox investigates whether UK borders are safe and secure.

20120105

Metal theft has reached epidemic proportions, not just in the UK but across the world, driven by a huge demand in countries like India and China. Andrew Hosken visits one of the worst hit areas in the country, Walsall, and explores how stolen scrap is 'laundered' into the legitimate system. More sophisticated criminals are now involved with reports of some stolen goods being exporting directly out of the country. As forecasts predict that demand for metal will mean that prices continue to rise, we ask why the criminal justice system seems unable to control metal theft.

Producer: Rob Cave.

Metal theft has reached epidemic proportions - Andrew Hoskens follows the money.

20120112

Adrian Goldberg investigates alleged malpractice in the UK's multi-billion pound leasing industry, in both the private and the public sector. He hears from people who signed up to leasing contracts and have lost six figure sums, seen their businesses close, and been forced into bankruptcy. And beyond the stories of personal anguish, he looks into the role of some of Britain's major banks and finance houses involved in leasing and asks if it's time for a radical overhaul in the way the leasing industry is regulated.

Adrian Goldberg investigates claims of malpractice in the UK's leasing industry.

20120202

At least 16 people died when the cruise ship Costa Concordia ran aground off the Tuscan island of Giglio on 13 January. Simon Cox investigates exactly what happened and asks whether warning signs about cruise ship safety should have been acted on sooner.

Simon Cox investigates cruise ship safety after the Costa Concordia disaster.

20120405

Samantha Lewthwaite, the widow of a 7/7 bomber who killed half of the 52 victims, is suspected of involvement in a Kenya terror plot. Following the London atrocities, Germaine Lindsay's partner, also a Muslim convert, claimed no knowledge of his activities and dropped off the intelligence services' radar.

Now, a white woman resembling Lewthwaite and travelling with three children on a false passport has been linked to a house where bomb making equipment was found during a raid in December. Those involved are believed to be linked to al-Shabaab, the al-Qaeda associated group based in neighbouring Somalia and blamed for a string of abductions in the area.

The terrorist group, known for recruiting from the Somali diaspora including that in the UK, is now also targeting British Muslims from other backgrounds. The horn of Africa has become the latest training ground for potential jihadists who represent a threat not only in that area, but in Britain too.

Simon Cox investigates.

The widow of a 7/7 bomber allegedly involved in Kenya terror plot: Simon Cox investigates.

20120412

Parts of England are facing the worst drought in more than 30 years. A hosepipe ban has been imposed. How did we get here? For The Report, Linda Pressly investigates.

The Report investigates England's worst drought in over 30 years.

20120719

As investigations continue into claims the Libor interest rate was manipulated, Simon Cox examines allegations of collusion between banks and asks who has lost out.

20120927

With police still trying to establish a clear motive for the shooting of a British family and a cyclist in the French Alps, Simon Cox asks whether the murders will ever be solved.

20121004
20121011
20121115
20121129

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations. Presented by Angus Crawford.

20121220

Simon Cox presents the current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

20130214

Claims have recently re-emerged that thousands of construction workers have been turned down for jobs because of a 'blacklist' secretly run by a company called the Consulting Association and funded by some of the largest construction companies in the country.

In December last year the Consulting Association's Chief Officer gave compelling evidence to an on-going investigation by the Scottish Affairs Committee. During nearly four hours of evidence he revealed how potential employees on projects ranging from Millennium Dome to the Olympics were checked against the blacklist he held. Shortly afterwards he died, raising fears that he has taken secrets to the grave.

In this edition of the Report Simon Cox talks to the bookkeeper of the Consulting Association in her first ever broadcast interview. He examines evidence suggesting that union representatives may have "liaised" with contractors to blacklist workers from construction jobs. And he investigates claims that the Information Commissioner failed to collect all the evidence during a raid in 2009.

20130425

You can use it to buy a pizza, or pay a taxi fare. Simon Cox looks at the virtual currency Bitcoin, which is exclusively online and independent of any government or company and where a user can be anonymous. In recent weeks, Bitcoin lost half its value due to a panic sell-off, but who are the people buying and selling this new currency and how does it work?

20130530

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

20130801

Following the death of two reservists, Adam Fleming investigates whether deaths and injuries like these can be avoided.

20140522

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

20140717

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

20150813

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

20151217

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

20160114

Should Labour MPs be scared of Momentum? The group says it is attempting to build on the the groundswell of support for Jeremy Corbyn. Still in it's infancy it has already drawn the ire of Labour MPs and activists and sections of the press. They've been compared to the Militant Tendency that took over Liverpool Council in the early 1980's. They've been accused of aspiring to deselect disloyal MPs and have been described as a hard left rabble. Some Labour MPs are worried about their rise, but what is Momentum and what do they want? Stephen Bush of the New Statesman has been to Walthamstow, home of just one of these new groups, to find out.

*20090409

Northern Ireland has been plunged back into violence through the activities of dissident Republicans.

Linda Pressly visits Catholic communities to investigate the impact of the violence, and to assess the reasons for it.

She reports on how community leaders are trying to keep young people out of the clutches of the paramilitaries, and discovers an increase in so-called punishment shootings - which most people had hoped were a relic of the past.

Including an interview with the Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland, Sir Hugh Orde.

*20090423

Mukul Devichand assesses the British National Party's prospects for the forthcoming European Elections.

The programme meets the party's chairman, Nick Griffin, and investigates the BNP's efforts in the north west of England to have him elected as their first MEP.

*20090430

Cyber-attacks on international networks have targeted the computers used by the Dalai Lama's followers and the US power grid.

Reporter and web expert Ben Hammersley assesses how serious these threats really are, how well protected the UK is against foreign cyber war and asks whether we should be developing our own aggressive military 'botnet' for use in future conflicts.

Ben Hammersley assesses the seriousness of cyber-attacks on international networks.

*20090507

In the wake of controversy over police tactics at the G20 demonstrations, Simon Cox investigates how far the right to protest is being eroded in Britain.

Simon Cox investigates how far the right to protest is being eroded in Britain.

*20090514

With the Home Office consulting on a new strategy to deal with violence against women, Sue Littlemore examines a string of cases in which women were killed by their partners, despite having gone to the police for protection.

Is this an unconnected series of mistakes or evidence that the criminal justice system still does not take domestic violence as seriously as it should?

Sue Littlemore examines a string of cases in which women were killed by their partners.

*20090611

As the FA launches another investigation into claims of suspicious betting on a football match, Simon Cox reports on the industry behind the 40 billion pounds gambled on sport in the UK each year, and asks whether enough is being done to protect sport from corruption.

Simon Cox asks whether enough is being done to protect sport from corruption.

*20090716

As details emerge about the treatment of two British hostages captured in Iraq in 2007, questions are being raised about the government's hostage strategy.

With other nations' governments apparently showing greater willingness to make concessions to kidnappers, are British captives at a disadvantage? Simon Cox investigates the UK's policy towards hostage-takers and reports on new threats to tourists in emerging danger areas.

Simon Cox investigates the UK's policy towards hostage-takers.

*20090723

British homes for British people: planned changes to the way social housing is allocated would give greater priority to those waiting the longest.

Phil Kemp investigates whether this represents a fairer system or 'dog whistle' politics.

Phil Kemp investigates planned changes to the way social housing is allocated.

*20090730

Organised dog fighting is believed to be on the increase among some young British Asians.

Dog fighting is a long-established tradition in parts of Pakistan but here in the UK, it is being linked to other violent criminality - with drug money being used to wage bets on the outcome of the fight.

Amardeep Bassey investigates.

Amardeep Bassey looks at a rise in organised dog fighting among young British Asians.

*20090806

Simon Cox investigates the next phase in the swine flu story: the mass vaccination programme.

Will the majority of people be persuaded to be vaccinated voluntarily and will countries that need the vaccine be able to get it?

Simon Cox on the next phase in the swine flu story: the mass vaccination programme.

*20090813

Several prominent children's authors have said that they will stop visiting schools in protest at the impending introduction of new rules requiring the vetting of those working regularly with young people or vulnerable adults.

Wesley Stephenson reports on the new Vetting and Barring Scheme and what it will mean for the estimated 11 million people that will need to be registered.

He also asks if the new rules are likely to make children any safer.

*20090820

The UK's one and only wind turbine manufacturing plant, the Vestas factory in the Isle of Wight has finally closed, with the loss of more than 600 jobs.

The timing of the closure couldn't have been worse for the government, coming just days after it unveiled sweeping plans to transform the UK into a pioneering low-carbon economy, creating around 400,000 new 'green jobs' along the way.

Wind energy is set to be at the heart of this transformation, yet Vestas - the Danish company which owns the Isle of Wight factory - claims the market for wind turbines in the UK is simply too small to justify production here.

Simon Cox investigates how serious Britain is about building a renewable energy economy and whether the government's green jobs claims can be trusted.

*20090827

Babies are big business: more than 35,000 women undergo fertility treatment in the UK each year.

With many couples facing a postcode lottery for free IVF treatment on the NHS, some have turned to an illegal market in fertility drugs to make the process affordable.

Nadene Ghouri investigates the trade and examines claims that it could lead to women taking big risks with their health.

Nadene Ghouri investigates the illegal market in fertility drugs.

*20090903

Bombings on the holiday island of Mallorca by the Basque separatist group ETA have brought a nationalist conflict to the door of British tourists and expats.

Linda Pressly investigates whether the latest bombings are the resurgence of an organisation whose cause has been in decline or the actions of a desperate band who know their time is running out.

Linda Pressly investigates the latest ETA bombings in Mallorca.

*20090910

James Silver examines the potential effect of the decison to release Lockerbie bomber Abdelbaset Ali al-Megrahi on trade relations between Libya and the West.

The former pariah state has some of the world's biggest reserves of oil and gas - might British industry benefit from Libya's desire to develop its economy?

The potential impact of the Lockerbie bomber's release on trade between Libya and the West

*20090917

As the Conservatives intensify their campaign to highlight what they describe as 'broken Britain', Phil Mackie travels to Birmingham to examine the reality on the ground.

The government says it has been reducing unemployment and improving the lot of the country's poorest communities.

The Tories, however, accuse the government of failing to tackle long-term unemployment and deliberately attempting to hide the true scale of the problem.

In at least one district in Birmingham, four out of five people of working age are without a job, and that picture is set to worsen with the economy deep in recession.

Phil Mackie investigates claims by the Conservatives that Britain is a fractured society.

*20090924

Simon Cox explores the US healthcare debate.

Why has the path towards reform been so difficult and what forces are at work, as various groups in the lobbying battle compete to get their voices heard?

*20091001

Sarah Rainsford investigates the mysterious disappearance of The Arctic Sea, the Russian-operated cargo ship which went missing off the coast of Britain.

Was it the first modern case of piracy in Europe? Was the vessel part of a smuggling operation by the Russian mafia? Or was it an arms shipment on the way to the Middle East? Sarah explores the different theories as she retraces the ship's journey.

*20091119

The sacking of the government's former chief drugs adviser caused outrage in some quarters of the scientific community.

Professor David Nutt had criticised the government's decision to reclassify cannabis from class C to class B.

James Silver investigates the causes of the row and asks if the government's cannabis classification policy is in disarray.

James Silver investigates the sacking of the government's chief drugs adviser.

*20091210

Current affairs series which combines original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

Simon Cox reports.

Current affairs series.

*20091217

On the eve of what 999 ambulance crews have dubbed Black Friday - traditionally their busiest day of the year - Gill Dummigan investigates how they are meeting tough new government targets for response times.

Critics say it's resulting in some areas getting inadequate cover with critically ill patients enduring long waits for medical help.

Gill Dummigan investigates how ambulance crews are meeting tough new government targets.

*20091231

The home secretary has admitted that the government had been 'maladroit' in its past handling of immigration.

Ministers hope what they call their 'tough' new points-based system of allocating visas will restore the public's faith in their ability to manage migration.

Phil Kemp investigates claims that, far from strengthening our borders, the new rules have made it easier to play the system.

Investigating claims that new immigration rules have made it easier to play the system.

*20100107

The Criminal Justice Act 2003 modified the ancient legal principle of double jeopardy in England and Wales so that a person acquitted of a serious crime could be re-tried.

Now in Scotland there is a clamour to change the law too, and the government is committed to introducing legislation in 2010.

But there are voices of dissent, as Simon Cox finds out.

And if the law is changed, will it enable the reopening of the case that is driving the Scottish debate? Helen Scott and Christine Eadie were murdered in 1977 after they were seen leaving the World's End pub in Edinburgh.

Angus Sinclair was tried for the killings in 2007, but the case collapsed due to insufficient evidence.

In England and Wales, meanwhile, only a handful of double jeopardy cases have returned to court.

Is the law working as it should?

Simon Cox hears about voices of dissent about plans to change the retrial laws in Scotland

*20100114

The arctic weather has brought Britain close to shutdown.

Morland Sanders investigates the cost of the snow storms to the country's economy and asks if better planning might have lessened their impact.

Morland Sanders investigates the cost of the recent snow storms to the UK economy.

*20100121
*20100204

The attempt to blow up an airliner over Detroit on Christmas Day has led to claims that young Muslims are being radicalised at British universities.

Talented student turned alleged bomber Umar Farouk Abdulmutalib was president of the Islamic Student Society at University College London.

James Silver asks whether some UK campuses have become seedbeds for extremism?

*20100218

Author Terry Pratchett has argued that assisted suicide should be legal in the UK - but there is already a medical technique widely used in the NHS which some campaigners claim is euthanasia by the backdoor.

Called terminal sedation, it's used to ease the pain and suffering of the very sick.

But critics say it can hasten death.

Linda Pressly investigates the extent of terminal sedation and examines if it is always in the interests of patients and their families.

Linda Pressly investigates the extent of terminal sedation.

*20100325

A year ago Simon Cox reported from Mid Staffordshire Hospital where hundreds of patients died as the result of poor-quality care.

The government said this was a one-off but the list of hospitals with similar failings continues to grow.

Simon investigates the latest hospital with unusually high death rates and accused of poor quality of care.

