The Reith Lectures

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Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
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Daniel Barenboim: In the Beginning Was Sound2006040720120727

Conductor Daniel Barenboim points a way forward for everyone through music.

Daniel Barenboim: In the Beginning Was Sound2006040720120727

Another chance to hear the first of Daniel Barenboim's 2006 Reith Lecture series entitled In the Beginning Was Sound. "Music," argues Barenboim, "lies at the heart of what it is to be human". In his lecture, recorded in front of an audience at the Cadogan Hall in London, he draws on a lifetime of musical experience to point a way forward for us all through music. "Music is a way to make sense of the world: our history, our politics, our future . . . our very essence." Presented by Sue Lawley. Produced by Tony Phillips.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930623]

Working in ivorytowers or public offices, concentrating on private thoughts or challenging orthodoxy - Edward Said , Professor at Columbia University, examines how intellectuals have been defined and what their role should be in the modern world.

1: Representations of the Intellectual. Producer Anne Winder

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930623]

Unknown: Edward Said

Producer: Anne Winder

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970218]

The Reith Interview

This year's lecturer is Patricia J Williams , professor of law at

Columbia University, New York, and acclaimed author of The Alchemy of Race and Rights. She talks to Sue

MacGregor about the influences and inspirations for her thinking. Producer Constance St Louis

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970218]

The Reith Interview

This year's lecturer is Patricia J Williams , professor of law at

Columbia University, New York, and acclaimed author of The Alchemy of Race and Rights. She talks to Sue

MacGregor about the influences and inspirations for her thinking. Producer Constance St Louis

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970218]

Unknown: Patricia J Williams

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970218]

Unknown: Patricia J Williams

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970225]

The Emperor's New Clothes

In the first of five lectures, Professor Patricia J Williams examines how the issue of colour remains so powerfully determinative of everything from life circumstance to manner of death, in a world that is, by and large, officially "colour blind".

Producer Constance St Louis

* I Come In Peace: page 6

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970225]

The Emperor's New Clothes

In the first of five lectures, Professor Patricia J Williams examines how the issue of colour remains so powerfully determinative of everything from life circumstance to manner of death, in a world that is, by and large, officially "colour blind".

Producer Constance St Louis

* I Come In Peace: page 6

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970225]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970225]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970304]

The Pantomime of Race. In the second of five lectures, Professor Patricia J Williams explores what is distorted and what is rendered invisible by the lens of colour blindness.

Producer Constance St Louis

* See Polly Toynbee : page 12

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970304]

The Pantomime of Race. In the second of five lectures, Professor Patricia J Williams explores what is distorted and what is rendered invisible by the lens of colour blindness.

Producer Constance St Louis

* See Polly Toynbee : page 12

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970304]

Unknown: Patricia J Williams

Producer: Constance St Louis

Unknown: Polly Toynbee

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970304]

Unknown: Patricia J Williams

Producer: Constance St Louis

Unknown: Polly Toynbee

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970311]

The Distribution of Distress. In the third of five lectures, Professor

Patricia J Williams looks at the juxtaposition of race and class and their interaction in society. Producer Constance St Louis

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970311]

The Distribution of Distress. In the third of five lectures, Professor

Patricia J Williams looks at the juxtaposition of race and class and their interaction in society. Producer Constance St Louis

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970311]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970311]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970318]

The War between the Worlds. In the fourth of five lectures, Professor Patricia J Williams examines the impact of racialised science on attitudes to race. She argues that scientific statements about black people, in terms of genetic attributes of, for example, athleticism or intelligence, nurture racial stereotyping; and she explains why it is so difficult to argue against what are supposedly scientific facts. Producer Constance St Louis

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970318]

The War between the Worlds. In the fourth of five lectures, Professor Patricia J Williams examines the impact of racialised science on attitudes to race. She argues that scientific statements about black people, in terms of genetic attributes of, for example, athleticism or intelligence, nurture racial stereotyping; and she explains why it is so difficult to argue against what are supposedly scientific facts. Producer Constance St Louis

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970318]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970318]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970325]

An Ordinary Brilliance: Parting the Waters, Closing the Wounds in the concluding lecture, Professor Patricia J Williams attempts to point the way forward by drawing out solutions which include developing the ability to resist racism's inevitability and reconciling racial tensions across the divide.

