Recruiting Officer, The

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2011121820140413George Farquhar's popular Restoration Comedy, broadcast in combination with Our Country's Good (this weekend's Radio 4 Saturday Play).|During a lull in the War of the Spanish Succession, Captain Plume comes to Shrewsbury, to seduce soldiers into the army, and - if possible - recruit Silvia into marriage.|Captain Plume - Paul Higgins|Silvia - Lisa Dillon|Sergeant Kite - Ralph Ineson|Mr Worthy - Adam James|Melinda - Kate Fleetwood|Captain Brazen - Elliot Levey|Rose - Alex Tregear|Bullock - Simon Bubb|Justice Balance - Jonathan Forbes|Lucy - Adjoa Andoh|Appletree - James Lailey|Pearman - Adam Billington|Bridewell - Rikki Lawton|Justice Scale - Paul Moriarty|Justice Scruple - Gerard McDermott|Directed by Jessica Dromgoole|The Recruiting Officer enjoyed enormous success and popular acclaim during the eighteenth century, when it was produced more often than any other play, outstripping its nearest rival, Hamlet, by a wide margin.|The play also holds the honour of being the first piece of theatre ever to be produced in Australia, with a cast of convicts and officers, an event described by Thomas Keneally in his book The Playmaker, and then dramatised by Timberlake Wertenbaker in her play, Our Country's Good.|A double bill of the two plays was staged in repertory to great acclaim at The Royal Court in 1988, with a common cast.|This new pair of radio productions reproduces the enterprise.|Farquhar's 1709 Restoration comedy, where wives are recruited while soldiers are wooed.||George Farquhar's popular Restoration Comedy. During a lull in the War of the Spanish Succession, Captain Plume comes to Shrewsbury, to seduce soldiers into the army, and - if possible - recruit Silvia into marriage.|First broadcast in December 2011|The Recruiting Officer enjoyed enormous success and popular acclaim during the eighteenth century, when it was produced more often than any other play, outstripping its nearest rival, Hamlet, by a wide margin. The play also holds the honour of being the first piece of theatre ever to be produced in Australia, with a cast of convicts and officers, an event described by Thomas Keneally in his book The Playmaker, and then dramatised by Timberlake Wertenbaker in her play, Our Country's Good. A double bill of the two plays was staged in repertory to great acclaim at The Royal Court in 1988, with a common cast.