After tens of billions of pounds extra investment, he asks why the NHS continues to have problems with patient safety.

Simon Cox investigates the latest hospital to be accused of providing poor-quality care.

*20100401

Morland Sanders investigates the background to the strike at British Airways.

How has a dispute over reductions in cabin crew turned into a long-running and costly row?

Union officials fear the dispute has the potential to cause acrimonious rifts between staff at BA - once dubbed the world's favourite airline.

But managers say they have to cut costs and have put in place extensive plans to keep many routes operating.

Travellers, though, face chaos and cancellations.

The Report examines the financial problems facing BA - and asks if the industrial action will result in business and first class passengers taking their custom elsewhere.

They make up the premium market that the airline needs to keep for its long-term survival.

Producer: Sally Chesworth.

Morland Sanders investigates the background to the cabin crew strike at British Airways.

03/03/201120110306

Hugh Miles explores the history of Britain's relationship with Libya.

7-day Nhs20160218

This drive for changing the way the NHS operates has been frequently used by Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt as the reason why a change to junior doctor and consultant contracts is needed. But what does it actually mean? John Ware explores what a seven-day NHS would look like, what evidence there is that it's needed, and, crucially, whether we can afford it.

Reporter: John Ware

Producer: Hannah Barnes

Researcher: Kirsteen Knight.

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

A Not So Merry Migrant Christmas In Vienna20151224

Thousands of migrants are stuck in Vienna, their journey to Germany cut short. Will they ever realise their European dreams? Frances Stonor Saunders reports.

Producer: Lucy Proctor.

A Seven-day Nhs20160204

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

A Toxic Tiger20101216
Afghan Sikhs20140904

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations, presented by Melanie Abbott.

Afghanistan: Time For Truth?20160107

Violence has spiked in Afghanistan in the 12 months since the NATO mission ended and Britain and its allies withdrew the vast majority of its troops. In October, the Taliban took and briefly held the city of Kunduz, the first time they had held an urban centre since before the western intervention in 2001. The security situation, in the words of President Obama, is "still very fragile." And there is now evidence that so-called IS has established toe-holds in some parts of the country. In The Report this week we hear the claim that the Taliban is the most effective organisation in Afghanistan today. So we'll be asking if it's time to be honest about Afghanistan; time to acknowledge that we knew we were leaving behind us a precarious situation; time to admit that despite spending trillions of dollars and losing hundreds of soldiers, the western allies were defeated in Afghanistan?

Producer: Tim Mansel.

Aid To Nepal20150521

Aid is pouring in to Nepal in the wake of the earthquake. But in a country where corruption is endemic, will the money go where it is meant to? Simon Cox investigates.

Producer: Ben Crighton

Researcher: Aurelia Allen.

Algerian Siege20130131

The Report: Algerian Siege

What really went on at the In Amenas gas field in Algeria?

This programme examines how the security breach at the gas facility happened and why the rescue attempt took so long. We speak with security insiders with knowledge of the plant. Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb are the terrorist group who have claimed responsibility for the kidnappings but who makes up this group and how do they operate in the wider Sahara region? And is this really the new front in the "war on terror"?

Reporter: Simon Cox

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.

Anti-semitism In The Uk: Is It Growing?20150305

Anti-Semitism in the UK: Simon Cox investigates the changing face of prejudice against Jewish people after recent lethal attacks in Paris, Copenhagen and Brussels. With the Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, calling for European Jews to move to Israel, we look at whether there is more dangerous anti-Semitism online and on the streets of the UK.

Producer: James Melley

Researcher: Kirsteen Knight.

Are Russian Sanctions Dangerous For Britain?20150402

EU sanctions against Russia over the crisis in Ukraine expire in September. Sharmini Selvarajah looks at whether it is in Britain's security and business interests to see them extended, and whether they go far enough to curb Russian aggression.

Are Russian Sanctions Dangerous For Britain?20150409

EU sanctions against Russia over the crisis in Ukraine expire in September. Sharmini Selvarajah looks at whether it is in Britain's security and business interests to see them extended, and whether they go far enough to curb Russian aggression.

Bankers' Bonuses20110120

Bankers are on course to collectively receive an estimated £7 billion over the next couple of months.

David Cameron has called on banks to show restraint when awarding themselves their annual bonuses, but indications are that the bosses of the biggest beasts will not heed his words.

And even if bonuses are cut, salaries have risen significantly to compensate - up to 40% in some cases.

Simon Cox asks how well bankers have to perform to secure their generous awards, and why the Government seems powerless to curb them.

The Coalition is at loggerheads over the failure to deliver on its promises: Vince Cable says that 'robust action' must be taken to stop large payouts.

The Chancellor, George Osborne prefers to avoid any aggressive action warning that bankers will leave London for jobs in countries with more relaxed rules on bonuses.

New European rules have just come into effect, which encourage more transparency in the City, but The Report reveals that some bankers are using loop holes to by-pass that legislation and receive bumper payouts.

Producer: Samantha Fenwick.

Bankers due £7bn: Simon Cox asks why the Government seems powerless to curb bonuses.

Banking It Crisis20131226

The 'Cyber Monday' computer meltdown that affected RBS and NatWest customers as they tried to bag bargains in the run-up to Christmas was just the latest in a string of IT glitches that have plagued the big UK banks in recent years.

But is there a greater problem than the inconvenience caused for shoppers? Melanie Abbott talks to those who have worked on the huge, ageing computer systems at the heart of the UK banking system and finds out that banks like RBS face a massive dilemma - spend billions replacing their 'mainframes' or risk bigger, more serious problems in the next few years.

Melanie finds out about the scale and size of the IT systems behind our everyday transactions as she becomes the first journalist allowed access to one of the secret data centres that power the banking payments system at Vocalink. And she hears from Andrew Tyrie, chair of the Treasury Select Committee, about the urgent need to solve the banks' IT problem before they damage the entire financial system.

Battling Boardroom Pay20120209

The boss of RBS, Stephen Hester eventually succumbed to political pressure to waive his million pound bonus at the taxpayer backed bank, and former boss Fred Goodwin is now plain Mister after being stripped of his knighthood. But will the proposals from Business Secretary Vince Cable to curb excessive pay packets in Britain's boardrooms work?

Max Flint examines the workings of the remuneration committees which have awarded generous increases even when company performance has been poor. The Report reveals how the system of voting and rewards means pay is continually ratcheted up by a network of well paid retired executives.

Shareholders are being promised more power, but it's not always in the interests of asset managers to vote against increases in the pay packages of their counterparts. Will the 'independent' committee members the Government is suggesting really be outside the 'club'?

Max Flint asks whether the Prime Minister can deliver on his promise to get tough on boardroom pay.

Producer: Rob Cave.

Can the Government bring top CEOs pay under control? Max Flint reports.

Behind The Lines20111201

Public sector workers are signing up for a Day of Action on November 30 in support of a 'fair deal on public service pensions'.

Lucy Ash spends a week Birmingham where the TUC is holding a national rally, and goes behind the scenes with union officials planning the strike, talks to some of those who'll be affected, the hears from the schools and hospitals preparing for the effects of the disruption.

Produced by Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Behind the scenes in Birmingham as unions and services plan for the TUC's Day of Action.

Birmingham Children's Services20131114

Last month, a serious case review into the death of two year old Keanu Williams concluded that there were a number of significant opportunities to save him from being beaten to death by his mother. It's the latest in a series of horrific child deaths that have shocked Birmingham and exposed shortcomings which have led to the city's children's services department repeatedly failing inspections and the city being branded a 'national disgrace' by the head of the watchdog, Ofsted. Simon Cox investigates what is wrong with social services at Britain's largest local authority and asks whether its reputation is justified.

Breast Implants20120119

As the NHS prepares to deal with the 3,000 women it treated with PIP implants, Simon Cox asks what will happen to the many more thousands of women who had their surgery in private clinics. How did this faulty product come to be so widely used by the big cosmetic surgery companies, and who will ultimately foot the bill?

Despite repeated warnings to the government regulator, French company Poly Implant Prothese was allowed to sell its cheap breast implants filled with industrial-grade silicone to women in the UK for a decade.

Big companies like Transform and Harley Medical Group now have thousands of former patients demanding that they take the government's lead and remove or replace their implants for free. But thousands more paid companies which have gone bust. Women now battling to get their potentially dangerous implants removed recount their ordeal since finding out they paid for implants filled with silicone never designed for use in people.

Surgeons involved in the urgent review called by Health Secretary Andrew Lansley tell of the days that followed the French government's announcement that it would pay for all PIP implants to be removed. And those involved in the drive to train and educate cosmetic surgeons properly call for government support for ideas that could stop a repeat of this very expensive scandal.

Simon Cox reports on the faulty breast implant scandal.

Bulgarian And Romanian Immigration20130328

Bulgarian and Romanian citizens will have the same rights to work in the UK as other EU nationals from next year. Victoria Derbyshire investigates how prepared the government is for a new influx of migrants and asks what the stories of those who've already made the move tell us about what may happen in 2014.

Reporter: Victoria Derbyshire

Producer: Phil Kemp.

Burglary Victims Who Fight Back20121122

The Report is a current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

Today Melanie Abbott asks what happens when victims of burglary come face to face with an intruder in their home and fight back. How does the legal process work? Are they treated as sympathetically as Justice Secretary, Christopher Grayling, thinks they should be? And what might result if the current law is strengthened?

Calling Time On Cheap Booze?20120419

A new alcohol strategy for England unveiled by the Government will clamp down on cheap alcohol with the introduction of a minimum unit price. This unexpected u-turn, just months after the Health Secretary, Andrew Lansley, cast doubt on the legality of the plan, has delighted campaigners and follows the lead set in Scotland last year.

The proposals are now being trumpeted by the Home Office as a way to crack down on binge drinking and alcohol related violence, but how far will they go in reducing late night anti-social behaviour in town centres?

Andy Denwood investigates moves North and South of the border to reduce alcohol related crime.

Producer: Gail Champion.

Will the Coalition's planned minimum price for alcohol reduce binge drinking and violence?

Changing Jihadi Minds20151203

How do you go about trying to change a person's fundamental beliefs? And how do you decide who is need of state intervention to do so?

Public sector workers now have a legal obligation to refer suspected Islamist and far right extremists to a local body known as a Channel panel. Referees deemed to hold extremist views are offered ideological mentoring, usually on a voluntary basis.

The government says its Channel deradicalisation programme is a success, helping prevent vulnerable people from being drawn into terrorism. But some British Muslims see it as a Big Brotherish state spying operation, wreathed in secrecy and suspicion. John Ware enters the "pre-criminal space" to find out - from the inside - how Channel works.

Producer: Simon Maybin

Researcher: Kirsteen Knight.

Channel Tunnel Breakdown20100128

The weekend before Christmas five trains became marooned in the Channel Tunnel leaving thousands of passengers to fare as best they could. Wesley Stephenson explores the full story, which led to a very long and eventful night spent underground.

The weekend before Christmas five trains became marooned in the Channel Tunnel leaving thousands of passengers to fare as best they could.

Wesley Stephenson explores the full story, which led to a very long and eventful night spent underground.

The full story of the trains that were marooned in the Channel Tunnel before Christmas.

Chemsex20150702

Crystal Meth, GHB and Mephedrone form what some health workers call an 'un-holy trinity' of drugs that together can heighten arousal and strip away inhibitions.

They've become increasingly popular on London's gay scene, and the effects can see some users taking part in weekend-long sex parties, involving multiple partners.

For Radio 4's The Report, Mobeen Azhar speaks to men entrenched in this lifestyle and explores the impact the so-called 'chemsex' scene is having on public health services.

It's a scene where unsafe sex is common and has been cited as a contributing factor in the rising number of HIV infections in London, posing new challenges to those trying to promote the safe sex message.

Such parties are fuelled by technology and smartphone dating apps, which have triggered a social shift where men have moved out of bars and clubs and into private homes - out of reach to sexual health and drug advice services.

A potential solution to help protect those involved in the scene is Pre Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) - the practice of issuing men with HIV medication before they become HIV positive, which studies have shown as an effective means to reduce HIV infection.

PrEp has been championed by the World Health Organisation, saying it could prevent 1 million new HIV infections around the world. Its advocates in Britain suggest it should be made available on-demand as soon as possible - but how affordable is it? And will fears that it will only encourage more unsafe sex prove true?

Presenter: Mobeen Azhar

Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith.

Childhood Obesity20120816

This week's Report investigates the cases of children who are so overweight that their health is at risk.

As childhood obesity becomes more common, some experts are asking whether severely overweight children should be removed from their parents. Social workers, family lawyers and health workers tell reporter Helen Grady about cases where obesity has been a significant factor prompting local authorities to step in and take children into care.

Producer: Emma Rippon.

Should severely obese children be taken into care?

Children's Heart Surgery20130418
Cia Torture: What Did Britain Know?20150115

Shortly before Christmas the Intelligence Committee of the United States Senate published an extraordinary and explosive document, universally referred to as the Torture Report, accusing the CIA of brutality in its treatment of prisoners detained in what George W. Bush had called the "War on Terror".

The report debunks the CIA's claims that its "enhanced interrogation techniques" produced important intelligence. These techniques include practices such as waterboarding, sleep deprivation, and sexual humiliation. The simple message for many who've read the report: torture doesn't work.

What was published represents a fraction of the Senate's findings after an investigation lasting more than five years. The 600 or so pages now available online are merely a summary of the full 6,700 page report that remains classified. And much of the 600 pages is illegible, because of redactions in the form of thick, black lines, some of which were demanded by Britain's intelligence services.

In The Report this week Simon Cox asks to what extent Britain's intelligence services were complicit in the mistreatment of prisoners; and why Britain has been dragging its heels in carrying out its own investigation into allegations of mistreatment.

He traces the history of British investigations: a discredited investigation by the Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament (ISC) in 2007 on extraordinary rendition from which it was later discovered that the intelligence services withheld information; the promise by David Cameron of a judge-led inquiry in 2010, which was subsequently scrapped; and handing back of the torture enquiry to the ISC, which Mr Cameron himself had said was not the appropriate body to carry out this investigation.