Producer Constance St Louis

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970325]

An Ordinary Brilliance: Parting the Waters, Closing the Wounds in the concluding lecture, Professor Patricia J Williams attempts to point the way forward by drawing out solutions which include developing the ability to resist racism's inevitability and reconciling racial tensions across the divide.

Producer Constance St Louis

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970325]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970325]
Programme Catalogue - Details: 119960206

Producer: T. WATT

Next in series: PATRICIA J. WILLIAMS, PROG 1/5

Previous in series: 30 June 1993

Description

"A Web Of Worries" Is our language sick? Complaints about language 'disease'

Subject Categories

discussion programmes (programme format)

language analysis

development of languages

Broadcast history

06 Feb 1996 20:30-21:00 (RADIO 4)

15 Jul 1996 BT=1930 (RADIO 3)

Contributors

Tessa Watt (Producer)

Jean Aitchison (Speaker)

John Ayto (Speaker)

Dafydd Rees (Speaker)

Gordon Fudge (Speaker)

Claire Peyton Jones (Speaker)

Recorded on 1996-01-19.

01Securing Freedom: 2011, Aung San Suu Kyi: Liberty20110628

The Burmese pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lecture series, 'Securing Freedom'.

Reflecting on her own experience under house arrest in Burma, she explores the universal human aspiration to be free and the spirit which drives people to dissent.

She also comments on the Arab Spring, comparing the event that triggered last December's revolution in Tunisia with the death of a student during a protest in Burma in 1988.

Aung San Suu Kyi explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lectures.

01Securing Freedom: 2011, Aung San Suu Kyi: Liberty20110702

Aung San Suu Kyi explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lectures.

01Securing Freedom: 2011, Aung San Suu Kyi: Liberty20110715

The Burmese pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lecture series, 'Securing Freedom'.

Reflecting on her own experience under house arrest in Burma, she explores the universal human aspiration to be free and the spirit which drives people to dissent. She also comments on the Arab Spring, comparing the event that triggered last December's revolution in Tunisia with the death of a student during a protest in Burma in 1988.

Aung San Suu Kyi explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lectures.

01The Reith Lectures 2010
01The Reith Lectures 2010, The Scientific Citizen20100601

Lecture 1: ''The Scientific Citizen'

In the first of this year's Reith Lectures, entitled Scientific Horizons, Martin Rees, President of the Royal Society, Master of Trinity College and Astronomer Royal, explores the challenges facing science in the 21st century.

We are increasingly turning to government and the media to explain the risks we face.

But in the wake of public confusion over issues like climate change, the swine 'flu vaccine and, more recently, Iceland's volcanic ash cloud, Martin Rees calls on scientists to come forward and play a greater role in helping us understand the science that affects us all.

Prof Martin Rees asks who we should trust to explain the risks we face.

01The Reith Lectures 2010, The Scientific Citizen20100605
02Martin Rees: Scientific Horizons: 2010, Surviving The Century20100612

Lecture 2: 'Surviving the Century'

In the second of this year's Reith Lectures, recorded for the first time in Wales in the National Museum Cardiff, Martin Rees, President of the Royal Society and Astronomer Royal, continues to explore the challenges facing science in the 21st century.

Our planet is coming under increasing strain from climate change, population explosion and food shortages.

How can we use science to help us solve the crisis that we are moving rapidly towards, as we use up our natural resources ever more quickly?

Professor Rees explores the urgent need to substantially reduce our global CO2 emissions, or the atmospheric concentration will reach truly threatening levels.

