Reality Check

Justin Rowlatt presents a discussion series involving experts and people closely involved.

show more detailshow less detail

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
012007122620071229

Two government advisors join teachers and parents to discuss the current system of admission to secondary schools and how it might be improved.

02*2008010220080105

Should victims of crime be involved in dispensing justice? Legal experts join relatives of murder victims and a convicted criminal. Prof Lawrence Sherman believes in restorative justice, but will his views strand up to scrutiny from all sides?

03 LAST*2008010920080112

The government plans millions of new homes. Two government advisors come face to face with a developer, a rural campaigner and a woman who is desperate to buy her own home. They ask where the new homes should go and whether it is possible to create sustainable communities from scratch.

0201

020120090729

Justin Rowlatt presents a series of discussions with experts and people closely involved with the issues.

Those who seek to influence university policy are joined by students at the sharp end of the government's higher education policy to ask if the UK needs to send so many people to university.

Around 300,000 university students finish their studies in summer 2009, only to join one of the worst employment markets for years, and questions continue to be asked about the quality of education provided by some institutions.

Discussion about whether the UK needs to send so many people to university.

020120090801

Justin Rowlatt presents a series of discussions with experts and people closely involved with the issues.

Those who seek to influence university policy are joined by students at the sharp end of the government's higher education policy to ask if the UK needs to send so many people to university.

Around 300,000 university students finish their studies in summer 2009, only to join one of the worst employment markets for years, and questions continue to be asked about the quality of education provided by some institutions.

Discussion about whether the UK needs to send so many people to university.

0202

020220090805

Justin Rowlatt presents a discussion series involving experts and people closely involved in the issues.

The UK is suffering an obesity crisis, supermarkets are accused of having too much power over our lives and of squeezing farmers dry, while others worry about the impact of the food industry on global warming.

Consumers, farmers, retailers and food experts ask if our food chain needs a radical overhaul and discuss who has the right to tell us where to shop.

Does our food chain need a radical overhaul?

020220090808

Justin Rowlatt presents a discussion series involving experts and people closely involved in the issues.

The UK is suffering an obesity crisis, supermarkets are accused of having too much power over our lives and of squeezing farmers dry, while others worry about the impact of the food industry on global warming.

Consumers, farmers, retailers and food experts ask if our food chain needs a radical overhaul and discuss who has the right to tell us where to shop.

Does our food chain need a radical overhaul?

0203

0203 LAST20090812

Justin Rowlatt presents a discussion series involving experts and people closely involved in the issues.

The growth of surveillance is said to have made Britain one of the most watched nations on earth. Faced with the threats of crime and terrorism, how do we reconcile the demands for the protection of privacy with the benefits to security that new surveillance techniques can bring?

Justin presents a debate between people who seek to influence policy with those affected by such policies, and asks if surveillance in Britain is out of control.

Justin Rowlatt asks if surveillance in Britain is out of control.

0203 LAST20090815

Justin Rowlatt presents a discussion series involving experts and people closely involved in the issues.

The growth of surveillance is said to have made Britain one of the most watched nations on earth. Faced with the threats of crime and terrorism, how do we reconcile the demands for the protection of privacy with the benefits to security that new surveillance techniques can bring?

Justin presents a debate between people who seek to influence policy with those affected by such policies, and asks if surveillance in Britain is out of control.

Justin Rowlatt asks if surveillance in Britain is out of control.

0301School Testing20100728

Justin Rowlatt returns with a series of debates on topical issues, bringing together experts in a particular field with people living at the sharp end.

He visits a primary school in South London to ask whether testing young children really helps them, or whether it subjects them to unnecessary stress.

And is the point of SATS tests to benefit the children themselves or to give an indicator of school performance?

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

Justin Rowlatt and guests debate how much young children should be tested at school.

0301School Testing20100731

Justin Rowlatt returns with a series of debates on topical issues, bringing together experts in a particular field with people living at the sharp end.

He visits a primary school in South London to ask whether testing young children really helps them, or whether it subjects them to unnecessary stress.

And is the point of SATS tests to benefit the children themselves or to give an indicator of school performance?

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

Justin Rowlatt and guests debate how much young children should be tested at school.

0302Our Military Future?

0302Our Military Future?

0302Our Military Future?20100804

Justin Rowlatt is joined by experts on the government's defence policy - and those at the sharp end of it - to discuss whether it is time to radically rethink the British armed forces.

With the government's Strategic Defence Review under way against a background of public spending cuts, is now the time to consider a big reduction in the size and ambition of the British military?

But what would a smaller defence force look like? What would it do? What would it mean for Britain's place on the world stage? And would it be a credible strategy, given present and expected future threats to global peace?

Justin Rowlatt discusses the future of the military with a panel of guests at the military thinktank, RUSI.

He is joined by Professor Mary Kaldor from the London School of Economics; Professor Malcolm Chalmers of RUSI; Commodore Steven Jermy, recently retired from the Navy; Patrick Hennessey, former soldier and author of The Junior Officers' Reading Club; Freshta Raper, who escaped from Saddam Hussein's Iraq; and Sarah Lasenby, a peace activist from Oxford.

Producer: Ruth Alexander

Editor: Hugh Levinson.

Justin Rowlatt debates topical issues with experts and people at the sharp end.

0302Our Military Future?20100807

Justin Rowlatt is joined by experts on the government's defence policy - and those at the sharp end of it - to discuss whether it is time to radically rethink the British armed forces.

With the government's Strategic Defence Review under way against a background of public spending cuts, is now the time to consider a big reduction in the size and ambition of the British military?

But what would a smaller defence force look like? What would it do? What would it mean for Britain's place on the world stage? And would it be a credible strategy, given present and expected future threats to global peace?

Justin Rowlatt discusses the future of the military with a panel of guests at the military thinktank, RUSI.

He is joined by Professor Mary Kaldor from the London School of Economics; Professor Malcolm Chalmers of RUSI; Commodore Steven Jermy, recently retired from the Navy; Patrick Hennessey, former soldier and author of The Junior Officers' Reading Club; Freshta Raper, who escaped from Saddam Hussein's Iraq; and Sarah Lasenby, a peace activist from Oxford.

Producer: Ruth Alexander

Editor: Hugh Levinson.

Justin Rowlatt debates topical issues with experts and people at the sharp end.

0302Our Military Future?20100807

Justin Rowlatt is joined by experts on the government's defence policy - and those at the sharp end of it - to discuss whether it is time to radically rethink the British armed forces.

With the government's Strategic Defence Review under way against a background of public spending cuts, is now the time to consider a big reduction in the size and ambition of the British military?

But what would a smaller defence force look like? What would it do? What would it mean for Britain's place on the world stage? And would it be a credible strategy, given present and expected future threats to global peace?

Justin Rowlatt discusses the future of the military with a panel of guests at the military thinktank, RUSI.

He is joined by Professor Mary Kaldor from the London School of Economics; Professor Malcolm Chalmers of RUSI; Commodore Steven Jermy, recently retired from the Navy; Patrick Hennessey, former soldier and author of The Junior Officers' Reading Club; Freshta Raper, who escaped from Saddam Hussein's Iraq; and Sarah Lasenby, a peace activist from Oxford.

Producer: Ruth Alexander

Editor: Hugh Levinson.

Justin Rowlatt debates topical issues with experts and people at the sharp end.

0303Intellectual Property

0303 LAST20100811
0303 LAST20100814

Justin Rowlatt debates topical issues with experts and people at the sharp end.