Simon will also look what appears to be a consistent tactic of successive British governments to avoid embarrassing details coming to light by claiming that publication would damage relations with the United States, or damage national security. It's a claim rejected by human rights agencies who defend alleged victims of torture, as well as by senior politicians. "National security often just means national embarrassment," says one.

Contributors to the programme include a man who claims he was illegally rendered with British complicity; a member of the judge-led inquiry into torture that was subsequently scrapped; and members of the ISC, now charged with carrying out an investigation.

The alleged abuse is historical. But it acquired contemporary resonance last week when it was reported that one of the alleged perpetrators of the Paris murders had been radicalised by the images of detainees being tortured by US operatives at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

Producer: Tim Mansell.

Clinical Trials20111222

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

Original insights into major news stories and topical investigations.

Computer Hacking20111215

As police from Operation Tuleta warn former Northern Ireland Secretary Peter Hain that his computer may have been hacked and questions are raised about national security, Jane Dodge asks how widespread was the practice by the press?

The Leveson Enquiry into Culture, Practices and Ethics of the Press continues to hear from witnesses who believe their phones have been hacked, but earlier this month Sienna Miller also revealed that her email had been hacked, allegedly at the behest of the press.

Other celebrities suspect the same intrusion.

The Report reveals that the technique was a tool regularly used by some private investigators working for News International - and was known to the police at the time - and paints a picture of a culture of law breaking.

Producer: Paul Grant.

How widespread was the use of computer hacking by the press? Jane Dodge reports.

Conservative Future20151210

Jon Manel investigates bullying allegations in the conservative youth movement.

Constance Briscoe20140515

Constance Briscoe is one of England's highest profile legal figures. She rose to prominence after publishing her memoir 'Ugly' in 2006 in which she told the story of how she overcame an abusive childhood at the hands of her mother to become a barrister and part-time judge. But earlier this month she was jailed for sixteen months for lying to the police about her involvement in the Chris Huhne speeding points story. A jury at the Old Bailey found her guilty of three counts of intending to pervert the course of justice. Clive Coleman investigates how she misled police and fabricated evidence to help her defence in the trial which followed. He also revisits the libel action her mother brought in 2008 disputing the abuse detailed in 'Ugly' and hears why police are now investigating claims Constance Briscoe may have previously fabricated evidence in court.

Producer: Phil Kemp.

Cosmetic Surgery20120906

Melanie Abbott asks whether the cosmetic surgery industry has cleaned up its act.

Following the PIP breast implants scandal, has the cosmetic surgery industry cleaned up its act? Melanie Abbott investigates.

Counting The Cost Of Britain's Snow Storms20100114

The arctic weather has brought Britain close to shutdown. Morland Sanders investigates the cost of the snow storms to the country's economy and asks if better planning might have lessened their impact.

Cypriot Banks20130404
Death Of An Mi6 Officer20120524

Gareth Williams was found dead in his central London flat, inside a locked holdall, in August 2010. The 31-year old had been seconded from his full-time job at Government listening post GCHQ to MI6.

An inquest earlier this month concluded that 'on the balance of probabilities' Mr Williams was unlawfully killed and that it was unlikely he got into the bag by himself.

However, the Coroner in charge, Dr Fiona Wilcox, expressed doubt that Gareth Williams' death would ever be explained. His body was so badly decomposed when it was discovered that subsequent pathology reports proved inconclusive.

This week, The Report asks whether the investigation into what happened two years ago was hampered by mistakes from the outset.

Reporter Phil Kemp questions whether the police ruled out legitimate lines of inquiry too early. He explores the role of MI6 and the impact their delay in notifying anyone of his disappearance subsequently had on forensic testing.

Producer: Hannah Barnes.

Deprivation Of Liberty Safeguards20111124

Are the protections designed to grant people being deprived of their liberty the right to challenge their detention in the courts really working? In this edition of The Report, Matthew Hill investigates the mechanism known as Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards.

Rather than protecting vulnerable adults, there's increasing concern that people who are deemed unable to make their own decisions can be kept in care homes and hospitals against their will without transparency and, in some cases, without proper safeguards.

Just two years after the safeguards were introduced, The Report has been granted exclusive access to a new study highlighting the many flaws in the system.

Matthew Hill asks whether the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) are adequate; if the DoLS understood by care workers, and why are they so unevenly applied across the country?

Producer: Hannah Barnes.

Are vulnerable adults deprived of their liberty adequately protected by the law?

Derby Jihadist20141204

Suspected suicide bomber Kabir Ahmed left Derby to fight for IS. He is the second Islamist extremist in a decade to travel from the small suburb of Normanton to die abroad. Simon Cox looks at the sinister networks connecting the two men and investigates whether their leaders are still active in Derby.

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane

Researcher: James Melley.

Diabetes: A Surgical Solution?20140731

Around 700 people are diagnosed with diabetes in Britain every day, and the condition accounts for around 10 per cent of the NHS budget - but is enough being done to combat the effects of the disease?

The National Institute of Clinical Excellence - NICE - is the body which provides guidance and advice to the NHS. It recently published new draft guidelines which proposed increasing access to weight-loss surgery to a wider range of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

This announcement was met with fierce criticism, especially from the tabloid press, which declared such treatment as undeserved: fat people should just stop eating instead of using up valuable resources to pay for vanity operations.

But some experts say bariatric surgery is the most important development in the history of diabetes treatment and its effectiveness can lead to full remission of type 2 diabetes. In turn, this could end up saving the NHS millions of pounds as patients are weaned off costly drugs, and are less likely to develop complications such as blindness or kidney failure.

But is this really a long-term solution? Or do we need to think more radically about how to educate the public about healthy living to really reduce the rapid rise in diabetes diagnoses?

CONTRIBUTORS INCLUDE:

Simon O'Neill - Director of Health Intelligence, Diabetes UK

Prof Roy Taylor, Professor of Medicine and Metabolism, Newcastle University

Prof Francesco Rubino, Professor of Metabolic Surgery, King's College Hospital

Prof Mark Baker, Director of the Centre for Clinical Practice, NICE

Mr Andrew Mitchell, Consultant General Surgeon, Darlington Memorial Hospital

Reporter: Adrian Goldberg

Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith.

Diabetes: A Surgical Solution?20151022

In June of this year, presenter of Radio 4's Woman's Hour, Jenni Murray, underwent an operation which removed 75 per cent of her stomach. A few months later, she has lost over 4 stones in weight and her symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes have gone into remission.

Once a purely cosmetic procedure, bariatric surgery procedures like this have been described as the greatest advance in the history of treatment of Type 2 diabetes - so why aren't more patients being treated in this way?

The National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE), which provides guidance and advice to the NHS, has said obese patients with diabetes should be rapidly assessed for surgery - but that's yet to happen.

The treatment has been met with fierce criticism, especially from the tabloid press, which declared it undeserved: fat people should just stop eating instead of using up valuable resources to pay for vanity operations.

Furthermore, Britain's leading diabetes charity, Diabetes UK, has also warned of the 'serious risks' posed by the procedure - even though the NHS has itself stated it is not more risky than a routine gall bladder operation.

The irony here is that increasing the number of bariatric procedures could actually save the NHS millions of pounds, as patients are weaned off costly diabetes drugs - the NHS currently spends around £12bn a year treating the disease.

With round 700 people diagnosed with diabetes in Britain every day, are we letting misguided morality get in the way of an opportunity to save money - and lives?

CONTRIBUTORS INCLUDE:

Jenni Murray, presenter Radio 4's Woman's Hour

Simon O'Neill - Director of Health Intelligence, Diabetes UK

Prof Roy Taylor, Professor of Medicine and Metabolism, Newcastle University

Prof Francesco Rubino, Professor of Metabolic Surgery, King's College Hospital

Prof Mark Baker, Director of the Centre for Clinical Practice, NICE

Mr Andrew Mitchell, Consultant General Surgeon, Darlington Memorial Hospital

Presenter: Adrian Goldberg

Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith

Note: A version of this programme was first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June, 2014.

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

Dieudonne: France's Most Dangerous Comedian?20140130

Dieudonne has divided France with his controversial comedy. His shows are sold out, his videos get millions of hits online, and people around the world from firefighters to famous footballers have been photographed doing the 'quenelle', a gesture he popularised. Many fans see Dieudonne and the quenelle as expressing their anger and disillusionment with 'the system'. But the French government has banned his shows and his opponents say Dieudonne is a dangerous anti-Semite who is popularising the ideas of the extreme-right. Helen Grady investigates why Dieudonne has become so popular, and whether his critics are right to claim he's become a 'recruiting sergeant' for the French National Front.

Drug Resistance20150507

Why drug resistance is now regarded by the UK government as one of the most severe threats to public safety. Peter Marshall reports.

Producer: Lucy Proctor

Researcher: James Melley.

Dublin's Gangs20160303

Extra armed police have been put on the streets of Dublin after two murders within just four days of each other. It's being blamed on a flare up of gang wars more akin to Sicily. The first involved gunmen carrying Ak47s disguised as police who burst into a respectable hotel packed with people. The next was assumed to be a swift reprisal: a man was shot several times in his own home. Melanie Abbott travels to Dublin to find out the background to this bitter gang feud and talk to the community caught in the middle.

Producer: Anna Meisel.

Easy Online Credit20110210

Consumer credit is growing ever tighter. Prices are rising, wages are being frozen, jobs being lost. Times are tough and increasingly people who are finding themselves short of cash are heading to the internet to secure quick and easy but very, very expensive short term loans. Cyberspace has proved the perfect breeding ground for smart young loan entrepreneurs who are capitalizing on lax regulation and consumer need to build a multimillion-pound industry. And with interest rates running as high as nearly 3000% APR, a new generation of online borrowers, many from the middle class, are slipping ever deeper into debt. Phil Kemp investigates the growing market for high-cost lending amid growing calls for the industry to face tougher regulation.

E-cigarettes20140703

More than two million people in Britain are thought to have used electronic cigarettes. Whitehall civil servants think that e-cigarettes are one of the most significant public health success stories of our generation. In Wales however, the principality's government wants to ban their use in public places. Wesley Stephenson asks why the two governments have such different approaches.

Producer: Smita Patel.

E-cigarettes: Another Puff20150827

More than two million people in Britain are thought to have used electronic cigarettes. Whitehall civil servants think that e-cigarettes are one of the most significant public health success stories of our generation.

Just last week Public Health England published an update on the best evidence available. It found that e-cigarettes have become the number one quitting aid used by smokers. The report said the health risks of using e-cigarettes are minimal when compared to the harm associated with smoking cigarettes. Yet nearly half of all adults perceive e-cigarettes to be at least as harmful as traditional tobacco.

Why?

In Wales, the principality's government plans to ban their use in public places and hopes that a new law will be passed within the next 12 months. Wesley Stephenson asks why the two governments have such different approaches, and who's right?

Presenter: Wesley Stephenson

Producer: Smita Patel

A version of this programme was first broadcast on 3rd July, 2014.

Energy Prices - The Truth20131121

Hannah Barnes asks where the money from your energy bills goes. Do the energy companies have anything to hide and are customers are being ripped off? She visits Jane, an energy customer in Brighton, and finds her in a cold house waiting as long as she can to turn on her heating. Jane isnot alone - there are thousands like her who cannot afford to pay their bills. So why are they going up and are each of the different reasons given by the big six energy companies valid or are we paying too much.

Contributors:

Audrey Gallacher - Director of Energy, Consumer Futures

Reg Platt - Senior Research Fellow, IPPR

Omar Rahim - former energy trader and Editor, Energy Trader Daily

Keith Anderson - Chief Corporate Officer, Scottish Power

Alan Whitehead - Labour MP and member of the House of Commons, Energy and Climate Change Select Committee.

Stephen Fitzpatrick - Managing Director, Ovo Energy.

Hannah Barnes asks where the money from your energy bills goes. Do the energy companies have anything to hide, and are customers are being ripped off?

Energy Prices: The Truth20131121

As energy bills rise, Hannah Barnes investigates if customers are being ripped off.

Fight Over Falkirk20130725

The Unite trade union has been accused of trying to manipulate the process for choosing the Labour Party's candidate to be the Falkirk MP in the next general election. Police are now investigating allegations that the UK's largest trade union signed people up to be members of the Labour Party, without their knowledge. In the wake of the Falkirk debacle, Labour leader Ed Miliband signalled that the historic links with the unions must change.

But what happened in Falkirk? Hannah Barnes travels to the Scottish constituency to find out whether the selection process was hijacked by outside forces.

Producer: Charlotte McDonald.

Forced Marriage20110922

This summer as many as 350 people may have been sent abroad and forced to marry against their will.

Official figures suggest many of them are schoolchildren and as the new academic year begins there will be empty seats in classrooms across the UK.

The number of protection orders issued by the courts has doubled in the last quarter, year on year, and schools are on the frontline of efforts to try and prevent forced marriage.

But the Report has learned that some still refuse to talk about the issue with pupils, while others are unaware that it's a problem.

In some areas its reported that 'sensitivities' to the local community has lead to a reluctance by schools or local authorities to get involved, with the police being the agency most likely to intervene.

The Coalition has ruled out criminalising forced marriage, but three years after guidance was issue to every school in the UK, Angus Crawford asks whether they and the government are doing enough to help vulnerable young people.

The Forced Marriage Unit says 350 young people could be missing as the school year starts.

Forensic Science20120830

In The Report this week Hannah Barnes investigates the state of the forensic science industry in the UK. Earlier this year the national forensic science service (FSS) closed, leaving the UK as the only European country without a national service to analyse evidence for criminal investigations. How has the privatisation of the industry impacted our criminal justice system? We hear worries from legal professionals and forensic scientists that the system is increasingly fragmented meaning errors are falling through the cracks. We speak to those at the heart of cases where innocent people have spent time in jail because of DNA mix-ups in private labs.

Presenter: Hannah Barnes.

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.

Hannah Barnes investigates the state of the forensic science industry in the UK.