To do this, we need international cooperation, and global funding for clean and green technologies.

He calls for the UK to keep one step ahead of other countries by developing technologies to reduce emissions, and says we should take the lead in wave and tidal energy, among other solutions.

Science brings innovation but also risk, and random elements including fanatics can abuse new technologies to threaten our planet in ways we never dreamt of.

The challenge, for our scientists, governments and people, is to confront the threats to our planet and find the solutions in science.

Does science have the answers to help us save our planet?

02Securing Freedom: 2011, Aung San Suu Kyi: Dissent20110705

The pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, examines what drives people to dissent in the second of the 2011 Reith Lecture series.

'Securing Freedom'.

Reflecting on the history of her own party, the National League for Democracy, Aung San Suu Kyi, examines the meaning of opposition and dissident.

She also explains her reasons for following the path of non-violence.

Aung San Suu Kyi examines what drives people to dissent in the second Reith Lecture 2011.

02Securing Freedom: 2011, Aung San Suu Kyi: Dissent20110709

Aung San Suu Kyi examines what drives people to dissent in the second Reith Lecture 2011.

02The Reith Lectures 2010, Surviving The Century20100608

Lecture 2: 'Surviving the Century'

In the second of this year's Reith Lectures, recorded for the first time in Wales in the National Museum Cardiff, Martin Rees, President of the Royal Society and Astronomer Royal, continues to explore the challenges facing science in the 21st century.

Our planet is coming under increasing strain from climate change, population explosion and food shortages.

How can we use science to help us solve the crisis that we are moving rapidly towards, as we use up our natural resources ever more quickly?

Martin explores the urgent need to substantially reduce our global CO2 emissions, or the atmospheric concentration will reach truly threatening levels.

To do this, we need international cooperation, and global funding for clean and green technologies.

Martin calls for the UK to keep one step ahead of other countries by developing technologies to reduce emissions, and says we should take the lead in wave and tidal energy, among other solutions.

Science brings innovation but also risk, and random elements including fanatics can abuse new technologies to threaten our planet in ways we never dreamt of.

The challenge, for our scientists, governments and people, is to confront the threats to our planet and find the solutions in science.

Does science have the answers to help us save our planet?

03Martin Rees: Scientific Horizons: 2010

03Martin Rees: Scientific Horizons: 2010, What We'll Never Know20100615

3.

What We'll Never Know

In the third of this year's Reith Lectures, recorded at the Royal Society during its 350th anniversary year, its President Martin Rees continues to explore the challenges facing science in the 21st century.

He stresses there are things that will always lie beyond our sphere of comprehension and we should accept these limits to our knowledge.

On the other hand, there are things we've never even dreamt of that will one day be ours to explore and understand.

The outcome of the quest for alien life will revolutionise our sense of self in the next two decades.

But some things -- like travelling back in time -- will never happen.

Professor Martin Rees explains where the limits of our scientific knowledge lie.

03Martin Rees: Scientific Horizons: 2010, What We'll Never Know20100619

3.

What We'll Never Know

In the third of this year's Reith Lectures, recorded at the Royal Society during its 350th anniversary year, its President Martin Rees continues to explore the challenges facing science in the 21st century.

He stresses there are things that will always lie beyond our sphere of comprehension and we should accept these limits to our knowledge.

On the other hand, there are things we've never even dreamt of that will one day be ours to explore and understand.

The outcome of the quest for alien life will revolutionise our sense of self in the next two decades.

But some things -- like travelling back in time -- will never happen.

Professor Martin Rees explains where the limits of our scientific knowledge lie.

03Securing Freedom: 2011, Terror20110906

The former Director-General of the Security Service (MI5), Eliza Manningham-Buller gives the first of her BBC Reith Lectures 2011 called " Terror." On the tenth anniversary of the attacks on the United States on September 11th she reflects on the lasting significance of that day.