Fracking20130905

There's a battle for influence taking place over fracking. Should companies in the UK be drilling for the trillions of cubic feet of shale gas lying thousands of metres below the surface of the earth, and hydraulically fracturing (fracking) the wells to get it out? Demonstrators have already voiced noisy opposition to the plans in the West Sussex village of Balcombe, citing fracking-induced earthquakes in Lancashire and leaks and contamination of water sources near fracking sites in the United States. The Prime Minister, David Cameron, and the Chancellor, George Osbourne, have both championed fracking saying it will lower energy prices and lead to better energy security for the UK as it has done in America. But is fracking dangerous, and will it be the silver bullet for energy prices? Wesley Stephenson looks at the evidence.

Francis: The Pope's Calling20141002

Just over a year ago, the phone rang at the office of the Italian newspaper La Repubblica. A man asked to speak to Eugenio Scalfari, the paper's 90 year old founder and a prominent atheist. The caller was Pope Francis. And so began an unusual friendship, an unconventional piece of journalism and an unexpected glimpse into the character of a man who has taken the world stage by storm. Scalfari drew a picture of a "revolutionary" Pope, set on reforming Church bureaucracy, punishing paedophilia and re-examining priestly celibacy.

It's just one example of the style that has seen Pope Francis labelled the "cold-call Pope" - someone who has swapped the traditional, measured means of Papal communication for off the cuff statements and direct outreach to Catholics and non-Catholics alike. His informal approach has added to his mega-star popularity and fuelled hopes, and fears, about change in the Catholic Church.

For The Report, the BBC's Director of News and Current Affairs James Harding sets out to understand one of the world's most fascinating and charismatic leaders. How does Pope Francis really operate, does he herald a revolution in style or substance, and can his popularity survive in the face of such high expectations? As Church leaders gather in the Vatican for a Synod looking at how Church teaching concerning the family relates to the reality of modern life, The Report asks whether a "revolutionary" really has taken over at the Vatican.

French Republican, Insha'allah20150129

Ahmed Merabet was one of three police officers killed in the recent terrorist attacks in France. All were honoured as heroes, but it was Ahmed's story which captured France, and the world's attention. As a Muslim who died responding to an attack on a publication which satirised the prophet Muhammed, many saw him as the perfect embodiment of the values of the French Republic and its hopes for the integration of its substantial Muslim population. As France now struggles to figure out how to combat radicalism and promote integration, politicians have called for France's muslims to "choose the Republic", in essence to be more like Ahmed Merabet. At his memorial service, Helen Grady meets Muslims who have come to pay their respects, and follows their lives in the aftermath of the attacks to find out whether they need to do more to be French, or whether the Republic's strong insistence on secularism leaves little place for French Muslims.

Funding For Nothing?20140814

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

Germany, Islam And The New Right20150122

Germany's new anti-Islamisation movement, Pegida, is attracting a middle-aged, middle class following to its weekly marches around the country. The founder, Lutz Bachmann, has criminal convictions for burglary and assault. He rarely gives interviews to the media. However in this edition of The Report he talks to our reporter Catrin Nye.

Producer: Smita Patel

Researcher: James Melley.

Germany's nascent anti-Islamisation movement, Pegida, is attracting a new middle aged, middle class following to its weekly marches around the country. The man who leads them though, Lutz Bachmann, has criminal convictions for burglary and assault. He rarely gives interviews to the media. However in this edition of The Report he talks to our reporter Catrin Nye.

Gibraltar20130822

Phillip Kemp travels to Gibraltar to investigate what's really happening on The Rock.

Grooming: Who Cares?20120531

Why are vulnerable girls living in children's homes falling victim to grooming and sexual abuse?

The recent convictions of nine men involved in a child sex ring in Rochdale revealed the tactics of the perpetrators. But the investigation also showed failures in the care system and its inability to protect residents of children's homes.

One of the victims living in a privately run residential home was abused by 25 men in one night. New figures suggest hundreds more may have suffered similar exploitation.

Many local authorities no longer run residential establishments but send children to homes in other parts of the country. There is a concentration of provision in the North West of England where property is cheap. But vulnerable young women far from their roots can become at risk of being groomed - particularly in areas where there is known to be a problem.

The leader of Rochdale Council tells Simon Cox that local authorities should stop sending children to private homes in their area as they can't guarantee that children will be kept safe.

Michael Gove recently called for new safeguards to protect teenagers in care, but why are existing guidelines and procedures not being followed?

Former victims speak out to describe the devastating impact on their lives and why - for them - any new measures will be too late.

Producer: Gail Champion.

Hacking Scandal20110818

In an exclusive interview with Radio 4's The Report, Tom Watson MP calls on the government to look again at the links between the murder of private investigator Daniel Morgan and the phone and email hacking scandal.

As a result of evidence brought to light by The Report, Tom Watson states he will write to the Prime Minister the day before the transmission of the programme to demand that the 1987 Daniel Morgan murder case be reinvestigated as part of the Leveson public inquiry.

Are there links between the murder of PI Daniel Morgan and the phone hacking scandal?

Help To Buy20131003

The government announced this week that it was bringing it's new help to buy scheme forward to start in a few days time. Its a policy designed to help get the housing market moving. But will it really be a lifeline for hardworking families wanting to get on the property ladder or will it drive up prices and cause a housing bubble? Helen Grady finds out who the scheme is likely to benefit and talks to people trying to buy and sell in York and London.

High Street Closures2013020720130218

With the recent collapse of several top retail brands, Jenny Chryss reports on the behind-the-scenes battles to save some of the High Street's best known names. And she examines the knock-on effects on other businesses. Why does the law allow some creditors to get back millions of pounds, while others will get nothing?

The programme hears from angry workers in one chain who say they were kept in the dark about the state the company was in. It also talks to the owners of one small family business which is owed hundreds of thousands of pounds. They describe how they had to wind up their company because of the debts they've been left with.

The Government has now ordered an inquiry into the demise of one of the major retailers, but how much information will be made public ?

And, with more retailers facing a losing battle against the internet, and more closures expected, experts warn of severe implications for the wider British economy.

Producer: Emma Forde

Reporter: Jenny Chryss.

Historic Child Abuse Lessons20130103

After a year marked by new revelations and allegations about the scale of historic child abuse in England and Wales, Simon Cox asks whether there are lessons in the way other countries have tackled the problem. In Northern Ireland victims from across the province have begun giving testimony to an independent inquiry panel and in Scotland there are also plans for a national hearing to take evidence from residents of children's homes across the country. In the Irish Republic, as long ago as 1999, the Prime Minister apologised on behalf of the State and set up a redress board to make pay-outs to victims of abuse. But there are complaints there from those who felt it didn't go far enough and from others worried about the way costs quickly spiralled. So should there be, as some argue, a comprehensive nation-wide inquiry in England and Wales? Would it just re-open old wounds or is a truth and reconciliation process necessary to learn the lessons of the past and protect children in the future?

Producer: Nicola Dowling.

How to Get Into the UK20151015

How to Get Into the UK20151015

There's been much talk of immigration this year, and intense coverage of the hundreds of thousands of migrants who have been making their way to Europe. Some, in Calais, continue to make desperate attempts to reach Britain. Tens of thousands of people from outside the European Union do come to Britain each year, to live and to work. But how do they manage it? Peter Marshall finds out in this week's edition of The Report, meeting four recent migrants and hearing about the obstacles they've faced. And he meets a lawyer who represents the super rich, for whom entry is guaranteed provided they stump up millions of pounds.

How to Get Into the UK20151015

There's been much talk of immigration this year, and intense coverage of the hundreds of thousands of migrants who have been making their way to Europe. Some, in Calais, continue to make desperate attempts to reach Britain. Tens of thousands of people from outside the European Union do come to Britain each year, to live and to work. But how do they manage it? Peter Marshall finds out in this week's edition of The Report, meeting four recent migrants and hearing about the obstacles they've faced. And he meets a lawyer who represents the super rich, for whom entry is guaranteed provided they stump up millions of pounds.

How to Get Into the UK20151015

How to Get Into the UK20151015

There's been much talk of immigration this year, and intense coverage of the hundreds of thousands of migrants who have been making their way to Europe. Some, in Calais, continue to make desperate attempts to reach Britain. Tens of thousands of people from outside the European Union do come to Britain each year, to live and to work. But how do they manage it? Peter Marshall finds out in this week's edition of The Report, meeting four recent migrants and hearing about the obstacles they've faced. And he meets a lawyer who represents the super rich, for whom entry is guaranteed provided they stump up millions of pounds.

How to Get Into the UK20151015

There's been much talk of immigration this year, and intense coverage of the hundreds of thousands of migrants who have been making their way to Europe. Some, in Calais, continue to make desperate attempts to reach Britain. Tens of thousands of people from outside the European Union do come to Britain each year, to live and to work. But how do they manage it? Peter Marshall finds out in this week's edition of The Report, meeting four recent migrants and hearing about the obstacles they've faced. And he meets a lawyer who represents the super rich, for whom entry is guaranteed provided they stump up millions of pounds.

How to Get Into the UK20151015

How to Get Into the UK20151015

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

How to Get Into the UK20151015

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

Hp And Autonomy20121227

Current affairs series. Phil Kemp investigates the sale of the British software company Autonomy to IT giant Hewlett Packard, which claims it was misled about the firm's value.

Inside The Vatican20131128

Original insights into major news stories and topical investigations.

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

Interest Rate Swaps20120503

Phil Kemp investigates claims that some businesses were mis-sold products designed to protect them against interest rate rises.

Phil Kemp asks if banks are facing another mis-selling scandal with 'interest rate swaps'.

Investigating Historic Abuse20130523

The Jimmy Savile scandal has prompted a wave of new investigations into alleged sexual abuse of children and young people, some of it dating back decades. But can the police and the criminal justice system deliver on their promise to put offenders behind bars? In The Report, Melanie Abbott investigates whether there really have been improvements in getting justice for both victims and the accused in these complex cases. What results can the public expect from the millions of pounds being spent on Operation Yewtree and the new investigation into abuse at North Wales care homes? Those who have suffered false accusations, and those who have gone through the heartache of failed attempts to prosecute their attackers reveal the human reality behind police and legal actions.

Iran's Soft Power20111229

Relations between Iran and Britain are at a low ebb. The British Embassy in Tehran was attacked in November and now Iranian diplomats have been expelled from the UK. But Iran does not just rely on its embassy to influence people in Britain.

In The Report this week Linda Pressly looks into the satellite TV channel Press TV, funded by the Iranian state and edited from Tehran. Press TV has come under fire in recent weeks after it aired the forced confession of Iranian-Canadian journalist Maziar Bahari and critics now want to see it closed down. The Foreign Office has sought ways to curtail the channel's activities and Ofcom is forcing the broadcaster to move its licence to Tehran by the start of the New Year.

Present and former Press TV journalists tell the story of the channel's creation in 2007 and explain how it has sought to provide an alternative view of the news with prominent presenters like Yvonne Ridley and George Galloway. Human rights activists explain why they continue to complain to Ofcom about the airing of suspected forced confessions; freelancer Jody Sabral recounts how the channel's coverage of the Syrian uprisings lead to her resignation earlier this year.

Many Iranian dissidents and activists see Press TV as part of a wider network of religious, cultural and educational organisations funded by the government. The Report asks what the Iranian government hopes to achieve through these centres and what role they will play with the official embassy closed.

Producer: Lucy Proctor

Presenter: Linda Pressly.

With diplomatic relations at a new low, does Iran still have influence in the UK?

Ireland's Toxic Tiger20101219

How much will British taxpayers suffer from the fallout in Ireland? British banks such as RBS and Lloyds have large debts in the Republic, and are making decisions about which to call in, threatening more pain for local communities.

Morland Sanders hears protests from small contractors in Donegal where Ulster Bank want to sell off a prestige residential development at rock bottom prices.

This amid questions about the part British institutions actually played in fuelling the property market bubble.

As the Irish government deals with the "toxic loans" of the Republic's banks, it's being estimated that 15% of them are in the UK.

We explore how this will affect the businesses reliant on that borrowed money, and what will happen to those trophy assets such as Claridges, now 'owned' by the Republic's new holder of its toxic debts, NAMA.

The Chancellor, George Osborne may have said the £3.2bn loan to Ireland was to support a friend in need, and protect British exports, but we report on the importance to British banks and British businesses of an economic recovery in Ireland.

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

How much will British taxpayers suffer from the economic fallout in Ireland?

Islamic State20150108

A former jihadi tells reporter Peter Marshall how Islamic State came to power and how it survives.

Jehovah's Witnesses And Child Sexual Abuse20150709

In June, the High Court ruled that the Jehovah's Witnesses organisation was liable for sexual abuse committed by one of its members.

The Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Britain - to give the group its official name - had failed to take adequate safeguarding steps when senior members of the organisation were aware that a fellow Witness was a known paedophile.

It was the first civil case in the UK of historical sexual abuse brought against the Christian-based religious movement.

The BBC's Religious Affairs Correspondent, Caroline Wyatt, explores the implications of the Court's decision and investigates the child safeguarding policies of the Jehovah's Witnesses.

The Report hears from former Witnesses who have suffered abuse and who claim that rather than protecting children, the Society provides a 'paedophile's paradise' that encourages allegations of abuse to be dealt with in-house, rather than by the police.

The programme investigates how the group's Elders are instructed to act when they receive an allegation of sexual abuse, and asks whether the Jehovah's Witnesses have a systematic problem in the way it deals with such complaints.

Presenter: Caroline Wyatt

Producer: Hannah Barnes.

Jehovah's Witnesses And Child Sexual Abuse20150723

In June, the High Court ruled that the Jehovah's Witnesses organisation was liable for sexual abuse committed by one of its members.

The Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Britain - to give the group its official name - had failed to take adequate safeguarding steps when senior members of the organisation were aware that a fellow Witness was a known paedophile.

It was the first civil case in the UK of historical sexual abuse brought against the Christian-based religious movement.

The BBC's Religious Affairs Correspondent, Caroline Wyatt, explores the implications of the Court's decision and investigates the Jehovah's Witnesses explicit policy of attempting to deal with all allegations of sexual abuse in-house.

The Report has gained access to confidential internal documents, sent out only to those who are senior in the Jehovah's Witnesses. These reveal the organisation's reluctance to involve the secular authorities in cases where a crime has been committed by one Witness against another.

Caroline Wyatt hears from former Witnesses who have suffered abuse and who claim that the organisation's doctrine and procedures have allowed offenders within the congregation to avoid prosecution.

Presenter: Caroline Wyatt

Producer: Hannah Barnes.

Jihadi Converts20140508

Converts to Islam are far more likely to be involved in terrorist incidents than those who were born into Muslim families: converts account for around a quarter of terrorist convictions in Britain since 9/11 yet they represent only 2-3% of the UK's Muslim population.

As the anniversary of the murder of Fusilier Lee Rigby by two Muslim converts approaches, the Today programme's Zubeida Malik investigates why new Muslims appear to be so vulnerable to the call of jihadi recruiters. She hears the stories of converts lured by extremists and talks to terrorism expert Professor Peter Neumann.

Producer: Anna Meisel.

Jimmy Savile And The Bbc20160225

How did Jimmy Savile get away with it when so many people appear to have known so much?

Media and Arts Correspondent David Sillito tracks down former presenters, producers and BBC executives who worked with Savile. On the day that the Dame Janet Smith Review is published, some speak publicly for the first time and reveal a shocking list of missed warning signs.

Producers: Steven Wright

Researcher: Kirsteen Knight

You can find details of organisations which offer advice and support with sexual abuse by visiting bbc.co.uk/actionline.

Media and Arts Correspondent David Sillito tracks down former presenters, producers and BBC executives who worked with Saville. On the day that the Dame Janet Smith Review is published, some speak publicly for the first time and reveal a shocking list of missed warning signs.

Kids Company: What's Going On?20150806

The charity Kids Company and its charismatic founder Camila Batmanghelidjh have endured weeks of negative headlines. Reporter Simon Cox investigates the accusations of mismanagement.

Kids Company was founded in 1996 by Camila Batmanghelidjh and has aimed to deliver practical and emotional support for vulnerable children and young people.

The charity has attracted support from celebrities, investment banks and successive governments.

But last month, it was revealed that an intended £3 million of government funding would not be released unless Ms Batmanghelidjh relinquished her role as chief executive. In documentation released by the Government, the Permanent Secretary at the Cabinet Office voiced his concern that money given to Kids Company would not be wisely spent.

Camila Batmanghelidjh has since announced that the search for her successor has begun she and that she will move into a new role focusing on the clinical side of the charity's work.

In the meantime, further concerns about the charity have emerged in the media.

Simon Cox investigates the truth behind the headlines: Do the charity's claims of positive outcomes and helping tens of thousands of vulnerable young people stand up to scrutiny? Are the accusations of mismanagement justified? Or is the government's change of attitude to Kids Company politically motivated?

Reporter: Simon Cox

Producer: Hannah Barnes.

Libor20130117

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

Litvinenko: The Miniature Nuclear Attack20140807

It was a death in Britain like no other seen in living memory.

The gaunt and agonised face of the former Russian security service officer, Alexander Litvinenko, stared out of television screens and newspaper front pages in November 2006 as his painful end approached in London's University College Hospital. His poisoning by a radioactive isotope was a bizarre death. It baffled the experts and transfixed a horrified nation.

Nearly eight years on from his death, Litvinenko's relatives - as well as lawyers, scientists, diplomats, politicians and the public at large - are still waiting to find out how this British citizen met his end in such an alarming and public way. After patient but unyielding pressure from his widow, Marina, and a High Court ruling earlier this year, the Home Secretary finally accepted in July that the inquest into the death needed to be replaced with a public inquiry. Under the senior judge, Sir Robert Owen, it will probe aspects of the case which the inquest was unable to scrutinise.

Peter Marshall reported on the Litvinenko story as it first unfolded. Now, he speaks to Marina Litvinenko about the questions she thinks should lie at the centre of Sir Robert's inquiry and what she wants it to achieve. He also speaks to lawyers, scientific and security experts about the unusual life and death of the former security officer in Russia's FSB - the successor body to the Soviet-era KGB.

Marshall discovers how far Alexander Litvinenko's decision to flee to Britain, the special work he undertook and the enemies he had all affected how he died. And he questions how far the Russian state and its president, Vladimir Putin - already under pressure over Ukraine and the downing of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 - should be under examination too.

Litvinenko: The Miniature Nuclear Attack20160121

Litvinenko: The Miniature Nuclear Attack20160121

It was a death in Britain like no other seen in living memory.

The gaunt and agonised face of the former Russian security service officer, Alexander Litvinenko, stared out of television screens and newspaper front pages in November 2006 as his painful end approached in London's University College Hospital. His poisoning by a radioactive isotope was a bizarre death. It baffled the experts and transfixed a horrified nation.

As the public inquiry into this mysterious death got under way in 2014, reporter Peter Marshall investigated the evidence suggesting that the Russian state might have been behind the fatal poisoning. Eighteen months later, as the inquiry publishes its findings, The Report returns to the story.

This is an updated version of a programme first broadcast on 7 August 2014.

Reporter: Peter Marshall

Producer: Simon Coates.

Litvinenko: The Miniature Nuclear Attack20160121

It was a death in Britain like no other seen in living memory.

The gaunt and agonised face of the former Russian security service officer, Alexander Litvinenko, stared out of television screens and newspaper front pages in November 2006 as his painful end approached in London's University College Hospital. His poisoning by a radioactive isotope was a bizarre death. It baffled the experts and transfixed a horrified nation.

As the public inquiry into this mysterious death got under way in 2014, reporter Peter Marshall investigated the evidence suggesting that the Russian state might have been behind the fatal poisoning. Eighteen months later, as the inquiry publishes its findings, The Report returns to the story.

This is an updated version of a programme first broadcast on 7 August 2014.

Reporter: Peter Marshall

Producer: Simon Coates.

Lord Bramall: A Failure to Investigate?20160204

Lord Bramall: A Failure to Investigate?20160204

Lord Bramall, a former head of the British army, has now been told he will face no further action by the Metropolitan Police following thirteen months of investigation into allegations of paedophilia. The Met has so far refused to apologise for the way its inquiry, "Operation Midland", was handled.

In his first broadcast interview, Lord Bramall speaks to BBC journalist Alistair Jackson.

The programme also hears from Met insiders and other key witnesses. Their accounts raise serious questions about how the investigation was run and why the allegations against Lord Bramall were not dismissed earlier.

Reporter: Alistair Jackson

Producer: Anna Meisel

Researcher: Kirsteen Knight.

Maria Miller's Expenses20140417

The MPs' expenses debacle has claimed a cabinet minister victim - 5 years after the initial revelations about abuse of parliamentary allowances. Reporter Melanie Abbott investigates the story behind Maria Miller's resignation as culture secretary.

Producer: Anna Meisel.

Marius The Giraffe: Zoogenics?20140227

Copenhagen Zoo's decision to kill Marius - an 18 month old healthy giraffe - and to perform a public autopsy in front of children sparked a global outcry. Despite receiving numerous death threats and hate emails, the zoo's scientific director insisted he had no choice but to kill Marius because there were already too many giraffes with similar genes in the European breeding programme.

Reporter Hannah Barnes travels to Denmark to explore the reasons behind the killing of Marius and other healthy animals. Back in Britain she talks to staff at British zoos to find out whether what the Danes did in public is happening behind the closed doors in the UK.

Producer: Anna Meisel.

Mark Duggan Investigation20120426

When Mark Duggan was shot by armed police in Tottenham, north London on 4th August 2011, the Independent Police Complaints Commission immediately began an investigation into the circumstances surrounding his death.

It is normal procedure for the IPCC to conduct an independent investigation into the circumstances of any fatal shooting by the police.

At the time, IPCC Commissioner, Rachel Cerfontyne, said: "I will make certain that this investigation is thorough and answers the many questions that everyone has when such an incident occurs."

Yet there is now the real possibility that a full inquest conducted openly and before a jury, will never be held into the shooting which triggered rioting in Tottenham, and which later spread across London and other English cities.

Simon Cox speaks to people close to Mark Duggan about what impact this news is having in the community.

He investigates whether the IPCC have the statutory powers they need in order to do their job properly.

And, after the IPCC stated that their hands may well be 'tied' by the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act, Simon will ask whether it is time for a change in the law which currently prevents phone intercept evidence being heard in court.

Producers: Hannah Barnes and Mike Wendling.

Will we find out why police shot Mark Duggan, whose death sparked last summer's riots?

Midwife Shortage20110217

Midwives have been in short supply in England for years. Why aren't there enough and what effect is this having on hospitals and pregnant women?

Miners' Strike Miscarriages?20140102

With cabinet papers relating to the 1984 miners' strike due to be published tomorrow, Jenny Chryss examines growing calls for a public inquiry into allegations of widespread falsification of evidence by the police against some of the miners who ended up facing charges.

On June 18 1984, scores of pickets and police officers were injured during one of the bloodiest events of the year long strike. Protesters at Orgreave were trying to stop coke from the plant being transported to the British Steel mill at Scunthorpe. Ninety three people were arrested that day with some charged with riot, which carries a potential life sentence. However, nearly four months into the trial of fifteen of the accused pickets the case against them collapsed.

Thirty years on, it's alleged that some police officers manipulated the evidence given in court and colluded over their statement writing or were told what to write. But no officer has ever been charged.

And allegations about police malpractice spread beyond Orgreave. The programme hears from one former miner who says he was beaten almost unconscious during a picket at Frickley Colliery in West Yorkshire and then charged with a public order offence on the basis of falsified evidence. The case against him was later dropped.

Campaigners and some MPs are now calling for a public inquiry and are drawing parallels between these allegations and similar revelations about the manipulation of evidence after the Hillsborough football disaster five years later. The Hillsborough Independent Panel revealed that more than a hundred and sixty South Yorkshire police statements had been altered after the disaster in which ninety six Liverpool fans died in April 1989.

Producer: Sally Chesworth.

Missing Migrant Children20100121

Every week children who arrive alone in the UK and claim asylum go missing from local authority care. Many are believed to have been trafficked to work in brothels, cannabis factories and private homes or in street crime. Angus Crawford examines how criminals are using loopholes in the system to exploit these children.

Mmr And The Legacy Of The Link With Autism20130502
My Big Fat Greek Crisis20150924

My Big Fat Greek Crisis20150924

Greece's future in Europe dominated headlines throughout the summer, but can the country turn its fortunes around? While it's true that the country owes hundreds of billions of euros and is facing austerity for years to come, Frances Stonor Saunders finds that Greece has plenty going for it - and not just its idyllic islands where Brits like to holiday.

Frances takes a trip to picturesque Skiathos, with its sandy beaches and boutique hotels, before exploring the 'real' Greece on the mainland of Volos. Along the way she discovers that, contrary to the popular narrative, the Greek people are accepting responsibility for the crisis that now engulfs them, and are coming up with innovative solutions to fix the future.

Presenter: Frances Stonor Saunders

Producer: Ben Crighton.

My Big Fat Greek Crisis20150924

Greece's future in Europe dominated headlines throughout the summer, but can the country turn its fortunes around? While it's true that the country owes hundreds of billions of euros and is facing austerity for years to come, Frances Stonor Saunders finds that Greece has plenty going for it - and not just its idyllic islands where Brits like to holiday.

Frances takes a trip to picturesque Skiathos, with its sandy beaches and boutique hotels, before exploring the 'real' Greece on the mainland of Volos. Along the way she discovers that, contrary to the popular narrative, the Greek people are accepting responsibility for the crisis that now engulfs them, and are coming up with innovative solutions to fix the future.

Presenter: Frances Stonor Saunders

Producer: Ben Crighton.

Nhs Complaints20130718

Simon Cox asks whether serious complaints about the NHS in England are being ignored. Was the scandal at the Morecambe Bay Hospitals an isolated case, and has the system for investigating complaints been overhauled?

Nhs Reform20120322

Why are plans to reform the NHS in England so controversial? Simon Cox investigates the tortuous path of the Health and Social Care Bill and asks how the proposed changes may work.

Simon Cox asks: why is NHS reform mired in controversy?

Nhs Trust Going Bust20120712
Oakwood Prison20140123

Following the recent riot at Britain's largest prison, in which around 20 prisoners caused damage to cells and prison property, Hannah Barnes investigates what caused it.

Oakwood has faced a troubled history since it opened in April 2012, with several rooftop protests and a number of damning reports into its operation to contend with. The Report speaks to those who have spent time at the prison, both as inmates and staff, and asks why there have been so many challenges in less than two years.

The programme explores the changes taking place across the prison estate, and examines whether the most recent incident at HMP Oakwood is a sign of wider problems facing the UK prison estate.

Ofsted20140213

Phil Kemp assesses changes at the top of the body that regulates English schools.

Olympic Legacy20120809

The Government has claimed that the London Olympics will provide a 13.5 billion pound boost to the British economy. In The Report, Simon Cox investigates the key areas of jobs in the Olympic boroughs, new business deals for the UK and tourism across the country, and asks whether attempts to link the Games with economic growth are flawed.

Simon Cox investigates the economic legacy of hosting the Olympic Games.

Olympic Security20120802

The London Olympics were 7 years in preparation. So why did the plans for security to be provided by private contractor G4S go so badly wrong?

Mukul Devichand hears from G4S guards and police officers working on the Olympic sites about their concerns for securing the Games. Whistleblowers talk of untrained guards operating the x-ray machines, men working 24 hour shifts and vans entering venues without being searched. Police officers tell the programme how they're trying to fill the security gaps left by G4S.

The Report also explores how G4S achieved the Olympic contract, their recruitment process and what seems to have gone wrong. And as media attention focuses on blaming G4S, Mukul Devichand asks if the London Organising Committee (LOCOG) could have sorted these problems much earlier on.

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.

Mukul Devichand investigates the inside story of G4S and Olympic security.

Paramedics Under Pressure20141009

Why are paramedics quitting the ambulance service in rising numbers? Adrian Goldberg investigates.