Was it a "terrorist" crime, an act of war or something different?

Eliza Manningham-Buller reflects on 9/11 in the first of her Reith Lectures 2011.

03Securing Freedom: 2011, Terror20110910

The former director-general of the British security service MI5, Eliza Manningham-Buller, gives the first of her BBC Reith Lectures, entitled Terror.

On the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on the United States, she reflects on the lasting significance of that day, asking was it a terrorist crime? An act of war? Or something different?

She also reveals details of the discussions involving international security agencies in the days following the attacks on New York and Washington DC and examines the impact the US-led invasion of Iraq had on the fight against al-Qaeda.

Eliza Manningham-Buller reflects on 9/11 in the first of her Reith Lectures 2011.

04Martin Rees: Scientific Horizons: 2010

04Securing Freedom: 2011, Eliza Manningham-buller Lecture 2:security20110913

The former Director-General of the Security Service (MI5), Eliza Manningham-Buller gives the second of her BBC Reith Lectures 2011.

In this lecture called " Security" she argues that the security and intelligence services in a democracy have a good record of protecting and preserving freedom.

Assessing the role of security and intelligence services in a democracy.

04Securing Freedom: 2011, Eliza Manningham-buller: Security20110917

The former Director-General of the Security Service (MI5), Eliza Manningham-Buller gives the second of her BBC Reith Lectures 2011.

In this lecture called " Security" she argues that the security and intelligence services in a democracy have a good record of protecting and preserving freedom.

Assessing the role of security and intelligence services in a democracy.

04 LASTMartin Rees: Scientific Horizons: 2010, The Runaway World20100622

THE REITH LECTURES 2010

4.

The Runaway World

In the last Reith Lecture of 2010, Martin Rees, President of the Royal Society and Astronomer Royal, explores how fast our world is moving in the 21st century.

Speaking at the Open University in Milton Keynes, the home of online learning, he acknowledges how the internet and other technologies have transformed our lives.

Now he calls on politicians and other authorities to provide the funding that will keep the UK among the world's front runners in scientific research and discovery.

Without money and without education to attract young people into science, the UK is in danger of falling behind China and other countries in the Far East that are investing heavily in their science and technology sectors.

Professor Rees ends his series of lectures evoking memories of the 'glorious' Ely Cathedral, near Cambridge, a monument built to last a thousand years.

If we, like the cathedral builders, redirect our energies and focus on the long-term, he believes together we can solve the problems that face our planet, and secure its future for billions of people worldwide and for generations to come.

Producer: Kirsten Lass

Editor: Sue Ellis.

Prof Rees calls for the UK to stay at the forefront of scientific research and discovery.

04 LASTMartin Rees: Scientific Horizons: 2010, The Runaway World20100626

THE REITH LECTURES 2010

4.

The Runaway World

In the last Reith Lecture of 2010, Martin Rees, President of the Royal Society and Astronomer Royal, explores how fast our world is moving in the 21st century.

Speaking at the Open University in Milton Keynes, the home of online learning, he acknowledges how the internet and other technologies have transformed our lives.

Now he calls on politicians and other authorities to provide the funding that will keep the UK among the world's front runners in scientific research and discovery.

Without money and without education to attract young people into science, the UK is in danger of falling behind China and other countries in the Far East that are investing heavily in their science and technology sectors.

Professor Rees ends his series of lectures evoking memories of the 'glorious' Ely Cathedral, near Cambridge, a monument built to last a thousand years.

If we, like the cathedral builders, redirect our energies and focus on the long-term, he believes together we can solve the problems that face our planet, and secure its future for billions of people worldwide and for generations to come.

Producer: Kirsten Lass

Editor: Sue Ellis.

Prof Rees calls for the UK to stay at the forefront of scientific research and discovery.

04 LASTThe Reith Lectures 2009, A New Politics Of The Common Good20090704

Professor Michael Sandel delivers four lectures about the prospects of a new politics of the common good. The series is presented and chaired by Sue Lawley.

Sandel makes the case for a moral and civic renewal in democratic politics. Recorded at George Washington University in Washington DC, he calls for a new politics of the common good and says that we need to think of ourselves as citizens, not just consumers.

Professor Sandel makes the case for a moral and civic renewal in democratic politics.

05 LASTSecuring Freedom: 2011, Eliza Manningham-buller: Freedom20110920

In this third and final Reith lecture the former Director General of the security service (MI5), Eliza Manningham-Buller, discusses policy priorities since 9.11.

She reflects on the Arab Spring, and argues that the West's support of authoritarian regimes did, to some extent, fuel the growth of Al-Qaeda.

The lecture also considers when we should talk to "terrorists".

Ex M15 boss Eliza Manningham-Buller discusses foreign policy in her third Reith Lecture.

05 LASTSecuring Freedom: 2011, Eliza Manningham-buller: Freedom20110924

Ex M15 boss Eliza Manningham-Buller discusses foreign policy in her third Reith Lecture.

199701The Emperor's New Clothes19970721

In the first of five lectures, Professor Patricia J Williams examines how the issue of colour remains so powerfully determinative of everything from life circumstance to manner of death, in a world that is, by and large, officially `colour blind'.

199702The Pantomime Of Race19970722

`The Pantomime of Race'.

In the second of five lectures, Professor Patricia J Williams explores what is distorted and what is rendered invisible by the lens of colour blindness.

199703The Distribution Of Distress19970723

`The Distribution of Distress'.

In the third of five lectures, Professor Patricia J Williams looks at the juxtaposition of race and class and their interaction in society.

199704The War Between The Worlds19970724

`The War between the Worlds'.

In the fourth of five lectures, Professor Patricia J Williams examines the impact of racialised science on attitudes to race.

She argues that scientific statements about black people, in terms of genetic attributes of, for example, athleticism or intelligence, nurture racial stereotyping; and she explains why it is so difficult to argue against what are supposedly scientific facts.

199705 LASTAn Ordinary Brilliance: Parting The Waters, Closing The Wounds19970725

In the concluding lecture, Professor Patricia J Williams attempts to point the way forward by drawing out solutions which include developing the ability to resist racism's inevitability and reconciling racial tensions across the divide.

199799The Geneology Of Race - Towards A Theory Of Grace19970728

Dr Polly Rewt explores the issues raised by Professor Patricia J Williams in her lectures `The Geneology of Race - Towards a Theory of Grace'.

1998011998040819980425
1998021998041519980502
199803War And Our World1998042219980509

The fiftieth season of Reith Lectures continues with the third of five lectures, `War and Our World', by military historian John Keegan.

Melvyn Bragg introduces the event and chairs questions from an invited audience gathered in the Great Hall, King's College, London.

/ The first of five lectures, `War and Our World', is given by military historian John Keegan.

Melvyn Bragg introduces the event and chairs questions from an invited audience gathered in the Faraday Lecture Theatre at the Royal Institution, London.

199804War And The Individual1998042919980502

The fiftieth season of `Reith Lectures' continues with the fourth of five lectures, `War and the Individual', by military historian John Keegan.

Melvyn Bragg introduces the event and chairs questions from an invited audience gathered in the Bute Hall, Scottish Centre for War Studies, Glasgow University.

199805 LASTCan There Be An End To War?1998050619980509

The fiftieth season of Reith Lectures is concluded with the last of five lectures, `Can There Be an End to War?' by military historian John Keegan.

Melvyn Bragg introduces the event and chairs questions from an invited audience gathered in the Radio Theatre, Broadcasting House, London.

199901Globalisation1999032419990410

Five lectures about globalisation given by Anthony Giddens, director of the London School of Economics.

For the first time the lectures are broadcast from around the world and given before an invited audience who will join in the discussion.