Researcher: James Melley

Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith.

Pension Liberation Schemes20130321

It can begin with a simple text inviting you to release money from an old pension before you are fifty five, the earliest age at which you can officially access your money. People in financial difficulties may be tempted to sign up, but will they ever see their money again?

Simon Cox investigates the dangers of "pension liberation" schemes.

Peter Oborne's Chilcot Report20151029

The inquiry into the UK's involvement in the Iraq war started 6 years ago - and there's still no sign of a report. Political columnist Peter Oborne can't understand why: "Come on Sir John! It's not that difficult. I reckon I could get something together in 3 weeks." To prove his point, Peter Oborne attempts to put together a definitive 30 minute audio report into Britain's involvement in the Iraq war... within budget and on time.

Using evidence provided to the Iraq Inquiry and that already publicly available Oborne delivers his verdict on the key questions relating to the British Government's decision to go to war with Iraq. The programme hears from those in key positions in the lead up to the conflict, including:

Dr Hans Blix, Chairman of the United Nations Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC), 2000 - 2003

Sir Christopher Meyer, British Ambassador to the United States, 1997 - 2003

Sir Stephen Wall - European Adviser to Prime Minister Tony Blair and head of the Cabinet Office's European Secretariat, 2000 - 2004

Carne Ross - First Secretary, United Kingdom Mission to New York, 1998 - 2002

Producer: Hannah Barnes

Researcher: Phoebe Keane.

Phone Hacking20110721

Simon Cox investigates whether the phone hacking scandal goes further than just the News of the World.

Simon Cox investigates how far the phone hacking scandal spreads.

Police And Crime Commissioners20130516

, it was argued, would make the police more accountable by providing oversight by a directly elected individual, who would in turn be subject to strict checks and balances. Yet, the electorate failed to vote in high numbers for such an idea; the November 2012 elections recorded an average turnout of just 15%.

A string of headlines in recent weeks has questioned the judgement of some PCCs, whether it's claiming expenses for two limousine journeys costing £700, attempting to hire a full-time youth commissioner, or appointing friends and former colleagues to well-paid jobs in the Police and Crime Commissioner office.

Six months after they were elected, Simon Cox investigates how well Police and Crime Commissioners are getting on in the job.

The Report will investigate why some Commissioners appear to be more active than others and will explore the different styles they have adopted. The programme will speak to a selection of Commissioners elected in 41 areas across England and Wales about the key decisions they've made on budgets, staffing and policing priorities.

Producer: Hannah Barnes.

Police Complaints20120913

The Independent Police Complaints Commission is under pressure on several fronts. It's being investigated by the Home Affairs Select Committee and is re-examining some of its serious cases. Is the IPCC up to the job - and if not, what are the problems? Simon Cox investigates.

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

Police Tasers20130919

More and more police are being armed with Taser stun guns prompting questions about whether they are always used in the right circumstances. Campaigners point to the controversial cases of partially-sighted Colin Farmer, Tasered in the back when police mistook his white stick for a Samurai sword. And 23 year-old Jordan Begley who died after being Tasered by Greater Manchester Police in July this year.

But how much do we really know about how dangerous these stun guns are compared with alternatives like CS spray, batons and police dogs? And is the training adequate? Melanie Abbott is given rare access to police officers as they undertake their final Taser assessment. And she'll hear demands for more research into the medical impact of being Tasered.

Producer: Sally Abrahams.

Pope Francis20130411

For the past few weeks there's been excitement across the Catholic world over the election of the first Latin American Pope - a man who wants to put the poor at the centre of the Church's teaching. But a series of difficult questions have been raised about Pope Francis's role during Argentina's "Dirty War" and the military dictatorship of the 1970s and early 1980s. In this week's Report journalist and former Dominican monk Mark Dowd travels to Buenos Aires to find out the truth about Pope Francis. Mark speaks to those close to the new Pontiff, his former colleagues, friends and sister about his motivations and character. He talks to key players in the case of two Jesuit priests who were seized and tortured by the dictatorship to find out what Pope Francis really knew and did when they went missing. And he hears from a family whose pregnant relative was kidnapped by agents of the dictatorship. The baby was taken away and relatives appealed to the then Father Bergoglio for help in finding the child. But what happened - and when did Father Bergoglio become aware of the stolen babies scandal?

Private Investigators20130829

are coming under increasing scrutiny themselves - with the latest controversy surrounding the work they carry out for companies.

Adam Fleming investigates how PIs take advantage of cameras, GPS tracking devices and legal grey areas to carry out surveillance on individuals for insurers and other clients.

He also meets the people who accuse the industry of dirty tricks, as the government announces the introduction of licences for investigators.

Private Schools And Public Benefit20141211

Shadow Education Secretary Tristram Hunt has caused controversy by arguing that private schools that don't have partnerships with their state counterparts should lose their business rates relief. But how easy is it to discover what partnerships are happening? And do they do any good? Simon Cox investigates.

Publishing Wars20140828

Who will win the book wars between the world's largest publishers and Amazon, the comprehensive online retailer? Adam Fleming reports on the latest - and potentially epoch-making - chapter in the book wars.

The big French publishing house Hachette is locked in a battle with Amazon in the US over the price of Ebooks. Amazon alleges the prices which publishers, including Hachette, charge for these titles are too high. In support of its campaign to lower them, Amazon has made purchases on its website of books by authors who are published by Hachette - including such well-known writers as Ian Rankin - slower and more expensive. In return, publishers are threatening to withhold books by popular authors from the online retailer. This endangers Amazon's claim always to stock the book readers want.

Adam Fleming asks why this row has flared up now and who will win it. Where do authors and readers stand in this battle between corporate giants and what do they stand to win and lose? He also explores the radical changes that are taking place elsewhere in the publishing industry - such as self-publishing - in which Amazon is itself involved - and independent funding of books. How will these changes affect all those who write, publish, buy and read books.

Among those contributing to the programme are the writers Germaine Greer and Alexander McCall Smith, the children's author Linda Strachan and award-winning self-published writer Al Brookes. We also hear from Ben Edelman, an expert on what Amazon has to lose, and Brad Stone on what it - and its publishing counterparts - stand to gain.

Racism In Northern Ireland20140911

Since April, police have recorded 218 racially motivated crimes in Belfast - at least one a day. Family homes have been attacked, a Ku Klux Klan flag has flown and apparently xenophobic slogans were seen on bonfires during the Eleventh Night celebrations in July. The Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) has even launched a special operation to tackle the problem.

But who is behind the apparent rise in racist incidents? Helen Grady heads to Belfast to investigate.

Why are racist incidents becoming more frequent? And why are they recorded more often in loyalist neighbourhoods?

Radicals, Rights And Hunting - The Battle For The Rspca20150730

Peter Marshall uncovers the real story about the fight for control of the RSPCA.

This summer the charity elected its new ruling council. As members prepared to vote, stories in the national press warned that animal rights activists were fighting to gain control of the animal welfare charity and use it to pursue their radical agenda.

But are these stories true?

Peter talks to the men and women at the front line of this battle for influence at one of the best known, best funded and best loved charities in England and Wales. He meets the so-called radicals to discuss their views, and finds out why their enemies have left the RSPCA in protest. It's a tale of dirty tricks and sometimes vicious skirmishes.

As he delves deeper into the politics and history of the charity, Peter discovers an old feud at the heart of this story, one that has dominated life at the RSPCA for decades and confounds politicians to this day - the thorny issue of fox hunting.

Producer: Lucy Proctor.

Railways20130110

Rail passengers are again facing inflation-busting fare rises on what is often described as has one of the most expensive rail systems in Europe. But despite the level of investment that's taking place in Britain's rail network, punctuality targets on the long-distance routes are being missed. In the West Midlands, trains haven't been turning up because of hundreds of cancellations in recent months. Reporter Jenny Chryss investigates whether rail passengers are getting value for money.

Rape: Prosecuting Accusers20141218

The suicide of a woman being prosecuted for falsely crying rape has raised questions about the best way of dealing with these cases.

In this week's edition we hear the story of Paul Fensome, who was investigated and jailed after a false rape claim. His accuser was convicted of perverting the course of justice. Some say her prison sentence was too harsh and she should have been dealt with far more sympathetically. Do cases like this deter women from reporting rape, or is it the best way to get justice for men who go through the ordeal of clearing their name?

Producer: India Rakusen

Researcher: Kirsteen Knight.

Retrial Laws In Scotland20100107

The Criminal Justice Act 2003 modified the ancient legal principle of double jeopardy in England and Wales so that a person acquitted of a serious crime could be re-tried. Now in Scotland there is a clamour to change the law too, and the government is committed to introducing legislation in 2010.

But there are voices of dissent, as Simon Cox finds out. And if the law is changed, will it enable the reopening of the case that is driving the Scottish debate? Helen Scott and Christine Eadie were murdered in 1977 after they were seen leaving the World's End pub in Edinburgh. Angus Sinclair was tried for the killings in 2007, but the case collapsed due to insufficient evidence.

In England and Wales, meanwhile, only a handful of double jeopardy cases have returned to court. Is the law working as it should?

Right To Buy20141120

In the 1980s, Right to Buy was one of the landmark successes of Margaret Thatcher's government, enabling millions of council tenants to buy their own home at a discounted price. The policy changed the financial fortunes of a generation.

Since coming to power in 2010, David Cameron's government has reinvigorated the totemic Tory policy, by reinstating big discounts previously withdrawn under Labour - today, some tenants can get over £100,000 off the price of their home.

There are some changes to the policy, too: for the first time, the government has pledged to replace homes sold under Right to Buy on a one-for-one basis - but is this target being met? Councils and housing associations tell The Report they don't have the funds to replace homes quickly enough. The programme also hears allegations that opportunist investors are taking advantage of the big discounts now on offer.

Not everyone is happy with the revival of Right to Buy - in Scotland, MSPs have voted in favour of bringing Right to Buy to an end, and in North London, Enfield Council has devised a scheme to opt out of selling its newly-acquired housing stock.

Meanwhile, the government has plans to make it even easier for tenants to buy their home, adamant that the policy is a vital tool in enabling low-income families to to fulfil their economic aspirations - but with 1.8m households on the social housing waiting list, can the UK afford to keep selling off valuable social housing stock off on the cheap?

CONTRIBUTORS INCLUDE:

Brandon Lewis MP, Minister of State for Housing and Planning

Julian Fulbrook, Labour Councillor, Camden Council

Catherine Ryder, Head of Policy, The National Housing Federation

Dr Peter King, Reader in Social Thought, De Montfort University

Nick Atkin, Chief Executive, Halton Housing Trust

Andrew Stafford, Labour Councillor, Enfield Council and Chair, Housing Gateway

Reporter: Peter Marshall

Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith.

Right To Die20140109

The UK's supreme court is due to rule on the 'right to die' early in 2014. What can we learn from Belgium's experience of legalised euthanasia?

Roma Migration20131212

Last month the former Home Secretary David Blunkett warned that tensions between Sheffield's Roma and their more established neighbours could lead to "an explosion". But, with estimates of as many as 200,000 Roma in the UK, such tensions aren't confined to Sheffield. So is enough being done to help ease their integration? Andrew Fletcher reports on how local authorities are coping with the arrival of large numbers of Roma migrants and asks why the UK has missed out on European funds that might have helped. And, with Britain's labour market opening to Bulgaria and Romania in January, will there be extra pressures in areas already experiencing community tensions?

Producer: Rob Cave.

Rwanda: Has Britain Been Beguiled?20150716

On June 20th the head of Rwanda's external intelligence service, Lt. General Karenzi Karake, was arrested at Heathrow Airport. He is accused by a Spanish judge of war crimes committed during and after the genocide in Rwanda in the 1990s. General Karake is now on bail awaiting an extradition hearing.

The Rwandan president, Paul Kagame, was furious when he heard about the arrest. He described it as a continuation of slavery and colonialism. General Karake is a senior member of the RPF, the party that took power in Rwanda in 1994 after its army, led by Paul Kagame, had put an end to the genocide. The general is also, intriguingly, seen as a potential rival to the president and was briefly sent to jail by Mr Kagame in 2010.

The arrest is indeed embarrassing for Britain. Successive governments under Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron have cultivated close ties with Rwanda. Part of the reason appears to be Rwanda's remarkable recovery from the dark days of the genocide. Rwanda has emerged as a country with a well-functioning economy and little corruption. Britain, one of its principal aid donors, can point to Rwanda as a success story in a way it cannot with most other countries in Africa.

But has Britain turned a blind eye to well-documented war crimes and human rights abuses perpetrated by senior government members? The accusations come from human rights organisations, as well as political opponents of the government. And even as British aid has continued to flow to Rwanda, there has been criticism of the country's human rights record from members of parliament and the Foreign Office itself.

Reporter: Simon Cox

Producer: Tim Mansel

Researcher: Phoebe Keane.

Samantha Lewthwaite: From The Shires To Al-shabab20130926

As bullets flew around the Westgate Shopping Mall in Nairobi, Kenya, at the weekend, a familiar name surfaced once again. Samantha Lewthwaite, the widow of a 7/7 bomber and a woman wanted by both British and Kenyan security services, was reported as being involved in the mass shootings. Who is the woman known as 'The White Widow'?

While it is not yet confirmed that she was at Westgate, there is no doubt that Samantha Lewthwaite has become a key figure in the Somalia-based terrorist organisation Al-Shabab, which masterminded the audacious attack.

The widow of 7/7 bomber Germaine Lindsay, she claimed ignorance of the plans to bomb London in 2005 and was even given police protection at her home in Aylesbury. The police lost track of her until she reappeared in Kenya in 2012 where she was accused of involvement in a terror plot in Mombasa. But she escaped arrest and has been on the run ever since. Her reputation has grown and she is now seen as a key communicator for the network.

Presenter Simon Cox first reported on Samantha Lewthwaite's story in April 2012. In the wake of the Westgate shopping centre attacks, The Report gives listeners another chance to hear how the daughter of a former British soldier rose to prominence in the jihadist group responsible for the killings.

Producers: Lucy Proctor and Sally Chesworth.