Melvyn Bragg is in the chair at the Royal Institution in London.

1: `Globalisation'.

199903Tradition1999040719990424

Five lectures about aspects of globalisation given by Anthony Giddens, director of the LSE.

3: `Tradition'.

Globally, tradition and custom are in retreat.

What are the consequences of this and of the rise of fundamentalism? This lecture comes from the Nehru Memorial Museum and Library in Delhi and is followed by questions from an invited audience.

Mark Tully is in the chair.

199904The Family1999041419990501

Five lectures about aspects of globalisation given by Anthony Giddens, director of the LSE.

4: `The Family'.

Some of the most profound changes happening across the world are in people's personal lives.

How best do we understand and cope with these changes? This fourth lecture comes from the National Press Club in Washington and is followed by questions from an invited audience.

Bridget Kendall is in the chair.

199905 LASTDemocracy1999042119990508

The last of five lectures about aspects of globalisation given by Anthony Giddens, director of the LSE.

`Democracy'.

Why are people growing disillusioned with democracy? Can we build a new global consensus based on dialogue and communication? Melvyn Bragg is in the chair at the Royal Institution in London.

200001Governance2000032920000415

Five eminent thinkers discuss sustainable development, and will meet at the end of the series for a round-table discussion hosted by the Prince of Wales.

Introduced by Kate Adie.

1: `Governance'.

Chris Patten, Commissioner for External Affairs for the European Union explains why he believes democratic values must flourish if governments are to pursue environmentally friendly policies.

200001Governance2000041220000415

Five eminent thinkers discuss sustainable development, and the series will end with a round-table discussion hosted by the Prince of Wales.

Introduced by Kate Adie.

1: `Governance'.

Chris Patten, Commissioner for External Affairs for the European Union explains why he believes democratic values must flourish if governments are to pursue environmentally friendly policies.

200002Biodiversity2000040520000422

Five eminent thinkers talk about sustainable development.

At the end of the series, they will come together for a discussion hosted by the Prince of Wales.

2: `Biodiversity'.

Thomas E Lovejoy, chief biodiversity adviser to the World Bank and councillor at the Smithsonian, says we are in `deep trouble biologically...

in a spasm of extinction of our own making unequalled since the one which took the dinosaurs'.

200003Respect For The Earth2000041220000429

Five eminent thinkers speak from around the world on different aspects of the theme of sustainable development.

At the end of the series the lecturers will come together for a final round-table discussion hosted by the Prince of Wales.

Presented by Kate Adie.

3: Business.

Chief executive of BP-Amoco Sir John Browne examines the challenges faced in a world where demands are increasing and resources are limited.

200003Respect For The Earth2000051720000429

In a special programme recorded at Highgrove, the Prince of Wales presents his views on sustainable development.

The distinguished individuals who have delivered their lectures over the past five weeks will also be present to listen and to discuss how their theories can be made to work in practice.

James Naughtie presents and chairs the discussion.

200004Respect For The Earth2000041920000506

Five eminent thinkers speak on different aspects of the theme of sustainable development.

The lecturers will come together for a final round-table discussion hosted by the Prince of Wales.

Presented by Kate Adie.

4: Health and Population.

Director-general of the World Health Organisation Gro Harlem Brundtland calls for a radical new approach to enable the planet to meet the basic needs of its six billion people.

200004Respect For The Earth2000050320000520

The series concludes with a lecture on this year's theme of sustainable development given at Highgrove by the Prince of Wales, who afterwards talks to the five Reith lecturers about how their theories can be made to work in practice.

Presented and chaired by James Naughtie

200005Poverty And Globalisation2000042620000513

5: `Poverty and Globalisation'.

Can we feed the world without intensive farming techniques or GM crops? In the last lecture on the theme of sustainable development, environmental campaigner Vandana Shiva argues that globalisation is robbing the poor and threatening the planet.

Presented from New Delhi by Kate Adie.

This year's lecturers talk to the Prince of Wales on Wednesday at 8.00pm (repeated Saturday 10.15pm).

200005Poverty And Globalisation2000051020000513

5: `Poverty and Globalisation'.

Can we feed the world without using intensive farming techniques or GM crops? In the last lecture on this year's theme of sustainable development, environmental campaigner Vandana Shiva argues that globalisation is robbing the poor and threatening the planet.

Presented by Kate Adie.

Next week the lecturers will come together for a discussion hosted by the Prince of Wales.

200101Brave Old World2001040420010407

The Reith Lectures 2001 tackle the topic of ageing.

Prof Tom Kirkwood examines the impact of science upon the human lifespan - both now and in years to come.

200102Making Choices2001041820010428

The Reith Lectures 2001 tackle the topic of ageing.

From the Edinburgh International Science Festival, Prof Tom Kirkwood delivers a third lecture on the impact of science on human lifespan, asking if sex shortens our lives.

200102Thread Of Life2001032820010414

This year's Reith Lectures tackle the topic of ageing.

From Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York, Prof Tom Kirkwood gives a second lecture on how science is impacting on human lifespan, asking if Bill Clinton's promise that Leo Blair would live an extra 25 years was a sensible target.

200102Thread Of Life2001041120010414
200103Making Choices2001042520010428

The Reith Lectures 2001 tackle the topic of ageing.

From Berryhill Retirement Village, Stoke-on-Trent, Prof Tom Kirkwood delivers a fourth lecture on the impact of science on human lifespan.

200103New Directions20010505

The Reith Lectures 2001 tackle the topic of ageing.

From the International Centre for Life, Newcastle, Prof Tom Kirkwood delivers his final lecture on the impact of science on human lifespan.

He explains why the decisions made in the next few years will have such far-reaching consequences for the state of our society.

200104New Directions2001050220010505
200201Spreading Suspicion2002032020020406

Onora O'Neill of Newnham College, Cambridge, delivers the Reith Lectures 2002.

1: `Spreading Suspicion'.

In an age of sleaze, have our institutions become less trustworthy?

200202Trust And Terror2002041020020427
200202Trust And Terror2002041020020413

Onora O'Neill delivers the Reith Lectures 2002.

2: `Trust and Terror'.

How can communities that have been devastated by terrorist attacks return to an atmosphere of trust?

200204Trust And Transparency2002041020020427

Onora O'Neill delivers the Reith Lectures 2002.

4: `Trust and Transparency'.

Has the new ethos of open government offered more opportunities for disinformation from our leaders?

200205Licence To Deceive2002041720020504

Onora O'Neill delivers the Reith Lectures 2002.

5: `Licence to Deceive'.

Journalists tell us whom we can trust, but can we trust the journalists themselves?

200301Phantoms In The Brain2003040220030405

Professor V S Ramachandran delivers the Reith Lectures 2003.

The exploration of neurological curiosities reveals startling facts about our brains.

200302Synapses And The Self2003040920030412

Professor V S Ramachandran delivers the Reith Lectures 2003.

Tracking the visual pathways with the help of patients who are blind.

200303The Artful Brain2003041620030419

Professor VS Ramachandran delivers the third of this year's Reith Lectures, revealing what baby seagulls have to teach us about Picasso.

200304Purple Numbers And Sharp Cheese2003042320030426

Professor V S Ramachandran delivers the Reith Lectures 2003.

Mixed signals which help to explain language and metaphor.

200305Neuroscience, The New Philosophy:2003043020030503

Transforming our understanding of mankind and our place in the cosmos, Professor V S Ramachandran delivers the Reith Lectures 2003.

200401 OF 5The Changing Mask Of Fear2004040720040410

The anonymous power of the terrorist over the destiny of others.

Nobel prize winning poet and playwright Wole Soyinka argues that we are living in a new "climate of fear" and examines the challenge this presents to democracy.