Sexism In The City20150430

City banker, Svetlana Lokhova, is awarded a £3 million payout for sexual harassment at work. Her line manager at Sberbank CIB (UK), spread vicious lies to colleagues and clients that she was a Class A drug user, ruining her career in finance and causing her extreme mental illness. In an exclusive interview, Svetlana tells Simon Cox how she discovered the extent of his campaign against her, her efforts to resolve the problem and explains why, despite the huge compensation, there are no winners in this case. Talking to others whose claims have reached an employment tribunal, Simon investigates how common such cases are and why they continue to happen, despite laws and policies designed to prevent it.

Producer: Sally Abrahams

Researcher: James Melley

Sexual Harassment In Politics20140206

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

Sexual Harassment In Westminster20140501

Simon Cox investigates allegations of abuse of power, a culture of silence, a lack of protection for junior staff and how effective measures introduced to combat the problem are likely to be.

Shale Gas20111013

, extracted through a process known as "hydraulic fracturing" has had dramatic effects on the United States energy market - contributing to both increased supply and reduction in the cost of gas.

In Poland its discovery caused so much excitement that the first exploratory drilling was carried live on television.

Britain has shale gas reserves too and the Department of Energy and Climate Change is about to open the next round of bidding for licences to test drill in certain parts of the country.

The industry is in its infancy in Britain but in "The Report" Simon Cox analyses the areas where shale gas might occur - potentially in large tracts of northern and southern England as well as parts of Scotland and Wales.

Might the U.K.

eventually see large multi-national companies coming to this country to invest? How accurate are the claims that are made for how much gas might be produced? And what does the prospect of cheap, plentiful gas mean for the government's commitment to renewable energy?

Simon Cox looks at the real story behind the potential for shale gas extraction in the UK.

Sharia Law In Britain20150416

Britain's sharia councils are to be reviewed by the government. Reporter Jenny Chryss investigates Islamic law in the UK and asks if sharia councils should be under any greater scrutiny than other religious tribunals.

Producer: Chloe Hadjimatheou

Reporter: Jenny Chryss.

Sleepless In The City20130912

The death of banking intern Moritz Erhardt this summer has led to soul searching in The City. Although the exact cause of his death has not yet been confirmed, reports that he worked three all-nighters in a row has shed light on a fiercely competitive world of 120-hour weeks that leads many to illness, addiction and depression.

What led the young would-be banker, and others like him, to work such long hours? Phil Kemp speaks to current and former bankers about the face-time culture that forces them to stay at their desk regardless of their workload and the tactics they use to help stay awake, including the use of illegal prescription drugs.

Doctors describe the toll that pushing the body to these limits eventually takes, and interns tell Phil about the big decision they will have to make between huge pay-packets and a life outside of the Square Mile.

Producer: Lucy Proctor.

Stirling Decides20140925

The city of Stirling is situated in the heart of Scotland and has been described as the brooch the clasps together the Highlands and the Lowlands. It lies in Scotland's central belt, seen by many as the region that could decide the outcome of the referendum on independence. Sharmini Selvarajah spends the final days of the campaign in the city following local people as they make up their minds which way to cast their ballots. How did Stirling, in the centre of a country split down the middle on its future, decide whether to remain part of the UK or whether to leave the union?

Surgeons Under Scrutiny20121206

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations. Presented by Matthew Hill.

Surrogacy20140821

British couples seeking commercial surrogates abroad tell Catrin Nye their stories.

Tackling Poorly Performing Primaries20120216

As some of England's 200 weakest primary schools fight Government plans to force them to become sponsored Academies, Simon Cox reports on Michael Gove's drive to improve children's achievement.

For the first time, poorly performing primary schools in England are eligible to become sponsored Academies, independent of local authorities and control their own budgets. Some schools are contesting the figures used to class them as failing, claiming that the goalposts have been shifted and that improvements are already being achieved. Several are refusing to convert without a fight. The Education Secretary, Michael Gove, recently branded those opposing his plans at one school in North London as the "enemies of promise" and part of a "Trot campaign".

However, over sixty of those approached by Westminster's Department of Education have grasped the opportunity and are in the process of finding a sponsor and preparing to move out of local authority control.

With only a handful of primary schools already operating as Academies and dispute over the results of some secondary school Academies, what's the evidence this mandatory, widescale and fundamental shift will benefit children's education? Simon Cox examines the figures behind an increasingly fractious fight.

Producer: Samantha Fenwick.

Why some primary schools are fighting government plans to force them to become academies.

Tax Relief On Charity Donations20120510

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations. Presented by Simon Cox.

Simon Cox presents original insights into major news stories.

Tension In Woolwich20130704

Off-duty soldier Lee Rigby was killed in broad dalight in Woolwich, south-east London, in May. Fears were voiced at the time that the town - which was the scene of riots in the summer of 2011 - could become the site of further violence. Simon Cox goes to Woolwich to find out how its many communities are coping with the tension.

Terror Laws: An Unhappy Compromise?20131205

Mohammed Ahmed Mohamed's audacious escape from terror restrictions by removing his electronic tag and absconding from a west London mosque in a burka has brought the Coalition's terror laws into the spotlight. Should we be worried that under the relaxed legislation six other suspected terrorists will have restrictions on them lifted in January? Phil Kemp investigates Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures - or TPIMs - and asks if the civil liberties of suspects have been put ahead of public safety.

Tesco: Trouble At The Top20141113

Tesco is under investigation by the Serious Fraud Office over an alleged black hole in its accounts. Simon Cox tells the story of Tesco's biggest crisis to date.

Reporter: Simon Cox

Producer: Mark Turner

Researcher: James Melley.

The Ambridge Price Of Milk20150910

The Ambridge Price Of Milk20150910
The Ambridge Price Of Milk20150910

What has The Archers got to do with the price of milk? Lesley Curwen looks at the present crisis in dairy farming through the prism of the long-running Radio 4 soap opera, "The Archers" and talks to the man behind the agricultural storyline, Graham Harvey.

Along with archive from the drama and interviews with today's farmers, she looks at the milk industry and its increasing exposure to volatile global markets.

Producer: Smita Patel.

The Brixton Maoists20131219

The Report investigates how three women could disappear into a London-based Maoist collective for more than 30 years and seemingly lose contact with society.

Reporter: Simon Cox

Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith.

The Children's Care Business20120705

Current affairs report with Simon Cox.

The Drug Khat20120126

, mainly used by East Africans, is illegal in many western countries and has recently been outlawed by the Dutch, famed for their liberal approach to drugs. Yet it remains legal in the UK. The Report asks why Britain is out of step, and what impact this will have. How harmful is the drug to users and society? Will the UK become the centre of unlawful distribution of the drug throughout Europe? And is the Khat trade funding terrorism? Lucy Ash investigates.

Producer: John Murphy; Presenter: Lucy Ash

Assistant Editor: Jane Ashley.

Why is the drug khat still legal in the UK but banned in many other western countries?

The Hollywood Spy20150917

The Hollywood Spy20150917
The Hollywood Spy20150917

British writer, Cedric Belfrage, avoided prosecution after passing top secret documents to Russia in World War Two. But was he acting under orders or was he a Soviet spy?

Gordon Corera examines new evidence from recently declassified MI5 files, which help explain how Belfrage went from being a Hollywood film critic in the 1930s to having access to highly confidential British and US intelligence material in the 1940s which he later admitted passing to Russia.

After being named as a Soviet spy in 1945, Belfrage appeared before The House Un-American Activities Committee and was later deported from the US for having been a member of the Communist Party.

We talk to some of those who met him after he later settled in Mexico, including the son of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were executed by the US in 1951 for being Soviet spies. And we explore why MI5 was anxious to avoid prosecuting Belfrage in case it proved embarrassing for the British security service.

Producer: Sally Abrahams.

The Ira And Sexual Abuse20150903

Máiría Cahill was Irish republican royalty. So it sent shockwaves through the republican movement when she spoke out last year about the sexual abuse she suffered at the hands of a senior IRA operative. Cahill tells her story to BBC Northern Ireland's Jennifer O'Leary.

Presenter: Jennifer O'Leary

Producer: Ben Crighton.

The Liverpool Care Pathway20130815

Critics dubbed the controversial Liverpool Care Pathway the "road to death" and accused the NHS of killing off thousands of elderly patients. Supporters say it helped their relative have a peaceful and dignified death. The campaign against the Liverpool Care Pathway fuelled by countless stories in the newspapers of patients being deprived of food and water and heavily sedated prompted an independent review. Last month the review 'More Care Less Pathway' recommended that the Liverpool Care Pathway be phased out between 6 to 12 months. But some medical professionals fear the baby has been thrown out with the bathwater. In The Report Helen Grady looks at the back story - how and why the Liverpool Care Pathway was rolled out, the opposition campaign and asks what next? She talks to relatives of patients who were on the pathway, doctors and palliative care experts.

The Mod's Missing Kit20110801

How did the MOD lose track of over 5bn pounds worth of military equipment? Firearms, ammunition, even a plane fuselage are unaccounted for. A tenth of all the specialist and valuable Bowman radios have strayed from their rightful place. The Ministry of Defence insist that doesn't mean they are not being put to good use somewhere - but there's no way of knowing. Antiquated systems mean that accurately recording and despatching items from the hundreds of thousands of lines of stock is a virtually impossible task - nearly half of all deliveries to Afghanistan are late. Adrian Goldberg enters the labyrinthine world of the military stores and distribution networks and asks where some of the 'mislaid' equipment is, how it got there, and the impact on troops.

Producer: Rob Cave.

How did the MOD lose track of over 5bn pounds of equipment?

The Mod's Missing Kit20110728

How did the MOD lose track of over 5bn pounds worth of military equipment? Firearms, ammunition, even a plane fuselage are unaccounted for.

A tenth of all the specialist and valuable Bowman radios have strayed from their rightful place.

The Ministry of Defence insist that doesn't mean they are not being put to good use somewhere - but there's no way of knowing.

Antiquated systems mean that accurately recording and despatching items from the hundreds of thousands of lines of stock is a virtually impossible task - nearly half of all deliveries to Afghanistan are late.

Adrian Goldberg enters the labyrinthine world of the military stores and distribution networks and asks where some of the 'mislaid' equipment is, how it got there, and the impact on troops.

Producer: Rob Cave.

How did the MOD lose track of over 5bn pounds of equipment?

The Muslim Brotherhood In Britain20140424

The Muslim Brotherhood is an Egyptian Islamist organisation with branches throughout the world - including Britain, where it has had a presence for several decades. During this time, the organisation has courted little attention and has at times been viewed by British authorities as a force for good in the fight against extremism. So why has David Cameron called for an investigation into their activities now?

In this edition of The Report, Peter Marshall hears claims that this review is less about national security, and more about appeasing the rulers of the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia, who are ideologically opposed to the Brotherhood. The UAE and Saudi Arabia also happen to have lucrative contracts with British businesses.

The programme also reveals how senior members of the Conservative party have been raising concerns about the Muslim Brotherhood for several years - in particular the Brotherhood's ties to Hamas - and so the new investigation is perhaps not a complete surprise. However, this is the same organisation which received the backing of the British government when Mohammed Morsi was elected president of Egypt, and so is the government now guilty of hypocrisy?

Critics of the Brotherhood say much has changed in the Middle East over the past year - especially in Egypt - and there are concerns that rogue elements of the Muslim Brotherhood will seek refuge in Britain. Already, members of the Brotherhood and its political wing, The Freedom and Justice Party, have come to London to seek asylum. The Report speaks to them about the on-going investigation into their activities and asks them why they have come to the UK and what does the Muslim Brotherhood really stand for?

Reporter: Peter Marshall

Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith

Researcher: James Melley.

The Mystery Of Flight 37020140403

It may never be known why MH370 crashed into the Indian Ocean with the loss of everyone on board. Melanie Abbott asks how a plane can disappear in the 21st Century, and why nearly a month on we are still no nearer to solving the mystery of what happened on that flight.

The 'pink Pill': The Female Viagra?20151001

The 'pink pill' flibanserin has been called 'the female Viagra', but critics argue its benefits are few and side effects many.

Melanie Abbott investigates how the failed anti-depressant came to be licensed in the USA, and what the future plans are to bring the drug to Europe.

Presenter: Melanie Abbott

Producer: James Melley

Researcher: Phoebe Keane.

The Police Federation20130124

Current affairs series. Phil Kemp examines the Police Federation and its role in the resignation of the Chief Whip Andrew Mitchell.

The Right To Be Forgotten20140918

Simon Cox asks why people want to have some results wiped from Google searches and if the new EU law is just the start of more privacy for EU citizens.

The Riots - How They Began20110825

England has witnessed its worst rioting for a generation this month.

The majority have been shocked by scenes of people, some as young as 11, looting high street shops with seemingly no fear of being caught by the police or of any punishment that could be handed out by the courts.

The violence started in Tottenham, North London, where what started out as a peaceful protest over the shooting of 29 year old Mark Duggan, spiralled out of control.

Two days after Mr Duggan had been killed by armed officers, his friends and family gathered outside Tottenham police station asking for more information on the circumstances surrounding his death.

Five hours later, trouble ensued.

Police cars were set on fire; shops were destroyed along the length and breadth of Tottenham High Road; and families were forced to flee their homes as the flames spread.

Later that night, just a mile or so away in Tottenham Hale, the looting began.

The Report investigates what happened on that fateful Saturday - August 6th 2011 - in Tottenham and asks why the situation grew so violent.

Wesley Stephenson speaks with people who were on Tottenham High Road when the violence broke out.

He reveals deep-seated anger at the police within some sections of the community and hears claims that the police response was not robust enough.

Producer: Hannah Barnes.

Why did the shooting of Mark Duggan by police in North London spark riots?

The Satanic Cult That Wasn't20150423

How Satanic abuse accusations in a North London suburb went global, but turned out to be untrue. Melanie Abbott investigates.

Producer: Joe Kent

Researcher: Kirsteen Knight.

The Seven Day Health Service20140116

The Seven-day Health Service20140116

Jeremy Hunt says he wants the NHS to expand so that more patients get the best care when they need it. But is the health secretary's goal of week-round provision realistic when the health service is already struggling to make an unprecedented £20bn in efficiency savings? And what is the evidence that more staff at weekends will make a difference? Wesley Stephenson investigates the case for weekend working in the NHS and asks what lessons we can take from hospitals in England already moving towards seven-day services.

The Truth About Statins20140410

The vast majority of men in their 50s, and most women over 60, could soon be offered statins - cholesterol-lowering drugs - to reduce the risk of heart disease. That would mean that a 59 year old man who doesn't smoke, has no history of heart disease and has healthy weight, blood pressure and cholesterol levels could find himself taking a statin a day for life. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence proposes that up to twelve million people - one in four adults - should take the medication.

Critics argue against such mass medication and claim that there is a high incidence of side affects including muscle aches, sleep problems and diabetes. They also question the drugs' effectiveness in reducing the number of heart attacks.

But the defenders of statins say that this is scaremongering and risks unnecessary deaths.

Tom Esslemont investigates how the UK has become the so called 'statins capital' of Europe and explores the arguments for and against.

Producer: Emma Rippon

Researcher: Ben Weisz.

The Work Programme20110915
The Work Programme Revisited20120329

The Report investigates the government's welfare-to-work scheme. Why are some of the organisations in charge of delivering the plans saying that the Work Programme is unworkable?

Shortly after the £5 billion Work Programme was put into place last year, The Report highlighted concerns about whether the scheme could succeed where other plans had failed in helping the long-term unemployed find jobs, through the use of charities and for-profit companies.

Hannah Barnes revisits the story and finds that despite the fact the scheme has been running for less than a year, some charities and voluntary organisations are already pulling out. They cite a lack of referrals from prime contractors - the handful of mostly private companies the government contracted with under the Work Programme - and the difficulty of helping the most difficult cases.

With the bulk of payments under the scheme linked to keeping people in jobs over the long term, some charities have struggled with cash flow problems that have threatened to put them out of business.

A National Audit Office report suggested that the government had been being overly optimistic in its estimates of the number of people who will be helped into work over the course of the Work Programme's five-year contracts. Hannah revisits some of the unemployed people currently on the scheme who spoke to The Report to in September. Six months on, have any of them found jobs?

With warning signs piling up, The Report asks why the coalition government is still pressing forward with the Work Programme.

Is the government's welfare-to-work programme simply unworkable?

Tommy Robinson's Pegida Ambition20160128

Tommy Robinson's Pegida Ambition20160128
Tommy Robinson's Pegida Ambition20160128

Tommy Robinson was the most high profile figure in the English Defence League. Then he apparently abandoned his hostility towards Islam and aligned himself with the counter extremism think tank Quilliam. Now he is back on the anti-Islam beat, helping to launch the UK branch of the German pressure group Pegida, with the first rally planned to take place in Birmingham. Reporter and Birmingham resident Adrian Goldberg spends time with Robinson and gets him to meet some of his fiercest foes in the city.

Producer: Smita Patel

Researcher: Holly Topham

Editor: Innes Bowen.

Tony Blair: Farewell To The Quartet20150326

As Tony Blair steps down from his Middle East peace envoy role, Simon Cox asks why the former Prime Minister is going and what he has achieved.

Trojan Horse Schools Plot20140724

An anonymous document purporting to reveal a conspiracy by Muslim activists to Islamise secular schools hit the headlines in March this year. The document, known as the Trojan horse letter, was almost certainly a fake. But a government investigation concluded this week that there had been a campaign to introduce "an intolerant and aggressive Islamic ethos into a few schools in Birmingham" and that some Muslim governors had in fact employed the underhand tactics outlined in the letter. Teachers who failed to go along with the Islamising agenda were sometimes bullied by Muslim governors and activists. Yet Birmingham City Council preferred to pay off bullied teachers rather than confront the perpetrators.

Reporter Simon Cox spends time in one of the schools inspected, meets parents and teachers and talks to two of the alleged plotters.

Producer: Ben Crighton.

Trouble At The Telegraph20150312

A once great British institution is in real trouble - Her Majesty's Daily Telegraph. The paper that used to appeal to barristers is courting clicks with headlines like 'A bondage masterclass? Sure, just show me the ropes' and facing accusations it's letting advertisers dictate its news agenda. What went so wrong? Many are pointing the finger at the newspaper's reclusive owners, The Barclay Brothers, and CEO, Murdoch MacLennan. The Report investigates.

Reporter: Robin Aitken

Producer: Tom Randall.

Trouble At The Telegraph20150319

The Daily Telegraph's political commentator Peter Oborne resigned in February 2015, accusing the paper of shying away from stories that might upset its advertisers. Reporter Robin Aitken asks whether the accusation is fair and traces the Telegraph's evolution from a broadsheet newspaper designed to appeal to middle England to a multimedia "news content provider".

Reporter: Robin Aitken

Producer: Tom Randall.

Trouble Inside20110203

The riots at Ford open prison at New Year made front page news, but there have been several disturbances recently in young offenders institutes and higher category prisons.

Tension in prisons has risen as a result of overcrowding and street gangs who operate inside prisons, putting pressure on the transfer system.

After a day of rioting at HMP Ashwell in Rutland in 2009, three quarters of the premises were damaged and 420 inmates had to be moved - yet no prosecutions are being brought, which some say sends out the wrong message.

Figures for injuries and attacks on officers and other prisoners are up in some areas, and prison officers believe that staffing levels are inadequate with so much pressure in the system.

Twenty years after the Woolf Report into the riots and protests at Strangeways prison in Manchester, Gill Dummigan asks whether those lessons are being heeded.

Producer: Rob Cave.

Riots, disturbances and injuries in prisons: what's behind the rise in tension?

Trump V The Republicans In New Hampshire: Pj O'rourke On The Campaign Trail20160211

The New Hampshire primary is the first proper vote of the American Presidential election. Finally, after all the debates, polls and bluster, voters get to choose their preferred candidate for president.

This year, New Hampshire is seen by many as the moment of truth for the Republican frontrunner Donald Trump. The polls say he is on his way to the nomination, but the pundits are almost universally sceptical.

Conservative satirical journalist PJ O'Rourke is a long time watcher of the Republican Party and a veteran at covering elections. He is also a long term resident of New Hampshire, a state so small where you do not have to go looking for the candidates - they will find you. In the last week of the New Hampshire primary, PJ O'Rourke goes on the campaign trail to discover whether voters will really choose a candidate who breaks all the rules of US politics.

Tunisia On The Fault Line20150820

The gun attack on the beach resort of Sousse that killed 38 tourists in June deterred many holidaymakers from travelling to Tunisia. But not journalist Frances Stonor Saunders. She set off for an all-inclusive holiday package to Hammamet, a nearby seaside resort. As well as deserted beaches and eerily empty hotels, Frances has a chance encounter with a man who helped foil a previous terror attack at a popular tourist site. And she hears why Tunisians are refusing to go to local hotels, despite desperate pleas from hotel owners.

Producer: Ben Crighton.

(Image credit: European Photopress Agency)

Uk Border Agency Strike20120726

What are the reasons behind the strike by border staff? Adrian Goldberg investigates.

Border guards and other Home Office staff are due to strike today (July 26th) in protest at staff cuts, pay and privatisation.

The move has been condemned by the government who say the action by workers in the Border Force is designed to cause maximum disruption on the eve of the Olympics. Around 120,000 passengers are expected through Heathrow on Thursday alone.

The Report examines the reasons behind the strike. Unions say the drive to ensure no queues at Heathrow has come at a cost. They point out the UK Border Agency and Border Force has cut a thousand more jobs than planned and staff are being drafted in from other areas to ensure immigration desks are fully manned. But they complain these staff aren't fully trained and security is being jeopardised.

Adrian Goldberg also investigates concerns that UKBA is not doing enough to trace and deport many people who should not be in the country.

Undercover Police20130711

After revelations that an undercover police officer spied on Stephen Lawrence's family and friends,

Melanie Abbott looks for the truth about undercover policing.

Universal Credit20131010

In The Report this week Simon Cox finds out why the Department for Work and Pensions has struggled to create an IT system that can deliver Universal Credit.

The government announced in 2010 that it planned to create a single payment - combining six of the current benefits available for those struggling financially. The plan for Universal Credit was developed in Opposition by Iain Duncan Smith, now Secretary of State for Work and Pensions.

It was envisioned that there would be a pilot in April 2013, with the system rolled out to all new out-of-work claimants by October 2013. By 2017 all those in receipt of benefits should be claiming Universal Credit.

However, it was announced earlier this year that the pilot would only include a very small number of new claimants - the most simple to process. The national roll-out has now been scaled back. And in September this year the National Audit Office produced a damning report, saying the project had been beset with problems.

But was the plan too ambitious in the first place? Or could better management have delivered the project to the timescales originally set out? Simon Cox travels to the areas of Greater Manchester where the new benefit is being trialled to see how Universal Credit is being welcomed.

Producer: Charlotte McDonald.

Current affairs series combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.

University Fees20120823

What is the impact of the £9,000-a-year student fees on English universities?

Students starting university this Autumn will see a three-fold increase in fees - and they say they want value for money. But with universities experiencing a squeeze on the funding they receive from Government, can they give students what they want?

Reporter Phil Mackie reports that some universities are now running courses at a loss - and hears from consultants who warn that a number of institutions are unlikely to be financially viable in the longer term. They warn that the changes to the university funding system could have potentially "devastating consequences."

Producer: Samantha Fenwick.

Virgin Galactic20141127

Should Sir Richard Branson have known about safety issues associated with the fatal crash of a Virgin Galactic rocket in October 2014? Lesley Curwen tells the story behind the crash and asks whether the Virgin brand can survive the tragedy.

Producer: Simon Coates.

Visa Trouble At London Met20120920

The UK Border Agency recently revoked London Metropolitan University's licence to sponsor overseas students, meaning that it can no longer recruit or continue to teach current students.

According to the Government, the UKBA found systemic failings in the way the university managed its records. It found that many students did not have permission to study in the UK, did not have the correct English language or academic qualifications, while in other cases there was not enough evidence students were attending their courses.

London Met on the other hand does not recognise these problems, and is taking legal against the UKBA's decision.

Wesley Stephenson asks why the licence was revoked. Has London Met been lax in its recruitment and monitoring of students, or has it fallen victim of a complicated visa system? Why did the UKBA act now? Was there overwhelming evidence of systemic failings, or was there political pressure to take tough action? university- one.

What Caused The Prison Riots?20110203

The riots at Ford open prison at New Year made front page news, but recently there have been a clutch of riots, disturbances and incidents of indiscipline in young offenders institutes and higher category prisons. The Tornado Squads - brought in to regain control in an establishment - were called out eleven times in 2010, more than twice as often as in the previous year. Lord Woolf, the new Chair of the Prison Reform Trust, and author of the report into Britain's worst rioting at Strangeways over 20 years ago says these outbreaks are a disturbing sign and symptomatic of strain in the system: "a well run prison won't have riots".

Tension in prisons is said to have risen as a result of continued overcrowding and bullying by street gangs who operate inside prisons, all of which put pressure on the transfer system. Prison officers believe that staffing levels are inadequate and that cuts in prison budgets can only make things worse. The Government Green Paper promises radical reform of the prison system, and a rehabilitation revolution to reduce prisoner numbers in the medium term, and the Minister Crispin Blunt is clear that the country can't afford to reduce overcrowding now. In the meantime over 800 prison places are to go by April. Gill Dummigan reports on the pressures on the prison system.

Producer: Rob Cave.

When Gps Should Say No20150528

The Academy of Royal Medical Colleges believes there is evidence that many patients are over-medicalised; given treatments that do not help alleviate a range of commonplace conditions. In some cases they may even do harm. Adrian Goldberg explores what patients expect from a medical consultation, how they might work better and why some doctors find it hard to just say no. As scientific progress makes more treatments possible, have we confused what is on offer with what might do us the most good?

Producer: Rosamund Jones.

Who Killed Meredith Kercher?20140220

Amanda Knox has had her conviction for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher reinstated by an Italian court. She was convicted, along with her former boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito, in 2009. Doubts about forensic evidence meant the couple were freed after a successful appeal in 2011. But in January 2014 an appeal court reverted to the original guilty verdicts.

Reporter Ruth Alexander travels to Italy to investigate the strength of the case.

Producer: Helen Grady.

Who Runs England's Schools20101202
Why Are People Voting Ukip?20140710

Wesley Stephenson hangs out in the Essex district of Thurrock and tries to find out why so many of its voters deserted Labour and the Tories for UKIP. In the European and local council elections the UKIP vote jumped 163 percent in Thurrock. The council area comprises one of the most marginal Westminster seats in the country, so what will this mean for the general election and can what's happening in Thurrock tell us anything about the rise of UKIP elsewhere in the UK?

Why Can't We Catch The Athletes Who Dope?20130808

Just a few weeks before the World Athletics Championships in Moscow, two top sprinters tested positive for performance enhancing drugs. Tyson Gay is the fastest man this year over 100 metres and Asafa Powell is the former world record holder. They were the biggest scalps since Ben Johnson was stripped of his Olympic gold medal in 1988. Since then sophisticated testing programmes have been set up and systems to monitor athletes' whereabouts are in place.

In this week's Report, Simon Cox examines why so few cheating athletes are being detected. He speaks to the key figures who have drawn up the most damning assessment of the anti-doping regime and the failure of individual national bodies to properly address the problem. And he travels to the German laboratory who developed a test for the latest banned drug which can still be bought legally in the UK.

Women Bishops20121213

Since the House of Laity in the General Synod voted not to push ahead with the ordination of women bishops there have been calls for reform. Many believe that the House of Laity does not represent the views of the majority of churchgoers and overly represents the evangelical conservative and anglo-catholic perspective. Is that the case or are these calls for reform indicative of a bad case of sour grapes? Linda Pressly investigates what it would take to create common ground between traditionalists and liberals within the Church and, if that is not possible, what the future might hold.