Presented by Sue Lawley from the royal institution, London.

200402Power And Freedom2004041420040417

What motivates those who seek to supplant our freedom with fear? From the School of Oriental and African Studies, London.

200403The Rhetoric That Blinds And Binds2004041420040421

Wole Soyinka examines the power of language, and argues that the way we speak and the slogans with which we describe the world can limit and distort our actions.

The language of religious fanaticism and jargon of political correctness can both prove to be deadly.

200404A Quest For Dignity2004042820040501

Wole Soyinka warns of grave consequences if dignity is a casualty of fear.

Fear in the face of natural disasters leaves an individual's sense of self esteem intact, but fear engendered by terrorism or by repressive regimes robs victims of their dignity.

The loss of dignity and the resulting resentment can be one of the greatest barriers to the resolution of conflict whether in Northern Ireland or the Middle East.

200405 LASTI Am Right, You Are Dead20040505

Wole Soyinka delivers the Reith Lectures 2004.

The final talk focuses on the most dangerous being on earth - the fanatic.

2007012007041120070414

Jeffrey Sachs delivers the first of five lectures, recorded at The Royal Society in London.

Sachs outlines the challenges facing mankind and argues that we must adapt to the new age and choose a fresh path for this generation and for those to come.

2007022007041820070421

Jeffrey Sachs delivers the second of five lectures from the University in Beijing.

He discusses the dynamics of China's emergence as an economic superpower and asks what this means for the big challenges we face, notably climate change.

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Jeffrey Sachs delivers the third of five lectures from the Earth Institute at Columbia University, New York.

He talks about the need for international cooperation to begin the search for peace, warning of the ever-present threats of war, of failed states and the sheer complexity of a globalised society.

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Jeffrey Sachs delivers the fourth of five lectures from London's School of Oriental and African Studies.

He considers the challenges of extreme poverty and the extreme worry of the developed world which fears for its own prosperity.

He argues that the free market cannot solve these problems and proposes his own plan of action.

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He calls for a new Enlightenment to help make globalisation work for all.

Laying out a blueprint for global co-operation in the new millennium, he urges the world to fulfil our promises to tackle climate change, to end nuclear proliferation and to banish extreme poverty by 2015.

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Michael Sandel, Harvard Professor of Government, delivers four lectures about the prospects of a new politics of the common good.

The series is presented and chaired by Sue Lawley.

Sandel considers the expansion of markets and how we determine their moral limits.

Should immigrants, for example, pay for citizenship? Should we pay schoolchildren for good test results, or even to read a book? He calls for a more robust public debate about such questions, as part of a 'new citizenship'.

Prof Michael Sandel considers the expansion and moral limits of markets.

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Professor Michael Sandel delivers four lectures about the prospects of a new politics of the common good.

The series is presented and chaired by Sue Lawley.

Sandel considers the role of moral argument in politics.

He believes that it is often not possible for government to be neutral on moral questions and calls for a more engaged civic debate about issues such as commercial surrogacy and same-sex marriage.

Michael Sandel asks what role, if any, there is for moral argument in politics.

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Professor Michael Sandel delivers four lectures about the prospects of a new politics of the common good.

The series is presented and chaired by Sue Lawley.

Recorded at the Centre for Life in Newcastle, Sandel considers how we should use our ever-increasing scientific knowledge.

New genetic technologies hold great promise for treating and curing disease, but how far we should go in using them to manipulate muscles, moods and gender?

Professor Sandel considers how we should use our ever-increasing scientific knowledge.

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Professor Michael Sandel delivers four lectures about the prospects of a new politics of the common good.

The series is presented and chaired by Sue Lawley.

Sandel makes the case for a moral and civic renewal in democratic politics.

Recorded at George Washington University in Washington DC, he calls for a new politics of the common good and says that we need to think of ourselves as citizens, not just consumers.

Professor Sandel makes the case for a moral and civic renewal in democratic politics.